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Encyclopedia > Rush (band)
Rush
Alex Lifeson, Geddy Lee, and Neil Peart of Rush30th Anniversary tour photo, 2004
Alex Lifeson, Geddy Lee, and Neil Peart of Rush
30th Anniversary tour photo, 2004
Background information
Origin Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Genre(s) Hard rock, progressive rock, heavy metal
Years active 1968–present
Label(s) Moon, Mercury, Anthem, Atlantic
Website www.rush.com
Members
Geddy Lee
Alex Lifeson
Neil Peart
Former members
John Rutsey
Jeff Jones
Rush (band) Portal

Rush is a Canadian rock band originally formed in August 1968, in the Willowdale neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario; presently comprised of bassist, keyboardist, and lead vocalist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart. The band and its membership went through a number of re-configurations between 1968 and 1974, achieving their definitive form when Neil Peart replaced original drummer John Rutsey in July 1974, two weeks before the group's first U.S. tour. This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Mercury Records is a record label currently headquartered in the UK, and is a subsidiary of Universal Music Group. ... Anthem Records is an independent record label based in Toronto, Ontario. ... Atlantic Records (Atlantic Recording Corporation) is an American record label, and operates as a wholly owned subsidiary of Warner Music Group. ... Geddy Lee OC is a Canadian musician best known as the lead vocalist, bassist, and keyboardist for the Canadian rock group Rush. ... Alex Lifeson, OC (born August 27, 1953), is a Canadian musician, known as the guitarist for the rock group Rush. ... Neil Ellwood Peart (pronounced ) OC, (born September 12, 1952 in Hamilton, Ontario) is a Canadian musician and author. ... John Rutsey of Rush. ... Jeff Jones is a Canadian bassist, best known for his work in Red Rider. ... Image File history File links Portal. ... Main articles: History of Canada, Timeline of Canadian history Canada has been inhabited by aboriginal peoples (known in Canada as First Nations) for at least 40,000 years. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... Willowdale is an established community in the former City of North York, now part of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... Geddy Lee OC is a Canadian musician best known as the lead vocalist, bassist, and keyboardist for the Canadian rock group Rush. ... An electric guitar An electric guitar is a type of guitar that uses pickups to convert the vibration of its steel-cored strings into electrical current, which is then amplified. ... Alex Lifeson, OC (born August 27, 1953), is a Canadian musician, known as the guitarist for the rock group Rush. ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set) is a collection of drums, cymbals and sometimes other percussion instruments, such as a cowbell, wood block, chimes or tambourines, arranged for convenient playing by a single drummer. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Neil Ellwood Peart (pronounced ) OC, (born September 12, 1952 in Hamilton, Ontario) is a Canadian musician and author. ... John Rutsey of Rush. ...


Since the release of the band's self-titled debut album in March 1974, Rush has become known for the instrumental skills of its members, complex compositions, and eclectic lyrical motifs drawing heavily on science fiction, fantasy, and libertarian philosophy, as well as addressing humanitarian, social, emotional, and environmental concerns. This article is about the album by Rush. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ...


Musically, Rush's style has evolved over the years, beginning in the vein of blues-inspired heavy metal on their first album, then encompassing hard rock, progressive rock, a period dominated by synthesizers and, more recently, modern rock. They have influenced various musical artists such as Metallica,[1][2] The Smashing Pumpkins[3] and Primus,[3] as well as notable progressive metal bands such as Dream Theater[1] and Symphony X.[4] Heavy metal redirects here. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... The term synthesiser is also used to mean frequency synthesiser, an electronic system found in communications. ... Modern rock is term commonly used to describe a rock music format found on American commercial radio. ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ... The Smashing Pumpkins are an American alternative rock band that formed in Chicago in 1988. ... For other uses, see Primus. ... Progressive metal is a sub-genre of heavy metal music which blends the powerful, guitar-driven sound of metal with the complex compositional structures, odd time signatures, and intricate instrumental playing of progressive rock. ... Dream Theater is an American progressive metal band comprising James LaBrie, John Petrucci, Jordan Rudess, John Myung, and Mike Portnoy. ... Symphony X is an American progressive metal band from New Jersey founded in 1994 by guitarist Michael Romeo. ...


Rush has won a number of Juno Awards, and was inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame in 1994. Over the course of their careers, the individual members of Rush have been acknowledged as being some of the most proficient players on their respective instruments, with each band member winning several awards in magazine readers' polls. As a group, Rush possesses 24 gold records and 14 platinum (3 multi-platinum) records. These statistics place Rush fifth behind The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Kiss and Aerosmith for the most consecutive gold and platinum albums by a rock band. Rush also ranks 78th in U.S. album sales according to the RIAA with sales of 25 million units.[5] Although total worldwide album sales are not calculated by any single entity, as of 2004 several industry sources estimated Rush's total worldwide album sales at over 40 million units. The Juno Awards are awards of achievement presented to Canadian musical artists and bands; they could be considered the transnational counterpart to the United States Grammy Awards. ... The Canadian Music Hall of Fame honors Canadian musicians for their lifetime achievements in music. ... “Golden record” redirects here. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Kiss is an American rock band formed in New York City in January 1973. ... This article is about the band Aerosmith. ...


The band is currently promoting their latest album, Snakes & Arrows with an intercontinental tour. The second leg is set to begin in San Juan, Puerto Rico on April 11, and finish in Atlanta, Georgia, July 22.[6] Snakes & Arrows is the 18th full-length studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush. ... Rush began the tour to promote their latest album, Snakes & Arrows on June 13, 2007 in Atlanta, Georgia. ... San Juan, the Spanish for Saint John, is a common toponym in parts of the world where Spanish is or was spoken: Argentina San Juan Province San Juan, Argentina, the capital of that province Cuba San Juan Hill Mexico San Juan, Campeche San Juan, Chihuahua San Juan, Coahuila San Juan... Atlanta redirects here. ...

Contents

History

The early years (1968–1976)

For more details on this topic, see History of Rush.
Music sample:

Working Man (1974) The history of Rush spans over thirty-five years, from the original lineup (of Geddy Lee, Alex Lifeson, and John Rutsey), to the modern era, after the replacement of Rutsey with Neil Peart. ... Image File history File links WorkingMan. ...

Sample of "Working Man" from the debut album Rush. This was the song responsible for giving the band the recognition they needed to procure a record contract.
Problems listening to the file? See media help.

The original line-up formed in August 1968 in the neighbourhood of Willowdale in Toronto, Ontario, by Alex Lifeson, Jeff Jones, and John Rutsey. Within a couple weeks of forming, and before their second performance, bassist and lead vocalist Jones was replaced by Geddy Lee, a schoolmate of Lifeson. After several lineup reformations, Rush's official incarnation was formed in May 1971 consisting of Lee, Lifeson, and Rutsey. The band was managed by local Toronto resident Ray Danniels, a frequent attendee of Rush's early shows.[7][8] Willowdale is an established community in the former City of North York, now part of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Jeff Jones is a Canadian bassist, best known for his work in Red Rider. ...


After gaining stability in the lineup and honing their skills on the local bar/high school dance circuit, the band came to release their first single "Not Fade Away", a cover of the Buddy Holly song, in 1973. Side B contained an original composition, "You Can't Fight It", credited to Rutsey and Lee. The single generated little reaction and, due to record company indifference, the band formed their own independent record label, Moon Records. With the aid of Danniels and the newly enlisted engineer Terry Brown, the band released their self-titled debut album in 1974, which was considered highly derivative of Led Zeppelin.[9] Rush had limited local popularity until the album was picked up by WMMS, a radio station in Cleveland, Ohio. Donna Halper, a DJ and music director working at the station, selected "Working Man" for her regular play list. The song's blue collar theme resonated with hard rock fans and this new found popularity led to the album being re-released by Mercury Records[10][11] in the U.S. For the Weezer song, see Buddy Holly (song). ... Terry Brown is a record producer involved in a variety of work, but most noted for his involvement with the Canadian rock band Rush. ... This article is about the album by Rush. ... WMMS 100. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Donna Halper, summarizing a paper she cowrote with Christopher Sterling about the date of Reginald Fessendens first broadcast Donna L. Halper is a Boston-based historian and radio consultant. ... Mercury Records is a record label currently headquartered in the UK, and is a subsidiary of Universal Music Group. ...

The "starman" logo (by artist Hugh Syme) first appeared on the back cover of the 1976 album 2112.

Immediately after the release of the debut album, Rutsey resigned in July 1974 due to his affliction with diabetes and a distaste for touring. Rush held auditions and eventually selected Neil Peart as Rutsey's replacement. Peart officially joined the band on July 29, 1974, two weeks before the group's first US tour. They performed their first concert together, opening for Uriah Heep and Manfred Mann with an attendance of over 11,000 people at the Civic Arena in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on August 14. In addition to becoming the band's drummer, Peart assumed the role of principal lyricist as Lee and Lifeson had very little interest in writing, contributing to only a handful of song lyrics over the rest of the band's career. Instead, they focused primarily on the musical aspects of Rush. Fly by Night (1975), Rush's first album after recruiting Peart, saw the inclusion of the band's first mini-epic tale "By-Tor and the Snow Dog", replete with complex arrangements and multi-section format. Lyrical themes also underwent dramatic changes after the addition of Peart due to his love for fantasy and science-fiction literature.[12] However, despite these many differences some of the music and songs still closely mirrored the blues style found on Rush's debut.[13][12] This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... This article is about the disease that features high blood sugar. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Uriah Heep are an English rock band, formed in December 1969 when record producer Gerry Bron invited keyboardist Ken Hensley (previously a member of The Gods and Toe Fat) to join Spice, a band signed to his own Bronze Records label. ... Cock-A-Hoop Manfred Mann was a British R&B and pop band of the 1960s, named after its keyboard player, who later led the successful 1970s follow-on group Manfred Manns Earth Band. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Rush (1974) Fly by Night is the second studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in February 1975 (see 1975 in music). ...


Following quickly on the heels of Fly By Night, the band released 1975's Caress of Steel, a five track hard rock album featuring two extended multi-chapter songs, "The Necromancer" and "The Fountain of Lamneth." Caress of Steel was reported by some critics to be unfocused and an audacious move for the band due to the placement of two protracted numbers back-to-back, as well as a heavier reliance on atmospherics and story-telling, a large deviation from Fly by Night.[14] Intended to be the band's first "break-through" album, Caress of Steel sold below expectations and the promotional tour consisted of small venues which led to the moniker the "Down the Tubes Tour."[15] In light of these events, Rush's record label pressured them into molding their next album in a more commercially friendly and accessible fashion. However, in spite of such urges, the band ignored the requests and developed their next album, 2112. It was the band's first taste of commercial success and their first platinum album in Canada.[16] The supporting tour for the album culminated in a three night stand at Massey Hall in Toronto, which the band recorded for the release of their first live album titled All the World's a Stage. Allmusic Guide critic Greg Prato summarily reminds listeners and fans of how the album demarcates the boundary between the band's early years and the next era of their music.[17][18] Caress of Steel was the third album by Rush, released in 1975. ... For the year 2112, see 22nd century. ... Massey Hall, Main Entrance as seen from across Shuter Street, December 2005. ... For the live album by Rush, see All the Worlds a Stage (album). ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music, owned by All Media Guide. ...


The progressive rock era (1977–1981)

After 2112, Rush retreated to the United Kingdom to record 1977's A Farewell to Kings and 1978's Hemispheres at Rockfield Studios in Wales. These albums saw the band members pushing the prog rock envelope for Rush even further than before by expanding their use of progressive elements. Trademarks such as increased synthesizer usage, extended-length concept songs, and highly dynamic playing featuring complex time signature changes became a staple of Rush's compositions. To achieve a broader, progressive palette of sound, Alex Lifeson began to experiment with classical and twelve-string guitars, and Geddy Lee added bass-pedal synthesizers and Minimoog. Likewise, Peart's percussion became diversified in the form of triangles, glockenspiel, wood blocks, cowbells, timpani, gong and chimes. Beyond instrument additions, the band kept in stride with the progressive rock movement by continuing to compose long, conceptual songs with science fiction and fantasy overtones. However, as the new decade approached, Rush gradually began to dispose of their older styles of music in favor of shorter, and sometimes softer, arrangements. The lyrics up to this point (most of them written by Peart) were heavily influenced by classical poetry, fantasy literature, science fiction, and the writings of novelist Ayn Rand, as exhibited most prominently by their 1975 song "Anthem" from Fly By Night and a specifically acknowledged derivation in 1976's 2112.[19] Rush (A Farewell to Kings) A Farewell to Kings is the fifth studio album by the Canadian band Rush, released in 1977 (see 1977 in music). ... Hemispheres is the sixth studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1978. ... Rockfield Studios, near Monmouth in South Wales and just outside the village of Rockfield, are where many of British rock music’s most successful recordings have been made. ... This article is about the country. ... In popular music, a concept album is an album which is unified by a theme, which can be instrumental, compositional, narrative, or lyrical (Shuker 2002, p. ... The time signature (also known as meter signature) is a notational convention used in Western musical notation to specify how many beats are in each measure and what note value constitutes one beat. ... An old-fashioned triangle, with wand (beater) Angelika Kauffmann: LAllegra, 1779 The triangle is an idiophone type of musical instrument in the percussion family. ... Most orchestral glockenspiels are mounted in a case. ... The cowbell is a percussion instrument. ... A timpanist in the United States Air Forces in Europe Band. ... A gong is one of a wide variety of metal percussion instruments. ... Tubular bells (also known as chimes) are musical instruments in the percussion family. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... Ayn Rand (IPA: , February 2 [O.S. January 20] 1905 – March 6, 1982), born Alisa Zinovyevna Rosenbaum (Russian: ), was a Russian-born American novelist and philosopher. ...


Permanent Waves (1980) shifted Rush's style of music dramatically via the introduction of reggae and new wave.[20] Although a hard rock style was still evident, more and more synthesizers were introduced. Moreover, due to the limited airplay Rush's previous extended-length songs received, Permanent Waves included shorter, more radio-friendly songs such as "The Spirit of Radio" and "Freewill", two songs which helped Permanent Waves become Rush's first U.S. Top 5 album; both songs continue to make appearances on classic rock radio stations in Canada and the United States to this day.[21] Meanwhile, Peart's lyrics shifted toward an expository tone with subject matter that dwelled less on fantastical or allegorical story-telling and more heavily on cerebral topics that explored humanistic, social, emotional and metaphysical elements. Permanent Waves is the seventh studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released January 1, 1980 (see 1980 in music). ... Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... The New Wave was a movement in American, Australian and British popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, growing out of the New York City musical scene centered around the club CBGB. The term itself is a source of much confusion. ... Synth redirects here. ... Resist (1997) The Spirit of Radio (Live) (1998) Secret Touch (2002) Permanent Waves track listing Beginning of Album The Spirit of Radio (Track 1) Freewill (Track 2) The Spirit of Radio is a song first released in 1980 by popular Canadian rock band Rush on their album Permanent Waves. ... Allegory of Music by Filippino Lippi. ... Plato (Left) and Aristotle (right), by Raphael (Stanza della Segnatura, Rome) Metaphysics is the branch of philosophy concerned with explaining the ultimate nature of reality, being, and the world. ...

Music sample:

Tom Sawyer (1981) Image File history File links TomSawyer. ...

Sample of "Tom Sawyer" from the album Moving Pictures. This is the band's best known song with heaviest radio airplay.
Problems listening to the file? See media help.

Rush's popularity reached its pinnacle with the release of Moving Pictures in 1981. Moving Pictures essentially continued where Permanent Waves left off, extending the trend of highly accessible and commercially friendly pop-progressive rock that helped thrust them into the spotlight. The lead track, "Tom Sawyer", is probably the band's best-known song[22] with "Limelight" also receiving satisfactory responses from listeners and radio stations. Moving Pictures was Rush's last album to feature an extended song, the ten-and-a-half-minute "The Camera Eye". The song also contained the band's heaviest usage of synthesizers up to that point, hinting that Rush's music was shifting direction once more. Moving Pictures reached #3 on the Billboard 200 album chart and has been certified quadruple platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America.[23] Moving Pictures is the eighth studio album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1981 (see 1981 in music). ... Tom Sawyer is a 1981 song by Canadian progressive rock band Rush named for Mark Twains literary character. ... The Billboard 200 is a ranking of the 200 highest-selling music albums and EPs in the United States, published weekly by Billboard magazine. ... RIAA redirects here. ...


Following the success of Moving Pictures and the completion of another four studio albums, Rush released their second live recording, Exit...Stage Left, in 1981. The album delineates the apex of Rush's progressive period by featuring live material from the band's Permanent Waves and Moving Pictures tours. As with their first live release, Exit...Stage Left identified the margin of a new chapter of Rush's sound. The band underwent another radical stylistic transmutation with the release of Signals in 1982.[24] Exit. ... Category: ... Category: ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


The synthesizer period (1982–1989)

The OBX synthesizer used by Geddy Lee on the album Signals (1982)
The OBX synthesizer used by Geddy Lee on the album Signals (1982)

While Geddy Lee's synthesizers had been featured instruments ever since the late 70s, keyboards were suddenly shifted from the contrapuntal background to the melodic frontlines[25][26] as evidence by songs such as "Countdown" and the lead-off track "Subdivisions". Both feature nimble lead synthesizer lines with minimalistic guitar chords and solos. Other previously unused instrument additions was seen in the song "Losing It," featuring collaborator Ben Mink on electric violin.[27] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Ben Mink (born 1951) is a Canadian songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer, and long-time collaborator with k. ...

Music sample:

Subdivisions (1982)

Sample of "Subdivisions" from the album Signals. This song is notable for demonstrating the band's foray into their synthesizer period.
Problems listening to the file? See media help.

Signals also represented a drastic stylistic transformation apart from instrumental changes. The album contained Rush's only U.S. top-40 pop hit, "New World Man",[28] while other more experimental songs such as "Digital Man", "The Weapon", and "Chemistry" expanded the band's use of ska, reggae, and funk.[29] More specifically, Alex Lifeson's guitar tone and playing style on Signals were very reminiscent of contemporary acts of the time who were well known for incorporating such rhythms into their music. Although the band members consciously decided to move in this overall direction, they felt dissatisfied with long-time producer Terry Brown's studio treatment of Signals and parted ways with him in 1983. These diverse styles would come into further play on their next studio album. For other uses, see SKA (disambiguation). ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ...

Neil Peart began incorporating Simmons Electronic Drums beginning with 1984's Grace Under Pressure
Neil Peart began incorporating Simmons Electronic Drums beginning with 1984's Grace Under Pressure

The style and production of Signals were augmented and taken to new heights on 1984's Grace Under Pressure. It was Peart who named the album, as he borrowed the words of Ernest Hemingway to describe what the band had to go through after making the decision to leave Terry Brown. Producer Steve Lillywhite, who gleaned fame with successful productions of Simple Minds and U2, was enlisted to produce Grace Under Pressure. However, he backed out at the last moment, much to the ire of Lee, Lifeson and Peart. Lee has said "Steve Lillywhite is really not a man of his word....after agreeing to do our record, he got an offer from Simple Minds, changed his mind, blew us off,..so it put us in a horrible position." Eventually Rush hired Peter Henderson to co-produce and engineer the album in his stead.[30] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3456x2304, 3338 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3456x2304, 3338 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Simmons (electronic drum company). ... Grace Under Pressure is the tenth studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1984 (see 1984 in music). ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Steve Lillywhite (born in 1955) is a well-known Grammy Award winning English music producer. ... Simple Minds is a rock band from Scotland, which had its greatest worldwide popularity from the mid-1980s to the early-1990s. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ...


Musically, although Geddy Lee's use of sequencers and synthesizers remained the band's cornerstone, his focus on new technology was complemented by Neil Peart's adaptation of Simmon's electronic drums and percussion. Alex Lifeson's contributions on the album were decidedly enhanced to act as an overreaction to the minimalistic role he played on Signals.[31] Still, many of his trademark guitar textures remained intact in the form of open reggae chords and funk and new-wave rhythms; "Distant Early Warning", "Red Lenses", "Red Sector A" and "The Enemy Within" serving as prime examples. Red Sector A is a song by Rush that chronicles The Holocaust. ...


With new producer Peter Collins, the band released 1985's Power Windows and 1987's Hold Your Fire. The music on these two albums gives far more emphasis and prominence to Geddy Lee's multi-layered synthesizer work. While fans and critics took notice of Lifeson's diminished guitar work, his presence was still palpable on "The Big Money", (the album's modest-charting single) with spotlights on "Grand Designs", "Middletown Dreams" and "Marathon." Lifeson, like many guitarists in the late 1980s, experimented with processors that reduced his instrument to echoey chord bursts and razor-thin leads. Hold Your Fire represents both a modest extension of the guitar stylings found on Power Windows, and, according to Allmusic Guide critic Ed Rivadavia, the culmination of this era of Rush.[32] Whereas the previous five Rush albums sold platinum or better, Hold Your Fire only went gold in November 1987, although it managed to peak at number 13 on the Billboard 200.[33] The name Peter Collins may apply to one of the following: Peter Collins (Australian politician) Peter Collins (organ builder) Peter Collins (racing driver) Peter Collins (record producer) Peter Collins (soccer player) Peter Collins (speedway rider) Peter Collins (sports broadcaster) Peter Collins (journalist) Category: ... Power Windows is the eleventh studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1985 (see 1985 in music). ... For the FireHouse album, see Hold Your Fire (FireHouse album). ...


A third live album and video, A Show of Hands (1989), was also released by Mercury following the Power Windows and Hold Your Fire tours, demonstrating the aspects of Rush in the 80s. A Show of Hands met with strong fan approval, but Rolling Stone critic Michael Azerrad dismissed it as "musical muscle" with 1.5 stars, claiming Rush fans viewed their favourite power trio as "the holy trinity".[34] Nevertheless, A Show of Hands managed to surpass the gold album mark, reaching number 21 on the Billboard 200.[35] At this point, the group decided to change record labels from Mercury to Atlantic. After Rush's departure in 1989, Mercury released a double platinum two-volume compilation of their Rush catalogue, Chronicles (1990).[36] A Show of Hands is a live album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1989 (see 1989 in music). ... This article is about the magazine. ... Atlantic Records (Atlantic Recording Corporation) is an American record label, and operates as a wholly owned subsidiary of Warner Music Group. ... Chronicles is a compilation album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1990 (see 1990 in music). ...


Returning to their roots (1989–1997)

Music sample:

Dreamline (1991) Image File history File links Dreamline. ...

Sample of "Dreamline" from the album Roll the Bones. This song is notable for demonstrating the band's return to a more standard three piece instrument style, where synthesizers are used more sparingly and the guitar returning to the forefront of the sound.
Problems listening to the file? See media help.

Rush started to deviate from their 1980s style with the albums Presto and Roll the Bones. Produced by record engineer and musician Rupert Hine, these two albums saw Rush shedding much of their keyboard-saturated sound. Beginning with 1989's Presto, the band opted for arrangements that were notably more guitar-centric than the previous two studio albums. Although synthesizers were still used in many songs, the instrument was no longer featured as the centerpiece of Rush's compositions. Continuing this trend, 1991's Roll the Bones extended the use of the standard three-instrument approach with even less focus on synthesizers than its predecessor. While musically these albums do not deviate significantly from a general pop-rock sound, Rush stuck to their creative approach of incorporating traces of more exotic musical styles. "Roll the Bones", for instance, exhibits funk and hip hop elements, and the instrumental track "Where's My Thing?" features several jazz components.[37] This return to three-piece instrumentation helped pave the way for future albums in the mid-90s, which would adopt a more straightforward rock formula. Presto is the thirteenth studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1989 (see 1989 in music). ... Roll the Bones is the fourteenth studio album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1991 (see 1991 in music). ... Rupert Hine (full name Rupert Neville Hine) is an English musician and also a prolific producer in the synth pop era, helming albums such as Tina Turners Private Dancer, Howard Joness Humans Lib, Sagas Worlds Apart, and The Fixx Reach the Beach. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... The Canadian Progressive Rock trio Rush has written, recorded, and performed several instrumentals throughout its career. ...


The transition from synthesizers to more guitar-oriented and organic instrumentation continued with the 1993 album Counterparts[38] and its follow-up, 1996's Test for Echo, again both produced in collaboration with Peter Collins. Musically, Counterparts[38] and Test For Echo are two of Rush's most guitar-driven albums. Although the music in general did not meet the criteria for "progressive rock", some of the songs could be considered more adventurous than what one might expect from a standard modern rock band.[39] For instance, "Time and Motion" possesses multiple time signature changes and organ usage, while the instrumental track "Limbo", consists of several relatively complex musical passages repeated throughout. Musically, Test For Echo still retained much of the hard rock/alternative style already charted on the previous record. Lifeson and Lee's playing remained more or less unchanged; however, a distinct modification in technique became apparent in Peart's playing due to formal Jazz and Swing training under the tutelage of jazz instructor Freddie Gruber during the interim between Counterparts and Test For Echo.[40] In October 1996, in support of Test For Echo, the band embarked on an extensive and successful North American tour, the band's first without an opening act and dubbed "An Evening with Rush." The tour was broken up into two segments spanning October through December, 1996 and May through July, 1997 with the band taking a respite between legs. Counterparts is the fifteenth studio album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1993 (see 1993 in music). ... Test for Echo is the sixteenth studio album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1996 (see 1996 in music). ... The Canadian Progressive Rock trio Rush has written, recorded, and performed several instrumentals throughout its career. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Swing music, also known as swing jazz, is a form of jazz music that developed during the 1920s and had solidified as a distinctive style by 1935 in the United States. ... Freddie Gruber was a friend of Buddy Rich that began playing drums in New York and ended up as a teacher in LA. His students varried form Dave Weckl and Neil Peart. ... This was the first time Rush toured without an opening act; with the extra time available, 2112 was performed in its entirety for the first time ever (including Oracle). After the first ten dates the setlist remained constant throughout the tour although it was broken up into two legs with...


Hiatus and comeback (1997–2005)

After wrapping up the tour promoting Test for Echo in 1997, the band entered a five-year hiatus mainly due to personal tragedies in Peart's life. Peart's daughter Selena died in a car accident in August 1997, followed by his wife Jacqueline's death from cancer in June 1998. Peart took a hiatus to mourn and reflect, during which time he traveled extensively throughout North America on his BMW motorcycle, covering 88,000 km (55,000 miles). At some point in his journey, Peart decided to return to the band. Peart wrote Ghost Rider: Travels on the Healing Road as a chronicle of his geographical and emotional journey. In this book he writes of how he had told his bandmates at Selena's funeral, "consider me retired."[41] On November 10, 1998 a triple CD live album entitled Different Stages was released, dedicated to the memory of Selena and Jacqueline. Mixed by producer Paul Northfield and engineered by Terry Brown, it contained three discs packed with recorded performances from the band's Counterparts, Test For Echo, and A Farewell to Kings tours, marking the fourth officially released live album by the band. Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Different Stages is a live album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1998 (see 1998 in music). ... Paul Northfield is a prolific record producer and sound engineer, who has worked on albums by bands like Dream Theater, Queensrÿche, Rush and Suicidal Tendencies. ... Category: ... This was the first time Rush toured without an opening act; with the extra time available, 2112 was performed in its entirety for the first time ever (including Oracle). After the first ten dates the setlist remained constant throughout the tour although it was broken up into two legs with...

Music sample:

One Little Victory (2002) Image File history File links OneLittleVictory. ...

Sample of "One Little Victory" from the album Vapor Trails. This song's rapid tempo and heavy double bass drumming was done intentionally in order to herald the comeback of the band after their hiatus.
Problems listening to the file? See media help.

After sufficient time to grieve and reassemble the pieces of his life, and while visiting long-time Rush photographer Andrew MacNaughtan in Los Angeles, MacNaughtan would play matchmaker and introduce Peart to his future wife, photographer Carrie Nuttall. Peart married Nuttall on September 9, 2000. In early 2001 he announced to his band mates that he was ready to once again enter the studio and get back into the business of making music. With the help of producer Paul Northfield the band returned in May 2002 with Vapor Trails, written and recorded in Toronto. To herald the band's comeback, the single and lead track from the album, "One Little Victory" was designed to grab the attention of listeners due to its rapid guitar and drum tempos.[42] Vapor Trails marked the first studio recording not to include a single synthesizer, organ or keyboard part since the early 1970s. While the album is almost completely guitar-driven, it is mostly devoid of any conventional sounding guitar solos, a conscious decision made by Alex Lifeson during the writing process. According to the band, the entire developmental process for Vapor Trails was extremely taxing and took approximately 14 months to finish, by far the longest the band had ever spent writing and recording a studio album.[42] The album debuted to moderate praise and was supported by the band's first tour in six years, including first-ever concerts in Mexico City and Brazil, where they played to some of the largest crowds of their career. Carrie Nutall is a photographer who works primarily in the music industry, mainly devoted to black & white pictures. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Vapor Trails is the seventeenth studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 2002 (see 2002 in music). ... One Little Victory is the opening track to Rushs 2002 album Vapor Trails, with music by Geddy Lee and Alex Lifeson and lyrics by Neil Peart. ... June 28, 2002 Meadows Music Centre. ... For the album by The Cure, see Concert (album). ... Nickname: Location of Mexico City Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ...


A triple CD live album and dual Rush In Rio DVD was released in late October 2003 featuring an entire concert performance recorded on the last night of their Vapor Trails Tour, November 23, 2002, at Maracanã Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. To celebrate their 30th anniversary, June 2004 saw the release of Feedback, a studio EP recorded in suburban Toronto featuring eight covers of such artists as Cream, The Who and The Yardbirds, bands which the members of Rush cite as inspiration around the time of their inception.[43]. That same summer of 2004, Rush again hit the road for the very successful 30th Anniversary Tour, playing dates in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Germany, Italy, Sweden, the Czech Republic, and the Netherlands. On September 24, 2004 a Frankfurt, Germany concert was recorded at The Festhalle for DVD (titled R30: Live in Frankfurt), which was released November 22, 2005. Rush in Rio is a live DVD by Canadian band Rush, released in 2003 (see 2003 in music). ... June 28, 2002 Meadows Music Centre. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Maracanã stadium (official name: Estádio Mário Filho, Maracanã being its neighborhoods name) in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) is one of the biggest football stadiums of the world, and it is home of the four biggest football teams of Rio: Flamengo, Botafogo, Vasco da Gama and Fluminense. ... For other albums of the same name, see Feedback (album). ... A studio album is a collection of studio-recorded tracks by a recording artist. ... // Extended play (EP) is the name typically given to vinyl records or CDs which contain more than one single but are too short to qualify as albums. ... // In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ... Not to be confused with Yard Birds. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...   (German: , English: American English: ) is the largest city in the German state of Hesse and the fifth-largest city in Germany, with a mid-2007 population of 663,567. ... Festhalle is an arena in Frankfurt, Germany. ... Rush (30th Anniversary Tour) R30: Live in Frankfurt is a live DVD by the Canadian band Rush, that was released on November 22nd 2005 in Canada and the U.S. and November 28th 2005 in Europe and the UK. The DVD was released in a standard and deluxe set. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Snakes & Arrows (2006–present)

Main article: Snakes & Arrows
Main article: Snakes & Arrows Tour

During promotional interviews for the R30 Live In Frankfurt DVD, the band revealed their intention to begin writing new material in early 2006. While in Toronto, Lifeson and Lee began the songwriting process in January 2006. During this time, Peart simultaneously assumed his role of lyric writing while residing in Southern California. That following September, Rush chose to hire American producer Nick Raskulinecz to co-produce the album. The band officially entered Allaire Studios, in Shokan, New York in November 2006 in order to record the bulk of the material. Taking the band 5 weeks, the sessions ended in December. On February 14, 2007, an announcement was made on the the official Rush web site that the title of the new album would be Snakes & Arrows. The first single, entitled "Far Cry," was released to North American radio stations on March 12, 2007 and reached #2 on the Mediabase Mainstream and Radio and Records Charts.[44] Snakes & Arrows is the 18th full-length studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush. ... Rush began the tour to promote their latest album, Snakes & Arrows on June 13, 2007 in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Raskulinecz (right, in the back) with Nick Oliveri Nick Raskulinecz (born in Knoxville, Tennessee)[1] is a Grammy-winning American record producer. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Snakes & Arrows track listing Far Cry (Track 1) Armor and Sword (Track 2) Far Cry is the first single of Rushs 2007 album Snakes & Arrows. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


The Rush website, newly redesigned on March 12 to support the new album, also announced that the band would embark on a tour to begin in the summer. Snakes & Arrows was released May 1, 2007 in North America, where it debuted at #3 in the Billboard 200 with approximately 93,000 units sold in its first week.[45] To coincide with the Atlantic ocean hurricane season, "Spindrift" was released as the official second radio single on June 1, 2007, whereas "The Larger Bowl (A Pantoum)" saw single status on June 25, 2007. "The Larger Bowl" positioned within the top 20 of the Mainstream Rock and Media Base Mainstream charts, however, "Spindrift" failed to appear on any commercial chart.[46] The planned intercontinental tour in support of Snakes & Arrows began on June 13, 2007 in Atlanta, Georgia, coming to a close on October 29, 2007 at Hartwall Arena in Helsinki, Finland.[47] On October 3, 2007 Alex Lifeson confirmed an extension of the tour that will run through the summer of 2008 with 45 additional tour dates.[48] The tour dates have since been released along with an announcement for the accompanying release of a Snakes & Arrows double live album, entitled Snakes & Arrows Live, slated for April 8, 2008.[49] According to the latest Rush electronic newsletter and Peart's official website, it has been confirmed that performances filmed at the Ahoy arena in Rotterdam, Netherlands on October 16 and 17 will eventually be released as a live concert DVD.[50][51] is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Snakes & Arrows is the 18th full-length studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Larger Bowl (A Pantoum) is the fourth song off of Rushs 2007 album Snakes & Arrows. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Rush began the tour to promote their latest album, Snakes And Arrows on June 13, 2007 in Atlanta, Georgia. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Hartwall Areena from the south Hartwall Areena (often called Helsingin Areena (Arena of Helsinki) by Finnish press) is a large multifunctional indoor arena located in Helsinki, Finland. ... Location of Helsinki in Northern Europe Coordinates: , Country Province Region Uusimaa Sub-region Helsinki Charter 1550 Capital city 1812 Government  - Mayor Jussi Pajunen Area  - Total 187. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Motto: Sterker door strijd (Stronger through Struggle) Location of Rotterdam Coordinates: , Country Province Government  - Mayor Ivo Opstelten  - Aldermen Jeannette Baljeu Hamit Karakus Orhan Kaya Lucas Bolsius Jantine Kriens Dominic Schrijer Roelf de Boer Leonard Geluk Area [1]  - Total 319 km² (123. ...


Musical style and influences

Rush's musical style has changed substantially over the years. Their debut album is strongly influenced by British-Blues rock: an amalgam of sounds and styles from such rock bands as Cream, Led Zeppelin, and Deep Purple. Over the first few albums their style remained essentially hard rock, with heavy influences from The Who[52] and Led Zeppelin,[9] but also became increasingly influenced by the British progressive rock movement.[53] In the tradition of progressive rock, Rush wrote protracted songs with irregular and multiple time signatures combined with fantasy/science fiction-inspired lyrics; however, they did not soften their sound. This fusion of hard and progressive rock continued until the end of the 1970s. In the 1980s, however, Rush successfully merged their sound with the trends of this period, experimenting with New Wave, reggae and pop rock.[54] This period included the band's most extensive use of instruments such as synthesizers, sequencers and electronic percussion. It is largely agreed that the culmination of this era of Rush was in 1987 after the release of Hold Your Fire.[55] With the approach of the early '90s and Rush's character sound still intact, the band transformed their style once again to harmonize with the alternative rock movement.[56] The new millennium has seen them return to a more rock and roll roots sound, albeit with modern production.[52] Cream were a classic 1960s British rock band, which consisted of guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce and drummer Ginger Baker. ... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... This article is about the rock band. ... The Who are a British rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ... The time signature (also known as meter signature) is a notational device used in Western musical notation to specify how many beats are in each bar and which note value (minim, crotchet, eighth note and so on) constitutes one beat. ... For other uses, see Pop rock (disambiguation). ... In the field of electronic music, a sequencer was traditionally a device or piece of software that allows the user to record, play back and edit musical patterns. ... Alternative music redirects here. ...


Band members

A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Mellotron is an electro-mechanical, polyphonic keyboard originally developed and built in Birmingham, England in the early 1960s. ... An electric guitar An electric guitar is a type of guitar that uses pickups to convert the vibration of its steel-cored strings into electrical current, which is then amplified. ... Spanish guitar redirects here. ... This article is about the musical instrument. ... mandola A mandola (US and Canada) or tenor mandola (Europe, Ireland, and UK) is a stringed musical instrument. ... For bouzoukia, see nightclubs in Greece. ...

Former members

  • John Rutsey – drums, percussion, backing vocals (summer 1968–July 1974)
  • Jeff Jones – bass, lead vocals (summer 1968-September 1968)

Reputation

More than 30 years of activity has provided Rush with the opportunity for musical diversity across their discography. As with many bands known for experimentation, such changes have inevitably resulted in dissent among critics and fans. The bulk of the band's music has always included synthetic instruments in some form or another, and this is a great source of contention in the Rush camp, especially the band's heavy reliance on synthesizers and keyboards during the 1980s, particularly on albums Grace Under Pressure, Power Windows, and Hold your Fire.[57][58] Still, most fans saw this as nothing less than artistic growth and support for the band remained unwavering through each transitional phase.[55]


The members of Rush have themselves noted that people "either love Rush or hate Rush", resulting in strong detractors and an intensely loyal fan base. To the chagrin of fans, the band has not been nominated for entry into the American Rock and Roll Hall of Fame since their year of eligibility in 1998. The Hall's refusal to induct Rush may be a consequence of the band's insistence on remaining outside the mainstream of rock when it comes to self-promotion, in favor of maintaining a high degree of independence.[59] To this day fans earnestly clamor for the band's inclusion into the Hall by citing noteworthy accomplishments including longevity, proficiency, and influence, as well as commercial sales figures and RIAA certifications. However, Lifeson has expressed his indifference toward the perceived slight saying "I couldn't care less, look who's up for induction, it's a joke". [60] Rush has gained a degree of recognition in popular culture despite any official recognition from the Hall.[61]


As a band, Rush has been nominated for and received various awards throughout its career. Likewise, the individual members have received coverage in various modern music magazines with specific technocratic recognition for instrumental ability. See List of awards and nominations for Rush for more details on this topic.


Geddy Lee

Geddy Lee, 2004.
Geddy Lee, 2004.

Geddy Lee's high-register vocal style has always been a main signature of the band — and sometimes, a focal point for criticism, especially during the early years of Rush's career when Lee's vocals were high-pitched, with a strong likeness to other singers like Robert Plant of Led Zeppelin. In fact, his voice is often described as a "wail".[62][63] However, his voice has softened significantly over the years. His instrumental abilities, on the other hand, are rarely criticized. An award-winning musician, Lee's style, technique, and virtuosity on the bass guitar have proven influential in the rock and heavy metal genres, inspiring such players as Steve Harris of Iron Maiden,[64] John Myung of Dream Theater,[65] Les Claypool of Primus[66] and Cliff Burton of Metallica[67] among others. Lee is notable for his ability to operate various pieces of instrumentation simultaneously. This is mostly evident during live shows when Lee must play bass, supply lead vocals, manipulate keyboards, and trigger foot pedals during the course of a performance, as in the song "Tom Sawyer".[53] Because of this he is required to remain in one place during songs containing complex instrumentation. Lifeson and Peart are, to a lesser extent, responsible for similar actions during live shows. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (904x1094, 440 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Geddy Lee Rush (band) Talk:Rush (band)/Sandbox User:Wikioogle=world take over/Cool/weird pictures ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (904x1094, 440 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Geddy Lee Rush (band) Talk:Rush (band)/Sandbox User:Wikioogle=world take over/Cool/weird pictures ... Robert Anthony Plant (born August 20, 1948, West Bromwich, West Midlands, England), is an English rock singer and songwriter, famous for his membership in the rock band Led Zeppelin as the lead vocalist, as well as for his successful solo career. ... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... Stephen Percy Harris (born March 12, 1956 in Leytonstone, London, England) is the bassist and primary composer of the heavy metal band Iron Maiden. ... Iron Maiden are an English heavy metal band from Leyton in the East End of London. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Leslie Edward Les Claypool (born September 29, 1963 in Richmond, California, U.S.) is a singer, lyricist, bassist, multi-instrumentalist, and composer, best known for his work with the alternative rock band Primus. ... Clifford Lee Burton (February 10, 1962 – September 27, 1986) was a bass guitarist best known for his work with the thrash/heavy metal band Metallica from 1982 - 1986. ...


Alex Lifeson

Alex Lifeson in concert, 2007.
Alex Lifeson in concert, 2007.

Instrumentally, Lifeson is regarded as a guitarist whose strengths and notability rely primarily on signature riffing, electronic effects, unorthodox chord structures, chorusing/phrasing and a copious arsenal of equipment used over the years.[68] [69] [70] Despite his esteem, however, Lifeson is often regarded as being overshadowed by his bandmates due to Lee's on-stage multi-instrumental dexterity and Peart's status as a drummer.[71] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 693 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (709 × 613 pixel, file size: 524 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 693 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (709 × 613 pixel, file size: 524 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ...


During his adolescent years, he was influenced primarily by Jimi Hendrix, Pete Townshend, Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page.[72] For versatility, Lifeson was known to incorporate touches of Spanish and classical music into Rush's guitar-driven sound during the 1970s. Taking a backseat to Lee's keyboards in the 1980s, Lifeson's guitar returned to the forefront in the 1990s and has remained there ever since, along with his occasional duties of cuing various guitar effects and the use of bass-pedal synthesizers, as well as backing vocals. Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... Pete Townshend (born Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend on 19 May 1945 in Chiswick, London), is an award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, composer, and writer. ... Geoffrey Arnold (Jeff) Beck (born June 24, 1944 to Arnold and Ethel Beck in Wallington, Greater London) is an English rock guitarist. ... Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE[2] (born 30 March 1945) [3], nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter and composer. ... James Patrick Jimmy Page, OBE (born 9 January 1944) is an English guitarist, composer and record producer. ...


Neil Peart

Music

Peart is commonly regarded by music fans, critics and fellow musicians as one of the greatest rock drummers.[73] He is also regarded as one of the finest practitioners of the in-concert drum solo.[74] Initially inspired by Keith Moon, Peart absorbed the influence of other rock drummers from the 1960s and 1970s such as Ginger Baker, Carmine Appice, and John Bonham.[75] Incorporation of unusual instruments (for rock drummers of the time) such as cowbells, glockenspiel, and tubular bells, along with several standard kit elements, helped create a highly varied setup. Continually modified to this day, Peart's drumkit offers an enormous array of percussion instruments for sonic diversity. For two decades Peart honed his technique; each new Rush album introduced an expanded percussive vocabulary. In the 1990s, he reinvented his style with the help of drum coach Freddie Gruber. It was at this point that Peart began emulating jazz drummer Buddy Rich. Keith Moon at his Pictures of Lily-drumkit Keith John Moon (August 23, 1946 – September 7, 1978) was the drummer of the rock group The Who. ... Peter Edward Ginger Baker (born August 19, 1939, Lewisham, South London) is an English drummer who gained fame as a member of the Graham Bond Organization (GBO) and Cream from 1966 until 1968. ... Carmine Appice (b. ... John Henry Bonzo Bonham (May 31, 1948 – September 25, 1980) was an English drummer and member of the English rock band Led Zeppelin. ... Most orchestral glockenspiels are mounted in a case. ... Tubular bells (also known as chimes) are musical instruments in the percussion family. ... Freddie Gruber was a friend of Buddy Rich that began playing drums in New York and ended up as a teacher in LA. His students varried form Dave Weckl and Neil Peart. ... Bernard Buddy Rich (September 30, 1917 Brooklyn, New York – April 2, 1987) was an American jazz drummer and bandleader. ...

Neil Peart in concert, 2007.
Neil Peart in concert, 2007.

Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ...

Lyrics

Peart also serves as Rush's primary lyricist, attracting much attention over the years due to his eclectic style. Known for penning concept suites and songs inspired by literature, music fan opinions of his writing have varied greatly, running the gamut from cerebral and insightful to overly pretentious and preachy. During the band's early years, Peart's lyrics were largely fantasy/science fiction focused and did not appeal to all listeners.[76] Peart's lyrics continue to divide audiences today. For example, in 2007, he was placed second on Blender magazine's list of the "40 Worst Lyricists In Rock".[77] Blender is an American magazine that bills itself as the ultimate guide to music and more. ...


Albums

Studio album discography

Main article: Rush discography

This is the discography of the Canadian rock band Rush. ... This article is about the album by Rush. ... Rush (1974) Fly by Night is the second studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in February 1975 (see 1975 in music). ... Caress of Steel was the third album by Rush, released in 1975. ... For the year 2112, see 22nd century. ... Rush (A Farewell to Kings) A Farewell to Kings is the fifth studio album by the Canadian band Rush, released in 1977 (see 1977 in music). ... Hemispheres is the sixth studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1978. ... Permanent Waves is the seventh studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released January 1, 1980 (see 1980 in music). ... Moving Pictures is the eighth studio album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1981 (see 1981 in music). ... Signals is the ninth studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1982 (see 1982 in music). ... Grace Under Pressure is the tenth studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1984 (see 1984 in music). ... Power Windows is the eleventh studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1985 (see 1985 in music). ... For the FireHouse album, see Hold Your Fire (FireHouse album). ... Presto is the thirteenth studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1989 (see 1989 in music). ... Roll the Bones is the fourteenth studio album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1991 (see 1991 in music). ... Counterparts is the fifteenth studio album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1993 (see 1993 in music). ... Test for Echo is the sixteenth studio album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1996 (see 1996 in music). ... Vapor Trails is the seventeenth studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 2002 (see 2002 in music). ... For other albums of the same name, see Feedback (album). ... Snakes & Arrows is the 18th full-length studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush. ...

Album sales

Over the course of their career, Rush has come to release a total of 24 gold records and 14 platinum records (3 of which have gone multiplatinum),[78] placing them within the top 5 for the most consecutive gold albums by a rock band.[79] Rush ranks 78th in U.S. album sales according to the RIAA with sales of 25 million units.[80] Total worldwide sales approximate 40 million units.[81][82][83][84]


Despite having completely dropped out of the public eye for five years after the gold-selling Test for Echo (which peaked at number 5 on the billboard 200) and the band being relegated almost solely to classic rock stations in the U.S., Vapor Trails reached #6 on the Billboard 200 chart in its first week of release in 2002 with 108,000 albums sold. It has sold approximately 343,000 units to date. The subsequent Vapor Trails tour grossed over $24 million and included the largest audience ever to see a headlining Rush show — 60,000 fans in São Paulo, Brazil. Nevertheless, Vapor Trails remains their first album not to achieve at least gold status. This article is about the city. ...


However, Rush's triple CD live album, 2003's Rush in Rio, was certified gold by the RIAA, marking the fourth decade in which a Rush album had been released and certified at least gold. Moreover, in 2004 Feedback cracked the top 20 on the Billboard 200 chart and received radio airplay. The band's most recent album, Snakes & Arrows, debuted at #3 (just one position shy of Rush's highest peaking album, 1993's Counterparts, which debuted at #2) on the billboard 200 selling approximately 93,000 copies in its first week of release.[85] This marks the 13th studio album to appear in the Top 20 and the band's 27th album to appear on the chart regardless of position over the course of their career. The album also debuted at #1 on the Billboard's Top Rock Albums chart, as well as peaking at #1 on the Top Internet Albums chart when the album was released on the MVI format a month later.[86] Still, Snakes & Arrows has yet to accumulate sales that approach or eclipse Vapor Trails or Rush in Rio. Snakes & Arrows is the 18th full-length studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush. ...


Live performances

The members of Rush share a strong work ethic, desiring to accurately depict songs from their albums when playing live performances. Toward this goal, beginning in the late 1980s, Rush has included in their concert equipment a capacious rack of digital samplers which the band members use, in real-time, to recreate the sounds of non-traditional instruments, accompaniments, vocal harmonies, and other sound "events" that are familiarly heard on the studio versions of the songs. An AKAI MPC2000 sampler Playing a Yamaha SU10 Sampler A sampler is an electronic music instrument closely related to a synthesizer. ...


In live performances, the band members share duties throughout most songs, with each member triggering certain sounds with his available limbs, while playing his primary instrument(s). Each band member has one or more MIDI controllers that enables him to use his free hands or feet to trigger sounds that have been loaded into the samplers for a particular song.[87] It is with this technology that the group is able to present their arrangements in a live setting with the level of complexity and fidelity that fans have come to expect, and without the need to resort to the use of backing tracks or employing an additional band member.[88] A device, real or virtual, which generates and transmits MIDI data for operating musical devices or other devices which are electronically enabled for MIDI operation. ... An instrumental is, in contrast to a song, a musical composition or piece without lyrics or any other sort of vocal music; all of the music is produced by musical instruments. ...


The band members' coordinated use of foot-pedal keyboards and other electronic triggers to "play" sampled instruments and audio events is subtly visible in their live performances, especially so on R30: 30th Anniversary World Tour, their 2005 concert DVD.[89] DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ...


A staple of Rush's concerts is a Peart drum solo. Peart's drum solos include a basic framework of routines connected by sections of improvisation, making each performance unique. Each successive tour sees the solo more advanced, with some routines dropped in favor of newer, more complex ones. Since the mid-1980s, Peart has used MIDI trigger pads to trigger sounds sampled from various pieces of acoustic percussion that would otherwise consume far too much stage area, such as a marimba, harp, temple blocks, triangles, glockenspiel, orchestra bells, tubular bells, and vibra-slap as well as other, more esoteric percussion. MIDI redirects here. ... A Sound module (sometimes referred to as tone generator) is an electronic musical instrument without a human-playable interface such as a keyboard, for example. ... The marimba ( ) is a musical instrument in the percussion family. ... For other uses, see Harp (disambiguation). ... The temple block is a percussion instrument originating in China, Japan and Korea where it has a part in religious ceremonies. ... An old-fashioned triangle, with wand (beater) Angelika Kauffmann: LAllegra, 1779 The triangle is an idiophone type of musical instrument in the percussion family. ... A bell is a simple sound-making device. ... A Vibraslap manufactured by LP LP Vibraslap showing metal teeth A vibraslap is a percussion instrument consisting of a piece of stiff wire (bent in a handle-like shape) connecting a wood ball to a block of wood with metal teeth inside. ...


See also

The Canadian Progressive Rock trio Rush has written, recorded, and performed several instrumentals throughout its career. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Austin Chronicle Music Rush's 30th Anniversary Tour, Accessed 16 August 2006
  2. ^ Metallica thanks Rush Accessed August 15, 2007
  3. ^ a b CNN.com Rush profile Accessed 17 August 2006
  4. ^ Symphony X Official website FAQ Accessed 16 August 2006
  5. ^ RIAA Website
  6. ^ Rush tour schedule
  7. ^ Banasiewicz, Bill (1990). Rush Visions: The Official Biography. Omnibus Press. ISBN 0711911622. 
  8. ^ Banasiewicz, Bill. Rush Visions: The Official Biography (excerpt). Retrieved on 2007-03-10.
  9. ^ a b Allmusic: Rush album AllMusic.com Accessed 18 March 2006
  10. ^ Donna Halper, and the Rush Discovery Story RushWeb Accessed 5 March 2006
  11. ^ History of Rush History of Rush Accessed February 2006
  12. ^ a b Fly By Night Review Allmusic Guide Accessed September 20, 2007
  13. ^ Banasiewicz, Bill (1990). Rush Visions: The Official Biography. Omnibus Press. ISBN 0-7119-1162-2
  14. ^ Caress of Steel Review Greg Prato, Allmusic Guide Accessed September 20, 2007
  15. ^ Tour Archive Caress of Steel Tour Archive Accessed 17 April 2006
  16. ^ Rush Highlights Official Rush Website Accessed 16 March 2006
  17. ^ Allmusic Guide Greg Prato on All the World's a Stage Accessed December 14, 2007
  18. ^ Power Windows Website Rush: By Brian Harrigan Accessed April 17, 2007
  19. ^ 2112 and Ayn Rand Rush FAQ Accessed 16 March 2006
  20. ^ Geoff Barton (September 2006). "Rush: Progressive To The Core". Classic Rock Magazine Issue 97.
  21. ^ Review of Permanent Waves by Greg Prato Allmusic Guide Accessed March 22, 2008
  22. ^ Rush Biography Allmusic guide, Jason Ankeny Accessed September 20, 2007
  23. ^ Moving Pictures Certification Recording Industry Association of America Accessed 16 March 2006
  24. ^ Signals Review by Greg Prato Allmusic Guide Accessed March 22, 2008
  25. ^ Signals Rate Your Music Accessed 6 May 2006
  26. ^ Signals Review Rolling Stone Accessed 6 May 2006
  27. ^ Signals Review by Greg Prato Allmusic Guide Accessed March 22, 2008
  28. ^ New World Man Rush Archives Accessed 6 May 2006
  29. ^ Signals Musical Style Visions, the Official Rush Biography, Chapter 10 Accessed 6 May 2006
  30. ^ Power Windows "Grace Under Pressure"Power Windows Website Accessed February 16, 2008
  31. ^ Grace Under Pressure "Success Under Pressure" Accessed 7 May 2006
  32. ^ Hold Your Fire Review Allmusic Guide, Ed Rivadavia Accessed September 20, 2007
  33. ^ Hold your Fire Power Windows Website Accessed September 14, 2007
  34. ^ Rolling Stone A Show of Hands Review Accessed 6 June 2006
  35. ^ A Show of Hands Power Windows Website Accessed September 14, 2007
  36. ^ Chronicles Power Windows Website Accessed September 14, 2007
  37. ^ Roll the Bones Allmusic: Accessed 18 March 2006
  38. ^ a b Counterparts Review Allmusic Guide Accessed April 18, 2007
  39. ^ All Music Guide Test For Echo Review Accessed April 17, 2007
  40. ^ Neil Peart's tutelage Drummerworld Accessed April 18, 2007
  41. ^ Peart, Neil. Ghost Rider: Travels on the Healing Road. Toronto: ECW Press. 2002. ISBN 1550225464
  42. ^ a b Vapor Trails news archive Power Windows website Accessed 16 March 2006
  43. ^ Feedback new archive Power Windows Website Accessed 28 April
  44. ^ Rush Official Website, Rush.com, accessed August 3, 2007.
  45. ^ Katie Hasty, "Ne-Yo Scores Second No. 1 In Debut-Heavy Week", Billboard.com, May 9, 2007
  46. ^ Snakes and Arrows chart rankings, Power Windows website, Accessed August 12, 2007.
  47. ^ Official Rush Website Accessed 26 March 2007.
  48. ^ Rush fan web site, accessed 17 October 2007.
  49. ^ Power Windows Website Latest Rush News Accessed January 20, 2008
  50. ^ Rush News, Snakes & Arrows DVD release, Power Windows website, Accessed November 12, 2007
  51. ^ Snakes $ Arrows DVD release, Neil Peart's Official website, Accessed November 12, 2007
  52. ^ a b Alex Lifeson Interview, March 2006 Guitar Player Magazine Accessed 30 March 2006
  53. ^ a b Geddy Lee Interview, March 2006 Bass Player Magazine Accessed 30 March 2006
  54. ^ Allmusic: Signals AllMusic.com Accessed 18 March 2006
  55. ^ a b ProgArchives Accessed 18 March 2006
  56. ^ Allmusic: Counterparts AllMusic.com Accessed 18 March 2006
  57. ^ Grace Under Pressure All Music Accessed 18 March 2006
  58. ^ Rush Profile Music.com Accessed 28 March 2006
  59. ^ Vapor Trails Interview: "R30 Interviews"
  60. ^ Rock & Roll Hall of fame Power Windows website Accessed November 12, 2007
  61. ^ Power Windows — A Tribute to Rush. Retrieved on March 3, 2006.
  62. ^ Allmusic: Geddy Lee Biography AllMusic.com Accessed 18 March 2006
  63. ^ East Rutherford, N.J., 16 December 1996, Concert Review New York Times Accessed 5 April 2006
  64. ^ Steve Harris Biography [1] Accessed 18 December 2006
  65. ^ John Myung Biography [2] Accessed 18 December 2006
  66. ^ Les Claypool [3] Accessed 18 December 2006
  67. ^ Cliff Burton [4] Accessed 18 December 2006
  68. ^ Alex Lifeson profile Dinosaur Rock God Accessed 31 March 2006
  69. ^ Alex Lifeson minor overview Guitar Player Accessed 16 July 2007
  70. ^ Alex Lifeson Archive Alex Lifeson Archive and equipment Accessed 16 July 2007
  71. ^ Alex Lifeson profile All Classical Accessed 31 March 2006
  72. ^ Alex Lifeson profile Epiphone Accessed 31 March 2006
  73. ^ Neil Peart profile Drummer World Accessed 30 March 2006
  74. ^ Modern Drummer Magazine April 2006 Article "Soloing in the Shadow of Giants". Modern Drummer Publishing Inc. NJ, USA.
  75. ^ Anatomy of a Drum Solo DVD, Neil Peart (2005) accompanying booklet. (Republished in Modern Drummer Magazine, April 2006)
  76. ^ Rush profile, John Mcferrin's Rock and Prog Reviews, accessed 18 March 2006
  77. ^ The 40 Worst Lyricists In Rock, Blender, November 2007.
  78. ^ RIAA searchable Database Recording Industry of America July 29, 2007
  79. ^ RIAA Top Artists [5] Recording Industry Association of America Accessed July 29, 2007
  80. ^ RIAA Top Artists [6] Recording Industry Association of America Accessed July 29, 2007
  81. ^ [7] Classicrock.about.com by Dave White
  82. ^ Rockreport, Claim for 40 million sold albums, October 5, 2005
  83. ^ "Rush Turns Up The "Feedback"", Warner Music Group, 2004. Retrieved on 2007-05-09. 
  84. ^ "Rush adds second show", The Air Canada Centre (website), 2007-04-27. Retrieved on 2007-05-09. 
  85. ^ Power Windows Website Snakes & Arrows chart rankings Accessed August 7, 2007
  86. ^ Power Windows Website Snakes and Arrows news page Accessed August 7, 2007
  87. ^ "Rush Rolls Again", September 2002, OnStage Magazine
  88. ^ Peart, Neil Rush Backstage Club Newsletter, March 1990, via "Power Windows" Rush Fan Site
  89. ^ Rush R30: 30th Anniversary World Tour entry at IMDb.

is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Further reading

Books

  • Rush: Visions: The Official Biography – Banasiewicz, Bill. (1988), Omnibus Press – ISBN 0-7119-1162-2
  • Rush Tribute: Merely Players – Telleria, Robert (2002) – ISBN 1-55082-271-3
  • Rush: Success Under Pressure – Gett, Steve. (1984) – ISBN 0-89524-230-3
  • Rhythm & Light – Nuttall, Carrie, (2005), Rounder Books, ISBN 1-57940-093-0
  • Drum Techniques of Rush – Peart (1985) – ISBN 0-7692-5055-6
  • More Drum Techniques of Rush – Peart, Wheeler (1989) – ISBN 0-7692-5051-3
  • The Masked Rider: Cycling in West Africa – Peart (1999) – ISBN 1-895900-02-6
  • Ghost Rider: Travels on the Healing Road – Peart (2002) – ISBN 1-55022-546-4 (hardcover), ISBN 1-55022-548-0 (paperback)
  • Traveling Music: Playing Back the Soundtrack to My Life and Times – Peart (2004) – ISBN 1-55022-664-9
  • Contents Under Pressure: 30 Years of Rush at Home and Away – Popoff, Martin. Publisher: Ecw Press (June 28, 2004) – ISBN 1-55022-678-9
  • Mystic Rhythms: The Philosophical Vision of Rush – Price, et al. (1999) – ISBN 1-58715-102-2
  • Rush: Chemistry : The Definitive Biography – Collins, Jon. (2006) Helter Skelter Publishing – ISBN 1-900924-85-4 (Hardcover)
  • Roadshow: Landscape With Drums - A Concert Tour By Motorcycle – Peart (2006), Rounder – ISBN 1-57940-142-2

The book cover Ghost Rider: Travels on the Healing Road is a 2002 memoir by Neil Peart, the drummer and main lyricist for the Canadian progressive rock band Rush. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Scholarly articles

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Geddy Lee OC is a Canadian musician best known as the lead vocalist, bassist, and keyboardist for the Canadian rock group Rush. ... Alex Lifeson, OC (born August 27, 1953), is a Canadian musician, known as the guitarist for the rock group Rush. ... Neil Ellwood Peart (pronounced ) OC, (born September 12, 1952 in Hamilton, Ontario) is a Canadian musician and author. ... John Rutsey of Rush. ... Jeff Jones is a Canadian bassist, best known for his work in Red Rider. ... This article is about the album by Rush. ... Rush (1974) Fly by Night is the second studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in February 1975 (see 1975 in music). ... Caress of Steel was the third album by Rush, released in 1975. ... For the year 2112, see 22nd century. ... Rush (A Farewell to Kings) A Farewell to Kings is the fifth studio album by the Canadian band Rush, released in 1977 (see 1977 in music). ... Hemispheres is the sixth studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1978. ... Permanent Waves is the seventh studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released January 1, 1980 (see 1980 in music). ... Moving Pictures is the eighth studio album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1981 (see 1981 in music). ... Signals is the ninth studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1982 (see 1982 in music). ... Grace Under Pressure is the tenth studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1984 (see 1984 in music). ... Power Windows is the eleventh studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1985 (see 1985 in music). ... For the FireHouse album, see Hold Your Fire (FireHouse album). ... Presto is the thirteenth studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1989 (see 1989 in music). ... Roll the Bones is the fourteenth studio album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1991 (see 1991 in music). ... Counterparts is the fifteenth studio album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1993 (see 1993 in music). ... Test for Echo is the sixteenth studio album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1996 (see 1996 in music). ... Vapor Trails is the seventeenth studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 2002 (see 2002 in music). ... Snakes & Arrows is the 18th full-length studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush. ... For other albums of the same name, see Feedback (album). ... All The Worlds a Stage is a double live album by Canadian band Rush, released in 1976 (see 1976 in music). ... Exit. ... A Show of Hands is a live album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1989 (see 1989 in music). ... Different Stages is a live album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1998 (see 1998 in music). ... Rush in Rio is a live album by Canadian band Rush, released in 2003 (see 2003 in music). ... Exit. ... Grace Under Pressure Tour is a concert released on videocassette and DVD by the Canadian band Rush. ... A Show of Hands is a videocassette/laserdisc released by the Canadian band Rush. ... Rush in Rio is a live DVD by Canadian band Rush, released in 2003 (see 2003 in music). ... Rush Replay X 3 is a live DVD by the Canadian band Rush, released on June 13, 2006. ... Archives is a compilation album by Rush, released in April 1978 (see 1978 in music). ... Chronicles is a compilation album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1990 (see 1990 in music). ... Retrospective I: 1974 to 1980 is a compilation album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1997 (see 1997 in music). ... Retrospective II: 1981 to 1987 is a compilation album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1997 (see 1997 in music). ... Gold is a compilation album by Canadian rock band Rush, released April 25, 2006. ... Through the Camera Eye is a videocassette/laserdisc release by the Canadian band Rush. ... Chronicles is a compilation DVD by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1990, showcasing music video highlights from the band from 1977 to 1987. ... ... February 14, 1975 Toronto, Ontario February 15, 1975 Owen Sound, Ontario February 16, 1975 Barrie, Ontario February 17, 1975 London, Ontario February 18, 1975 Kingston, Ontario February 20, 1975 Convention Center. ... November 7, 1975 Akron, Ohio (Ted Nugent) November 8, 1975 Allen Theatre. ... March 5, 1976 Randhurst Mall Ice Arena. ... August 27, 1976 Union Auditorium, Illinois State Univ. ... September 6, 1977 Fort William Gardens. ... May 10, 1978 Convention Center. ... The Hemispheres Tour was in support of Rushs studio album Hemispheres. ... Category: ... Category: ... Category: ... Category: ... Grace Under Pressure Tour is a videocassette/laserdisc released by the Canadian band Rush. ... Category: ... Category: ... Category: ... Category: ... Category: ... This was the first time Rush toured without an opening act; with the extra time available, 2112 was performed in its entirety for the first time ever (including Oracle). After the first ten dates the setlist remained constant throughout the tour although it was broken up into two legs with... June 28, 2002 Meadows Music Centre. ... Rush began the tour to promote their latest album, Snakes & Arrows on June 13, 2007 in Atlanta, Georgia. ... This is the discography of the Canadian rock band Rush. ... The history of Rush spans over thirty-five years, from the original lineup (of Geddy Lee, Alex Lifeson, and John Rutsey), to the modern era, after the replacement of Rutsey with Neil Peart. ... The Canadian Progressive Rock trio Rush has written, recorded, and performed several instrumentals throughout its career. ... Victor is a solo album by Rush guitarist Alex Lifeson which was released January 9, 1996 on Atlantic Records outside of Canada and Anthem Records within Canada. ... My Favourite Headache is a solo album by Geddy Lee of the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 2000. ... This 2-DVD box documents the work in progress of recording Rushs Test for Echo album, as well as Neil Peart in the studio. ... Anatomy of a Drum Solo a two-disc set, presents newly-recorded, in-studio footage of legendary Neil Peart discussing his approach to soloing. ... The Fear Series, or as its more commonly known among Rushs fanbase, The Fear Trilogy, is a set of four songs by the band Rush. ... Rushs Cygnus X-1 Duology consists of Book I: The Voyage and Book II: Hemispheres. ... Hugh Syme is a graphic artist, he is best known for his artwork and cover concepts for rock and metal bands. ...


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Rush concert Tickets - Buy Rush concert tickets (570 words)
Canadian rock band Rush consists of Geddy Lee on bass, keyboards and vocals, Ales Lifeson on guitar and Neil Peart as drummer and lyricisy.
Rush's new album, Snakes and Arrows, premiered on world radio on April 25, and is destined to explode from record stores across the globe on May 1.
Neil Peart, Rush's chief lyricist, stated that lyrical theme of the Snakes and Arrows is inspired by his personal reflections on faith, inspired by his many motorcycle journeys across the North American continent.
RUSH discography, MP3 and reviews (748 words)
RUSH is a pioneering line-up of the Seventies Progressive rock, who influenced most hard-rock and even heavy-metal power trios.
As at the end of all of RUSH's phases, a live LP was released.
RUSH embraced the 1980s sound with "Signals", making heavy use of synthesizers and keyboards for the first time in the band's history.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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