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Encyclopedia > Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg
Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg
Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg

Latin: Ruperto Carola Heidelbergensis
Motto: Semper apertus
(Latin for "The book of learning is always open")
Established 1386
Type: Public university
Rector: Prof. Dr. Bernhard Eitel
Staff: 15,000+ academics; 400+ University Professors
Students: 25,562 (2007)
Location Heidelberg, Germany
Campus: Urban
Colors:
               
Affiliations: LERU
Coimbra Group
EUA
Website: http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/
Data as of 2007

The Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg is a public, comprehensive research university located in Heidelberg, Germany. Commonly referred to as University of Heidelberg, Ruperto Carola, and as simply Heidelberg, it is the oldest German university, and it is considered a flagship institution of the German higher education system. The university consists of twelve faculties, and offers degree programs at undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral level in a wide array of disciplines.[1] Image File history File links Seal of the University of Heidelberg. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... Bernhard Eitel (* 1959 in Baden) is a German earth scientist. ... This article is about work. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... For other uses, see Heidelberg (disambiguation). ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... According to its mission statement, the League of European Research Universities (LERU) is a group of European research-intensive universities committed to the values of high quality teaching within an environment of internationally competitive research. ... The Coimbra Group (CG) is a network of European universities that gathers 38 universities, some of which are among the oldest and most prestigious in Europe. ... The European University Association (EUA) is the main voice of the higher education community in Europe. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the concept. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... For other uses, see Heidelberg (disambiguation). ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Quaternary education or postgraduate education is the fourth-stage educational level which follows the completion of an undergraduate degree at a college or university. ... Habilitation is the highest academic qualification a person can achieve by his/her own pursuit in certain European countries. ...


More than 600 years of innovation and independence have made the University of Heidelberg one of Europe's leading research and teaching institutions. It was established in the town of Heidelberg, then the seat of Prince-Electors of the Holy Roman Empire, in 1386[2], and acted initially as a center for theologians and law experts from throughout the Holy Roman Empire. Heidelberg quickly became a hub for independent thinkers, and developed into a stronghold of humanism. Its refusal to submit to a set doctrine from the Catholic or Evangelical churches, and its ability to balance religion and science ensured a lasting reputation as a haven for open-mindedness. The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Year 1386 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ...


Heidelberg's modern roots are firmly in the sciences, but it retains its humanistic traditions with renowned law, philosophy, and theology faculties. Having some of the best science institutes in Europe on its doorstep, it is particularly research oriented. With approximately 1,000 doctorates successfully completed every year, the University of Heidelberg ranks among the internationally leading education venues for doctoral students.[3] International Students from about 130 countries usually account for more than 20 percent of the entire student body, thus making it a truly cosmopolitan place.[4] Heidelberg University is a founding member of the elite League of European Research Universities, the Coimbra Group, and the European University Association According to its mission statement, the League of European Research Universities (LERU) is a group of European research-intensive universities committed to the values of high quality teaching within an environment of internationally competitive research. ... The Coimbra Group (CG) is a network of European universities that gathers 38 universities, some of which are among the oldest and most prestigious in Europe. ... The European University Association (EUA) is the main voice of the higher education community in Europe. ...

Contents

History

Founding

University Library

The university was founded at the behest of Rupert I, Count Palatine of the Rhine, in order to provide faculties for the study of philosophy, theology, jurisprudence, and medicine. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Rupert I, der Rote Elector Palatine (Wolfratshausen, June 9, 1309 – February 1390 in Neustadt an der Weinstraße) was Elector of the Palatinate from 1356 to 1390. ... A palatinate is an area administered by a count palatine, originally the direct representative of the sovereign but later the hereditary ruler of the territory subject to the crowns overlordship. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... For the jurisprudence of courts, see Case law. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ...


The Great Schism in 1378, which split European Christendom into two hostile groups, was initiated by the election of two popes after the death of Pope Gregory XI in the same year. One successor was in Avignon (elected by the French) and the other in Rome (elected by the Italian cardinals). The German secular and spiritual leaders voiced their support for the successor in Rome, which had far reaching consequences for the German students and teachers in Paris: they lost their stipends and had to leave. Palatine Elector Ruprecht I recognized the opportunity and initiated talks with the Curia, which ultimately lead to the creation of the Papal Bull of Foundation which can be considered the establishment of the university. Historical map of the Western Schism: red is support for Avignon, blue for Rome The Western Schism or Papal Schism (also known as the Great Schism of Western Christianity) was a split within the Catholic Church (1378 - 1417). ... Pope Gregory XI (c. ... City flag City coat of arms Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Région Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Département Vaucluse (préfecture) Arrondissement Avignon Canton Chief town of 4 cantons Intercommunality Communauté dagglomération du Grand Avignon Mayor Marie-Josée Roig... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... A palatinate is a territory administered by a count palatine, originally the direct representative of the sovereign, but later the hereditary ruler of the territory subject to the crowns overlordship. ... Rupert I, der Rote Elector Palatine (Wolfratshausen, June 9, 1309 – February 1390 in Neustadt an der Weinstraße) was Elector of the Palatinate from 1356 to 1390. ... A Curia in early Roman times was a subdivision of the people, i. ... A Papal bull is a particular type of patent or charter issued by a pope. ...


On October 18, 1386 a ceremonial fair commemorated the opening of the doors of the university. As a motto for the seal, Marsilius von Inghen, the first rector of the university chose "Semper apertus" - the book of learning is always open. At this point in time, the city of Heidelberg could not have had more than 3500 inhabitants and in the first year of existence the university had almost 600 enrolled. On October 19, 1386 the first lecture was held. Thus, the University of Heidelberg is the oldest university in Germany (the first university in German-speaking world was established in Vienna in1365). is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1386 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Marsilius of Inghen was a popular medieval Dutch Scholastic writer who studied together with Albert of Saxony and Nicole Oresme under Jean Buridan . ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... For other uses, see Heidelberg (disambiguation). ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1386 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Map of medieval European universities This is a list of the oldest extant universities in the world. ...

Carolinum (main administration building)

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Early development

During the second half of the 16th century the university underwent a flowering time and was converted into a calvinistic institution in the reign of Elector Louis VI. It attracted scholars from all over the continent and developed to a cultural and academic centre of Europe. However, with the beginning of the Thirty Years' War in 1618, the intellectual and fiscal wealth of the university declined. In 1622 the then world-famous Bibliotheca Palatina, the library of the university, was stolen from the Heiliggeistkirche (the University Cathedral) and brought to Rome.[5] Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Calvinism... Louis VI, Elector Palatine (Simmern, 4 July 1539 – 22 October 1583, Heidelberg) was an Elector from the branch of Palatinate-Simmern of the house of Wittelsbach. ... A scholar is either a student or someone who has achieved a mastery of some academic discipline, perhaps receiving financial support through a scholarship. ... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... Academia is a collective term for the scientific and cultural community engaged in higher education and research, taken as a whole. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Combatants Sweden  Bohemia Denmark-Norway[1] Dutch Republic France Scotland England Saxony  Holy Roman Empire Catholic League Austria Bavaria Spain Commanders Frederick V Buckingham Leven Gustav II Adolf â€  Johan Baner Cardinal Richelieu Louis II de Bourbon Vicomte de Turenne Christian IV of Denmark Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar Johann Georg I... Fiscal municipality in Huesca, Spain The term fiscal refers to government debt, expenditures and revenues, or to finance (particularly financial revenue) in general. ... Codex Manesse: Konrad von Altstetten. ... Julio Pérez Ferrero Library - Cúcuta, Colombia A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information, sources, resources, and services: it is organized for use and maintained by a public body, an institution, or a private individual. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ...


It was not until 1803 that this decline stopped. In this year, the university was reestablished as a state-owned institution by Karl Friedrich, Grand Duke of Baden and since then bears his name together with the one of Ruprecht I. The most influential student at that time was Karl Drais, inventor of the two-wheeler principle that started mechanized and later motorized personal transport. During the late 19th century, the Ruperto Carola housed a very liberal and open-minded spirit which was deliberately fostered by Max Weber, Ernst Troeltsch and a circle colleagues around them. In the Weimar Republic, the University was widely recognized as a centre of democratic thinking, coined by professors like Karl Jaspers, Gustav Radbruch, Martin Dibelius and Alfred Weber. Unfortunately, there were also dark forces working within the university: Nazi physicist Philipp Lenard was head of the physical institute during that time. Following the assassination of Walther Rathenau he refused to half mast the national flag on the institute, thereby provoking its storming by communist students.[6] Karl Friedrich, Grand Duke of Baden (November 22, 1728 in Karlsruhe--June 10, 1811 in Karlsruhe) was the son of Margrave Friedrich of Baden and Anna of Nassau-Dietz-Orange (October 13, 1710--September 17, 1777), the daughter of William Friso of Nassau-Dietz-Orange. ... Rupert I, der Rote Elector Palatine (Wolfratshausen, June 9, 1309 – February 1390 in Neustadt an der Weinstraße) was Elector of the Palatinate from 1356 to 1390. ... Karl Drais ca 1820, then still a baron Karl Drais (April 29, 1785 – December 10, 1851) was a German inventor and invented the Laufmaschine (running machine), also later called the velocipede, draisine (English) or draisienne (French), or nick-named, dandy horse. ... For the politician, see Max Weber (politician). ... Ernst Troeltsch ( February 17 1865 – February 1, 1923) was a German Protestant theologian and writer on philosophy of religion and philosophy of history, and an influential figure in German thought before 1914. ... Anthem Das Lied der Deutschen Germany during the Weimar period, with the Free State of Prussia (in blue) as the largest state Capital Berlin Language(s) German Government Republic President  - 1918-1925 Friedrich Ebert  - 1925-1933 Paul von Hindenburg Chancellor  - 1919 Philipp Scheidemann(first)  - 1933 Kurt von Schleicher (last) Legislature... For other uses, see Democracy (disambiguation). ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: [1]) varies. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Gustav Radbruch, born November 21, 1878 in Lübeck; died November 23, 1949 in Heidelberg, was a German law professor, most famous for the Radbruchsche Formel (Radbruchs formula) which states that where statutory law is incompatible with the requirements of justice to an intolerable degree, or where statutory law... Martin Dibelius (born September 14, 1883 in Dresden; died November 11, 1947 in Heidelberg) was German theologian and a professor for the New Testament at the University of Heidelberg. ... Alfred Weber (July 30, 1868 in Erfurt, Thuringia, Germany - May 2, 1958 in Heidelberg) was a German economist, sociologist and theoretician of culture whose work was influential in the development of modern economic geography. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... Philipp Eduard Anton von Lénárd, (June 7, 1862 in Preßburg, Austria-Hungary (today Bratislava, Slovakia)–May 20, 1947 in Messelhausen, Germany) was a Hungarian-German physicist and the winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1905 for his research on cathode rays and the discovery of... Walter Rathenau Walther Rathenau (September 29, 1867–June 24, 1922) was a German industrialist and politician who served as Foreign Minister of Germany. ... Flag Flying Half-Staff over the White House Half-mast, or half-staff, describes the act of flying a flag approximately halfway up a flagpole (though anywhere from one-third to two-thirds of the way up the flagpole is acceptable). ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ...

Old Assembly Hall in the Old University
Old Assembly Hall in the Old University

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1393 KB) The University of Heidelberg, the aula. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1393 KB) The University of Heidelberg, the aula. ...

Nazi Era and 1950s

With the advent of the Third Reich the university, just like all other German universities, supported the Nazis and lost many of its dissident professors. But since Heidelberg was for the most part spared from destruction during the war, the reconstruction of the University was realised rather quickly. With the foundation of the Collegium Academicum, Heidelberg became the home of Germany's first and, until today, only self-governed student hall. Newly laid statutes obliged the university to "the living spirit of truth, justice and humanity".[7] Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ...


1960s and 1970s

During the sixties and seventies, the university grew dramatically in size. In this time, the university developed into one of the main scenes of the left-wing student protests in Germany. In 1975, a massive police force arrested the entire student parliament "AStA". Shortly thereafter, the "Collegium Academicum", a progressive college in immediate vicinity to the universities main grounds, was stormed by over 700 police officers and closed once and for all. On the outskirts of the city, in the Neuenheimer Feld Area, a large campus for medicine and natural sciences was constructed.[8] Student protest encompasses a wide range of activities that indicate student dissatisfaction with a given political or academic issue and mobilization to communicate this dissatisfaction to the authorities (university or civil or both) and society in general and hopefully remedy the problem. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... The term natural science as the way in which different fields of study are defined is determined as much by historical convention as by the present day meaning of the words. ...


Structure

Today, about 25,000 students are enrolled for studies at the Ruperto Carola. More than 15,000 academic staff and over 400 University Professors[9] make it one of Germany's larger universities. Plato is credited with the inception of academia: the body of knowledge, its development and transmission across generations. ...


Faculties

A study in the library of the Faculty of Philosophy

After a structural reformation, the university consists of twelve faculties which in turn comprise several disciplines. As a consequence of the Bologna process, most faculties offer now Bachelor's, Master's, and PhD degrees in order to comply with the new European degree standard. phil wing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... phil wing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... The purpose of the Bologna process (or Bologna accords) is to create the European higher education area by making academic degree standards and quality assurance standards more comparable and compatible throughout Europe. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Aquatint of a Doctor of Divinity at the University of Oxford, in the scarlet and black academic robes corresponding to his position. ...

Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... Mannheim is a city in Germany. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... A modern language is any human language that is used by societies in the world today. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... Behavioural sciences (or Behavioral science) is a term that encompasses all the disciplines that explore the activities of and interactions among organisms in the natural world. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Earth science (also known as geoscience or the geosciences), is an all-embracing term for the sciences related to the planet Earth. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... For the song by Girls Aloud see Biology (song) Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, speech lit. ...

International Graduate Schools

Besides the various graduate programs offered by the Heidelberg Graduate Academy, and in addition to the opportunity to complete individual doctoral studies in all disciplines offered, with an University Professor as dissertation adviser, the university has recently set up interdisciplinary international graduate schools offering PhD programs for outstanding graduates in relevant disciplines. The lectures, seminars, and tutorials will be held in English. Interdisciplinarity is the act of drawing from two or more academic disciplines and integrating their insights to work together in pursuit of a common goal. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... A lecture on linear algebra at the Helsinki University of Technology A lecture is an oral presentation intended to teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. ... A seminar is, generally, a form of academic instruction, either at a university or offered by a commercial or professional organization. ... // Academia In British academic parlance, a tutorial is a small class of one, or only a few, students, in which the tutor (a professor or other academic staff member) gives individual attention to the students. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...

  • The Hartmut Hoffmann-Berling International Graduate School for Molecular und Cellular Biology [22]
  • The DKFZ International Biomedical PhD Program [23] is run jointly with the German Cancer Research Center
  • The Heidelberg Graduate School of International Public Health [24]
  • The Heidelberg Graduate School of Mathematical and Computational Methods for the Sciences [25]
  • The International Postgraduate Program "System Earth" [26]
  • The International Max Planck Research School for Astronomy and Cosmic Physics Heidelberg [27] is run in cooperation with the Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy
  • The International Max Planck Research School for Quantum Dynamics in Physics, Chemistry and Biology [28] is a joint initiative of Heidelberg University, the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, the German Cancer Research Center, the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, and the Heavy Ion Research Center Darmstadt.

The German Cancer Research Center (known as the Deutsches Krebs Forschungs Zentrum or simply DKFZ in German), is a cancer research center based in Heidelberg, Germany. ... The Max Planck Institute for Astronomy is a part of the Max Planck Society. ... The Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Phsyics (or MPI for Nuclear Physics) is a research institute in Heidelberg, Germany. ... The German Cancer Research Center (known as the Deutsches Krebs Forschungs Zentrum or simply DKFZ in German), is a cancer research center based in Heidelberg, Germany. ... The Max Planck Institut for Medical Research is a medical research institute located in Heidelberg, Germany. ... The Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI, Institute for Heavy Ion Research) in Wixhausen, a suburb of Darmstadt, Germany is a federally funded heavy ion research center. ...

Research Institutes

Accessorily to the faculties and their respective institutes, a number of independent, semi-independent, and inter-faculty research institutes take part in the educational tasks, including those listed below:

The Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy Heidelberg
The Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy Heidelberg

As one can see from the aforementioned lists, the Ruperto Carola is strongly dedicated towards fundamental research in humanities, natural sciences, and medicine. Although there are some links to commercial sponsors, the University depends mostly on financial support by the state. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixels, file size: 1. ... The German Cancer Research Center (known as the Deutsches Krebs Forschungs Zentrum or simply DKFZ in German), is a cancer research center based in Heidelberg, Germany. ... The European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) is a molecular biology research institution supported by 20 countries comprising nearly all of western Europe and Israel. ... The Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften e. ... The Max Planck Institut for Medical Research is a medical research institute located in Heidelberg, Germany. ... The Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften e. ... The Max Planck Institute for Astronomy is a part of the Max Planck Society. ... The Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften e. ... The Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Phsyics (or MPI for Nuclear Physics) is a research institute in Heidelberg, Germany. ... The Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften e. ... The Landessternwarte Heidelberg-Königstuhl The Landessternwarte Heidelberg-Königstuhl, or Heidelberg-Königstuhl State Observatory, is a historic astronomical observatory located near the summit of the Königstuhl hill, in the city of Heidelberg in Germany. ... The Astronomisches Rechen-Institut The Astromomisches Rechen-Institut (Astronomical Calculation Institute) is part of the Center of Astronomy of the University of Heidelberg. ... The Kirchhoff Institute for Physics The Kirchhoff-Institut für Physik (Kirchhoff Institute of Physics), built in 2002, is a research institute located in Heidelberg, Germany. ... The Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI, Institute for Heavy Ion Research) in Wixhausen, a suburb of Darmstadt, Germany is a federally funded heavy ion research center. ... The HCA Logo Founded in 2003 as newest institute of Germanys oldest university, the University of Heidelbergs Heidelberg Center for American Studies (HCA) serves as an interdisciplinary institute for higher education, as a center for advanced research, and as a forum for public debate on topics related to... The Heidelberg Institute for International Conflict Research (HIIK) at the Department of Political Science at the University of Heidelberg is a private organization. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Campuses

Old town and Heidelberg Castle
Old town and Heidelberg Castle

Heidelberg is a city with approx. 140,000 inhabitants. It is situated in the Rhine Neckar Triangle, an European metropolitan area with approx. 2.4 million people living there, comprising the neighbouring cities of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Ludwigshafen, and a number of smaller towns surrounding them. Heidelberg is known as the cradle of Romanticism, and its old town and castle are among the most frequented tourist destinations in Germany. Its pedestrian zone is a shopping and night life magnet for the surrounding area and beyond. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 147 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 147 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Rhein-Neckar is a district (Kreis) in the north-west of Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ... This is a list of the largest metropolitan areas of Europe. ... For other uses, see Heidelberg (disambiguation). ... Mannheim is a city in Germany. ... Map of Germany showing Ludwigshafen am Rhein Ludwigshafen am Rhein is a city in Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany, with about 166,000 inhabitants. ... Romantics redirects here. ...


Heidelberg University’s facilities are, generally speaking, separated in two parts. The faculties and institutes of humanities and social sciences are embedded in the old town. The sciences faculties and the medical school, including three large university hospitals, are located on the New Campus on the outskirts of Heidelberg.


Old Town Campus

The Old University (seat of the Rector and of the University Senate)

The so-called New University can be regarded as the center of the Old Town Campus. It is situated in the pedestrian zone at University Square in direct neighbourhood to the University Library and to the main administration buildings. The New University was officially opened in 1931. Its erection was largely financed by donations of American tycoon families, such as Goldman, Sachs, Morgan, Chrysler, Ford, and many others, in line with a fundraising campaign of Jacob Gould Schurman, an alumnus of Heidelberg University and former US Ambassador to Germany.[46] It houses the new assembly hall, the largest lecture halls, and a number of smaller seminar rooms, mostly used by faculties of humanities and social sciences. The University Library, the largest library of the university, was opened in 1905 and has about 3.2 million books in stock[47], including the returned parts of the Bibliotheca Palatina. It is a popular working place for students and also houses two large internet lounges, a number of special collections, and changing exhibitions. Education in humanities and social sciences takes place to a great extent in the respective faculty buildings which are spread all over the ancient part of town, though, they are mostly a maximum of ten minutes walk away from University Square. The faculties maintain own extensive libraries, and working places for their students. Seminars and tutorials are usually held in the faculty buildings. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Jacob Gould Schurman (May 22, 1854 - 1942), American educationist, was born at Freetown, Prince Edward Island, of Dutch descent, his Loyalist ancestors having left New York in 1784. ... Codex Manesse: Konrad von Altstetten. ...


New Campus

River Neckar and New Campus

The New Campus is located in the newest district of the town called Neuenheimer Feld. It is today the larger part of the university. Almost all science faculties and institutes, the medical school, the university hospitals, and the science branch of the University Library are situated at the New Campus. Most of the dormitories and the athletic facilities of the university can be found there as well. Lots of independent research institutes, such as the German Cancer Research Center, Max-Planck-Institutes, and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory have settled there. The New Campus is also seat of several biomedical spinn-off companies. The ancient part of the town can be reached by streetcar in about ten minutes. The Faculty of Physics and Astronomy is in an exceptional position since its faculty buildings are located in Heidelberg's exclusive residential area, overlooking the River Neckar, the ancient town, and the castle. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The German Cancer Research Center (known as the Deutsches Krebs Forschungs Zentrum or simply DKFZ in German), is a cancer research center based in Heidelberg, Germany. ... The Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften e. ... The European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) is a molecular biology research institution supported by 20 countries comprising nearly all of western Europe and Israel. ... The Neckar is a 367 km long river in Germany, a major right tributary of the River Rhine, which it joins at Mannheim. ... The castle in the early 19th century The Heidelberg Castle (German: Heidelberger Schloss) is a famous ruin in Germany and is the symbol of the city of Heidelberg. ...


Facilities abroad

Heidelberg University has founded a Center for Latin America in Santiago de Chile in 2001.[48] It has the task of organising, managing, and marketing the courses of study maintained either independently by Heidelberg University or in cooperation with the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile and the University of Chile. Heidelberg University has arranged cooperation agreements with both of these universities, the two most important universities in Chile. The center has responsibility for programs of postgraduate education. It also coordinates the activities of Heidelberg University in Latin America, and provides a platform for scientific cooperation. Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Satellite image of Santiago Santiago (full form Santiago de Chile) is the capital of Chile. ... PUC from Cerro Santa Lucía Inside PUC San Joaquin Campus Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC) (Pontifical Catholic University of Chile) is one of Chiles oldest universities and one of the most prestigious institutions in Latin America along with The University of Chile . ... Universidad de Chile may refer to: Universidad de Chile (university) Universidad de Chile (football club) This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ...


In addition, the university is currently about to set up a Heidelberg Center for North America, with similar tasks, in Amherst, Massachusetts. North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Hampshire County Settled 1703 Incorporated 1775 Government  - Type Representative town meeting Area  - Town  27. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Academics

Reputation

The THES - QS World University Rankings[49][50][51][52] ranked Heidelberg University overall between 12th and 15th in Europe, between 45th and 60th in the world, and consistently as the foremost German university. Based on the overall academic peer review score of 2005, Heidelberg ranked 6th in Europe and 28th in the world. THES ranked Heidelberg world-wide between 17th and 43rd in life science and biomedicine, between 22nd and 45th in science, and between 41st and 61st in arts and humanities. The Shanghai Jiao Tong University's Academic Ranking of World Universities[53] ranked Heidelberg between 12th and 18th in Europe, and between 58th and 66th in the world. With these placings Heidelberg outranks many world-renowned institutions of higher education such as, most often, two Ivy League universities. (Note that the THES - QS and Jiao Tong tables are the only annual comprehensive world university rankings, and that their methodologies are subject to very controversy.) The THES - QS World University Rankings is an annual publication of university rankings around the world, published by The Times Higher Education Supplement (THES) and Quacquarelli Symonds (QS). ... // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ...


According to the Ranking of Scientific Impact of Leading European Research Universities[54][55] compiled by the European Commission, which is commonly regarded as a highly reliable source, Heidelberg ranks 9th in Europe. Ranked by the number of Nobel Laureates affiliated with the university at the time of Nobel Prize announcement, Heidelberg is placed 4th in Europe and 13th in the world by 2007.[56] A study based on a survey of scientific journal referees created by Braun et al. in 2007 ranks the University of Heidelberg at the top of German universities in academic reputation.[57] The Times referred to Heidelberg University as "the oldest and most eminent in the country of Luther and Einstein" and as "the jewel of German learning".[58] In October 2007 Heidelberg was officially appointed "elite university" in line with an initiative started by the federal government, thus securing nine-digit additional funds.[59] In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of educational institutions in an order determined by any combination of factors. ... Berlaymont, the Commissions seat The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive branch of the European Union. ... Winners of the Nobel Prize are scientists, writers and peacemakers who have been awarded in their field of endeavour, and who are known collectively as either Nobel laureates or Nobel Prize winners. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ...


Organisation and length of courses

The academic year is divided into two semesters. The winter semester runs from 1st of October - 31st of March and the summer semester from 1st of April - 30th of September. Classes are held from mid-October to mid-February and mid-April to mid-July. Students can generally begin their studies either in the winter or the summer semester. However, there are several subjects students can begin only in the winter semester. The standard time required to finish a Bachelor's degree is principally 6 semesters, and a further 4 semesters for consecutive Master's degrees. The normal duration of PhD programs for full-time students is 6 semesters. The overall period of study for an undergraduate degree is divided into two parts: a period of basic study, lasting at least 4 semesters, at the end of which students must sit a formal examination, and a period of advanced study, lasting at least 2 semesters, after which students take their final examinations.


Tuition fees

Studying at German universities is heavily subsidized by the state in order to keep higher education affordable regardless of socio-economic background.[60] Therefore, Heidelberg charges tuition fees of approximately € 1,200 p.a., including student union fees, for undergraduate, consecutive Master's, and doctoral programs, for both EU and non-EU citizens, and for any subject area. The usual housing costs for on-campus dormitories range from € 2,200 to € 3,000 p.a.[61] Hence, Heidelberg ranks presumably among the world leaders in view of cost-benefit ratio. A students union, student government, or student council is a student organization present at many colleges and universities, often with its own building on the campus, dedicated to social and organizational activities of the student body. ...


Admission

Admission to Heidelberg University is strictly merit-based, and is generally highly competitive.


Since in Germany the universities are basically obliged to grant permission to study as an undergraduate by having acquired the German equivalent of the high school degree, the numerus clausus is applied to select among competing applicants. The selection depends primarily on the field of study and the grade point average of the higher education entrance qualification. Admission to the Faculties of Medicine, Biosciences, and Law is most competitive. Even graduating from high school at the top of one's class does not guaranty admission to these faculties. Some other faculties, in contrast, do not demand a minimum GPA and undergraduate admission is always granted if certain criteria (e.g. relevant language proficiency) are fulfilled. Acceptance rates are not published, and may vary significantly from faculty to faculty. For undergraduate studies a good command of German language is indispensable. Abitur (from Latin abire = go away, go off) is the word commonly used in Finland and Germany for the final exams young adults (aged 18, 19 or 20) take at the end of their secondary education, usually after 12 or 13 years of schooling. ... Numerus Clausus (closed number in Latin) is one of many methods used to limit the number of students who may study at a university. ...


Admisson to consecutive Master's programs always requires at least a "good" undergraduate degree. However, some very popular Master's programs apply even higher entrance criteria. PhD admission prerequisite is normally a strong Master's degree, but in exceptional cases an undergraduate degree can be sufficient. Moreover, most graduate schools require academic references and hold interviews which focus on additional aspects such as intellectual brightness, creativity, imagination, poise, perseverance, critical view, independency in motivation, ability to work in a team, and aims of personal career. A language test for English is requested for all graduate applicants except of those coming from Germany, and native speakers coming from Australia, Canada, Great Britain, Ireland, and USA. International applicants usually make up considerably more than 20 percent of the applicant pool, and are considered individually by the merits achieved in their respective state of origin. Provided having a suitable educational background, international students are generally encouraged to apply.


People associated with the university

Since 1386, a vast number of internationally renowned scholars have been affiliated with Heidelberg University, and it has produced an even greater number of notable alumni. Trying to compile a complete list of them must be foredoomed to failure. Therefore, the following is not ment to give more than an impression.


Arts and social sciences

G.F.W. Hegel
G.F.W. Hegel

Heidelberg has a strong tradition in the arts and social sciences. Max Weber and his brother Alfred both taught sociology and political economy at Heidelberg University. Carl Joachim Friedrich, the famous political scientist, studied under the latter, and so did the social psychologist, psychoanalyst, and humanistic philosopher Erich Fromm. Hannah Arendt completed her doctoral studies there, under the under the supervision of the existentialist philosopher-psychologist Karl Jaspers. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel was a Professor in Heidelberg. His then world-wide predominant school of thought had a stong influence on Heidelberg’s students, so that some of them became world-renowned philosophers themselves, such as Ludwig Feuerbach. Even important contemporary philosophers taught there. The critical theorist Jürgen Habermas held a chair in Heidelberg, where he maintained a congenial collaboration with his fellows Karl-Otto Apel and Hans-Georg Gadamer. The influential logicians and mathematicians Leo Königsberger and Emil Gumbel both held chairs there as well. Moreover, Heidelberg enjoys a long tradition in jurisprudence. Some of the most important figures in this branch were certainly Friedrich Carl von Savigny, Gustav Radbruch and Georg Jellinek. The same is true for divinity. The Old Testament’s scholars Gerhard von Rad and his successor Claus Westermann both were especially notable fellows in the field of religious studies. Even in other branches, Heidelberg has a number of notable alumni. The historian Ernst Hartwig Kantorowicz was educated at the university, just as Alan Kreider was. Image File history File links Hegel_portrait_by_Schlesinger_1831. ... Image File history File links Hegel_portrait_by_Schlesinger_1831. ... For the politician, see Max Weber (politician). ... Alfred Weber (July 30, 1868 in Erfurt, Thuringia, Germany - May 2, 1958 in Heidelberg) was a German economist, sociologist and theoretician of culture whose work was influential in the development of modern economic geography. ... Carl Joachim Friedrich (* June 5, 1901 in Leipzig; † 1984)) was a German-American professor political theorist. ... Erich Fromm Erich Pinchas Fromm (March 23, 1900 – March 18, 1980) was an internationally renowned Jewish-German-American social psychologist, psychoanalyst, and humanistic philosopher. ... Hannah Arendt (October 14, 1906 – December 4, 1975) was a German Jewish political theorist. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (IPA: ) (August 27, 1770 – November 14, 1831) was a German philosopher and, with Johann Gottlieb Fichte and Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Schelling, one of the representatives of German idealism. ... Ludwig Andreas Feuerbach (July 28, 1804 - September 13, 1872), German philosopher, fourth son of the eminent jurist Paul Johann Anselm Ritter von Feuerbach, was born in Landshut, Bavaria and died in Rechenberg (since 1899 a district of Nuremberg). ... Jürgen Habermas (IPA: ; born June 18, 1929) is a German philosopher and sociologist in the tradition of critical theory and American pragmatism. ... Karl-Otto Apel is a German philosopher. ... Hans-Georg Gadamer Hans-Georg Gadamer (February 11, 1900 – March 13, 2002) was a German philosopher best known for his 1960 magnum opus, Truth and Method (Wahrheit und Methode). ... Photograph of Leo Königsberger, 1886 Leo Königsberger (October 15, 1837–December 15, 1921) was a German mathematician, and historian of science. ... Emil Julius Gumbel (July 18, 1891 - September 10, 1966), was a German mathematician, pacifist and anti-Nazi campaigner. ... Friedrich Carl von Savigny Friedrich Carl von Savigny (February 21, 1779 - 25 October 1861) was one of the most respected and influential 19th-century jurists. ... Gustav Radbruch, born November 21, 1878 in Lübeck; died November 23, 1949 in Heidelberg, was a German law professor, most famous for the Radbruchsche Formel (Radbruchs formula) which states that where statutory law is incompatible with the requirements of justice to an intolerable degree, or where statutory law... Georg Jellinek Georg Jellinek (June 16, 1851, Leipzig–January 12, 1911, Heidelberg) was a German legal philosopher. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Rev. ... Ernst Hartwig Kantorowicz (1895-1963) was a German-born Jewish historian of theology and iconographer, known for his 1927 book Kaiser Friedrich der Zweite on Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II, and his later The Kings Two Bodies (1957). ... The Reverend Dr Alan Fetter Kreider was born at Goshen, Indiana on 8 November 1941. ...


Natural sciences

Today, Heidelberg is particularly strong in sciences. Besides such pioneers of their fields like Ludolf von Krehl for medicine, Robert Bunsen for chemistry, Gustav Kirchhoff for physics, and Hermann von Helmholtz for both physiology and physics, an impressive number of Nobel Laureates have been affiliated with the university. A distinctive fact is, that most of them received the award during their lectureship at Heidelberg, and for research achievements largely accomplished there.[62] Heidelberg's Physics Nobel Laureates are Philipp Lenard, Walther Bothe, J. Hans D. Jensen, Wolfgang Ketterle, and Theodor W. Hänsch. In medicine or physiology, the university's Nobel Laureates are Albrecht Kossel, Otto Fritz Meyerhof, Otto Heinrich Warburg, and Bert Sakmann, who is currently a fellow of the MPIMF in Heidelberg. Other Nobel Laureates who were fellows of the MPIMF, which is independent but situated on the campus and closely tied with the university, are Fritz Lipmann, Severo Ochoa, Rudolf Mößbauer, André Lwoff, and George Wald. Even in chemistry, Heidelberg University notes three Nobel Laureates: Fritz Haber, Richard Kuhn, and Georg Wittig. Ludolf von Krehl (December 26, 1861 - May 26, 1937) was a German internist and physiologist who was a native of Leipzig. ... Robert Wilhelm Eberhard Bunsen (31 March 1811 – 16 August 1899) was a German chemist. ... Gustav Robert Kirchhof (March 12, 1824 – October 17, 1887) was a German physicist who contributed to the fundamental understanding of electrical circuits, spectroscopy, and the emission of black-body radiation by heated objects. ... Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz (August 31, 1821 – September 8, 1894) was a German physician and physicist. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... Philipp Eduard Anton von Lénárd, (June 7, 1862 in Preßburg, Austria-Hungary (today Bratislava, Slovakia)–May 20, 1947 in Messelhausen, Germany) was a Hungarian-German physicist and the winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1905 for his research on cathode rays and the discovery of... Walther Wilhelm Georg Bothe (January 8, 1891 – February 8, 1957) was a German physicist, mathematician, chemist, and Nobel Prize winner. ... Johannes Hans Daniel Jensen (June 25, 1907 – February 11, 1973) was a German physicist who shared half of the 1963 Nobel Prize for Physics with Maria Goeppert-Mayer for their proposal of the shell nuclear model. ... Wolfgang Ketterle (born October 21, 1957, in Heidelberg, Germany) is a German physicist and a professor of physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... Theodor Wolfgang Hänsch (b. ... Ludwig Karl Martin Leonhard Albrecht Kossel (September 16, 1853 - July 5, German medical doctor. ... Otto Fritz Meyerhof (April 12, 1884 – October 6, 1951), German-born physician and biochemist. ... Otto Heinrich Warburg (October 8, 1883, Freiburg im Breisgau – August 1, 1970, Berlin), son of Emil Warburg, was a German physiologist and medical doctor. ... Bert Sakmann (born June 12, 1942) is a German cell physiologist. ... The Max Planck Institut for Medical Research is a medical research institute located in Heidelberg, Germany. ... The Max Planck Institut for Medical Research is a medical research institute located in Heidelberg, Germany. ... Categories: Stub | Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine winners ... Severo Ochoa Statue outside the School of Medicine of the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM). ... Rudolf Ludwig Mößbauer (born January 31, 1929) is a German physicist who studied gamma rays from nuclear transitions. ... Andre Michael Lwoff (1902 - 1994) was a French microbiologist. ... George Wald (November 18, 1906–April 12, 1997) was an American scientist who is best known for his work with pigments in the retina. ... Fritz Haber (9 December 1868 – 29 January 1934) was a German chemist, who received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1918 for his development of synthetic ammonia, important for fertilisers and explosives. ... Richard Kuhn (December 3, 1900 – August 1, 1967) was a German biochemist, born in Vienna, Austria. ... Georg Wittig (June 16, 1897 in Berlin (Germany) - August 26, 1987) was a german chemist who reported a method for synthesis of alkenes from aldehydes and ketones using compounds called phosphonium ylides. ...


Political and social life

Helmut Kohl

Heidelberg is an ancient university, and has always been most prestigious. Therefore, since the Middle Ages lots of leading figures from nobility, political, social, and business life obtained higher education there. Among them are Constantine I, King of Greece, and the statesmen Frederick II, Grand Duke of Baden, Johann von Miquel, and Charles McLaren, 1st Baron Aberconway. International industrialists and financiers like Baron Mayer Amschel de Rothschild and Heinrich, Baron Thyssen-Bornemisza de Kászon were educated there as well. Besides these rather historical figures, a number of outstanding contemporary German politicians also attended the university, such as Helmut Kohl, the 6th Chancellor of the Federal Republic, Bernhard Vogel, who was Prime Minister of two German federal states, Reinhard Bütikofer, the Chairman of the Green Party of Germany, and Hans-Christian Stroebele, the Deputy Parliamentary Leader of Germany's Green Party. Paul Kirchhof, former Justice of the German Constitutional Court, currently teaches public law there. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 550 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,077 × 1,173 pixels, file size: 259 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 550 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,077 × 1,173 pixels, file size: 259 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Constantine I, King of the Hellenes (Greek: Κωνσταντίνος A, Βασιλεύς των Ελλήνων) (2 August 1868 - 11 January 1923) ruled Greece from 1913 to 1917 and from 1920 to 1922. ... Frederick II, Grand Duke of Baden (born July 9, 1857 in Karlsruhe; died August 8, 1928 in Badenweiler) was the last Grand Duke of Baden. ... Johannes von Miquel (1829-1901) Johann von Miquel (1829-1901), German statesman, was born at Neuenhaus, Hanover on the 19th of February 1829, being descended from a French family that had emigrated during the French Revolution. ... Charles Benjamin Bright McLaren, 1st Baron Aberconway (12 May 1850 - 23 January 1934) was a Scottish Liberal politician and jurist. ... Drawing of Mayer Amschel de Rothschild Baron Mayer Amschel de Rothschild (June 29, 1818 – February 6, 1874) of the English branch of the Rothschild family was the fourth and youngest son of Nathan Mayer Rothschild (1777–1836). ... Heinrich Thyssen, since 1907 Heinrich Freiherr Thyssen-Bornemisza de Kászon et Impérfalva was a German-Hungarian entrepreneur and art collector. ... Helmut Josef Michael Kohl (born April 3, 1930) is a German conservative politician and statesman. ... Bernhard Vogel (born December 19, 1932 in Göttingen) is a German politician (CDU). ... Reinhard Hans Bütikofer (born January 26, 1953) is a German politician for the Alliance 90/The Greens party and one of the two current party leaders, together with Claudia Roth. ... Hans-Christian Ströbele Hans-Christian Ströbele is a German politician and lawyer. ... Paul Kirchhof (* February 21, 1943 in Osnabrück) is a German expert in law and finance. ...


Poetry and prose

As Heidelberg is deeply coined by Romanticism, its beautiful old town, and its stunning landscape surround has inspired poets and literates from the first days of the university on. Some of them were also educated there. Good examples are Joseph von Eichendorff, Jean Paul, William Somerset Maugham, Gottfried Keller, and Christian Friedrich Hebbel. Especially notable alumni are also José Rizal and Sir Muhammad Iqbal, who both were not only literates, but became national heroes and political icones of their countries. Freiherr Joseph von Eichendorff (March 10, 1788 - November 26, 1857), German lyricist and narrator. ... Jean Paul Jean Paul (March 21, 1763 – November 14, 1825), born Johann Paul Friedrich Richter, was a famous German humorist. ... W. Somerset Maugham as photographed in 1934 by Carl Van Vechten. ... Gottfried Keller (July 19, 1819 – July 15, 1890) was a Swiss writer who is best known as the master of the Novelle. ... Christian Friedrich Hebbel ( March 18, 1813 – December 13, 1863), was a German poet and dramatist. ... For places, institutions and objects named after this person, see Rizal (disambiguation). ... Allama Dr. Sir Muhammad Iqbal Allama Dr. Sir Muhammad Iqbal (November 9, 1877-April 21, 1938) was an important Indian Muslim poet from the colonial era, a philosopher and thinker of Kashmiri origin. ...


References

  1. ^ http://www.zuv.uni-heidelberg.de/AAA/english/info_hd_fach.htm
  2. ^ http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9039821/University-of-Heidelberg
  3. ^ http://graduateacademy.uni-heidelberg.de/graduate_academy.html
  4. ^ http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/press/news/press321_e.html
  5. ^ http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/university/welcome/history.html
  6. ^ http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/university/welcome/history.html
  7. ^ http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/university/welcome/history.html
  8. ^ http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/university/welcome/history.html
  9. ^ Conferences 2007: Welcome to Heidelberg
  10. ^ http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/university/welcome/theology.html
  11. ^ http://www.jura-hd.de/
  12. ^ http://www.klinikum.uni-heidelberg.de/index.php?id=8200
  13. ^ http://www.ma.uni-heidelberg.de/
  14. ^ http://www.philosophische-fakultaet.uni-hd.de/index-en.htm
  15. ^ http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/institute/fak9/
  16. ^ http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/institute/fak18/index.html
  17. ^ http://www.verkult.uni-hd.de/
  18. ^ http://www.mathematik.uni-heidelberg.de/
  19. ^ http://www.chemgeo.uni-hd.de/indexengl.html
  20. ^ http://www.physik.uni-heidelberg.de/index.php?lang=en
  21. ^ http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/institute/fak14/
  22. ^ http://www.hbigs-heidelberg.de
  23. ^ http://www.dkfz.de/en/phd-program/index.html
  24. ^ http://www.griph.de
  25. ^ http://www.mathcomp.uni-heidelberg.de
  26. ^ http://www.systemearth.uni-hd.de/
  27. ^ http://www.mpia-hd.mpg.de/imprs-hd/]
  28. ^ http://www.mpi-hd.mpg.de/imprs-qd/
  29. ^ http://www.dkfz.de/en/index.html
  30. ^ http://www.embl-heidelberg.de/
  31. ^ http://www.mpimf-heidelberg.de
  32. ^ http://www.mpia.de/Public/menu_q2e.php
  33. ^ http://www.mpi-hd.mpg.de/english/index.html
  34. ^ http://www.mpil.de/ww/en/pub/news.cfm
  35. ^ http://www.lsw.uni-heidelberg.de/?lang=en
  36. ^ http://www.ari.uni-heidelberg.de/index.php.en
  37. ^ http://www.kip.uni-heidelberg.de/?lang=en
  38. ^ http://www.gsi.de/
  39. ^ http://hca.uni-hd.de/
  40. ^ http://www.hiik.de/start/index.html.en
  41. ^ http://www.zi-mannheim.de/start_en.html
  42. ^ http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/university/welcome/sai.html
  43. ^ http://www.bioquant.uni-hd.de/
  44. ^ http://www.iwr.uni-heidelberg.de/
  45. ^ http://www.haw.baden-wuerttemberg.de/index_eng.php
  46. ^ http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/presse/news/2005schurman2.html
  47. ^ http://www.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/Englisch/allg/profil/geschichte.html
  48. ^ http://www.heidelberg-center.uni-hd.de/english/center.html
  49. ^ THES - QS World University Ranking 2004
  50. ^ THES - QS World University Ranking 2005
  51. ^ THES - QS World University Ranking 2006
  52. ^ THES - QS World University Ranking 2007
  53. ^ http://ed.sjtu.edu.cn/ranking.htm
  54. ^ ftp://ftp.cordis.europa.eu/pub/indicators/docs/3rd_report_snaps10.pdf
  55. ^ http://cordis.europa.eu/indicators/third_report.htm
  56. ^ http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/lists/universities.html
  57. ^ http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/presse/news07/2707budap.html
  58. ^ http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/press/news/press380_e.html
  59. ^ http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/press/news/538e.html
  60. ^ As a benchmark: The effective costs which the state must pay for every single medical student account for approximately €33,000 (=$48,500) per year. See http://www.unifr.ch/ztd/ems/berichte/b2/testergebnisse.htm
  61. ^ Information for incomming Erasmus Students
  62. ^ http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/lists/universities.html

See also

The first European medieval universities were established in Italy and France in the late 12th and early 13th Century for the study of arts, law, medicine, and theology. ... Responsibility for educational oversight in Germany has to lie primarily with the states while the federal government only has a minor role. ... There are 331 universities and colleges in Germany, 159 Fachhochschulen (Universities of Applied Science), 95 non-state institutions (of these 51 privately-, 44 church-operated), and 56 which teach arts or music only. ... For other uses, see Heidelberg (disambiguation). ... Region Logo of the Rhein-Neckar-Triangle initiative The Rhine Neckar Region, often referred to as Rhein-Neckar-Triangle is a metropolitan area located in south western Germany, between Frankfurt and Stuttgart. ... Location Coordinates , , Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE1 Capital Stuttgart Minister-President Günther Oettinger (CDU) Governing parties CDU / FDP Votes in Bundesrat 6 (of 69) Basic statistics Area  35,752 km² (13,804 sq mi) Population 10,741,000 (11/2006)[1]  - Density...

External links

  • University of Heidelberg
  • A Cyber Joint for University of Heidelberg Alumni
  • Photo Gallery with Images of the University of Heidelberg
  • Homepage of the Heidelberg Center for American Studies Heidelberg Center for American Studies
  • Coimbra Group (a network of leading European universities)
  • LERU Group

  Results from FactBites:
 
University of Heidelberg - History of the University - University of Heidelberg (1096 words)
The circle of outstanding university scholars such as Friedrich Creuzer and Joseph Görres was joined in the early 19th century by the writers Clemens von Brentano and Achim von Arnim.
Heidelberg jurist Anton Justus Friedrich Thibaut was the prime mover behind the creation of a new German Civil Code, while historical and philological research also played its part in enhancing the fast-growing fame of the University.
The reopening of the University after 1945 was fraught with all the birth pangs attendant upon a process of thoroughgoing internal and external renewal.
Ruprecht Karls University of Heidelberg - definition of Ruprecht Karls University of Heidelberg - Labor Law Talk ... (1066 words)
The Ruprecht Karls University of Heidelberg (German Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; also known as simply University of Heidelberg) was established in the town of Heidelberg in the Rhineland in 1386.
Palatine Elector Ruprecht I recognized the opportunity and initiated talks with the Curia, which ultimately lead to the creation of the Papal Bull of Foundation which can be considered the establishment of the University of Heidelberg.
Thus, the University of Heidelberg is the oldest German University.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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