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Encyclopedia > Rupert Brooke
A statue of Rupert Brooke in Rugby
A statue of Rupert Brooke in Rugby

Rupert Chawner Brooke (August 3, 1887April 23, 1915) was an English poet known for his idealistic War Sonnets written during the First World War (especially The Soldier), as well as for his poetry written outside of war, especially The Old Vicarage, Grantchester and The Great Lover. He was also known for his boyish good looks, which prompted W. B. Yeats to describe him as "the handsomest young man in England". Download high resolution version (400x966, 174 KB)A statue of Rupert Brooke in his birth town of Rugby. ... Download high resolution version (400x966, 174 KB)A statue of Rupert Brooke in his birth town of Rugby. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Soldier (Brooke) The Soldier is a poem written by Rupert Brooke. ... William Butler Yeats, 1933 photograph, author unknown. ...


Biography

Brooke was born at 5 Hillmorton Road in Rugby, Warwickshire, England, the son of a William Parker Brooke, a Rugby schoolmaster and Ruth Mary Brooke née Cotterill. He attended Hillbrow Prep School before being educated at Rugby School. While travelling in Europe, he prepared a thesis entitled "John Webster and the Elizabethan Drama", which won him a scholarship to King's College, Cambridge, where he became a member of the Cambridge Apostles, helped found the Marlowe Society drama club and acted in plays including the Cambridge Greek Play. Brooke made friends among the Bloomsbury group of writers, some of whom admired his talent, while others were more impressed by his good looks. Brooke belonged to another literary group known as the Georgian Poets, and was the most important of the Dymock poets, associated with the Gloucestershire village of Dymock, where he spent some time before the war. He also lived in the Old Vicarage, Grantchester (a house now occupied by Jeffrey Archer and his wife Mary Archer). Rugby is a market town in the county of Warwickshire in the West Midlands of England, on the River Avon. ... A detailed map Stratford-upon-Avon Kenilworth Castle Warwickshire (pronounced // or //) is a landlocked non-metropolitan county in central England. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II... A view of Rugby School from The Close, the playing field where according to legend Rugby was invented Rugby School, located in the town of Rugby, Warwickshire, is one of the oldest public schools in England and is one of the major co-educational boarding schools in the country. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... A thesis (from Greek position) is an intellectual proposition. ... John Webster (c. ... English Renaissance theatre is English drama written between the Reformation and the closure of the theatres in 1642. ... Full name The King’s College of Our Lady and St Nicholas in Cambridge Motto Veritas et Utilitas Truth and usefulness Named after Henry VI Previous names - Established 1441 Sister College(s) New College, Oxford Provost Prof. ... Trinity College Great Court. ... The Cambridge Greek Play is a play performed in Ancient Greek by students of the University of Cambridge. ... The Bloomsbury Group or Bloomsbury Set or just Bloomsbury, as its adherents would generally refer to it, was an English group of artists and scholars that existed from around 1905 until around World War II. // History The group began as an informal socialwe have been great to society assembly of... The Georgian poets were, by the strictest definition, those whose works appeared in a series of five anthologies named Georgian Poetry, published by Harold Monro and edited by Edward Marsh. ... The Dymock poets were a literary group of the early 20th century, who made their home in the Gloucestershire village of Dymock. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... Dymock is a village in the Forest of Dean (district) of Gloucestershire, England about four miles south of Ledbury, with a population of approx. ... The Old Vicarage in the English town of Grantchester is a house associated with the poet Rupert Brooke, who lived nearby and in 1912 immortalised it in a poem. ... Grantchester is a village on the River Cam or Granta in Cambridgeshire, England. ... Jeffrey Howard Archer, Baron Archer of Weston-super-Mare (born 15 April 1940) is a British best-selling author and politician. ... Mary Doreen Archer, Baroness Archer of Weston-super-Mare (born Mary Doreen Weeden,on 22nd December 1944) is a British scientist specialising in solar power conversion. ...


Brooke suffered from a severe emotional crisis in 1913, some say caused by sexual confusion and jealousy, resulting in the breakdown of his long relationship with Ka Cox. Intrigue by both Virginia Woolf and Lytton Strachey is said[citation needed] to have played a part in Brooke's nervous collapse and subsequent rehabilitation trips to Germany. For the American childrens writer, see Virginia Euwer Wolff Virginia Woolf (née Stephen) (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941) was an English novelist and essayist regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century. ... Giles Lytton Strachey (March 1, 1880–January 21, 1932) was a British writer and critic. ...


As part of his recuperation Brooke toured the United States and Canada to write travel diaries for the Westminster Gazette and visited several islands in the South Seas. It was later revealed that he may have fathered a daughter with a Tahitian woman (Taatamata) with whom he seems to have enjoyed his most complete emotional relationship[citation needed]. He was also romantically involved with the actress Cathleen Nesbitt. Brooke was once engaged to Noel Olivier, whom he met while she was a 15-year-old at the progressive Bedales School. The Westminster Gazette was a liberal newspaper based in London which started publishing on January 31, 1893. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Cathleen Nesbitt, CBE, born on (November 24, 1888 – and died on August 2, 1982) was an British actress of Welsh and Irish extraction. ... Bedales School is a public school with a progressive ethos located in the village of Steep, near Petersfield, Hampshire, England. ...


His accomplished poetry gained many enthusiasts and followers and he was taken up by Edward Marsh, who brought him to the attention of Winston Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty. He was commissioned into the Navy shortly after his 27th birthday and took part in the Royal Naval Division's Antwerp expedition in October 1914. He sailed with the British Mediterranean Expeditionary Force on February 28, 1915 but developed septic pneumonia from an infected mosquito bite. He died at 4.20pm on April 23, 1915 off the island of Lemnos in the Aegean on his way to a battle at Gallipoli. As the expeditionary force had orders to depart immediately, he was buried at 11pm in an olive grove on the island of Skyros, Greece. His grave remains there today. Edward Marsh (1872-1953) was an English polymath, the sponsor of the Georgian school of poets and a friend to many individuals, including Rupert Brooke and Siegfried Sassoon. ... Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, FRS, PC (Can) (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. ... The First Lord of the Admiralty was a British government position in charge of the Admiralty. ... The British 63rd (Royal Naval) Division was a First World War division of the New Army. ... The Mediterranean Expeditionary Force (MEF) was a World War I British Army headquarters formed in March 1915 that commanded all Allied forces at Gallipoli and Salonika. ... Diversity 41 genera Genera See text. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Lemnos (mod. ... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Combatants British Empire Australia India Newfoundland New Zealand United Kingdom France Senegal  Ottoman Empire Commanders Sir Ian Hamilton Lord Kitchener John de Robeck Otto von Sanders, Mustafa Kemal Strength 5 divisions (initial) 14 divisions (final) 6 divisions Casualties 252,000 251,309 The Battle of Gallipoli took place at Gallipoli... Skyros (Greek: Σκύρος) is the southernmost island of the Sporades, a Greek archipelago in the Aegean Sea. ...


As a side-note, Rupert Brooke's brother, 2nd Lt. William Alfred Cotterill Brooke was a member of the 8th Battalion London Regiment (Post Office Rifles) and was killed in action near Le Rutoire Farm on the historic Loos battlefield on June 14, 1915, aged 24. He is buried in Fosse 7 Military Cemetery (Quality Street), Mazingarbe, Pas de Calais, France. He had only joined the battalion on May 25 [1]. Beginnings The Post Office Rifles first came into being after 1,600 Post Office staff were enrolled as Special Constables under Major J.L. Du Plat Taylor of the 21st Middlesex Civil Service Volunteers (Post Office Company). ... The Battle of Loos was one of the major British offensives mounted on the Western Front in 1915 during World War I. The battle was the British component of the combined Anglo-French offensive known as the Second Battle of Artois. ... June 14 is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Pas-de-Calais is a département in northern France named after the strait which it borders. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


References

  • Mike Read, Forever England – The Life of Rupert Brooke, Mainstream Publishing, Edinburgh & London, 1997, ISBN 1-85158-995-3
  • Nigel Jones, Rupert Brooke – Life, Death & Myth, Richard Cohen Books, London, 1999, ISBN 1-86066-171-8

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Rupert Brooke
  • Rupert Brooke Society
  • Works by Rupert Brooke at Project Gutenberg
  • Poetry Archive: 150 poems of Rupert Brooke
  • Rupert Brooke at the Commonwealth War Graves Commission database
  • Collected Poems by Rupert Brooke
  • Elizabeth Whitcomb Houghton Collection, containing letters by Brooke

  Results from FactBites:
 
Rupert Brooke - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (760 words)
Brooke was born at 5 Hillmorton Road in Rugby, Warwickshire, England, the son of a William Parker Brooke, a Rugby schoolmaster and Ruth Mary Brooke née Cotterill.
Brooke was once engaged to Noel Olivier, whom he met while she was a 15-year-old at the progressive Bedales School.
As a side-note, Rupert Brooke's brother, 2nd Lt. William Alfred Cotterill Brooke was a member of the 8th Battalion London Regiment (Post Office Rifles) and was killed in action near Le Rutoire Farm on the historic Loos battlefield on June 14, 1915, aged 24.
Rupert Brooke (958 words)
Rupert Brooke was born in Rugby, Warwickshire, where his father taught classics and was a housemaster at Rugby School.
Brooke's appeal began to wane after the acrid poems of Wilfred Owen (1893-1918), who was machine-gunned to death, and Siegfried Sassoon's visions of "the hell where youth and laugher go," as Sassoon wrote.
Brooke's chivalry became his literary burden and he is now chiefly valued for his lighter verse, for the Tahiti poems, and for a few sonnets.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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