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Encyclopedia > Rumble Fish
Rumble Fish

Theatrical poster
Directed by Francis Ford Coppola
Produced by Francis Ford Coppola
Doug Claybourne
Fred Roos
Written by S.E. Hinton (novel)
S.E. Hinton
Francis Ford Coppola (screenplay)
Starring Matt Dillon
Mickey Rourke
Diane Lane
Vincent Spano
Nicolas Cage
Dennis Hopper
Laurence Fishburne
Chris Penn
Music by Stewart Copeland
Cinematography Stephen H. Burum
Editing by Barry Malkin
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date(s) October 8, 1983 (USA)
Running time 94 minutes
Country Flag of the United States United States
Language English
Budget $10,000,000 (estimated)
Gross revenue $2,494,480 (USA)
Official website
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

Rumble Fish is a 1983 film directed, produced and co-written by Francis Ford Coppola, based on the novel by S.E. Hinton (ISBN 0-440-97534-4) who co-wrote the screenplay as well. The film centers on the relationship between the Motorcycle Boy (Mickey Rourke), a revered former gang leader, and his younger brother, Rusty James (Matt Dillon), who can neither live up to his brother's great reputation nor live it down. Coppola wrote the screenplay for the film with Hinton on his days off from shooting The Outsiders. He made the films back-to-back, retaining much of the same cast and crew. The movie is notable for its avant-garde style, shot on stark high-contrast black-and-white film, using the spherical cinematographic process with allusions to French New Wave cinema and German Expressionism.[1] Rumble Fish features an experimental score by Stewart Copeland, drummer of the musical group The Police, who used a Musync, a new device at the time. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (479x755, 89 KB) Summary Movie poster for Rumble Fish (image source). ... Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) is a five-time Academy Award winning American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... Fred Roos (May 22, 1934, Santa Monica, California) is a noted American film producer. ... Susan Eloise Hinton (born on July 22, 1948 in Tulsa, Oklahoma) is an American author who wrote five young adult novels in the 1960s and 70s. ... Matthew Raymond Matt Dillon (born February 18, 1964) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Diane Lane (born January 22, 1965) is an Academy Award-nominated American actress. ... Vincent Spano (born October 18, 1962) is an American actor. ... Nicolas Cage (born January 7, 1964) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ... Laurence John Fishburne III[1] (born July 30, 1961) is an American Academy Award-nominated, Emmy- and Tony Award-winning actor of screen and stage, as well as playwright, director, and producer. ... Christopher Shannon Penn (October 10, 1965 – January 24, 2006) was an American film actor. ... Stewart Armstrong Copeland (born July 16, 1952) is an American musician, best known as the drummer for the band The Police and is an influential drum stylist. ... Stephen H. Burum is an American cinematographer, and was born on 25 November 1939 in Visalia, California. ... Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) is a five-time Academy Award winning American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... This article is about the literary concept. ... Susan Eloise Hinton (born on July 22, 1948 in Tulsa, Oklahoma) is an American author who wrote five young adult novels in the 1960s and 70s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Matthew Raymond Matt Dillon (born February 18, 1964) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed compared to the rest of the article. ... A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... François Truffauts New Wave film Jules et Jim The New Wave (French: la Nouvelle Vague) was a blanket term coined by critics for a group of French filmmakers of the late 1950s and 1960s, influenced (in part) by Italian Neorealism. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Stewart Armstrong Copeland (born July 16, 1952) is an American musician, best known as the drummer for the band The Police and is an influential drum stylist. ... The Police are a three-piece rock band consisting of singer/bassist Sting (Gordon Sumner), guitarist Andy Summers, and drummer Stewart Copeland. ...


Rumble Fish was booed when it debuted at the New York Film Festival.[1] It went on to gross only $2.5 million domestically, well below its estimated $10 million budget.[2] Most mainstream reviewers reacted negatively to the Coppola's movie, criticizing its overt style and lack of characterization.[3] However, film critic David Thomson called it, "Coppola's best film, the most emotional, the most revolutionary and the most clearly in love with the 1940's movies."[3] The New York Film Festival is the one of the United Statess most prestigious film festivals, first held in 1962 in New York. ... David Thomson can refer to a number of people: David Thomson, Australian politician David Thomson, film critic David K.R. Thomson, Canadian businessman This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

Contents

Plot summary

Set in an unnamed industrial town (much of the film was shot in Sapulpa Oklahoma)(Tulsa, Oklahoma, in Hinton's book), the film centers on the relationship between the Motorcycle Boy (Rourke), a revered former gang leader who is trying to escape a world of which he was such an intrinsic part, and his younger brother, Rusty James (Dillon), who can't live up to his brother's great reputation. Nickname: Location in the state of Oklahoma Coordinates: , Country United States State Oklahoma Counties Tulsa, Osage, Wagoner, Rogers Government  - Mayor Kathy Taylor (D) Area  - City  186. ... Susan Eloise Hinton (born on July 22, 1948 in Tulsa, Oklahoma) is an American author who wrote five young adult novels in the 1960s and 70s. ...


In the opening sequence, we see various shots of the industrial town, as well as graffiti declaring "The Motorcycle Boy Reigns". The movie starts in a pool hall where local high-school tough guy Rusty James is told by Midgit (Laurence Fishburne) that rival group leader Biff Wilcox (Glenn Withrow) wants to meet him that night in an abandoned garage lot for a fight. Accepting the challenge, Rusty James then talks with his friends - Smokey (Nicolas Cage), B.J. (Chris Penn) and Steve (Vincent Spano) - who all have a different take on the forthcoming fight. Steve mentions that Rusty James' older brother, the Motorcycle Boy, would not be pleased with the fight as he has created a truce and forbidden gang-fights, or "rumbles". Rusty James dismisses him, saying that the Motorcycle Boy has been gone for two months, leaving without explination or promise of returning. It becomes clear from what follows that Rusty James idolises his brother and hopes to one day be a reveared gang-leader like he was, which is why he wants to break the truce and relive "the old days, when we used to have rumbles". Laurence John Fishburne III[1] (born July 30, 1961) is an American Academy Award-nominated, Emmy- and Tony Award-winning actor of screen and stage, as well as playwright, director, and producer. ... Glenn Withrow (born November 24, 1953) is an American actor. ... Nicolas Cage (born January 7, 1964) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Christopher Shannon Penn (October 10, 1965 – January 24, 2006) was an American film actor. ... Vincent Spano (born October 18, 1962) is an American actor. ...


Rusty James visits his girlfriend, Patty (Diane Lane), then rendezvouses with his cadre and walks to the abandoned garage lot, where Biff and his buddies suddenly appear. Expecting a fist-fight, Rusty James is caught off guard when Biff pulls a knife. The two battle, with the fight ending when Rusty James disarms Biff and beats him almost unconscious. Diane Lane (born January 22, 1965) is an Academy Award-nominated American actress. ...


Suddenly, the Motorcycle Boy (Mickey Rourke) arrives and is quietly displeased with the renewed violence he worked to end. Distracted by a moment of happiness to see his brother's return, Rusty James leaves himself vulnerable - and Biff uses a shard of glass to cut him down the side. Incensed, The Motorcycle Boy sends his motorcycle flying into Biff, who is then taken away by friends. After sneaking him past Officer Patterson (William Smith), a street cop who's long had it in for the Motorcycle Boy and is anything but pleased to see he has returned, Steve and The Motorcycle Boy nurse Rusty James back to health through the night. The Motorcycle Boy explains that he went to California, without explaining why, and when asked about the beaches and the ocean, he answers "I didn't get to the ocean; California got in the way". It is in conversation between Steve and the injured Rusty James that we learn how the Motorcycle Boy is 21 years old, colorblind, partially deaf, and noticeably aloof - the last trait causing many to believe he's insane. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... William Smith (born March 24, 1934 in Columbia, Missouri, USA) is an American actor. ...


Rusty James and the Motorcycle Boy share the next evening with their alcoholic, welfare-dependent father (Dennis Hopper), who says that the Motorcycle Boy takes after his mother (whereas Rusty James is implied to take after him). Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ...


Things start to go wrong for Rusty James. He's kicked out of school after his frequent absenteeism. Despite Rusty James desire to do so, The Motorcycle Boy implies that he has no interest in reviving any gang activity. Rusty James fools around with another girl and is dumped by Patty, who quickly found out about his tryst from Smokey, who she then begins to date.

The Motorcycle Boy (Mickey Rourke) and Rusty James (Matt Dillon) look at the Rumble Fish.

Rusty James, the Motorcycle Boy and Steve head across the river that night to a strip of bars, where Rusty James is enjoying being away from his troubles. It's during this time that the Motorcycle Boy mentions that he located their long-lost mother in California. He also tries to dissect Rusty James' fear of being alone, a trait which explains his fondness for Steve, who is the opposite to Rusty James' other friends. The night goes on, and Steve and Rusty James drunkenly wander home alone, only to get caught in an alley with thugs. When Rusty James makes a run for it, he is clubbed on the head, having an out-of-body experience. When he comes back to, he and a helpless Steve are saved by the Motorcycle Boy, who dispatches the two thugs and rescues Rusty James yet again. As he nurses Rusty James again, the Motorcycle Boy tells Rusty James that the gang life and the rumbles he yearns for and idolizes are not what he believes them to be - rather, it's "a bore." Steve calls the Motorcycle Boy crazy, a claim which the Motorcycle Boy does not deny - further prompting Rusty James to believe his brother is insane, just like his runaway mother supposedly was. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Matthew Raymond Matt Dillon (born February 18, 1964) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ...


Rusty James meets up the Motorcycle Boy the next day when the latter is in a pet store, strangely fascinated with the Siamese Fighting Fish, which he refers to as "rumble fish". He believes that if they had more space, if they were free of their confined environment, they wouldn't want to fight. Patterson notices their attention to the store and suspects they will try to rob it. The brothers leave and end up at a bar, where, by coincidence, they meet their father. The father explains to Rusty James that neither (contrary to popular belief) his mother nor brother are crazy, but rather they were both born with an acute perception. Binomial name Regan, 1910 The Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) is one of the most popular species of freshwater aquarium fish, native to the Mekong basin in Southeast Asia and called pla-kad in its native Thailand. ...


The father leaves, and the brothers go for a motorcycle ride through the city. They arrive at the Pet Store, and despite Rusty James' pleas, the Motorcycle Boy breaks in and starts to set the animals loose. Rusty James makes a last-gasp effort to convince his brother to reunite with him and , but the Motorcycle Boy refuses, explaining they are too different to ever have the life Rusty James speaks of. The Motorcycle Boy then tells Rusty James that, whatever happens, to take his newly stolen motorcycle all the way to the ocean. The Motorcycle Boy leaves the store with the "rumble fish", but never makes it to the river - Patterson meets him before he can dump the fish and shoots the Motorcycle Boy, killing him. Rusty James is too late to stop the shooting, but does complete his brother's task and get the fish into water. As the major characters congregate at the scene and see the Motorcycle Boy has been killed, a motorcycle shadow races across a slab of concrete where the words, "The Motorcycle Boy Reigns" is spray-painted. The movie ends with Rusty James finally reaching the ocean, where the sun is shining.


Cast

Matthew Raymond Matt Dillon (born February 18, 1964) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Diane Lane (born January 22, 1965) is an Academy Award-nominated American actress. ... Vincent Spano (born October 18, 1962) is an American actor. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ... Nicolas Cage (born January 7, 1964) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Laurence John Fishburne III[1] (born July 30, 1961) is an American Academy Award-nominated, Emmy- and Tony Award-winning actor of screen and stage, as well as playwright, director, and producer. ... Thomas Alan Waits (born December 7, 1949) is an American singer-songwriter, composer, and actor. ... Diana Scarwid (born August 27, 1955 in Savannah, Georgia) is an American film and television actress. ... William Smith (born March 24, 1934 in Columbia, Missouri, USA) is an American actor. ... Christopher Shannon Penn (October 10, 1965 – January 24, 2006) was an American film actor. ... Glenn Withrow (born November 24, 1953) is an American actor. ...

Production

Francis Ford Coppola wrote the screenplay for Rumble Fish with S.E. Hinton on his days off from shooting The Outsiders. He made the films back-to-back, retaining much of the same cast and crew. As with The Outsiders, Coppola enlisted a large group of young, up-and-coming male actors - including now-famous performers such as Matt Dillon, Chris Penn, Nicolas Cage (actually, Coppola's nephew), Laurence Fishburne, Vincent Spano and Mickey Rourke. The material had an autobiographical element for the director as the relationship between Rusty-James and the Motorcycle Boy mirrored the one between Coppola and his brother, August.[4] This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed compared to the rest of the article. ...


To get Rourke into the mindset of his character, Coppola gave him some books written by Albert Camus and a biography of Napoleon.[4] The Motorcycle Boy's look was patterned after Camus complete with trademark cigarette dangling out of the corner of his mouth - taken from a photograph of the author that Rourke used as a visual handle.[4] Rourke remembers that he approached his character as "an actor who no longer finds his work interesting."[1] Albert Camus (IPA: ) (November 7, 1913 – January 4, 1960) was a French author and philosopher. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ...


Before filming started, Coppola ran regular screenings of old films during the evenings to familiarize the cast and in particular, the crew with his visual concept for Rumble Fish. Most notably, Coppola showed Anatole Litvak's Decision Before Dawn, the inspiration for the film's smoky look, and Robert Wiene's The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, which became Rumble Fish's stylistic prototype.[1] Coppola's extensive use of shadows (some were painted on alley walls for proper effect), oblique angles, exaggerated compositions, and an abundance of smoke and fog are all hallmarks of these German Expressionist films.[1] Godfrey Reggio's Koyaanisqatsi, shot mainly in time-lapse photography, motivated Coppola to use this technique to animate the sky in his own film.[3] Anatole Litvak (May 10, 1902 – December 15, 1974) was a Ukrainian-born international filmmaker who wrote, directed, and produced films in a variety of countries and languages. ... Decision Before Dawn is a 1950 war film which tells the story of an American Army, looking for intelligence in the closing days of World War II, which has to rely on potentially unreliable German prisoners to gather information. ... Robert Wiene (born April 27, 1873 in Breslau; died 17 July 1938 in Paris) was a German film director. ... Dr. Caligari, Caligari, and Doctor Caligari all redirect here. ... Polaroid by Michael Dare Godfrey Reggio (born March 29, 1940) is an American director of experimental documentary films. ... Koyaanisqatsi: Life out of Balance is a 1982 film directed by Godfrey Reggio with music composed by minimalist composer Philip Glass and cinematography by Ron Fricke. ...


Warner Brothers was not happy with an early cut of The Outsiders and passed on distributing Rumble Fish.[1] Despite the lack of financing in place, Coppola completely recorded the film on video during two weeks of rehearsals in a former school gymnasium.[5][1] Warner Bros. ...


Coppola hired Michael Smuin, a choreographer and co-director of the San Francisco Ballet, to stage the fight scene between Rusty-James and Biff Wilcox. He asked Smuin to include specific visual elements: a motorcycle, broken glass, knives, gushing water and blood.[1] The choreographer spent a week designing the sequence.


Six weeks into production, Coppola made a deal with Universal Pictures and principal photography began on July 12, 1982 on many of the same Tulsa, Oklahoma sets used in The Outsiders.[1] Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ...


The movie is notable for its avant-garde style, shot on stark high-contrast black-and-white film, using the spherical cinematographic process with allusions to French New Wave cinema. The striking black and white photography of the film's cinematographer, Stephen H. Burum, lies in two main sources: the films of Orson Welles and German cinema of the 1920s.[4] A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... François Truffauts New Wave film Jules et Jim The New Wave (French: la Nouvelle Vague) was a blanket term coined by critics for a group of French filmmakers of the late 1950s and 1960s, influenced (in part) by Italian Neorealism. ... Stephen H. Burum is an American cinematographer, and was born on 25 November 1939 in Visalia, California. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


The result is an often surreal world where time seems to follow its own rules. The film, filled with retro anachronisms, seems to portray life in the mid-1950s when Rusty James' hoodlum gang mentality was beginning to give way to the bohemian Beatnik way of life represented by his brother.[3] However, other elements in the film indicate that the story in fact takes place in the present time: Rusty James plays a Pac-Man arcade game in a bar, and contemporary Zydeco musician Queen Ida is performing at an outdoor festival. Beatnik is a media stereotype that borrowed the most superficial aspects of the Beat Generation literary movement of the 1950s to present a distorted (and sometimes violent), cartoon-like misrepresentation of the real-life people and the spirituality found in Jack Kerouacs autobiographical fiction. ... Pac-Man is an arcade game developed by Namco and licensed for distribution by Midway Games in 1979. ...


Soundtrack

Rumble Fish (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)
Rumble Fish (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) cover
Soundtrack by Stewart Copeland
Released April 21, 1992 (CD)
Recorded 1983
Genre Soundtrack
Length 43:08
Label A&M
Producer Stewart Copeland
Francis Ford Coppola
Professional reviews

Coppola envisioned a largely experimental score to complement his images. He began to devise a mainly percussive soundtrack to symbolize the idea of time running out.[1] As Coppola worked on it, he realized that he needed help from a professional musician. He asked Stewart Copeland, drummer of the musical group The Police, to improvise a rhythm track.[1] Coppola soon realized that Copeland was a far superior composer and let him take over.[1] The musician proceeded to record street sounds of Tulsa and mixed them into the soundtrack with the use of a Musync, a new device at the time, that recorded film, frame by frame on videotape with the image on top, the dialogue in the middle, and the musical staves on the bottom so that it matched the images perfectly.[1] Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... In film formats, the soundtrack is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... Stewart Armstrong Copeland (born July 16, 1952) is an American musician, best known as the drummer for the band The Police and is an influential drum stylist. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A&M Records is an American record label, owned and operated by Universal Music Group. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music, owned by All Media Guide. ... Image File history File links 4. ... Stewart Armstrong Copeland (born July 16, 1952) is an American musician, best known as the drummer for the band The Police and is an influential drum stylist. ... The Police are a three-piece rock band consisting of singer/bassist Sting (Gordon Sumner), guitarist Andy Summers, and drummer Stewart Copeland. ...


The song "Don't Box Me In (theme from Rumble Fish)", a collaboration between Copeland and singer/songwriter Stan Ridgway leader and frontman of Wall of Voodoo was released with the film and enjoyed significant radio airplay. Multi-instrumentalist singer-songwriter Stan Ridgway was the original lead singer of the band Wall of Voodoo, singing on their debut EP and first two albums, Dark Continent and Call of the West, the last of which included their only hit song, Mexican Radio. The band was named Wall of... Wall of Voodoo is a New Wave art - punk group from Los Angeles best known for the 1983 hit Mexican Radio. ...


Track listing

  1. "Don't Box Me In" 4:40
  2. "Tulsa Tango" 3:42
  3. "Our Mother Is Alive" 4:16
  4. "Party at Someone Else's Place" 2:25
  5. "Biff Gets Stomped by Rusty James" 2:27
  6. "Brothers on Wheels" 4:20
  7. "West Tulsa Story" 3:59
  8. "Tulsa Rags" 1:39
  9. "Father on the Stairs" 3:01
  10. "Hostile Bridge to Benny's" 1:53
  11. "Your Mother Is Not Crazy" 2:48
  12. "Personal Midget/Cain's Ballroom" 5:55
  13. "Motorboy's Fate" 2:03

Reception

At Rumble Fish's world premiere at the New York Film Festival, there were several walkouts and at the end of the screening, boos and catcalls.[1][6] Former head of production at Paramount Pictures remembers legendary producer Robert Evans' reaction to Coppola's film, "Evans went to see Rumble Fish, and he remembers being shaken by how far Coppola had strayed from Hollywood. Evans says, 'I was scared. I couldn't understand any of it.'"[3] The film grossed $18,985 on its opening weekend, playing in only one theater. Its widest release was in 296 theaters and it finally grossed $2,494,480 domestically.[7] The film has a 77% "fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes. The New York Film Festival is the one of the United Statess most prestigious film festivals, first held in 1962 in New York. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... There have been several well-known people named Robert Evans, including: Robert Evans (author) Robert_Evans_(film_producer) Robert Evans (politician) Robert Evans is also the name of a firefighter who was killed in the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 Bob Evans This is a disambiguation...


The film was not well-received by most mainstream critics, receiving nine negative reviews in New York City, mostly from broadcast media and newspapers with harsh reviews by David Denby in New York and Andrew Sarris in the Village Voice.[3] In her review for the New York Times, Janet Maslin wrote, "But the film is so furiously overloaded, so crammed with extravagant touches, that any hint of a central thread is obscured."[8] Gary Arnold in the Washington Post wrote, "It's virtually impossible to be drawn into the characters' identities and conflicts at even an introductory, rudimentary level, and the rackety distraction of an obtrusive experimental score...frequently makes it impossible to comprehend mere dialogue."[9] David Denby is an author and academic at Dublin City University: Published works Books by David Denby include: Sentimental Narrative and the Social Order in France, 1760-1820, Cambridge University Press, 1994. ... Headquarters New York magazine is a weekly magazine, founded in 1968, concerned with the life, culture, politics, and style of New York City. ... Andrew Sarris is a film critic and a leading proponent of the Auteur theory of criticism. ... The Village Voice is a New York City-based weekly newspaper featuring investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts reviews and events listings for New York City. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Janet Maslin is a book critic for the daily New York Times. ... ...


Jay Scott wrote one of the few positive reviews for the film in the Globe and Mail. "Francis Coppola, bless his theatrical soul, may have the commercial sense of a newt, but he has the heart of a revolutionary, and the talent of a great artist."[6] Jack Kroll also gave a rare rave in his review for Newsweek: "Rumble Fish is a brilliant tone poem...Rourke's Motorcycle Boy is really a young god with a mortal wound, a slippery assignment Rourke handles with a fierce delicacy."[10] Jay Scott was the pen name of Jeffrey Scott Beaven (1949 - July 30, 1993), a Canadian film critic. ... The Globe and Mail is a large Canadian English language national newspaper based in Toronto. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...


DVD

The film was first released on September 9, 1998 with no extra material. A special edition was released on September 13, 2005 with an audio commentary by Coppola, six deleted scenes, a making-of featurette, a look at how Copeland's score was created and the "Don't Box Me In" music video. is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Goodwin, Michael, Naomi Wise. "On the Edge: The Life and Times of Francis Ford Coppola", William & Morrow & Company, 1989. 
  2. ^ "Rumble Fish", Box Office Mojo, May 23, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-05-23. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Chown, Jeffrey. "Hollywood Auteur: Francis Ford Coppola", Praeger, 1988. 
  4. ^ a b c d Cowie, Peter. "Coppola", St. Edmundsbury Press, 1989. 
  5. ^ Scott, Jay. "Rumble Fish: Another from the Heart", Globe and Mail, September 10, 1982. 
  6. ^ a b Scott, Jay. "Loving, Ferocious Depiction of Teen Angst", Globe and Mail, October 14, 1983. 
  7. ^ "Rumble Fish", Box Office Mojo, May 23, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-05-23. 
  8. ^ Maslin, Janet. "Matt Dillon is Coppola's Rumble Fish", New York Times, October 7, 1983. 
  9. ^ Arnold, Gary. "Bungled Rumble", Washington Post, October 18, 1983. 
  10. ^ Kroll, Jack. "Coppola's Teen-Age Inferno", Newsweek, November 7, 1983. 

is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Globe and Mail is a large Canadian English language national newspaper based in Toronto. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... The Globe and Mail is a large Canadian English language national newspaper based in Toronto. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ...

External links

  • Rumble Fish at the Internet Movie Database
  • Official site for Rumble Fish DVD
  • Official Site for Stan Ridgway
  • Copeland's official site

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RUMBLE FISH (496 words)
Indeed, it is in Rumble Fish that Coppola achieved the balance of aesthetic innovation and human drama he had been seeking with One from the Heart.
Rumble Fish is about the dawning of an existential crisis in alienated and undisciplined youths who are beginning to look for a greater meaning to their lives.
Rumble Fish is one of his lesser works, and in general it’s better left on the rental shelf.
Rumble Fish Movie -The 80s Rewind « (2054 words)
Whereas "The Outsiders" was filmed in rich Technicolor grandeur, "Rumble Fish" -the second film was, in direct contrast, filmed in fl and white.
Rumble fish are Siamese fighting fish which, if put together, will try to annihilate each other.
Often misunderstood as a teen movie, Rumble Fish, with its theme of the elapsing and ebbing of time and youth, and of personal enlightenment, is perhaps more pertinent to an adult audience.
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