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Rufus Choate

Rufus Choate (October 1, 1799July 13, 1859), American lawyer and orator, was born at Ipswich, Massachusetts, the descendant of a family which settled in Massachusetts in 1667. His birthplace, Choate House, remains virtually unchanged to this day. Rufus Choate was the son of Dr. George Choate, one of Salem, Massachusetts most distinguished physicians, and the brother of Dr. George C. S. Choate. Image File history File links Rufus-Choate. ... Image File history File links Rufus-Choate. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... July 13 is the 194th day (195th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 171 days remaining. ... 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... A lawyer is a person qualified to give legal advice who advises clients in legal matters and represents them in courts of law and in other forms of dispute resolution. ... Orator is a Latin word for speaker (from the Latin verb oro, meaning I speak or I pray). In ancient Rome, the art of speaking in public (Ars Oratoria) was a professional competence especially cultivated by politicians and lawyers. ... Seal of Ipswich, MA Ipswich is a coastal town located in Essex County, Massachusetts. ... // Events January 20 - Poland cedes Kyiv, Smolensk, and eastern Ukraine to Russia in the Treaty of Andrusovo that put a final end to the Deluge, and Poland lost its status as a Central European power. ... Choate House is a historic house in the Crane Wildlife Refuge, Essex, Massachusetts, owned and adminstered by the nonprofit Trustees of Reservations. ... Seal of Salem, MA Salem is a city located in Essex County, Massachusetts. ... George Cheyne Shattuck Choate, was born on March 30, 1827 at Ipswich, Massachusetts, the descendant of a family which settled in Massachusetts in 1667. ...


As a child he was remarkably precocious; at six he is said to have been able to repeat large parts of the Bible and of Pilgrim's Progress by heart. He graduated as valedictorian of his class at Dartmouth College in 1819, was a tutor therein 1819-1820, spent a year in the law school of Harvard University, and studied for a like period at Washington, in the office of William Wirt, then attorney-general of the United States. He was admitted to the Massachusetts bar in 1823 and practised at what was later South Danvers (now Peabody) for five years, during which time he served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives (1825-1826) and in the state senate (1827). The Bible (Hebrew: תנ״ך tanakh, Greek: η Βίβλος hÄ“ biblos) (sometimes The Holy Bible, The Book, Word of God, The Word Scripture, Scripture), from Greek (τα) βίβλια, (ta) biblia, (the) books, is the name used by Jews and Christians for their (differing but overlapping) canons of sacred texts. ... The Pilgrims Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come by John Bunyan (published 1678) is an allegorical novel. ... Dartmouth College is a private academic institution in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The crest of Harvard Law School is drawn from the Royall coat of arms Harvard Law School (HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Official language(s) None Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 18th 184,824 km² 385 km 580 km 6. ... William Wirt (November 8, 1772 – February 18, 1834) was an American author and statesman who is credited with turning the position of United States Attorney General into one of influence. ... Alberto Gonzales, current Attorney General of the United States The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Seal of Danvers, MA Danvers, a town located in Essex County, Massachusetts was formerly named Salem Village. ... The Massachusetts House of Representatives is the lower house of the Massachusetts General Court, the bicameral state legislature of Massachusetts. ...

Rufus Choate memorial statue by noted American sculptor Daniel Chester French, Old Suffolk County Court House, Boston, Massachusetts.
Rufus Choate memorial statue by noted American sculptor Daniel Chester French, Old Suffolk County Court House, Boston, Massachusetts.

In 1828 he removed to Salem, where his successful conduct of several important lawsuits brought him prominently into public notice. In 1830 he was elected to Congress as a Whig from the Salem district, defeating the Jacksonian candidate for re-election, BW Crowninshield (1772-1851), a former secretary of the navy, and in 1832 he was re-elected. His career in Congress was marked by a notable speech in defence of a protective tariff. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (371x632, 57 KB) Photograph of the Rufus Choate memorial statue by noted American sculptor Daniel Chester French. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (371x632, 57 KB) Photograph of the Rufus Choate memorial statue by noted American sculptor Daniel Chester French. ... Daniel Chester French Signature, Daniel Chester French (April 20, 1850 – October 7, 1931) was an American sculptor. ... Nickname: City on a Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Solar System), Athens of America Official website: www. ... 1828 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Seal of Salem, MA Salem is a city located in Essex County, Massachusetts. ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in which the party commencing the action, the plaintiff, seeks a legal remedy. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845) was the seventh President of the United States (1829-1837), first governor of Florida (1821), hero of the Battle of New Orleans (1815), a founder of the Democratic Party, and the eponym of the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... A tariff is a tax on imported goods. ...


In 1834, before the completion of his second term, he resigned and established himself in the practice of law in Boston. Already his fame as a speaker had spread beyond New England, and he was much sought after as an orator for public occasions. For several years he devoted himself unremittingly to his profession, but in 1841 succeeded Daniel Webster in the United States Senate. Shortly afterwards he delivered one of his most eloquent addresses at the memorial services for President Harrison in Faneuil Hall, Boston. 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: City on a Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Solar System), Athens of America Official website: www. ... Flag of New England The states of New England are Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. ... Daniel Webster Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 25, 1852) was a United States Senator and Secretary of State. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States, (1841). ...


In the Senate he made a series of brilliant speeches on the tariff, the Oregon boundary, in favor of the Fiscal Bank Act, and in opposition to the annexation of Texas. On Webster's re-election to the Senate, Choate resumed (1845) his law practice, which no amount of urging could ever persuade him to abandon for public office, save for a short term as attorney-general of Massachusetts in 1853-1854. In 1853 he was a member of the state constitutional convention. He was a faithful supporter of Webster's policy as declared in the latter's famous Seventh of March Speech (1850) and labored to secure for him the presidential nomination at the Whig national convention in 1852. Official language(s) None Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 9th 255,026 km² 420 km 580 km 2. ...


In 1856 he refused to follow most of his former Whig associates into the Republican Party and gave his support to James Buchanan, whom he considered the representative of a national instead of a sectional party. In July 1859 failing health led him to seek rest in a trip to Europe, but he died on the 13th of that month at Halifax, Nova Scotia, where he had been put ashore when it was seen that he probably could not outlive the voyage across the Atlantic. 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... James Buchanan (April 23, 1791 – June 1, 1868) was the 15th president of the United States (1857–1861). ... Europe is conventionally considered one of the seven continents of Earth which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiographic one, leading to various perspectives about Europes borders. ... Please read first: This article is about the Nova Scotia community. ... The Atlantic Ocean is the second-largest ocean, covering approximately one-fifth of the earths surface. ...


Choate, besides being one of the ablest of American lawyers, was one of the most scholarly of American public men, and his numerous orations and addresses were remarkable for their pure style, their grace and elegance of form, and their wealth of classical allusion.


His Works (edited, with a memoir, by SG Brown) were published in 2 vols. at Boston in 1862. The Memoir was afterwards published separately (Boston, 1870). See also EG Parker's Reminiscences of Rufus Choate (New York, 1860); EP Whipple's Some Recollections of Rufus Choate (New York, 1879); and the Albany Law Review of 1877-1878). Edwin Percy Whipple (1819 - 1886), essayist and critic, born in Massachusetts, was a brilliant and discriminating critic. ...

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Rufus Choate

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References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

External link

  • The Works of Rufus Choate: With a Memoir of His Life, by Samuel Gilman Brown

  Results from FactBites:
 
Rufus Choate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (718 words)
Rufus Choate (October 1, 1799–July 13, 1859), American lawyer and orator, was born at Ipswich, Massachusetts, the descendant of a family which settled in Massachusetts in 1667.
Rufus Choate was the son of Dr. George Choate, one of Salem, Massachusetts most distinguished physicians, and the brother of Dr.
Choate, besides being one of the ablest of American lawyers, was one of the most scholarly of American public men, and his numerous orations and addresses were remarkable for their pure style, their grace and elegance of form, and their wealth of classical allusion.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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