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Encyclopedia > Royal Canadian Air Force
Royal Canadian Air Force

Components
Royal Canadian Air Force
Royal Canadian Air Force Women's Division
Royal Canadian Air Force Police

The Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) was the air force of Canada from 1924 until 1968 when the three branches of the Canadian military were merged into the Canadian Forces. The modern Canadian air force has been known as Canadian Forces Air Command (AIRCOM) since 1975, but still refers to itself as the "Air Force" and maintains many of the traditions of the RCAF. RCAF may refer to: Royal Cambodian Armed Forces, Cambodias military, including the army, navy, air force and military police Royal Canadian Air Force, the name of Canadas air force until 1968 Royal Canadian Air Farce, a comedy radio and television show Royal Chicano Air Force, a collective of... Image File history File links Ensign_of_the_Royal_Canadian_Air_Force. ... Title and Graphic from a Royal Canadian Air Force Womens Division public relations Poster The Royal Canadian Air Force Womens Division was an element of the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) formed during World War II. The Womens Division was originally called the Canadian Womens Auxiliary... The Royal Canadian Air Force Police was responsible for military police functions for the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF). ... The Canadian Forces (French: Forces canadiennes), abbreviated as CF (French: FC), are the unified armed forces of Canada. ... CF-18 off the coast Hawaii CH-124 Sea King CH-149 Cormorant CC-115 Buffalo Canadian Forces Air Command (AIRCOM) is the air force element of the Canadian Forces. ...

Contents

History

The First World War and the formative years

Canada's first aircraft, the AEA Silver Dart
Canada's first aircraft, the AEA Silver Dart

The aviation age came to Canada on February 23, 1909, when Alexander Graham Bell's Silver Dart took off from the ice of Bras d'Or Lake at Baddeck, Nova Scotia with J.D. McCurdy at the controls. This flight was the first "controlled powered flight" (also the first flight of a "heavier than air craft") in the British Empire. The craft also set other firsts with a March 10, 1909 flight of over 20 miles around Baddeck and on August 2, 1909, the Silver Dart made the first passenger flight in Canada and the British Empire. Despite these successes, the craft was similar to many early aircraft of the day and had poor control characteristics. "The Canadian Army was unimpressed at the headway made by the group. The general impression of the time was that airplanes would never amount to much in actual warfare. One official felt otherwise, and the group was finally invited to Camp Petawawa, to demonstrate their machine. The sandy terrain of the Ottawa River valley proved to be the wrong thing for an aircraft with landing wheels about 2 inches in diameter, and there was great difficulty taking off. Worse still, on the fifth flight McCurdy wrecked the craft on landing when one wheel struck a rise in the ground. Thus ended the career of the Silver Dart."[1] AEA Silver Dart. ... AEA Silver Dart. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Alexander Graham Bell (3 March 1847 - 2 August 1922) was a Scottish scientist, inventor and innovator. ... The Silver Dart (or Aerodrome #4) was an early aircraft which after many successful flights in Hammondsport, New York, earlier in 1909, was dismantled and crated then brought to Baddeck Nova Scotia. ... Bras dOr Lake, Nova Scotia. ... The village of Baddeck is located in Victoria County, Nova Scotia on Cape Breton Island in the Province of Nova Scotia, Canada. ... John Alexander Douglas McCurdy (August 2, 1886 – June 25, 1961) was a Canadian aviation pioneer and lieutenant-governor of Nova Scotia from 1947 to 1952. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Canadian Forces Land Force Command (LF) is responsible for army operations within the Canadian Armed Forces. ... Canadian Forces Base Petawawa, commonly referred to as CFB Petawawa, is a Canadian Forces Base located in Petawawa, Ontario. ...


Several years later, the beginning of the First World War on August 4, 1914, found Canada immediately embroiled in the conflict by virtue of Britain's declaration. Some European nations were using airplanes for military purposes and Canada's Minister of Militia and Defence, Sam Hughes, who was organizing the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), enquired if London had any need for aviators. London answered with a request for six experienced pilots immediately, but Hughes was unable to fill the requirement. Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... E.P. Taché ~1855-1860 John A. Macdonald 1860-1867 George-Étienne Cartier 1867-1873 Hector Louis Langevin 1873 Hugh McDonald 1873 William Ross 1873-1874 William Vail 1874-1878 Alfred Jones 1878 Louis Mason 1878-1880 Alexander Cambell 1880 Adolphe-Philippe Caron 1880-1892 Sir Mackenzie Bowell 1892 James... Sam Hughes The Honourable Sir Samuel Hughes, PC (January 8, 1853 – August 23, 1921) was the Canadian Minister of Militia and Defence during World War I. // Early life Samuel pooes was born January 8, 1853, at Solina near Bowmanville in what was then Canada West. ... 26th Battalion of the Second Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1915 The Canadian Expeditionary Force was the group of Canadian military units formed for service overseas in the First World War. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...

The Burgess-Dunne was Canada's first military aircraft, although it never saw military service
The Burgess-Dunne was Canada's first military aircraft, although it never saw military service

Hughes did authorize the creation of a small aviation unit to accompany the CEF to Britain and on September 16, 1914, the Canadian Aviation Corps was formed with two officers, one mechanic, and $5000 to purchase an aircraft from a Massachusetts company for delivery to Quebec City. The Burgess-Dunne biplane was delivered on October 1, 1914, and was shipped immediately to England. On arrival, the biplane was transported to Salisbury Plain where the CEF was marshalled for training. The craft never flew. It quickly deteriorated in the damp winter climate and was written off. On May 7, 1915, the Canadian Aviation Corps was decommissioned. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Canadian Aviation Corps (CAC) was an early attempt to create an air force for Canada at the beginning of the First World War. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Motto: Don de Dieu feray valoir (Gift of God shall make prosper) Area: 547. ... Hs123 biplane. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the plateau in southern England; Salisbury Plain is also an area on South Georgia Island. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


In 1915, Britain asked the Dominions to consider training crew to serve with the Royal Flying Corps, but Canada did not act on the request until 1918 (likely owing to other war priorities). During this period, Canadians served with the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Naval Air Service producing such aces as William Barker, W.A. "Billy" Bishop, Naval Pilot Raymond Collishaw, Roy Brown, and Wilfrid "Wop" May[1]. In spring 1918, the Canadian government proposed forming a wing of eight squadrons for service with the Canadian Corps in France, but Britain felt the disruption to their war effort by relocating Canadian pilots and mechanics from their own air service was not worth the effort. Britain was short of ground crew; and so, Canadians filled this void for several months until August 5, 1918, when the British Air Ministry formed two Canadian squadrons (one bomber, one fighter). On September 19, 1918, the Canadian government authorized the creation of the Canadian Air Force (CAF) to take control of these two squadrons under the command of Canada's Lieutenant-Colonel W.A. Bishop, the leading ace of the British Empire and the first Canadian aviator awarded the Victoria Cross. This article is about Dominions of the British Empire and of the Commonwealth of Nations. ... The Royal Flying Corps (RFC) was the over-land air arm of the British military during most of World War I. // Formed by Royal Warrant on 13 May 1912, the RFC superseded the Air Battalion of the Royal Engineers. ... Personnel of No 1 Squadron RNAS in late 1914 The Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) was the air arm of the Royal Navy until near the end of World War I, when it merged with the British Armys Royal Flying Corps (RFC) to form the Royal Air Force. ... Lt. ... Air Marshal William Avery Billy Bishop VC CB DSO & Bar MC DFC ED (8 February 1894 – 11 September 1956) was a Canadian First World War flying ace, officially credited with 72 victories, the highest number for a British Empire pilot. ... Air Vice-Marshal Raymond Collishaw (November 22, 1893 - September 28, 1976) was the highest scoring Royal Naval Air Service flying ace and the second highest scoring Canadian pilot of World War I. Raymond Collishaw was born at Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada on 22nd November 1893. ... Captain Arthur Roy Brown Captain Arthur Roy Brown (DFC and bar) (23 December 1893–9 March 1944) was a Canadian World War I flying ace whom the Royal Air Force officially credited with shooting down Manfred von Richthofen, the Red Baron, although evidence has shown that it is very unlikely... Wilfrid Reid Wop May (April 20, 1896 - June 21, 1952) was a pioneering aviator who basically invented the concept of a bush pilot while working the Canadian west. ... The Canadian Corps was a World War I Canadas soldiers in September of 1915 after the arrival of the 2nd Canadian Division in France. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... The Air Ministry was formerly a department of the United Kingdom Government, established in 1918 with the responsibility of managing the affairs of the (then newly formed) Royal Air Force. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... The Canadian Air Force (CAF) was a contingent of two Canadian air force squadrons created in August 1918 during the close of the First World War. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... Air Marshal William Avery Billy Bishop VC CB DSO & Bar MC DFC ED (8 February 1894 – 11 September 1956) was a Canadian First World War flying ace, officially credited with 72 victories, the highest number for a British Empire pilot. ... The Red Baron, Manfred von Richthofen, perhaps the most famous ace of all The first ace, Adolphe Pegoud being awarded the Croix de Guerre A flying ace or fighter ace is a military aviator credited with shooting down five or more enemy aircraft during aerial combat. ... For other uses, see Victoria Cross (disambiguation). ...


The infant Canadian Air Force had planned to form six additional squadrons in Europe, but the Armistice disrupted these plans and in late November, the existing two squadrons were merely upgraded with new aircraft. The following spring, on June 19, 1919, the Canadian government decided against a permanent, peacetime air force and in January 1920, the two squadrons were disbanded and equipment shipped back to Canada. On February 5, 1920, the Canadian Air Force in Europe was disbanded. is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ...


The Inter-war years

In 1919 the British government gave Canada a gift of over 100 aircraft that had been declared surplus. In February 1920 the Canadian Air Force was resurrected as a part-time or militia service, so that Canada would be ready in case of future war. The gift aircraft were operated in support of civil operations such as forestry and photographic surveying. Military flying was not ignored, however, and flying refresher training was provided to former wartime pilots at the old Royal Flying Corps air station at Camp Borden. Training ended in 1922 and the CAF was reorganized. Canadian Forces Base Borden (also CFB Borden or 16 Wing Borden) is a Canadian Forces Base located in Borden, Ontario. ...


On April 1, 1924, the title "Royal" was extended to the CAF by royal proclamation and the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) was formed. The RCAF continued civil tasks such as anti-smuggling patrols, forest fire watches, aerial forest spraying, and surveying/aerial photography. is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On May 25, 1925, the following squadrons were authorized for civil duties: is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Disagreement arising in government about having the RCAF perform civil air operations led to the 1927 creation of the Directorate of Civil Government Air Operations (DCGAO), and RCAF operations squadrons were transferred to DCGAO, leaving the RCAF with a headquarters, two training stations, and five training squadrons. Following the decision to remove civil duties from the Royal Canadian Navy in the mid-1930s and return that organization to a purely military operation, in 1936, it was decided the RCAF should follow suit. The Department of Transport (Canada) was formed to handle the federal government's civil aviation and marine policies (and operations), although RCAF maintained control of aerial photography. Sherman tank displayed outside of Waterloo Officers Mess at CFB Borden Canadian Forces Base Borden (also CFB Borden) is a Canadian Forces Base located in Borden, Ontario. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government - Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... Motto: Template:Unhide = Unum Cum Virtute Multorum (One With the Strength of Many) Location City Information Established: 1738 (Fort Rouge), 1873 (City of Winnipeg) Area: 465. ... This article refers to the city in British Columbia, Canada. ... RCAF Station High River was a station of the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) located near High River, Alberta, Canada. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... Ferry running between Halifax and Dartmouth, docked at Dartmouth Ferry Terminal. ... The Department of Transport, also referred to as Transport Canada, is the department within the government of Canada which is responsible for developing regulations, policies and services of transportation in Canada. ...


During the late 1930s, the RCAF undertook to create military squadrons with an authorized peacetime strength of 23 squadrons (11 operational, the remainder being training). Training took place at the following locations:

Sherman tank displayed outdors in Worthington Tank Museum at CFB Borden Canadian Forces Base Borden (also CFB Borden or 16 Wing Borden) is a Canadian Forces Base located in Borden, Ontario. ...

The Second World War

The outbreak of the Second World War saw the RCAF only fielding eight of its eleven permanent operational squadrons but by October 1939, 15 squadrons were available (12 for homeland defence, three for overseas service). There were over 20 different types of aircraft at this point, over half being for training or transport, and the RCAF started the war with only 29 front-line fighter and bomber aircraft. By the end of the war, the RCAF would be the fourth largest allied air force.[2] Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


On 15 August 1940, 1 (Canadian) Squadron became the first RCAF unit in action.


During the war, the RCAF had the following three key responsibilities:

  • British Commonwealth Air Training Plan (BCATP), Canada's massive contribution to training military aviators would see the RCAF expand to a ubiquitous presence across the country
  • Home War Establishment (HWE), fielding 37 squadrons for coastal defence, protection of shipping, air defence and other duties in Canada
  • Overseas War Establishment (OWE), headquartered in London, fielding 48 squadrons serving with the Royal Air Force in Western Europe, the Mediterranean and the Far East

The RCAF played key roles in the Battle of Britain, antisubmarine warfare during the Battle of the Atlantic, the bombing campaigns against German industries (particularly with No. 6 Group, RAF Bomber Command), and close support of Allied forces during the Battle of Normandy and subsequent land campaigns in northwest Europe. RCAF Harvards were used as a trainer aircraft by thousands of Commonwealth aviators from 1940 onwards. ... “RAF” redirects here. ... Combatants United Kingdom Including combatants from:[1] Poland New Zealand Canada Czechoslovakia Belgium Australia South Africa France Ireland United States Jamaica Palestine Rhodesia Germany Including combatants from Italy Commanders Hugh Dowding Hermann Göring Strength 754 single-seat fighters 149 two-seat fighters 560 bombers 500 coastal 1,963 total... Anti-submarine warfare is a term referring to warfare directed against submarines. ... The Second Battle of the Atlantic was the longest continuous military campaign of World War II, running from 1939 right through to the defeat of Nazi Germany in 1945, and was at its height from mid-1940 through to about the end of 1943. ... For other uses, see Bomber (disambiguation). ... No. ... Bomber Command badge RAF Bomber Command was the organisation that controlled the RAFs bomber forces. ... Combatants United States United Kingdom Canada Free France Poland Nazi Germany Commanders Dwight Eisenhower (Supreme Allied Commander) Bernard Montgomery (land) Bertram Ramsay (sea) Trafford Leigh-Mallory (air) Omar Bradley (U.S. 1st Army) Miles Dempsey (UK 2nd Army) Harry Crerar (Canadian 1st Army) Gerd von Rundstedt (OB WEST) Erwin Rommel...


The RCAF reached peak strength of 215,000 (all ranks) in January 1944 (including 15,000 women). Of that total, 100,000 were training air and ground personnel in the BCATP, 65,000 with HWE, and 46,000 with OWE. At that time there were 78 squadrons, 43 at home, 35 overseas. According to the RCAF's official history, 13,657 personnel were killed or died and a further 1889 were declared missing. One fact which is often overlooked is the number of pilots and aircrews killed in flight accidents (including training accidents), over 3,000 RCAF personnel lost their lives in this way.


On the homefront, the RCAF developed a volunteer organization called the Aircraft Identity Corps to assist in the early detection of enemy aircraft. During the early days of World War II radar was not yet in widespread use, so the Royal Canadian Air Force instituted the Aircraft Identity Corps organize volunteers who would report suspicious planes and guard against German, Japanese and Italian aircraft. ...


The Cold War era

By spring 1945, the BCATP was discontinued and the RCAF was reduced to 165,000 (all ranks) and by VJ Day on September 2, 1945, it was proposed that the RCAF maintain a peacetime strength of 16,000 (all ranks). By the end of 1947 the RCAF had five squadrons and close to 12,000 personnel (all ranks). Peacetime activities resumed and the RCAF participated in such pursuits as aerial photography, mapping and surveying, transportation, search and rescue, and mercy missions. Interest in the Arctic lead to several northern military expeditions supported by the RCAF. 15 August 1945 marked Victory over Japan or VJ Day, taking a name similar to Victory in Europe Day, which was generally known as VE Day. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Georgian terrace of Royal Crescent (Bath, England) from a hot air balloon Intersection of E42 and E451 from an aircraft soon after takeoff from Frankfurt International Airport Moreton Island in Queensland, Australia Aerial photography is the taking of photographs from the air with a camera mounted, or hand held... The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, commonly used to define the Arctic region border Satellite image of the Arctic surface The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic region around the South Pole. ...


By the end of 1948, the Soviet bloc was perceived as a serious threat to security in Europe. Peacetime activities were no longer a priority and the Canadian government began preparing to meet the Cold War threat. In December 1948 the government decided to increase the number of RCAF establishments, increase the size of and recondition existing air stations, recruit additional personnel, and obtain and produce new (jet) aircraft. Although the RCAF had a jet fighter in 1948, the British de Havilland Vampire, it would be replaced, beginning in 1951 by the more effective Sabre, built under licence by Canadair. The new Avro CF-100 Canuck was also built and entered squadron service in April 1953.[3] The RCAF was the first air force to operate jet transportation aircraft with two Comets entering service in 1953.[4] During the Cold War, the Eastern Bloc (or Soviet Bloc) comprised the following Central and Eastern European countries: Bulgaria, Romania, Hungary, East Germany, Poland, Albania (until the early 1960s, see below), the Soviet Union, and Czechoslovakia. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... The de Havilland DH.100 Vampire was the second jet-engined aircraft commissioned by the Royal Air Force during the Second World War (the first being the Gloster Meteor), although it did not see combat in that conflict. ... The Canadair Sabre was a fighter jet built by Canadair Ltd. ... Canadair Sabre (Golden Hawks aerobatic team) display at the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, Mount Hope, Ontario Canadair was a civil and military aircraft manufacturer in Canada. ... The Avro Canada CF-100 Canuck, (affectionately known as the Clunk), was a Canadian jet fighter serving during the Cold War. ... This article is about the de Havilland Comet jet airliner. ...


In August 1949 Canada joined NATO, and as part of its military commitment, established an Air Division (No. 1 Air Division) in Europe. The first Canadian NATO base, 1 Fighter Wing, was formed at North Luffenham, England in 1951, and later moved to Marville, France. At its peak, 1 Air Division consisted of four wings: two in France and two in West Germany consisting of three fighter squadrons each. The backbone of RCAF support to NATO's air forces in Europe were the CF-100 and the Sabre. During this time the RCAF also began training service personnel, including pilots, from other NATO countries. This article is about the military alliance. ... RCAF Metz, France was the headquarters and operations support centre of No. ... RAF North Luffenham was a Royal Air Force station in Rutland, United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... RCAF Station Marville (also known as 1(F) Wing or 1 Wing) was a Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) station located near Marville, France. ...


In 1950, the RCAF was heavily involved with the transportation of personnel and supplies in support of the Korean War. The RCAF was not involved with a combat role since no jet fighter squadrons capable of the type of combat required in Korea were yet in service. Twenty-two RCAF fighter pilots, however, flew on exchange duty with the USAF in Korea. Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ...


The Soviet nuclear threat posed by a growing bomber fleet in the early 1950s saw the USAF and RCAF partner to build the Pinetree Line network of early warning radar stations across Canada at roughly the 50° north parallel of latitude with additional stations along the east and west coasts. This was expanded in the mid-1950s with the building of the Mid-Canada Line at roughly the 55° north parallel and finally in the late-1950s and into the early 1960s the DEW Line was built across the Arctic regions of North America. The nature of the Soviet bomber threat and of other hostile incursions into North American airspace saw an RCAF and USAF partnership in the creation of the North American Air (Aerospace, after 1981) Defence Command (NORAD) which was formed on August 1, 1957. “CCCP” redirects here. ... A rough map of the three warning lines The Pinetree Line was a series of radar stations located across southern Canada at about the 50th parallel, along with a number of other stations located on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. ... This article is about the geographical term. ... A rough map of the three warning lines The Mid-Canada Line, also known as the McGill Fence, was a line of radar stations across the middle of Canada intended to provide early warning of a Soviet bomber attack on North America. ... A rough map of the three warning lines The Distant Early Warning Line, also known as the DEW Line or Early Warning Line, was a system of radar stations in the far northern Arctic region of Canada, with additional stations along the North Coast and Aleutian Islands of Alaska, in... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... NORAD is short for: North American Aerospace Defense Command Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ...


The Soviet bomber threat posed to North America also saw the RCAF begin the development of Canada's most famous (and infamous) military aircraft, the Avro CF-105 Arrow fighter-interceptor. The changing nature of the Soviet threat from bombers to ICBMs in the late 1950s, and pressure from the United States, saw the CF-105 program scrapped in favour of Bomarc nuclear-tipped anti-aircraft missiles. The Avro CF-105 Arrow was a delta-wing interceptor aircraft, designed and built by Avro Aircraft Limited (Canada) in Malton, Ontario, Canada, as the culmination of a design study that began in 1953. ... A Minuteman III ICBM test launch from Vandenberg AFB, California, United States. ... The Bomarc Missile Program was a joint United States of America-Canada effort during 1957 to 1971 to protect against the USSR bomber threat. ...


To improve its abilities, the RCAF began replacing its 1950s-era aircraft with smaller numbers of second-generation aircraft. For instance the CF-101 Voodoo armed with the AIR-2 Genie nuclear-armed air-to-air missile replaced the CF-100 in some roles, and the CF-104 Starfighter replaced the aging Sabres. Two 409 Squadron CF-101s in the mountains of British Columbia The CF-101 Voodoo was an all-weather interceptor aircraft operated by the Royal Canadian Air Force and Canadian Forces between 1961 and 1984. ... An AIR-2 Genie on display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force A Convair F-106 of the California Air National Guard fires an inert version of the Genie Plumbbob John Nuclear Test, a live test of nuclear AIR-2A Genie rocket on July 19th 1957. ... A US Navy VF-103 Jolly Rogers F-14 Tomcat fighter launches an AIM-54 Phoenix long-range air-to-air missile. ... The Lockheed F-104 Starfighter is a high-performance supersonic interceptor aircraft, capable of high speeds and climb rates. ...


Coastal defence and peacekeeping support were also important. Maritime patrol squadrons stationed on Canada's east and west coasts were provided with Lancasters, and later Neptune, and Argus aircraft to carry on anti-submarine operations. The RCAF's peacekeeping role mainly included the transportation of troops, supplies, and truce observers to troubled areas of the world. The Avro Lancaster was a British four-engine Second World War bomber aircraft made initially by Avro for the British Royal Air Force (RAF). ... The Lockheed P-2 Neptune (until 1963 the P2V Neptune) was a naval patrol bomber and anti-submarine warfare (ASW) aircraft for the United States Navy between 1947 and 1978, replacing the PV-1 Ventura and PV-2 Harpoon and being replaced in turn with the P-3 Orion. ... The Canadair CL-28 was a marine reconnaissance aircraft designed and manufactured by Canadair and was known in the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) as the CP-107 Argus. ...


Many RCAF aerobatic or flight demonstration teams existed during this period. These include the Blue Devils (flying Vampires), the Fireballs (an Air Division team flying Sabres), the Sky Lancers (an Air Division team flying Sabres), the Golden Hawks (flying Sabres), the Goldilocks (flying Harvards), and the Golden Centennaires (flying Tutors). The pilots of the Blue Devils. ... Categories: Aircraft stubs | Aerobatic teams ... The T-6 Texan was a single-engine, advanced trainer aircraft designed by North American Aviation and used to train fighter pilots of the USAAF, US Navy, Royal Air Force and other air forces of the British Commonwealth during World War II. The Texan is known by a variety of... Categories: Aircraft stubs | Aerobatic teams ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Canadair CT-114 Tutor. ...


Because of the Cold War and the Korean War, the RCAF grew to a strength of 54,000 personnel (all ranks) by 1954 and reached a 1955 peak of 41 squadrons.


Unification

In 1964 the Canadian government decided to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of Canada's armed forces by merging the RCAF with the Royal Canadian Navy and the Canadian Army to form the unified Canadian Forces. On February 1, 1968, unification was completed and the RCAF ceased to exist. The Canadian Forces (French: Forces canadiennes), abbreviated as CF (French: FC), are the unified armed forces of Canada. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Initially air force and naval aviation personnel were scattered among five commands of the new force, but in 1975, Canadian Forces Air Command (AIRCOM) was created, and most aviation units were placed under it. AIRCOM preserves many traditions of the RCAF, such as the RCAF tartan and the command march, "RCAF March Past." In 1988, Canadian air force personnel returned to the traditional blue uniform colour used by the RCAF, and in 1993 air force formations called wings were reintroduced within AIRCOM, echoing the similar structure of the RCAF thirty years previously. The army-style ranks which were instituted upon unification, however, were retained and the RAF-derived RCAF ranks and insignia were not re-adopted. CF-18 off the coast Hawaii CH-124 Sea King CH-149 Cormorant CC-115 Buffalo Canadian Forces Air Command (AIRCOM) is the air force element of the Canadian Forces. ... The RCAF March Past was the official march of the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF), and is currently the authorized march of both Air Command and the Air Operations Branch of the Canadian Forces, the Royal Canadian Air Cadets, and the Air Force Association of Canada. ... Wing is a term used by different air forces for a unit of command. ...


Ranks

This chart illustrates the rank structure of the RCAF (1924-1968) compared to the rank structure of the modern Canadian Air Force (Canadian Forces Air Command).

Royal Canadian Air Force Canadian Forces Air Command
Air Chief Marshal / maréchal en chef de l'Air General
Air Marshal / maréchal de l'Air Lieutenant General
Air Vice-Marshal / vice-maréchal de l'Air Major General
Air Commodore / commodore de l'Air Brigadier General
Group Captain / colonel d'aviation Colonel
Wing Commander / lieutenant-colonel d'aviation Lieutenant Colonel
Squadron Leader / commandant d'aviation Major
Flight Lieutenant / capitaine d'aviation Captain
Flying Officer / lieutenant d'aviation Lieutenant
Pilot Officer / sous-lieutenant d'aviation Second Lieutenant
Officer Cadet / élève-officier Officer Cadet
Warrant Officer, class 1 / adjudant de 1re classe Chief Warrant Officer
Warrant Officer, class 2 / adjudant de 2e classe Master Warrant Officer
Flight Sergeant / sergent de section Warrant Officer
Sergeant / sergent Sergeant
(no equivalent) Master Corporal
Corporal / caporal Corporal
Leading Aircraftman / aviateur-chef Private
Aircraftman / aviateur Private (no rank emblems)

Air Chief Marshal Sir Richard Johns in RAF No 1 Dress uniform Air Chief Marshal (Air Chf Mshl or ACM) is a senior air officer rank in the Royal Air Force of the United Kingdom As well as the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), and air forces of many Commonwealth... An air marshals sleeve/shoulder insignia Air Marshal (Air Mshl or AM) is a rank in the Royal Air Force. ... An Air Vice Marshals sleeve/shoulder insignia Air Vice Marshal is the third most senior rank active in the Royal Air Force today, after the inactivation of Marshal of the Royal Air Force as a substantive rank in peacetime during defence cuts of the 1990s. ... An Air Commodoress sleeve/shoulder insignia Air Commodore is the fourth most senior rank active in the Royal Air Force today, after the deactivation of Marshal of the Royal Air Force as a substantive rank in peacetime during defence cuts of the 1990s. ... A Group Captains sleeve/shoulder insignia Group Captain (Gp Capt in the RAF, GPCAPT in the RNZAF and RAAF, G/C in the former RCAF) is a senior commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries. ... A Wing Commanders sleeve/shoulder insignia A Wing Commanders command flag Wing Commander is a commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries. ... A Squadron Leaders sleeve/shoulder insignia Squadron Leader (Sqn Ldr in the RAF, SQNLDR in the RNZAF and RAAF and S/L in the former RCAF) is a commissioned rank in some air forces. ... A Flight Lieutenants sleeve/shoulder insignia Flight Lieutenant (abbreviated as Flt Lt and pronounced as flight lef-tenant, see Lieutenant) is a junior commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many Commonwealth countries. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Pilot Officers sleeve/shoulder insignia Pilot Officer (Plt Off in the RAF; PLTOFF in the RAAF and RNZAF, P/O in the former RCAF) is the lowest substantive commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries, ranking only above Acting... Officer Cadet is a rank held by military cadets during their training to become commissioned officers. ... For Warrant Officers in the United States military, see Warrant Officer (United States). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Sergeant (disambiguation). ... This article is about the military rank. ... Leading Aircraftman (LAC) (or Leading Aircraftwoman (LACW)) is a rank in the Royal Air Force, ranking between Aircraftman and Senior Aircraftman and having a NATO rank code of OR-2. ... Aircraftman (AC) (or Aircraftwoman (ACW)) is the lowest rank in the Royal Air Force, ranking below Leading Aircraftman and having a NATO rank code of OR-1. ...

Victoria Cross recipients

The Victoria Cross (VC) is a bronze medal which is the highest award given to British and Commonwealth armed forces personnel of any rank in any service, and civilians under military command for bravery in the presence of the enemy. This honour has been given to two members of the Royal Canadian Air Force since its inception in 1924. For other uses, see Victoria Cross (disambiguation). ...

Photo by Terry Macdonald Andrew Charles (Andy) Mynarski, VC (October 14, 1916 - June 12, 1944) was a Canadian recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... Cambrai (Dutch: Kamerijk) is a French city and commune, in the Nord département, of which it is a sous_préfecture. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Photo submitted by Simon Manchee David Ernest Hornell, VC was a Canadian recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... The Shetland Islands, also called Shetland (archaically spelled Zetland) formerly called Hjaltland, comprise one of 32 council areas of Scotland. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...

Symbols and insignia

RCAF Ensign
RCAF Ensign
RCAF insignia (Queen's crown)
RCAF insignia (Queen's crown)

The ensign of the Royal Canadian Air Force was based on the ensign of the British Royal Air Force (RAF), a light (sky) blue ensign, but with the Canadian roundel. The roundel was a version of the British roundel which has a red inner circle. The maple leaf replaces the inner circle to give it a distinctive Canadian character. The realistic-looking maple leaf was replaced with the eleven-point stylized leaf of the new Canadian flag in 1965.[2] Image File history File links Ensign_of_the_Royal_Canadian_Air_Force. ... Image File history File links Ensign_of_the_Royal_Canadian_Air_Force. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... “RAF” redirects here. ... The modern proportion RAF roundel A roundel in heraldry is any circular shape; in military use it is an emblem of nationality employed on military aircraft and air force flags, generally round and consisting of concentric rings of different colors. ... Flag Ratio: 1:2 (1965-Present) The National Flag of Canada (), popularly known as the Maple Leaf Flag (French: lUnifoli the one-leaved), is a base red flag with a white square in its centre, featuring a red stylized 11-pointed maple leaf. ...


The insignia of the RCAF was similar to that used by the RAF, the Royal Australian Air Force and the Royal New Zealand Air Force. It consists of the Imperial Crown (King's or Queen's crown), an "eagle volant", a circle inscribed with the RCAF's motto per ardua ad astra (which is usually translated as "Through Adversity to the Stars"), and a scroll inscribed with "Royal Canadian Air Force". The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) is the Air Force branch of the Australian Defence Force. ... The Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) is the air force arm of the New Zealand Defence Force. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...


The RCAF tartan, based on the Anderson tartan, was registered in 1942. It was originally designed for use with an RCAF pipe band. The tartan remains as the officially approved tartan of the modern Canadian Forces Air Command and is worn by Air Command pipe bands. Three examples of tartan. ... A Pipe band is a traditional Scottish musical group consisting of bagpipes and drums. ...


See also

This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... This is a list of stations operated by the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF), or stations where RCAF units existed, from 1924 until unification into the Canadian Armed Forces on February 1, 1968. ... This is a list of aircraft of the Royal Canadian Air Force. ... Title and Graphic from a Royal Canadian Air Force Womens Division public relations Poster The Royal Canadian Air Force Womens Division was an element of the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) formed during World War II. The Womens Division was originally called the Canadian Womens Auxiliary... No. ... The RCAF March Past was the official march of the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF), and is currently the authorized march of both Air Command and the Air Operations Branch of the Canadian Forces, the Royal Canadian Air Cadets, and the Air Force Association of Canada. ...

References

  1. ^ Sea Wings - History of Canada's Waterborne Defence Aircraft, J.A Foster, Canadian Cataloguing, 1986, p. 20-21
  2. ^ Milberry 1984, p. 97.
  3. ^ Milberry 1984, p. 282.
  4. ^ Milberry 1984, p. 89.
  • Greenhous, Brereton; Halliday, Hugh A. Canada's Air Forces, 1914 - 1999. Montreal: Editions Art Global and the Department of National Defence, 1999. ISBN 2-920718-72-X.
  • Milberry, Larry (General Editor). Sixty Years - The RCAF and CF Air Command 1924 - 1984. Toronto: Canav Books, 1984. ISBN 0-9690703-4-9.
  • Roberts, Leslie. There Shall Be Wings. Toronto: Clark, Irwin and Co. Ltd., 1959. No ISBN.

Larry Milberry (born 1943) is a Canadian aviation author and publisher. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Royal Canadian Air Force - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2023 words)
The RCAF played key roles in the Battle of Britain, antisubmarine warfare during the Battle of the Atlantic, the bombing campaigns against German industries, and close support of Allied forces during the Battle of Normandy and subsequent land campaigns in northwest Europe.
By the late 1960s, the RCAF was actively involved in the aerial defence of Canada, North America, and Europe, as well as performing maritime coastal patrols on Canada's east and west coasts as part of anti-submarine operations, and finally, the RCAF was heavily involved with the USAF in operating radar early warning stations across Canada.
On February 1, 1968, the Royal Canadian Air Force was merged with the Royal Canadian Navy and the Canadian Army to form the Canadian Armed Forces.
Encyclopedia4U - Royal Canadian Air Force - Encyclopedia Article (444 words)
In the Second World War the RCAF's 400-series squadrons were a key part of defending the United Kingdom during the Battle of Britain, antisubmarine warfare during the Battle of the Atlantic, the bombinging campaigns against German industries, and close support of Allied forces during the Battle of Normandy and subsequent land campaigns in northwest Europe.
Initially air force units were scattered among five commands of the new force, but in 1975 CF Air Command was created, and most air force units were placed under it.
Air Command preserves many traditions of the RCAF, such as the RCAF tartan and the command march, "RCAF March Past." In 1988, Canadian air force personel returned to the traditional light-blue uniform colour of the RCAF.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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