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Encyclopedia > Royal and noble styles

This page will detail the various styles used by royalty and nobility in Europe, in the final form arrived at in the nineteenth century. In earlier years, many different styles were used, with little standardization. Styles represent the fashion by which monarchs and noblemen are or were properly addressed. A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ...

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Imperial, royal, and princely styles

Emperors and Empresses enjoyed the style of His/Her Imperial Majesty (HIM). An emperor is a (male) monarch, usually the sovereign ruler of an empire or another type of imperial realm. ...


Members of imperial families were generally styled His/Her Imperial Highness (HIH).

  • In Austria, the members of the Imperial family, due to their status as also members of the royal family of the Apostolic Kingdom of Hungary, held the style of Imperial and Royal Highness (HI&RH), but actually traditionally the other way around: "königliche und kaiserliche Hoheit"[citation needed].
  • Also in the German Empire, the other 'heir' to the Holy Roman empire, the Emperor and Empress would be addressed as Imperial and Royal Majesty because of their ruling over the Kingdom of Prussia and the German Empire.
  • In Russia, children and male-line grandchildren of the Emperor had the style of Imperial Highness (HIH). Male-line great-grandchildren held the style of Highness (HH). Also, the eldest son of any person who held the style of Highness also held the style of Highness. All other male-line descendants held the style Serenity, often translated as Serene Highness (HSH). Some Russian noble princes also hold the style of Serenity; all others and Russian Counts hold the style of Illustriousness, often translated as Illustrious Highness (HIllH).

Kings and Queens have the style of Majesty (HM). Some, throughout history have also used Royal Majesty (HRM) Armenian king Tigranes the Great. ...


Members of royal families (Princes and Princesses) generally have the style of Royal Highness (HRH), although in some royal families (for instance, Denmark), more junior princes and princesses only bear the style of His or Her Highness (HH).


Reigning Grand Dukes and Grand Duchesses hold the style of Royal Highness (HRH). The title of Grand Duke (Latin, Magnus Dux; German, Großherzog, Russian, Великий князь) used in Slavic, Baltic, and Germanic countries, is ranked in honour below King but higher than a sovereign Duke (Herzog) or Prince (Fürst). ... A Grand Duchess is the wife of a Grand Duke or a woman who rules a Grand Duchy in her own right. ...


The styles of members of Grand Ducal families have been inconsistent. In Luxembourg, more senior members of the family have also been Royal Highnesses, but only due to their status as Bourbon princes of Parma. In Baden and Hesse-Darmstadt, junior members held the style of Grand Ducal Highness (HGDH). Members of other grand ducal families generally held the style of Highness (HH). Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ... Parma is a city in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna, famous for its architecture and the fine countryside around it. ... Baden was a territory in the southwest of what later became unified Germany. ... The Landgraviate of Hesse-Darmstadt came into existence in 1568, as the portion of George, youngest of the four sons of Landgrave Philip I of Hesse. ...


Reigning Dukes and Duchesses bore the style of Highness (HH), as did other members of ducal families. A duke is a nobleman, historically of highest rank and usually controlling a duchy. ... The term duke is a title of nobility which refers to the sovereign male ruler of a Continental European duchy, to a nobleman of the highest grade of the British peerage, or to the highest rank of nobility in various other European countries, including Spain and France (in Italy, principe...


Junior members of some ducal families bore the style of Ducal Serene Highness (HDSH), although it fell out of fashion.


The Elector of Hesse-Kassel also bore the style of Highness, as did other members of the Hesse-Kassel family. The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... Hesse-Kassel (Hessen-Kassel in German) was a German principality that came into existence when the Landgraviate of Hesse was divided in 1568 upon the death of Landgrave Philip I of Hesse. ...


Mediatized Dukes and reigning and mediatized Fürsten and Fürstinnen ("Princes" and "Princesses") bear the style of Serene Highness (HSH, German Durchlaucht), as do other members of princely families. Members of reigning princely families are also styled Serene Highness (HSH). Mediatized (from Mediatization) refers to a formerly souvereign non-eccelesiastic principality within the Holy Roman Empire that has has lost its immediate souvereignty (Reichsunmittelbarkeit = Imperial immediacy) within the Empire and been incorporated into another realm -- an event with wide application in Germany in 1803 (Reichsdeputationshauptschluss), following Napoleons victory over... Fürst (plural Fürsten) is a German title of nobility, usually translated into English as Prince; however this translation can be misleading, since a Fürst usually ranks below a Duke. ... Serene Highness (acronym HSH) – His Serene Highness or Her Serene Highness. ... A principality is a monarchical feudatory or sovereign state, ruled or reigned over by a Monarch with the title of prince or princess (a synonym is princedom) or (in the widest sense) a Monarch with another title within the generic use of the term prince. ...


Mediatized Counts and Countesses bear the style of Illustrious Highness (HIllH, German Erlaucht). A count is a nobleman in most European countries, equivalent in rank to a British earl, whose wife is also still a countess (for lack of an Anglo-Saxon term). ... Look up Count in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A count is a nobleman in most European countries, equivalent in rank to a British earl, whose wife is still a countess (for lack of an Anglo-Saxon term). ...


Noble styles in the United Kingdom

  • The monarch of the United Kingdom has a much longer style than that of other members of the British royal family and nobility. For example, the full style of Elizabeth II is, "Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and of Her other Realms and Territories Queen, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith".
  • Dukes and Duchesses in the peerages of England, Scotland, Great Britain, Ireland, and the United Kingdom bear the style of Grace, eg. "His Grace", "Your Grace". They also hold the style of Most High, Potent, and Noble Prince, but even in the most formal situations that is usually simply abbreviated to Most Noble, and even that style is quite archaic and very formal.
  • Marquesses and Marchionesses bear the styles of The Most Honourable and Lordship (e.g. "His Lordship," "Her Ladyship," "Your Lordship," and "Your Ladyship.") They also hold the style of Most Noble and Puissant Prince, but even in the most formal situations this style is rarely used.
  • Earls, Countesses, Viscounts, Viscountesses, Barons, and Baronesses bear the styles of The Right Honourable and Lordship. Earls and Countesses also hold the style of Most Noble and Puissant Prince, but, as with Marquesses and Marchionesses, even in the most formal situations this style is rarely used.

For more details, see Forms of Address in the United Kingdom Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... “Marquis” redirects here. ... A Marquess is a nobleman of hereditary rank in Europe and Japan. ... For other uses, see Earl (disambiguation). ... Look up Count in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A count is a nobleman in most European countries, equivalent in rank to a British earl, whose wife is still a countess (for lack of an Anglo-Saxon term). ... A viscount is a member of the European nobility whose comital title ranks usually, as in the British peerage, above a baron, below an earl (in Britain) or a count (his continental equivalent). ... A viscount is a member of the European nobility, especially of France, and of the British peerage, where a viscount ranks above a baron, below an earl (a count in France), and corresponds in Britain to the Anglo-Saxon shire reeve. ... Baron is a specific title of nobility or a more generic feudal qualification. ... Baroness could refer to: Female equivalent of Baron. ... Forms of address used in the United Kingdom are given below. ...


Noble styles in Germany

The nobility and all related styles were abolished with the Weimar Constitution of 1919, but are sometimes used socially.


Non-mediatized noble Dukes in Germany bear the style of Serene Highness (HSH) or High Born (Hochgeboren).


Non-mediatized noble Fürsten (princes) in Germany bear the styles of Serene Highness, Princely Grace (fürstliche Gnaden), or High Born.


Other non-mediatized German nobles of the rank of count or higher bear the style of High Born.


German nobles below the rank of count bear the style of High Well Born (Hochwohlgeboren).


Sources and references

(incomplete)

See also

For other uses, see Peerage (disambiguation). ... Forms of address used in the United Kingdom are given below. ... Traditional ranks among European royalty, peers, and nobility are rooted in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. ... The term prince, from the Latin root princeps, is used for a member of the highest ranks of the aristocracy or the nobility. ... A princely state is any state under the reign of a prince and is thus a principality taken in the broad sense. ... Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... Ecclesiastical addressesses are the formal styles of address used for members of the clergy, notably in the hierarchical Catholic church. ... The term Prince of the church is nowadays used nearly exclusively for Roman Catholic Cardinals. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Royal and noble ranks - Biocrawler (0 words)
Traditional ranks among European royalty, peers, and nobility are rooted in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages.
Among the regular nobility, those whose titles derived from the Holy Roman Empire ranked higher than those whose titles were granted by one of the German princes after 1806, no matter what title was held.
In Germany, the constitution of the Weimar Republic in 1919 abolished nobility and all nobility titles.
Parisian Entry of Henry II (0 words)
"noble children of the city" whose position in ranks with the major royal officials and other haute nobilite of the kingdom was regarded as the royal compliment (!) to the Parisian elite.
A triumphal arch in the Tuscan and Doric styles, it presented at its top a statue of the Gallic Hercules with the face of Francis I, the father of the new king.
However, the stops, the monuments, the banquet, and the spectacles contributed to the grandeur almost equal to the kings' entries: the Painters' Gate 1514 spectacle in the celebration of Mary Tudor's entry.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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