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Encyclopedia > Royal Navy
Naval Service
Flag of the United Kingdom
Components
Royal Navy
Royal Marines
History
History of the Royal Navy
History of the Royal Marines
Future of the Royal Navy
Ships
Current Fleet
Current deployments
Historic ships
Personnel
The Admiralty
Senior Officers
Uniforms
Officer rank insignia
Enlisted rate insignia
Related Civilian Agencies of the MOD
Royal Fleet Auxiliary
Royal Maritime Auxiliary Service

The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the oldest of the British armed services (and is therefore the Senior Service). From the early 18th century to the middle of the 20th century, it was the largest and most powerful navy in the world, playing a key part in establishing the British Empire as the dominant power of the 19th and early 20th centuries. In World War II, the Royal Navy operated almost 900 ships. During the Cold War, it was transformed into a primarily anti-submarine force, hunting for Soviet submarines, mostly active in the GIUK gap. With the collapse of the Soviet Union, its role for the 21st century has returned to focus on global expeditionary operations. Royal Navy can refer to the following: Belgian Navy of Belgium (Marine Royale) Royal Australian Navy of Australia Royal Bahraini Navy of Bahrain Royal Brunei Navy of Brunei (Tentera Laut Diraja Brunei) Royal Danish Navy of Denmark (Kongelige Danske Marine) Royal Malaysian Navy of Malaysia (Tentera Laut DiRaja Malaysia) Royal... The Naval Service is the maritime branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Image File history File links Naval_Ensign_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... HMS Illustrious (R06), an Invincible class aircraft carrier of the Royal Navy, and current flagship of the First Sea Lord. ... The Fleet Air Arm is the branch of the Royal Navy responsible for the operation of the aircraft on board their ships. ... The Royal Navy Submarine Service - sometimes known as the Silent Service, on account of a submarine being required to operate quietly in order to remain undetected by enemy SONAR (or ASDIC as it was known in the RN pre-1948) - is the collective name given to the submarine element of... The Royal Navy Regulating Branch is the military police branch of the British Royal Navy. ... “RNR” redirects here. ... Queen Alexandras Royal Naval Nursing Service, known as QARNNS, is a part of the Naval Service of the United Kingdom responsible for providing nursing support to the Royal Navy. ... The Royal Marines (RM), are the Royal Navys elite fighting forces. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The British Royal Navy does not have a well-defined moment of formation; it started out as a motley assortment of Kings ships during the Middle Ages, assembled only as needed and then dispersed, began to take shape as a standing navy during the 16th century, and became a... The Corps of Royal Marines, the land fighting element of the Royal Navy, was formed as part of the naval service in 1755. ... At the beginning of the 1990s, the Royal Navy was a force designed for the Cold War - with its three ASW aircraft carriers and a force of small, though numerous, frigates and destroyers, its main purpose was to search for and destroy Soviet submarines in the North Atlantic. ... This is a list of active Royal Navy ships, complete and correct as of 2006. ... Although the majority of the Royal Navy fleet, unless required, remains training and exercising in and around Home Waters, the Navy has a number of standing commitments, including those held for contingent operations, to provide ships for various missions around the world: // Fleet Flagship and R2 Carrier Normally two aircraft... The following is a list of Royal Navy ship names by name in alphabetical order, both past and present. ... Flag of the Lord High Admiral The Admiralty was formerly the authority in the United Kingdom responsible for the command of the Royal Navy. ... This is a list of senior officers of the Royal Navy. ... The uniforms of the Royal Navy have gradually evolved over the last three centuries, since the first uniform regulations for officers were issued by Lord Anson in 1748. ... History Insignia for officers was first introduced in 1748, with differences in rank being seen in the cut of the lapels and the cuffs. ... For Chief Petty Officer both the shoulder tab insignia and the sleeve insignia from the No. ... The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for implementation of government defence policy and the headquarters of the British Armed Forces. ... The Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) is the service that keeps the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom running around the world. ... Royal Maritime Auxiliary Service ensign The Royal Maritime Auxiliary Service is a British Government agency which runs a variety of small support vessels for the Royal Navy. ... The armed forces of the United Kingdom, commonly known as the British Armed Forces or Her Majestys Armed Forces, and sometimes legally the Armed Forces of the Crown[1], encompasses a navy, army, and an air force. ... The multinational Combined Task Force One Five Zero (CTF-150) The British Grand Fleet, the supreme naval force of World War I A rare occurrence of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Italian Full rigged ship Amerigo Vespucci in New York Harbor, 1976 A ship is a large watercraft capable of offshore navigation. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... “A/S” redirects here. ... The GIUK gap is an area in the northern Atlantic Ocean. ... A rare occurrence of an 11-country multinational fleet, during RIMPAC. A rare occurrence of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ...


The Royal Navy is the second-largest navy in NATO in terms of the combined displacement of its fleet.[1] There are currently 91 commissioned ships in the Royal Navy, including aircraft carriers, nuclear submarines, mine counter-measures and patrol vessels. There are also the support vessels of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary. The Royal Navy's ability to project power globally is considered second only to the United States Navy.[2][3] NATO 2002 Summit in Prague. ... In fluid mechanics, displacement occurs when an object is immersed in a fluid, pushing it out of the way and taking its place. ... A rare occurance of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ... This is a list of the current Royal Navy ships, complete and correct as of 2005. ... The Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) is the service that keeps the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom running around the world. ... USS , and HMS Illustrious, two aircraft carriers on a joint patrol. ... USN redirects here. ...


The Royal Navy is a constituent component of the Naval Service, which also comprises the Royal Marines, Royal Fleet Auxiliary, Royal Naval Reserve and Royal Marines Reserve. The Royal Navy numbers 37,500 people of which approximately 6,000 are in the Royal Marines.[4] The Naval Service is the maritime branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The Royal Marines (RM), are the Royal Navys elite fighting forces. ... The Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) is the service that keeps the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom running around the world. ... “RNR” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of the Royal Navy
See also: British military history

(all headings after 1603 and the Union of the Crowns apply to the United Kingdom) The British Royal Navy does not have a well-defined moment of formation; it started out as a motley assortment of Kings ships during the Middle Ages, assembled only as needed and then dispersed, began to take shape as a standing navy during the 16th century, and became a... British military history is a long and varied topic, extending from the prehistoric and ancient historic period, through the Roman invasions of Julius Cæsar and Claudius and subsequent Roman occupation; warfare in the Mediaeval period, including the invasions of the Saxons and the Vikings in the Early Middle Ages... The Union of the Crowns refers to the accession of James VI, King of Scots, to the thrones of England and Ireland, in March 1603. ...


900–1500

England's first navy was established in the 9th century by Alfred the Great but, despite inflicting a significant defeat on the Vikings in the Wantsum Channel at Plucks Gutter near to Stourmouth, Kent, it fell into disuse. It was revived by King Athelstan and at the time of his victory at the Battle of Brunanburh in 937, the English navy had a strength of approximately 400 ships. When the Norman invasion was imminent, King Harold had trusted to his navy to prevent William the Conqueror's invasion fleet from crossing the Channel. However, not long before the invasion the fleet was damaged in a storm and driven into harbour, and the Normans were able to cross unopposed and defeat Harold at the Battle of Hastings. The Norman kings created a naval force in 1155, or adapted a force which already existed, with ships provided by the Cinque Ports alliance. The Normans are believed to have established the post of Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Alfred (also Ælfred from the Old English: Ælfrēd //) (c. ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ... The Wantsum Channel is the name given to a now silted-up watercourse in the English county of Kent. ... Plucks Gutter is a small hamlet in Kent, England where the River Little Stour and River Great Stour meet. ... Stourmouth is a village in Kent, England. ... The Kent coat of arms For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... Athelstan redirects here. ... The Battle of Brunanburh was a West Saxon victory in 937 by the army of king Athelstan and his brother Edmund over the combined armies of Olaf III Guthfrithson, Viking king of Dublin, Constantine, king of Scotland and King Owain of Strathclyde. ... The Bayeux Tapestry depicts the Battle of Hastings and the events leading to it. ... King Harold of England may refer to King Harold I (Harold Harefoot); son of Canute. ... William I ( 1027 – September 9, 1087), was King of England from 1066 to 1087. ... Combatants Normans supported by: Bretons (one third of total), Aquitanians, Flemings Anglo-Saxons Commanders William of Normandy, Odo of Bayeux Harold Godwinson † Strength 7,000-8,000 7,000-8,000 Casualties Unknown, thought to be around 2,000 killed and wounded Unknown, but significantly higher than the Normans The... Norman conquests in red. ... Flag of the Cinque Ports Formally, in Kent and Sussex there are five Head Ports making up the Confederation of the Cinque Ports, often pronounced as the anglicised sink ports, and meaning five ports (cinque in French means five and ports is to be connected to the Italian word porto... Flag of the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports The Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports is a ceremonial official in the United Kingdom. ...


During the Hundred Years' War, the French fleet was initially stronger than the English fleet, but was almost completely destroyed at the Battle of Sluys in 1340. Much later the English navy suffered disastrous defeats off La Rochelle in 1372 and 1419 to Franco - Castilian fleets, and English ports were ravaged by fleets commanded by Jean de Vienne and Fernando Sánchez de Tovar. The English Navy began to develop though and King John had a fleet of 500 sails. In the mid-fourteenth century Edward III's navy had some 712 ships. There then followed a period of decline. Combatants France Castile Scotland Genoa Majorca Bohemia Crown of Aragon Brittany England Burgundy Brittany Portugal Navarre Flanders Hainaut Aquitaine Luxembourg Holy Roman Empire The Hundred Years War was a conflict between France and England, lasting 116 years from 1337 to 1453. ... Combatants England France Commanders Edward III of England Hugues Quiéret, Nicolas Béhuchet Strength 250 ships 190 ships Casualties Unknown 20 000 (Europe A History by Norman Davies) The naval Battle of Sluys was fought on 24 June 1340. ... La Rochelle is a city and commune of western France, and a seaport on the Atlantic Ocean (population 78,000 in 2004). ... This article is about the country. ... The starting point of Crown of Castile can be considered when the union of the Kingdoms of Castile and Leon in 1230 or the later fusion of their Cortes (their Parlaments). ... Jean de Vienne (1341, Dole - 1396, Nicopolis) was a French knight, general and admiral during the Hundred Years War. ... Fernando (or Fernán) Sánchez de Tovar († Lisbon, 1384) was a Spanish (Castilian) soldier and admiral of the Middle Ages. ... John of England depicted in Cassells History of England (1902) John (French: Jean) (December 24, 1166/67–October 18/19, 1216) reigned as King of England from 1199 to 1216. ... This article is about the King of England. ...


1500–1707

The first reformation and major expansion of the Navy Royal, as it was then known, occurred in the 16th century during the reign of Henry VIII, whose ships Henri Grâce a Dieu ("Great Harry") and Mary Rose engaged the French navy in the battle of the Solent in 1545. By the time of Henry's death in 1547 his fleet had grown to 58 vessels. In 1588 the Spanish Empire, at the time Europe's superpower and the leading naval power of the 16th century, and the Spanish Armada set sail to enforce Spain's dominance over the English Channel and transport troops from the Spanish Netherlands to England. The Spanish plan failed due to maladministration, logistical errors, English harrying, blocking actions by the Dutch, and bad weather. However, the bungled Drake-Norris Expedition of 1589 saw the tide of war turn against the Royal Navy. Image File history File links NPG_Drake. ... Image File history File links NPG_Drake. ... Sir Francis Drake, Vice Admiral, (c. ... “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... Henri Grace a Dieu, from the Anthony Roll. ... Mary Rose depicted on the Anthony Roll, a survey of Henry VIIIs navy, completed in 1546 The Mary Rose was an English Tudor warship of the carrack type and one of the first to be able to fire a full broadside of cannons. ... The French Navy, officially called the National Navy (French: Marine Nationale) is the maritime arm of the French military. ... Combatants France England Commanders Admiral Claude dAnnebault Admiral John Dudley, Viscount Lisle Strength 30,000 soldiers in more than 200 ships 12,000 soldiers in 80 ships The naval Battle of the Solent took place on 18 and 19 July 1545 during the Italian Wars, fought between the fleets... Capital Toledo (until 1561) Madrid (after 1561) Language(s) Spanish Religion Roman Catholic Government Monarchy Monarch  - 1516-1556 Charles I  - 1886-1898 Alfonso XIII¹ Regent  - 1886-1898 Maria Christina History  - Discovery of America 1402  - Conquest of the Aztec Empire 1519-1521  - Conquest of the Inca Empire 1532–1537  - Spanish-American... For the modern navy of Spain, see Armada Española. ... Satellite view of the English Channel The English Channel (French: , the sleeve) is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean that separates the island of Great Britain from northern France and joins the North Sea to the Atlantic. ... This article or section should be merged with Seventeen Provinces The Spanish Netherlands was a portion of the Low Countries controlled by Spain from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. ... The English Armada (also known as the Counter Armada) was a fleet of warships sent to the Iberian coast by Queen Elizabeth I of England in 1589, during the Anglo-Spanish War (1585–1604) in an attempt to drive home the advantage won upon the defeat and dispersal of the...


A permanent Naval Service did not exist until the mid 17th century, when the 'General-at-Sea' (equivalent to Admiral) Robert Blake took the Fleet Royal under Parliamentary control following the defeat of Charles I. After defeats in the second and third Anglo-Dutch wars the Royal Navy gradually developed into the strongest navy in the world. From 1692 the Dutch navy was placed under the command of the Royal Navy's admirals (though not incorporated into it) by order of William III following the Glorious Revolution. Robert Blake, General at Sea, 1599–1657 by Henry Perronet Briggs, painted 1829. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons The Right Honourable Michael Martin MP Lord Speaker Hélène Hayman, Baroness Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups (as of May 5, 2005 elections) Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... The painting Dutch attack on the Medway, June 1667 by Pieter Cornelisz van Soest, painted c. ... William III of England (The Hague, 14 November 1650 – Kensington Palace, 8 March 1702; also known as William II of Scotland and William III of Orange) was a Dutch aristocrat and a Protestant Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28... The Revolution of 1688, commonly known as the Glorious Revolution, was the overthrow of James II of England in 1688 by a union of Parliamentarians and the Dutch stadtholder William III of Orange-Nassau (William of Orange). ...


Under the Acts of Union in 1707 the Royal Scots Navy merged with the English Navy and the modern Royal Navy came into being. The Royal Navy had become the British navy. The Acts of Union were a pair of Acts of Parliament passed in 1706 and 1707 (taking effect on 1 May 1707) by, respectively, the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. ... The Scottish Red Ensign, flown by ships of the Royal Scots Navy The Royal Scots Navy (or Old Scots Navy) was the navy of the Kingdom of Scotland from its foundation in the 11th century until its merger with Englands Royal Navy per the Acts of Union 1707. ...


1707–1914

The early 18th century saw the Royal Navy with more ships than other navies. Although it suffered severe financial problems throughout the earlier part of this period, modern methods of financing government and in particular, the Navy were developed [5]. This financing enabled the navy to become the powerful force of the later 18th century without bankrupting the country. Naval operations in the War of the Spanish Succession were at first focused on the acquisition of a Mediterranean base, culminating in an alliance with Portugal and the capture of Gibraltar (1704) and Port Mahon (1708). The middle part of the century was occupied with the War of the Austrian Succession and the lesser known War of Jenkin's Ear against Spain. In the latter war, the British deployed a very large force under Admiral Edward Vernon in the Battle of Cartagena, aiming to capture this major Spanish colonial port in modern day Colombia. Following an able defense assisted by strong fortifications, and the ravages of disease, the British failed in their attempts.[6] The Navy also saw action in the Seven Years' War which was later described by Winston Churchill as the first world war.[7] The latter part of the century saw action in the American Revolutionary War where the Navy was defeating the fledgling Continental Navy until French intervention in 1778. The most important operation of the war came in 1781 when during the Battle of the Chesapeake the British failed to lift the French blockade of Lord Cornwallis, resulting in a British surrender in the Battle of Yorktown. Although combat was over in North America, it continued in the Caribbean (Battle of the Saintes) and India, where the British experienced both successes and failures. Combatants Habsburg Empire England (1701-6) Great Britain (1707-14)[1] Dutch Republic Kingdom of Portugal Crown of Aragon Duchy of Savoy [2] Kingdom of France Kingdom of Spain Electorate of Bavaria Hungarian Rebels [3] Commanders Eugene of Savoy Margrave of Baden Count Starhemberg Duke of Marlborough Marquis de Ruvigny... Municipality of Mahón Mahón (alternately, Maó; Catalan it is also the official name, Spanish Mahón), is a municipality and the capital city of the Balearic Island of Minorca (an autonomic Spanish community), located in the eastern part of the island. ... Combatants Prussia France Spain Bavaria Naples and Sicily Sweden (1741 — 1743) Austria Great Britain Hanover Dutch Republic Saxony Kingdom of Sardinia Russia Commanders Frederick II Leopold I Leopold II Maurice de Saxe François-Marie de Broglie Charles VII Charles Emil Lewenhaupt Ludwig Khevenhüller Charles Alexander George II Charles... The War of Jenkins Ear was a conflict between Great Britain and Spain that lasted from 1739 to 1742. ... For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Combatants Britain Spain Commanders Admiral Edward Vernon Lawrence Washington Viceroy Sebastián de Eslava Admiral Blas de Lezo † Strength 19,600 regulars 4,000 militia 186 ships 3. ... Combatants Kingdom of Prussia Kingdom of Great Britain Electorate of Hanover Iroquois Confederacy Kingdom of Portugal Electorate of Brunswick Electorate of Hesse-Kassel Philippines Archduchy of Austria Kingdom of France Empire of Russia Kingdom of Sweden Kingdom of Spain Electorate of Saxony Kingdom of Naples and Sicily Kingdom of Sardinia... “Churchill” redirects here. ... A world war is a war affecting the majority of the worlds major nations. ... This article is about military actions only. ... Continental Navy Jack The Continental Navy was authorized by the Continental Congress on October 13, 1775. ... Combatants France Great Britain Commanders Comte de Grasse Sir Thomas Graves Strength 24 ships 19 ships Casualties none some ships damaged The Battle of the Chesapeake, also known as Battle of the Virginia Capes, was a crucial naval battle in the American Revolutionary War which took place near the mouth... Combatants Britain Colonial America France Commanders Charles Cornwallis George Washington Comte de Rochambeau Strength 7,500 8,845 Americans 7,800 French Casualties 156 killed 326 wounded 7,018 captured Americans: 20 killed, 56 wounded French: 52 killed, 134 wounded The Battle of Yorktown (1781) was a victory by a... The Battle of the Saintes, 12 April 1782: surrender of the Ville de Paris by Thomas Whitcombe, painted 1783, shows Hoods Barfleur, centre, attacking the French flagship Ville de Paris, right. ...

The Napoleonic Wars saw the Royal Navy reach a peak of efficiency, dominating the navies of all Britain's adversaries. Initially Britain did not involve itself in the French Revolution, but in 1793 France declared war. The next 12 years saw battles such as the Cape St Vincent and the Nile and short lived truces such as the Peace of Amiens. The height of the Navy's achievements though came on 21 October 1805 at the Battle of Trafalgar where a numerically smaller but more experienced British fleet under the command of Admiral Lord Nelson decisively defeated a combined French and Spanish fleet. This eventually led to almost uncontested power over the world's oceans from 1805 to 1914, when it came to be said that "Britannia ruled the waves". From [1], in the public domain This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... From [1], in the public domain This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson, KB (29 September 1758 – 21 October 1805) was a British admiral famous for his participation in the Napoleonic Wars, most notably in the Battle of Trafalgar, a decisive British victory in the war, where he lost his life. ... Combatants Austria[1] Portugal Prussia[1] Russia[2] Sicily  Spain[3]  Sweden United Kingdom[4] French Empire Holland Italy Naples [5] Duchy of Warsaw Bavaria[6] Saxony[7] Denmark-Norway [8] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack von Leiberich Gebhard von Blücher Duke of Brunswick â€  Prince of Hohenlohe... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Combatants Great Britain Spain Commanders John Jervis José de Córdoba Strength 15 ships of the line 24 ships of the line Casualties 73 dead 327 wounded Four ships captured 250 dead 550 wounded The naval Battle of Cape St Vincent took place on 14 February 1797, near Cape St. ... Combatants Britain France Commanders Horatio Nelson François-Paul Brueys DAigalliers† Strength 14 ships of the line: * 13 x 74-gun, * 1 x 50-gun, 1 sloop 13 ships of the line: * 1 x 120-gun, * 3 x 80-gun, * 9 x 74gun, 4 frigates, some smaller Casualties 218... The Treaty of Amiens was signed on March 25, 1802 (Germinal 4, year X in the French Revolutionary Calendar) by Joseph Bonaparte and the Marquis Cornwallis as a Definitive Treaty of Peace between France and Britain. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants United Kingdom First French Empire Kingdom of Spain Commanders Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson † Pierre Charles Silvestre de Villeneuve Strength 27 ships of the line and 6 others. ... Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson, KB (29 September 1758 – 21 October 1805) was a British admiral famous for his participation in the Napoleonic Wars, most notably in the Battle of Trafalgar, a decisive British victory in the war, where he lost his life. ... Animated map exhibiting the worlds oceanic waters. ... For other uses, see Britannia (disambiguation). ...


In the years following the battle of Trafalgar there was increasing tension at sea between Britain and the United States. American traders took advantage of their country's neutrality to trade with both the French-controlled parts of Europe and Britain. Both France and Britain tried to prevent each other's trade, but only the Royal Navy was in a position to enforce a blockade. In 1812, the United States declared war on the United Kingdom and invaded Canada. At sea, the American War of 1812 was characterised by single-ship actions between small ships, and disruption of merchant shipping. Between 1793 and 1815 the Royal Navy lost 344 vessels due to non-combat causes: 75 by foundering, 254 shipwrecked and 15 from accidental burnings or explosions. In the same period it lost 103,660 seamen: 84,440 by disease and accidents, 12,680 by shipwreck or foundering, and 6,540 by enemy action. During the 19th century the Royal Navy enforced a ban on the slave trade, acted to suppress piracy, and continued to map the world. To this day, Admiralty charts are maintained by the Royal Navy. Royal Navy vessels on surveying missions carried out extensive scientific work. Charles Darwin travelled around the world on HMS Beagle, making scientific observations which led him to the theory of evolution. This article is about the U.S. – U.K. war. ... This is a list of notable single-ship actions, naval bombardments and other naval events: Not complete yet // Single-ship actions 1512 August 10 - English Regent vs French La Cordelière near Cape St Mathieu 1781 May 30 Cape Santa Maria - 2 Dutch vs 2 British frigates Russo-Swedish War... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... HMS Beagle was a Cherokee class 10-gun brig of the Royal Navy, named after the beagle, a breed of dog. ... This article is about biological evolution. ...


The end of the 19th century saw structural changes brought about by First Lord of the Admiralty Jackie Fisher who retired, scrapped, or placed into reserve many of the older vessels, making funds and manpower available for newer ships. He also oversaw the development of HMS Dreadnought, the first all-big-gun ship and one of the most influential ships in naval history. This ship rendered all other battleships then existing obsolete, and started an arms race in Europe. Admiral Percy Scott introduced several new programs such as gunnery training programs which greatly nd a central fire control the effectiveness in battle of the Navy's ships. John Arbuthnot Fisher, 1st Baron Fisher (January 25, 1841 – July 10, 1920), commonly known as Jackie Fisher, was a British admiral known for his efforts at naval reform. ... The sixth HMS Dreadnought of the Royal Navy was a revolutionary battleship which entered service in 1906. ... Admiral Sir Percy Scott was a British admiral in the Royal Navy and a pioneer in modern naval gunnery. ...


1914–1945

The British Grand Fleet sailing in parallel columns in World War I

During the two World Wars the Royal Navy played a vital role in keeping the United Kingdom supplied with food, arms and raw materials and in defeating the German campaigns of unrestricted submarine warfare in the first and second battles of the Atlantic. During the First World War the majority of the Royal Navy's strength was deployed at home in the Grand Fleet. The primary aim was to draw the Hochseeflotte (the German "High Seas Fleet") into an engagement. No decisive victory ever came though. The Royal Navy and the Kaiserliche Marine fought many engagements including the Battle of Heligoland Bight, and the Battle of Jutland. Although it suffered heavier losses than the Hocheseeflotte it did succeed in preventing the German Fleet from putting to sea in the latter stages of the War. The British Grand Fleet sailing in parallel columns in World War I This image was scanned from a public domain text by the Great War Primary Documents Archive and is made available by them for any purpose provided that they are credited and a link is given to the Photos... The British Grand Fleet sailing in parallel columns in World War I This image was scanned from a public domain text by the Great War Primary Documents Archive and is made available by them for any purpose provided that they are credited and a link is given to the Photos... A world war is a war affecting the majority of the worlds major nations. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up material in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Unrestricted submarine warfare is a kind of naval warfare in which submarines sink merchant ships without warning. ... The First Battle of the Atlantic (1914–1918) was a naval campaign of World War I, largely fought in the seas around the British Isles and in the Atlantic Ocean. ... Combatants Royal Navy Royal Canadian Navy United States Navy (1941–5) Kriegsmarine Regia Marina (1940–3) Commanders Sir Percy Noble Sir Max K. Horton Percy W. Nelles Leonard W. Murray Ernest J. King Erich Raeder Karl Dönitz Casualties 30,248 merchant sailors 3,500 merchant vessels 175 warships 28... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Grand Fleet during WWI Grand Fleet ships in formation During World War I, the British Home Fleet was renamed the Grand Fleet. ... German battlecruiser Derfflinger scuttled at Scapa Flow. ... The Kaiserliche Marine or Imperial Navy was the German Navy created by the formation of the German Empire and existed between 1871 and 1919; it grew out of the Prussian Navy and the Norddeutsche Bundesmarine. ... Combatants Britain German Empire Commanders David Beatty Reginald Tyrwhitt Leberecht Maass Strength 5 battlecruisers 8 light cruisers 33 destroyers 3 submarines 6 light cruisers 19 torpedo boats 12 minesweepers Casualties 35 killed 55 wounded 712 killed 149 wounded 336 captured 3 light cruisers 1 torpedo boat The First Battle of... Combatants Grand Fleet of the Royal Navy High Seas Fleet of the Kaiserliche Marine Commanders Sir John Jellicoe Sir David Beatty Reinhard Scheer Franz von Hipper Strength 28 battleships 9 battlecruisers 8 heavy cruisers 26 light cruisers 78 destroyers 1 minelayer 1 seaplane carrier 16 battleships 5 battlecruisers 6 pre...


In the inter-war period the Royal Navy was stripped of much of its power. The Washington Naval Treaty of 1922, together with the deplorable financial conditions during the immediate post-war period and the Great Depression, forced the Admiralty to scrap some capital ships and to cancel plans for new construction. The London Naval Treaty of 1930 deferred new capital ship construction until 1937 and reiterated construction limits on cruisers, destroyers and submarines. As international tensions increased in the mid-1930s the Second London Naval Treaty of 1935 failed to halt the development of a naval arms race and by 1938 treaty limits were effectively ignored. The re-armament of the Royal Navy was well under way by this point; the Royal Navy had constructed the King George V class of 1936 and several aircraft carriers including Ark Royal. In addition to new construction, several existing old battleships, battlecruisers and heavy cruisers were reconstructed, and anti-aircraft weaponry reinforced. The Washington Naval Treaty limited the naval armaments of its five signatories: the United States, the British Empire, the Empire of Japan, the French Third Republic, and Italy. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Flag of the Lord High Admiral The Admiralty was formerly the authority in the United Kingdom responsible for the command of the Royal Navy. ... The London Naval Treaty was an agreement between the United Kingdom, Japan, France, Italy and the United States, signed on April 22, 1930, which to regulate submarine warfare and limited military shipbuilding. ... The Second London Naval Disarmament Conference opened in England on December 9, 1935. ... The term arms race in its original usage describes a competition between two or more parties for military supremacy. ... One of the KGV battleships, HMS Prince of Wales (1941) This article is about the 1939 class. ... HMS Ark Royal (91), was the third ship of the Royal Navy to carry the name and the second to be an aircraft carrier. ...

British Battlecruiser HMS Hood
British Battlecruiser HMS Hood

During the early phases of World War II, the Royal Navy provided critical cover during British evacuations from Dunkirk, Greece and Crete. In the latter operation Admiral Cunningham ran great risks to extract the Army, and saved many soldiers. The Royal Navy suffered huge losses in the early stages of the war including HMS Hood, HMS Repulse and HMS Prince of Wales. As well as providing cover in operations it was also vital in guarding the sea lanes that enabled British forces to fight in remote parts of the world such as North Africa, the Mediterranean and the Far East. Naval supremacy in the Atlantic was vital to the amphibious operations carried out, such as the invasions of Northwest Africa, Sicily, Italy, and Normandy. During the war however, it became clear that aircraft carriers were the new capital ship of naval warfare, and that Britain's former naval superiority in terms of battleships had become irrelevant. Britain was an early innovator in aircraft carrier design, in place of the now obsolete and vulnerable battleship. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... French troops rescued by a British merchant ship at Dunkirk British evacuation on Dunkirk beach Operation Dynamo (or Dunkirk Evacuation, the Miracle of Dunkirk or just Dunkirk) was the name given to the World War II mass evacuation of Allied soldiers from May 26 to June 4, 1940, during the... Combatants Greece United Kingdom New Zealand Australia Germany Italy Commanders Bernard Freyberg Kurt Student Strength United Kingdom: 15,000 Greece: 11,000 Australia: 7,100 New Zealand: 6,700 Total: 40,000 (10,000 without fighting capability. ... Admiral of the Fleet Sir Andrew Cunningham Bronze bust of Lord Cunningham, looking at Nelsons column and Whitehall Sir Andrew Browne Cunningham, 1st Viscount Cunningham of Hyndhope (7 January 1883–12 June 1963), familiarly known as ABC, was a famous British admiral of World War II, winning distinction in... For other ships of this name see HMS Hood (disambiguation). ... HMS Repulse was a Renown-class battlecruiser, the second to last battlecruiser built for the Royal Navy. ... HMS Prince of Wales was a King George V-class battleship of the Royal Navy, built at the Cammell Laird shipyard in Birkenhead, England. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... The far east as a cultural block includes East Asia, Southeast Asia, Northeast Asia and South Asia. ... Combatants United States United Kingdom Free French Forces Vichy France Commanders Dwight Eisenhower Andrew Cunningham François Darlan Strength 73,500 60,000 Casualties 479+ dead 720 wounded 1,346+ dead 1,997 wounded Operation Torch (initially called Operation Gymnast) was the British-American invasion of French North Africa in... Combatants United States United Kingdom Canada Free France Poland Germany Commanders Dwight Eisenhower (Supreme Allied Commander) Bernard Montgomery (land) Bertram Ramsay (sea) Trafford Leigh-Mallory (air) Omar Bradley (U.S. 1st Army) Miles Dempsey (UK 2nd Army) Harry Crerar (Canadian 1st Army) Gerd von Rundstedt (OB WEST) Erwin Rommel (Heeresgruppe... Two aircraft carriers, USS (left), and HMS Illustrious (right), showing the difference in size between a supercarrier and a light V/STOL aircraft carrier. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Postwar period and 21st century

After World War II, the decline of the British Empire and the economic hardships in Britain at the time forced the reduction in the size and capability of the Royal Navy. The increasingly powerful U.S. Navy took on the former role of the Royal Navy as a means of keeping peace around the world. However, the threat of the Soviet Union and British commitments throughout the world created a new role for the Navy. In the 1960s, the Royal Navy received its first nuclear weapons and was later to become responsible for the maintenance of the UK's nuclear deterrent. In the latter stages of the Cold War, the Royal Navy was reconfigured with three anti-submarine warfare (ASW) aircraft carriers and a force of small frigates and destroyers. Its purpose was to search for and destroy Soviet submarines in the North Atlantic. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... The United Kingdom was the third country to test an independently developed nuclear weapon in October 1952. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... “A/S” redirects here. ... Four aircraft carriers, (bottom-to-top) Principe de Asturias, amphibious assault carrier USS Wasp, USS Forrestal and light V/STOL carrier HMS Invincible, showing size differences of late 20th century carriers An aircraft carrier is a warship designed to deploy and in most cases recover aircraft, acting as a sea... For the bird, see Frigatebird. ... USS McFaul underway in the Atlantic Ocean. ... The Soviet Navy (Russian: Военно-морской флот СССР, Voyenno-morskoy flot SSSR, literally Naval military forces of the USSR) was the naval arm of the Soviet armed forces. ... USS Virginia, a Virginia-class nuclear attack (SSN) submarine Alvin in 1978, a year after first exploring hydrothermal vents. ... For other uses, see Atlantic (disambiguation) The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one-fifth of its surface. ...

HMS Illustrious, one of the Royal Navy's current aircraft carriers
HMS Illustrious, one of the Royal Navy's current aircraft carriers

The most important operation conducted predominantly by the Royal Navy after the Second World War was the defeat in 1982 of Argentina in the Falkland Islands War. Despite losing four naval ships and other civilian and RFA ships the Royal Navy proved it was still able to fight a battle 8,345 miles (12,800 km) from Great Britain. HMS Conqueror is the only nuclear-powered submarine to have engaged an enemy ship with torpedoes, sinking the Argentine cruiser ARA General Belgrano. The war also underlined the importance of aircraft carriers and submarines and exposed the service's late 20th century dependence on chartered merchant vessels. The Royal Navy also took part in the Gulf War, the Kosovo conflict, the Afghanistan Campaign, and the 2003 Iraq War, the last of which saw RN warships bombard positions in support of the Al Faw Peninsula landings by Royal Marines. In August 2005 the Royal Navy rescued seven Russians stranded in a submarine off the Kamchatka peninsula. Using its Scorpio 45, a remote-controlled mini-sub, the submarine was freed from the fishing nets and cables that had held the Russian submarine for three days. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... There have been five ships in the Royal Navy to bear the proud name Illustrious, and as her name suggests, she and her predecessors have had an illustrious history. ... Combatants Argentina United Kingdom Commanders President Leopoldo Galtieri Vice-Admiral Juan Lombardo Brigadier-General Ernesto Crespo Brigade-General Mario Menéndez Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher Admiral Sir John Fieldhouse Rear-Admiral John “Sandy” Woodward Major-General Jeremy Moore Casualties 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner 75 fixed... The Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) is the service that keeps the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom running around the world. ... HMS Conqueror was a Churchill-class nuclear-powered submarine that served in the Royal Navy from 1971 to 1990. ... For the Argentine politician and military leader, see Manuel Belgrano. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... Combatants Taliban al-Qaeda IMU Hezbi Islami Afghanistan Northern Alliance United Nations NATO ISAF Commanders Mohammed Omar Obaidullah Akhund # Dadullah  Jalaluddin Haqqani Osama bin Laden Ayman al-Zawahiri Mohammad Atef  Juma Namangani  Gulbuddin Hekmatyar Bismillah Khan Mohammed Fahim Abdul Rashid Dostum William J. Fallon Bantz J. Craddock Egon Ramms Dan... For other uses of the term, see Iraq war (disambiguation) The 2003 invasion of Iraq (also called the 2nd or 3rd Persian Gulf War) began on March 20, 2003, when forces belonging primarily to the United States and the United Kingdom invaded Iraq without the explicit backing of the United... For other uses, see Artillery (disambiguation). ... Al-Faw peninsula, Iraq This article is about the Iraqi peninsula. ... “Kamchatka” redirects here. ... U.S. Navy Super Scorpio ROV The Scorpio is a class of underwater submersible remotely operated deep submergence vehicle used by the United States Navy and British Royal Navy. ...


The Royal Navy today

Fleet composition

See also: List of active Royal Navy ships

In numeric terms the Royal Navy has significantly reduced in size since the 1960s, reflecting the reducing requirement of the state. This raw figure does not take into account the increase in technological capability of the Navy's ships, but it does show the general reduction of capacity.[8] The following table is a breakdown of the fleet numbers since 1960. The separate types of ship and how their numbers have changed are shown.[9] At the beginning of the 1990s, the Royal Navy was a force designed for the Cold War - with its three ASW aircraft carriers and a force of small, though numerous, frigates and destroyers, its main purpose was to search for and destroy Soviet submarines in the North Atlantic. ... This is a list of active Royal Navy ships, complete and correct as of 2006. ...

Year[9] Submarines Carriers Assault Ships Surface Combatants Mine Counter Measure Vessels Patrol Ships and Craft Total
Total SSBN SSN SS & SSK Total CV CV(L) Total Cruisers Destroyers Frigates
1960 48 0 0 48 9 6 3 0 145 6 55 84 202
1965 47 0 1 46 6 4 2 0 117 5 36 76 170
1970 42 4 3 35 5 3 2 2 97 4 19 74 146
1975 32 4 8 20 3 1 2 2 72 2 10 60 43 14 166
1980 32 4 11 17 3 0 3 2 67 1 13 53 36 22 162
1985 33 4 14 15 4 0 4 2 56 0 15 41 45 32 172
1990 31 4 17 10 3 0 3 2 49 0 14 35 41 34 160
1995 16 4 12 0 3 0 3 2 35 0 12 23 18 32 106
2000 16 4 12 0 3 0 3 3 32 0 11 21 21 23 98
2005 15 4 11 0 3 0 3 2 28 0 9 19 16 26 90
2006 14 4 10 0 2 0 2 3 25 0 8 17 16 22 82

Before the Falklands War in 1982, the then Defence Secretary John Nott had advocated, and initiated, a series of cutbacks to the Navy.[10] The Falklands War though, proved a need for the Royal Navy to regain an expeditionary and littoral capability which, with its resources and structure at the time, would prove difficult. With the end of the Cold War at the beginning of the 1990s, the Royal Navy was a force focused on blue water anti-submarine warfare. Its purpose was to search for and destroy Soviet submarines in the North Atlantic, and to operate the nuclear deterrent submarine force. Combatants Argentina United Kingdom Commanders President Leopoldo Galtieri Vice-Admiral Juan Lombardo Brigadier-General Ernesto Crespo Brigade-General Mario Menéndez Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher Admiral Sir John Fieldhouse Rear-Admiral John “Sandy” Woodward Major-General Jeremy Moore Casualties 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner 75 fixed... The Right Honourable Sir John William Frederic Nott (born February 1, 1932 in Bideford, Devon) was a British Conservative Party politician prominent in the late 1970s and early 1980s. ... A littoral is the region near the shoreline of a body of fresh or salt water. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... A rare occurrence of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ... Soviet redirects here. ... USS Los Angeles A submarine is a specialized watercraft that can operate underwater. ... The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one_fifth of its surface. ... Mutual assured destruction (MAD) is the doctrine of military strategy in which a full scale use of nuclear weapons by one of two opposing sides would result in the destruction of both the attacker and the defender. ...


UK foreign policy after the end of the Cold War has given rise to a number of operations which have required an aircraft carrier to be deployed globally such as the Adriatic, Peace Support Operations in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Kosovo, Sierra Leone, the Persian Gulf. Destroyers and frigates have been deployed against piracy in the Malacca Straits and Horn of Africa. Consequently in the 1990s the navy began a series of projects to modernise the fleet and convert it from a North Atlantic-based anti-submarine force to an expeditionary force. This has involved the replacement of much of the Fleet and has seen a number of large procurement projects.[11] Kosovo (Albanian: Kosova or Kosovë, Serbian: , transliterated ; also , transliterated ) is a region in southern Serbia which has been under United Nations administration since 1999. ... Map of the Persian Gulf. ...


Large Fleet Units - Amphibious and Carriers

Artist's impression of HMS Queen Elizabeth

The two recently ordered Queen Elizabeth class aircraft carriers are to be a new generation of aircraft carrier to replace the three Invincible class ships. The two vessels are expected to cost £3.9 billion, will displace 65,000 tons and are expected to enter service in 2014 and 2016 respectively.[12] They will be STOVL carriers, operating the STOVL variant of the F-35 Lightning II, which has been ordered by both the Fleet Air Arm and the Royal Air Force to replace the Harrier. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (865x609, 95 KB) This is a copyrighted image that has been released by a company or organization to promote their work or product in the media, such as advertising material or a promotional photo in a press kit. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (865x609, 95 KB) This is a copyrighted image that has been released by a company or organization to promote their work or product in the media, such as advertising material or a promotional photo in a press kit. ... The Queen Elizabeth class aircraft carriers (formerly CVF)[4] are a new generation of aircraft carrier being developed for the United Kingdoms Royal Navy. ... The Queen Elizabeth class aircraft carriers (formerly CVF)[4] are a new generation of aircraft carrier being developed for the United Kingdoms Royal Navy. ... Four aircraft carriers, (bottom-to-top) Principe de Asturias, amphibious assault carrier USS Wasp, USS Forrestal and light V/STOL carrier HMS Invincible, showing size differences of late 20th century carriers An aircraft carrier is a warship designed to deploy and in most cases recover aircraft, acting as a sea... The sixth (and current) HMS Invincible. ... “GBP” redirects here. ... STOVL is an acronym for Short Take Off and Vertical Landing. ... The F-35 Lightning II is a single-seat, single-engine, stealth-capable military strike fighter, a multi-role aircraft that can perform close air support, tactical bombing, and air-to-air combat. ... The Fleet Air Arm is the branch of the Royal Navy responsible for the operation of the aircraft on board their ships. ... “RAF” redirects here. ...


The introduction of the 4 vessels of the Bay class of landing ship dock into the Royal Fleet Auxiliary in 2006 and 2007, together with the Albion class means that the Royal Navy has a significantly enhanced amphibious capability. In November 2006 the First Sea Lord, Admiral Sir Jonathon Band said, These ships represent a major uplift in the Royal Navy's war fighting capability.[13] An amphibious transport dock (also called a landing platform dock or LPD) is an amphibious assault ship, a warship that embarks, transports, and lands elements of a landing force for expeditionary warfare missions. ... The Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) is the service that keeps the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom running around the world. ... HMS Bulwark (L15) in the northern Persian Gulf in March 2006 The Albion class is a STATE OF THE ART class of landing platform dock, and are the newest amphibious assault vessels in the Royal Navy fleet. ... The First Sea Lord is the professional head of the British Royal Navy. ... Admiral Sir Jonathon Band, KCB, ADC,BSc(Exon), (born 1950), since 2006, is the First Sea Lord of the United Kingdom, the most senior serving officer in the Royal Navy. ...


Escort Units

HMS Daring: the first Type 45 destroyer

The escort fleet, in the form of frigates and destroyers, is the traditional workhorse of the Navy.[14] The escort fleet is also being updated. The near obsolete Type 42 destroyer is to replaced with the Type 45 destroyer. For its primary mission, it will be equipped with the PAAMS integrated anti-aircraft system. As with the Type 42, the Type 45 will also have a limited anti-surface/anti-submarine role. The last frigate to enter service was the Type 23 frigate, HMS St Albans (F83) On July 21, 2004, in the Delivering Security in a Changing World review of defence spending, Defence Secretary Geoff Hoon announced that 3 frigates would be paid off as part of a continuous cost-cutting strategy. Several designs have been created for a new generation Frigate such as the Future Surface Combatant, but none of these have got past the Main Gate stage. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3003x1477, 1433 KB) Summary HMS Daring under construction. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3003x1477, 1433 KB) Summary HMS Daring under construction. ... Six vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Daring. ... The United Kingdoms Type 45 destroyer (also known as the D or Daring class) is a state-of-the art air defence destroyer programme of the Royal Navy. ... Type 42 destroyer HMS Manchester Type 42, also known as the Sheffield class, is a class of destroyers of the Royal Navy. ... The United Kingdoms Type 45 destroyer (also known as the D or Daring class) is a state-of-the art air defence destroyer programme of the Royal Navy. ... The Principle Anti Air Missile System (PAAMS) is a joint French/Italian/British program for a naval anti-aircraft weapon. ... The Type 23 frigate is a class of warship serving with the Royal Navy, also known as the Duke class. ... HMS (F83) is a Type 23 frigate of the Royal Navy. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2003 Defence White Paper, entitled Delivering Security in a Changing World sets out the future of the British military, and builds on the 1998 Strategic Defence Review (SDR) and the 2002 SDR New Chapter which responded to the challenges raised by the War on Terror. ... Geoff Hoon (right) at Pentagon briefing Geoffrey William Geoff Hoon (born December 6, 1953) is a British politician. ... The Future Surface Combatant was the projected succesor to Type 22 and Type 23 frigates in service of the British Royal Navy until the programs de facto cancellation in late 2004. ...


Submarines

HMS Astute on the shiplift after launch

The submarine force is being replaced and replenished, with 4 new Astute class submarines ordered. These are much larger than their predecessors, the Trafalgar class and are expected to displace 7,400 tons submerged.[15] In December 2006, plans were unveiled for a new class of submarine to replace the Vanguard class submarine, which is due to be replaced by 2024. This new class will mean that the United Kingdom will maintain a nuclear ballistic missile submarine fleet and the ability to launch nuclear weapons.[16] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 573 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1164 × 1218 pixel, file size: 828 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)cropped version of Image:Astute2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 573 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1164 × 1218 pixel, file size: 828 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)cropped version of Image:Astute2. ... HMS Astute (S119) (possibly S20) is the lead ship of her class of nuclear-powered Fleet submarines. ... The Astute class submarines are the next generation nuclear Fleet submarines of the Royal Navy. ... The Trafalgar class submarines were, until the introduction of the Astute class, the Royal Navys most advanced nuclear fleet submarines (SSNs). ... The Vanguard class are the Royal Navys current nuclear ballistic missile submarines (SSBN), each armed with up to 16 Trident II SLBMs. ... The Redoutable, a French SNLE (now a museum) A ballistic missile submarine is a submarine equipped to launch ballistic missiles (SLBMs), such as the Russian SS-N-18 or the American Trident. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 kilometers (11 mi) above the hypocenter A nuclear weapon derives its destructive force from nuclear reactions of fusion or fission. ...


Other Vessels

At the beginning of the 1990s the Royal Navy had two classes of Offshore Patrol vessel, the Island class, and the larger Castle class. However, in 1997 a decision was taken to replace them. An order for three much larger offshore patrol vessels, the River class was placed in 2001. Unusually, the three River class ships are owned by Vosper Thorneycroft, and leased to the Royal Navy until 2013. A modified River class vessel, HMS Clyde, was commissioned in July 2007 and will become the Falkland Islands guardship. The Royal Navy also has the Sandown class minehunter and the Hunt class mine countermeasure vessel. The Hunt class of 8 vessels are mine countermeasure vessels that combine the separate role of the traditional minesweeper and that of the active minehunter in one hull. When needed they take on the role of offshore patrol vessels. The Royal Navy has a mandate to provide support to the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), which comes in the form of the dedicated Antarctic Patrol Ship HMS Endurance. The four Hecla class vessels were replaced by the survey vessel HMS Scott which surveys the ocean floor. HMS Roebuck meanwhile, surveys the UK continental shelf or other shallow waters in support of the larger vessels. The other survey vessels of the Royal Navy are the two multi-role ships of the Echo class which came into service in 2002 and 2003. The Island class was developed as a result of the Royal Navys experiences in the so called Cod War with Iceland, and the success of HMS Jura in fishery protection patrols. ... The Castle class was intended as a series of six offshore patrol vessels for the Royal Navy, designed in response to criticism of the previous Island class. ... River Class The River class is a class of three offshore patrol vessels in the Royal Navy, replacing the six ships of the Island class. ... VT Group plc is the British defence company formerly known as Vosper Thornycroft. ... HMS Clyde (P257) is the ninth ship in the Royal Navy to bear the name. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For the World War I minesweepers, see Hunt class minesweeper. ... A Mine Countermeasure Vessel or MCMV is a type of naval ship tasked with the location of and destruction of naval mines. ... USS Pivot (AM 276) World War II United States Admirable Class Minesweeper shown in the Gulf of Mexico on sea trials 12 July 1944 Image:Hameln Class. ... A Pinguin B3 minehunting ROV of the German Navy, explosive charges can be seen underneath the main body. ... BAS headquarters The British Antarctic Survey (BAS), formerly the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), is an institute of the Natural Environment Research Council, and has, for the last fifty years, undertaken the majority of Britains scientific research on and around the Antarctic continent. ... For other ships with the same name, see HMS Endurance. ... Hecla class The Hecla class formed the backbone of the Royal Navys ocean survey fleet from the mid-1960s. ... HMS Scott is an ocean-going survey vessel of the Royal Navy. ... HMS Roebuck is a coastal survey vessel of the Royal Navy. ...  Sediment  Rock  Mantle  The global continental shelf, highlighted in cyan The continental shelf is the extended perimeter of each continent, which is covered during interglacial periods such as the current epoch by relatively shallow seas (known as shelf seas) and gulfs. ... The two ships of Echo class are the latest vessels to join the Royal Navys Hydrographic Squadron. ...


Current role

The current role of the Royal Navy (RN) is to protect British interests at home and abroad, executing the foreign and defence policies of Her Majesty's Government through the exercise of military effect, diplomatic activities and other activities in support of these objectives. The RN is also a key element of the UK contribution to NATO, with a number of assets allocated to NATO tasks at any time.[17] These objectives are delivered via a number of core capabilities:[18] NATO 2002 Summit in Prague. ...

The Vanguard class are the Royal Navys current nuclear ballistic missile submarines (SSBN), each armed with up to 16 Trident II SLBMs. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Fleet Air Arm is the branch of the Royal Navy responsible for the operation of the aircraft on board their ships. ... The British Commandos were first formed by the Army in June 1940 during World War II as a well-armed but non-regimental raider force employing unconventional and irregular tactics to assault, disrupt and reconnoitre the enemy in mainland Europe and Scandinavia. ... Missing image RAF Harrier GR7 Joint Force Harrier is a defence proposal brought by the British Government as part of Strategic Defence Review. ... A Royal Air Force Merlin HC3 is an example of a helicopter of Joint Helicopter Command. ... Although the majority of the Royal Navy fleet, unless required, remains training and exercising in and around Home Waters, the Navy has a number of standing commitments, including those held for contingent operations, to provide ships for various missions around the world: // Fleet Flagship and R2 Carrier Normally two aircraft... A Pinguin B3 minehunting ROV of the German Navy, explosive charges can be seen underneath the main body. ... Hydrography is the measurement of physical characteristics of waters and marginal land. ... Meteorology is the scientific study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting. ... Sea areas in international rights Under the law of the sea, an Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) is a seazone over which a state has special rights over the exploration and use of marine resources. ...

Current deployments

The Royal Navy is currently deployed in many areas of the world, including a number of standing Royal Navy deployments. These include several home tasks as well as oversea deployments. The Royal Navy is deployed in the Mediterranean as part of standing NATO deployments including mine countermeasures and NATO Maritime Group 2. In both the North and South Atlantic Royal Naval vessels are patrolling. There is always a Falkland Islands Patrol Vessel on deployment, currently HMS Dumbarton Castle, though soon to be replaced by HMS Clyde. The Royal Navy is also deployed in the Middle East to provide "maritime security and surveillance in the Northern Persian Gulf".[19] Although the majority of the Royal Navy fleet, unless required, remains training and exercising in and around Home Waters, the Navy has a number of standing commitments, including those held for contingent operations, to provide ships for various missions around the world: // Fleet Flagship and R2 Carrier Normally two aircraft... HMS Dumbarton Castle main role is the protection of the offshore assets of the United Kingdom, including our oil and gas installations and fisheries out to the 200 mile limit. ... HMS Clyde (P257) is the ninth ship in the Royal Navy to bear the name. ...


Command, Control & Organisation

The head of the Royal Navy is the Lord High Admiral, a position which has been held by the Sovereign since 1964 (the Sovereign being the overall head of the Armed Forces). For the international law of the sea, see Admiralty law. ... The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen-in-Parliament) legislative power. ... The armed forces of the United Kingdom, commonly known as the British Armed Forces or Her Majestys Armed Forces, and sometimes legally the Armed Forces of the Crown[1], encompasses a navy, army, and an air force. ...


The professional head of the Naval Service is the First Sea Lord, an Admiral and member of the Defence Council. The Defence council delegates management of the Naval Service to the Admiralty Board, chaired by the Secretary of State for Defence, which directs the Navy Board, a sub-committee of the Admiralty Board comprising only Naval Officers and Ministry of Defence (MOD) Civil Servants. These are all based in MOD Main Building in London, where the First Sea Lord, also known as the Chief of the Naval Staff, is supported by the Naval Staff Department. The First Sea Lord is the professional head of the British Royal Navy. ... Admiral is a senior rank of the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom, outranked only by the rank Admiral of the Fleet. ... The Defence Council of the United Kingdom is the body legally entrusted with the defence of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories and with control over the British armed forces, and is part of the Ministry of Defence. ... The Admiralty Board is a committee of the Defence Council of the United Kingdom responsible for the administration of the Royal Navy. ... The Secretary of State for Defence is the senior United Kingdom government minister in charge of the Ministry of Defence. ... For the international law of the sea, see Admiralty law. ... The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for implementation of government defence policy and the headquarters of the British Armed Forces. ...


Senior Leadership

See also: Royal Navy officer rank insignia and Royal Navy enlisted rank insignia

As of July 2007, the following persons were in office: History Insignia for officers was first introduced in 1748, with differences in rank being seen in the cut of the lapels and the cuffs. ... For Chief Petty Officer both the shoulder tab insignia and the sleeve insignia from the No. ...

For the international law of the sea, see Admiralty law. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... For the Admiralty Board of Imperial Russia, see Admiralty Board (Russia). ... The First Sea Lord is the professional head of the British Royal Navy. ... Admiral Sir Jonathon Band, KCB, ADC,BSc(Exon), (born 1950), since 2006, is the First Sea Lord of the United Kingdom, the most senior serving officer in the Royal Navy. ... The Commander-in-Chief Fleet, or CINCFLEET, is the senior admiral responsible for the preparation and operation of the ships, submarines and aircraft of the Royal Navy. ... For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... Admiral Sir James Burnell-Nugent, KCB, CBE, ADC, is the current Commander-in-Chief Fleet of the Royal Navy and Vice-Admiral of the United Kingdom. ... Tri-service badge of the British Army, Royal Air Force and Royal Navy. ... The Second Sea Lord is one of the senior admirals of the Royal Navy. ... Vice Admiral Adrian Johns CBE is a senior commander in the Royal Navy and is currently the Second Sea Lord. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... The Third Sea Lord and Controller of the Navy was formerly the Naval Lord and member of the Board of Admiralty responsible for procurement and matériel in the British Royal Navy. ... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... DE&S headquarters, Abbey Wood, Bristol Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S) is the name of the merged procurement and support organisation within the UK Ministry of Defence. ... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... Rear Admiral Amjad Hussain is a high-ranking officer in the Royal Navy. ...

Fleet Command

For more details on this topic, see List of fleets and major commands of the Royal Navy.

Full command of all deployable fleet units (including the Royal Marines and the Fleet Auxiliary) is the responsibility of Commander-in-Chief Fleet (CINCFLEET), with a Command Headquarters at HMS Excellent in Portsmouth and an Operational Headquarters at Northwood, Middlesex. The latter is co-located with the Permanent Joint Headquarters of the United Kingdom's armed forces, and a NATO Regional Command, Allied Maritime Component Command Northwood (AMCCN). CINCFLEET is also Commander AMCCN. The purpose of CINCFLEET is to provide ships and submarines and commando forces at readiness to conduct military and diplomatic tasks as required by the UK government, including the recruitment and training of personnel. // Current Fleet British Fleet Past Fleets British Atlantic Fleet British Channel Fleet British East Indies Fleet British Eastern Fleet British Far East Fleet British Grand Fleet British Home Fleet British Mediterranean Fleet British Pacific Fleet British Reserve Fleet British Western Fleet Force H Past Major Commands Nore Command Plymouth Command... The Commander-in-Chief Fleet, or CINCFLEET, is the senior admiral responsible for the preparation and operation of the ships, submarines and aircraft of the Royal Navy. ... There have been a number of real ships named HMS Excellent over the years, but since around 1920 the name has been associated with the Royal Naval Gunnery training School at Whale Island in Portsmouth Harbour. ... Northwood is a suburb of London in the London Borough of Hillingdon. ... The Middlesex Guildhall at Westminster Middlesex is one of the 39 historic counties of England and was the second smallest (after Rutland). ... The Permanent Joint Headquarters is the British Tri Service Base in Northwood from where all overseas military operations are planned and controlled. ... NATO 2002 Summit in Prague. ...

  • Commander-in-Chief Fleet Headquarters:
    • Deputy CINC and Chief of Staff: Vice Admiral Paul Boissier, (based in HMS Excellent, commands the Headquarters).
    • Commander Operations:Rear Admiral D J Cooke (based at Northwood, also Rear Admiral Submarines and Commander Submarine Allied Forces North (NATO)).
    • Commander UK Maritime Forces: Rear Admiral Neil Morisetti, (deployable Force Commander responsible for Maritime Battle Staffs; UK Task Group, UK Amphibious Task Group, UK Maritime Component Command).
    • Commander UK Amphibious Force: Major General G S Robison, also the Commandant General Royal Marines

Vice Admiral is a naval rank of three star level, equivalent to Lieutenant General in seniority. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... The Commandant General Royal Marines is the professional head of the Royal Marines. ...

Locations

HMNB Clyde at Faslane, the home of the United Kingdom's nuclear deterrent

The Royal Navy currently operates three bases in the United Kingdom where commissioned ships are based; Portsmouth, Clyde and Devonport. Each base hosts a Flotilla Command under a Commodore, or in the case of Faslane a Captain, responsible for the provision of Operational Capability using the ships and submarines within the flotilla. 3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines is similarly commanded by a Brigadier and based in Plymouth. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (640x792, 49 KB)From [www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (640x792, 49 KB)From [www. ... Location of Faslane and RNAD Coulport Faslane Naval Base, HMNB Clyde Her Majestys Naval Base (HMNB) Clyde (HMS Neptune), is one of three operating bases for the Royal Navy (the others being HMNB Devonport and HMNB Portsmouth). ... Faslane Naval Base, officially HMS Neptune, is a Royal Navy base situated on Gare Loch, which connects to the River Clyde in Scotland. ... The Vanguard class are the Royal Navys current nuclear ballistic missile submarines (SSBN), each armed with up to 16 Trident II SLBMs. ... This is a list of fleet bases of the Royal Navy. ... Portsmouth Naval Dockyard. ... Location of Faslane and RNAD Coulport Faslane Naval Base, HMNB Clyde Her Majestys Naval Base (HMNB) Clyde (HMS Neptune), is one of three operating bases for the Royal Navy (the others being HMNB Devonport and HMNB Portsmouth). ... Devonport in 1909, courtesy WW1 Archive Devonport Dockyard and the Hamoaze from the Rame Peninsula, Cornwall Her Majestys Naval Base (HMNB) Devonport (HMS Drake), is one of three operating naval bases in the Royal Navy. ... British Commodore Sleeve Rank Command flag Commodore is a rank of the Royal Navy that dates to the mid-17th century: it was first used in the time of William III. There was a need for officers to command squadrons, but it was not deemed desirable to create new admirals. ... Location of Faslane and RNAD Coulport Faslane Naval Base, HMNB Clyde Her Majestys Naval Base (HMNB) Clyde (HMS Neptune), is one of three operating bases for the Royal Navy (the others being HMNB Devonport and HMNB Portsmouth). ... 3 Commando Brigade is the main manoeuvre force of the British Royal Marines. ... Brigadier (IPA pronunciation: ) is a military rank, the meaning of which has a considerable variation. ...


Historically the Royal Navy maintained Royal Navy Dockyards around the world.[20] Dockyards of the Royal Navy are harbours ships are overhauled and refitted. Only four are operating today; at Devonport, Faslane, Rosyth and at Portsmouth.[8] A Naval Base Review was undertaken in 2006 and early 2007, the outcome being announced by Secretary of State, Des Browne the Defence secretary confirming that all would remain however some reductions in manpower were anticipated.[21] Dockyards of the Royal Navy are harbours where either commissioned ships are based, or where ships are overhauled and refitted. ... Small shipyard in Klaksvík (Faroe Islands), reparing fishing vessels Dockyards and shipyards are places which repair and build ships. ... Devonport in 1909, courtesy WW1 Archive Devonport Dockyard and the Hamoaze from the Rame Peninsula, Cornwall Her Majestys Naval Base (HMNB) Devonport (HMS Drake), is one of three operating naval bases in the Royal Navy. ... Faslane Naval Base, officially HMS Neptune, is a Royal Navy base situated on Gare Loch, which connects to the River Clyde in Scotland. ... Rosyth Dockard is a large naval dockyard in Rosyth which today primarily undertakes refitting of Royal Navy surface vessels. ... Portsmouth Naval Dockyard. ... Desmond Henry Browne (born 22 March 1952), commonly known as Des Browne, is a Scottish Labour Party politician. ...


Significant numbers of naval personnel are employed within the Ministry of Defence, Defence Logistics Organisation, Defence Procurement Agency and on exchange with the Army and Royal Air Force. Small numbers are also on exchange within other government departments. The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... “RAF” redirects here. ...


Special Forces

Main article: Special Boat Service
See also: United Kingdom Special Forces

The Royal Navy, through the Royal Marines, provides the Special Boat Service (SBS), one of the three Special Forces units within the United Kingdom Special Forces group. The SBS is a maritime Special Forces capability is an independent force element of the Royal Marines. Based at RM Poole in Poole, Dorset it is made up of 4 operational squadrons and an element of the Royal Marines Reserve which provides individual trained ranks to the regular force. The Special Boat Service (SBS) is the British Royal Navys special forces unit. ... The United Kingdom Special Forces (UKSF) is an umbrella directorate overseeing the Special Forces units of the British Armed Forces. ... The Special Boat Service (SBS) is the British Royal Navys special forces unit. ... Special Forces (SF) or Special Operations Forces (SOF) are highly-trained military units that conduct specialized operations such as reconnaissance, unconventional warfare, and counter-terrorism actions. ... The United Kingdom Special Forces (UKSF) is an umbrella directorate overseeing the Special Forces units of the British Armed Forces. ... Poole is a coastal town, port and tourist destination, situated on the shores of the English Channel, in the ceremonial county of Dorset in southern England. ... Dorset (pronounced DOR-sit or [dɔ.sət], and sometimes in the past called Dorsetshire) is a county in the south-west of England, on the English Channel coast. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Roles include maritime activities such as covert shore reconnaissance, small boat operations, amphibious raiding and Maritime Counter-Terrorism however the force also conducts traditional land-centric activities.


The SBS provides the special forces element of 3 Commando Brigade when deployed. 3 Commando Brigade is the main manoeuvre force of the British Royal Marines. ...


Titles and naming

Of the Royal Navy

The British Royal Navy is commonly referred to as the "Royal Navy" both in the United Kingdom and other countries. Navies of Commonwealth of Nations countries where the British monarch is also head of state also include their national name e.g. Royal Australian Navy. Some navies of other monarchies, such as the Koninklijke Marine (Royal Netherlands Navy) and Kungliga Flottan (Royal Swedish Navy), are also called "Royal Navy" in their own language. The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2006 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Don McKinnon (since 1 April 2000) Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total... The Commonwealth Realms, shown in pink A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the sixteen sovereign states within the Commonwealth of Nations that recognise Elizabeth II as their respective monarch. ... The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) is the naval branch of the Australian Defence Force. ... For the comic series, see Monarchy (comics). ...


Of ships

Royal Navy ships in commission are prefixed with Her Majesty's Ship (His Majesty's Ship), abbreviated to HMS, e.g., HMS Ark Royal. Submarines are styled HM Submarine, similarly HMS. Names are allocated to ships and submarines by a naming committee within the MOD and given by class, with the names of ships within a class often being thematic (e.g.. the Type 23 class are named after British Dukes) or traditional (e.g., the Invincible class all carry the names of famous historic aircraft carriers). Names are frequently re-used offering a new ship the rich heritage, battle honours and traditions of her predecessors. This list was getting too big, therefore it has been split. ... His or Her Majestys Ship (HMS) is the title used for ships of the navy in some monarchies, either formally or informally. ... His or Her Majestys Ship (HMS) is the title of any commissioned ship in the British Royal Navy, and refers to the King or Queen of the United Kingdom as appropriate at the time. ... HMS is a three-letter acronym that may stand for: Handheld, Manpack, Small Form Factor radio transceivers in the United States military Joint Tactical Radio System Hans Majestäts Skepp (His Majestys ship) or Hennes Majestäts Skepp (Her Majestys Ship), the prefix of Royal Swedish Navy ship... HMS Ark Royal (R07) in Greenwich dock, London This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Type 23 frigate is a class of warship serving with the Royal Navy, also known as the Duke class. ... A duke is a nobleman, historically of highest rank and usually controlling a duchy. ... The sixth (and current) HMS Invincible. ...


As well as a name each ship, and submarine, of the Royal Navy and the Royal Fleet Auxiliary is given a pennant number which in part denotes its role. HMS Leeds Castle, launched in 1943 as a corvette with pennant number K384, was redesignated a frigate in 1948 and given the new flag superior F as seen here. ...

See also: Naming conventions for destroyers of the Royal Navy
See also: Type system of the Royal Navy

The first Torpedo Boat Destroyer (TBD) in the Royal Navy was HMS Havock of 1893. ... The Type system is a classification system used by the British Royal Navy to classify surface escorts by function. ...

Custom and tradition

The Royal Navy has several formal customs and traditions including the use of ensigns and ships badges. Royal Navy ships have several ensigns used when under way and when in port. Commissioned ships and submarines wear the White Ensign at the stern whilst alongside during daylight hours and at the main-mast whilst under way. When alongside, the Union Jack (as distinct from the Union Flag, often referred to as the Union Jack) is flown from the jackstaff at the stem, and can only be flown under way either to signal a court-martial is in progress or to indicate the presence of an Admiral of the Fleet on-board (including the Lord High Admiral, the Monarch).[22] There are many customs and traditions associated with the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom. ... The White Ensign. ... Flag Ratio: 1:2 The Union Flag (also known as the Union Jack and Butchers Apron) is the national flag of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. ... First Navy Jack being raised on a jackstaff A jackstaff is a small vertical spar (pole) in the bow of a ship, on which a particular type of flag, know as a jack, is flown. ...


The Fleet Review is an irregular tradition of assembling the fleet before the monarch. The first review is purported to have been held in 1400 and the most recent review was held on 28 June 2005. This was to mark the bi-centenary of the Battle of Trafalgar; 167 ships from many different nations attended with the Royal Navy supplying 67.[23] British tradition, where the monarch reviews the massed Royal Navy. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


There are several less formal traditions including service nicknames and Naval slang.The nicknames include "The Andrew" (of uncertain origin, possibly after a zealous press ganger[24][25]) and "The Senior Service".[26][27] The RN has evolved a rich volume of slang, known as "Jack-speak". Nowadays the British sailor is usually "Jack" (or "Jenny") rather than the more historical "Jack Tar". Royal Marines are fondly known as "Bootnecks" or often just as "Royals". The current compendium of Naval slang was brought together by Commander A. Covey-Crump and his name has in itself become the subject of Naval slang; Covey Crump.[26] A game traditionally played by the Navy is the four player board game called Uckers. This is similar to Ludo and it is regarded as extremely difficult to learn. Look up Impressment in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Slang is the use of highly informal words and expressions that are not considered standard in the speakers dialect or language. ... Jack Tar was the common Englishmans affectionate name for the sailors of the Royal Navy during the time of the British Empire. ... Commander A. Covey-Crump, Royal Navy (RN), a former Naval Assistant to the Chief of Naval Information, was responsible in the mid-1950s for compiling a record of naval slang. ... Uckers is a four player board game traditionally played in the Royal Navy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Royal Navy in fiction

The Royal Navy has been seen in many forms of entertainment. Some of the most well known revolve around the Napoleonic campaigns of the navy. These have been the subject of many novels including Patrick O'Brian's series featuring Jack Aubrey, C.S. Forester's Horatio Hornblower, Dudley Pope's Ramage and Alexander Kent's Richard Bolitho. Alexander Kent is a pen name of Douglas Reeman who, under his birth name, has written many novels featuring the Royal Navy in the two World Wars. Other well known novels include Alistair MacLean's HMS Ulysses, Nicholas Monsarrat's The Cruel Sea, and C.S. Forester's The Ship, all set during World War II. Patrick OBrian (12 December 1914 – 2 January 2000; born as Richard Patrick Russ) was an English novelist and translator, best known for his Aubrey–Maturin series of novels set in the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars and centered on the friendship of Captain Jack Aubrey and the Irish... The Aubrey–Maturin series, also known as the Aubreyad, is a sequence of 20 historical novels by Patrick OBrian, set during the Napoleonic Wars and centering on the friendship between Captain Jack Aubrey of the Royal Navy and his ships surgeon Stephen Maturin, who is also a... Cecil Scott Forester is the pen name of Cecil Smith (August 27, 1899 - April 2, 1966), an English novelist whose rose to fame with tales of adventure with military themes, notably the 11-book Horatio Hornblower series (being filmed with Ioan Gruffudd as Horatio Hornblower) about naval warfare during the... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dudley Pope (29 December 1925 - 25 April 1997) was a British writer of both nautical fiction and history, most notable for his Lord Ramage series of historical novels. ... Ramage is the surname of several notable people, including: Henry Ramage (approx. ... Alexander Kent is the pseudonym of the British novelist Douglas Edward Reeman. ... Richard Bolitho is a fictional Royal Navy officer who is the main character in a series of novels written by Douglas Reeman (using the pseudonym Alexander Kent). ... A pen name or nom de plume is a pseudonym adopted by an author. ... Douglas Reeman is a British author who has written many historical fiction books on the Royal Navy, set during World War II He has also written under the pseudonym of Alexander Kent - Napoleonic era Royal Navy. ... Alistair Stuart MacLean (April 28, 1922 - February 2, 1987) was a Scottish novelist who wrote successful thrillers or adventure stories, the best known of which are perhaps The Guns of Navarone and Where Eagles Dare. ... HMS Ulysses was the first novel by British author Alistair Maclean, and ultimately, one of his most popular. ... Commander Nicholas John Turney Monsarrat RNVR (22 March 1910 – 8 August 1979) was a UK novelist best known today for his sea stories, particularly The Cruel Sea (1951). ... The cover of the UK 1956 paperback edition of: The Cruel Sea The Cruel Sea is a 1951 novel by Nicholas Monsarrat. ... Cecil Scott Forester is the pen name of Cecil Smith (August 27, 1899 - April 2, 1966), an English novelist whose rose to fame with tales of adventure with military themes, notably the 11-book Horatio Hornblower series (being filmed with Ioan Gruffudd as Horatio Hornblower) about naval warfare during the... The Ship is a novel written by CS Forester set in the Mediterranean during World War II and first published in May 1943. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


The Navy can also be seen in several films. The fictional spy James Bond is 'officially' a commander in the Royal Navy. Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World was based on Patrick O'Brian's character Jack Aubrey. the Pirates of the Caribbean series of films also includes the Navy as the force pursuing the eponymous pirates. Noel Coward directed and starred in his own film In Which We Serve, which tells the story of the crew of the fictional HMS Torrin during World War II. It was intended as a propaganda film and was released in 1942. Coward starred as the ship's captain, with supporting roles from John Mills and Richard Attenborough.[28] Flemings image of James Bond; commissioned to aid the Daily Express comic strip artists. ... Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World is a 2003 film directed by Peter Weir and starring Russell Crowe as Jack Aubrey, with Paul Bettany as Stephen Maturin. ... Pirates of the Caribbean is a multi-billion dollar Walt Disney franchise encompassing a theme park ride, a series of films and spinoff novels as well as numerous video games and other publications. ... Sir Noël Peirce Coward (December 16, 1899 – March 26, 1973) was an English actor, playwright, and composer of popular music. ... In Which We Serve is a 1942 war film written by and starring Noel Coward, and directed by Coward and David Lean, both making their directorial debut. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... John Mills as Professor Bernard Quatermass in the Thames Television science-fiction serial Quatermass (1979). ... Richard Samuel Attenborough, Baron Attenborough, CBE, KBE (born August 29, 1923) is an English actor, director, producer, and entrepreneur. ...


The Royal Navy has not escaped the television screens either. Bernard Cornwell's Sharpe series, although primarily involving the Peninsular War of the time, includes several novels involving Richard Sharpe at sea with the Navy. The Royal Navy has also been the subject of an acclaimed 1970s BBC television drama series, Warship. It was also the subject of a five part documentary, entitled Shipmates, that followed the workings of the Royal Navy day to day.[29] Bernard Cornwell OBE (born February 23, 1944) is a prolific and popular English historical novelist. ... This article is about the television series. ... Combatants Kingdom of Spain, United Kingdom, Kingdom of Portugal French Empire The Peninsular War or Spanish War of Independence (Guerra de la Independencia Española) was a war in the Iberian Peninsula. ... Richard Sharpe is the central character in Bernard Cornwells Sharpe novels and of the Sharpe series of TV movies in which he is played by Sean Bean. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... Warship was an extremely popular British television drama series produced by the BBC between 1973 and 1977. ...


See also

The Naval Vessel Register (NVR), official inventory of ships and service craft in custody or titled by the United States Navy, traces its origin back to the 1880s. ... This page is a list of famous ships and sailors of the Royal Navy. ... The following is a list of Royal Navy ship names by name in alphabetical order, both past and present. ... The Naval Intelligence Department (NID) in the United Kingdom, otherwise known as Room 39. ... Wreaths of artificial poppies used on Remembrance Day Image:BrLegionflag. ... The Royal Naval Reserve are a part of the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom. ...

References

  1. ^ Chapter II: REGIONAL OVERVIEW AND CONTRIBUTIONS OF KEY ALLIES: Contributions of Selected NATO Allies. Allied Contributions to the Common Defense: A Report to the United States Congress by the Secretary of Defense. United States Department of Defense (March 2001). Retrieved on 2006-10-14.
  2. ^ Vanguard to Trident 1945-2000. Royal Navy. Retrieved on 2007-07-14.
  3. ^ The Royal Navy: Britain’s Trident for a Global Agenda. Henry Jackson Society website. Retrieved on 2007-07-14.
  4. ^ How many people are there in the Royal Navy?, Royal Navy Website, accessed 25 August, 2007.
  5. ^ Rodger, N.A.M., The Command of the Ocean, Chapter 19, page 291, ISBN 0140288961
  6. ^ Meisel, Adolfo. "Subsidy-led-growth in a fortified port:Cartagena de Indias and the Situado 1751-1810" (PDF). Stanford University. Retrieved on 2007-09-05.
  7. ^ Bowen, HV (1998). War and British Society 1688-1815. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press, pp.7. ISBN 0-521-57645-8. 
  8. ^ a b Vice-Admiral Sir Jeremy Blackham (2007-03-13). "The Royal Navy at the Brink" (pdf). 1. Royal United Services Institute. Retrieved on 2007-08-10.
  9. ^ a b created from data found at UK defence statistics. MOD. Retrieved on 2007-08-03. and Conways All the World's Fighting Ships 1947–1995
  10. ^ We were heading for war...and the Commons blamed me. The Daily Telegraph (2002-03-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-10.
  11. ^ Smith, Michael. "Half of Royal Navy’s ships in mothballs as defence cuts bite", The Times. Retrieved on 2007-07-14. 
  12. ^ Evans, Michael. "Go-ahead for £4bn aircraft carriers", The Times, Times Newspapers, 2007-07-25. Retrieved on 2007-07-26. 
  13. ^ Royal Navy unveils new Amphibious landing ships. MOD (2006-10-06). Retrieved on 2007-08-10.
  14. ^ Royal Navy information. MOD. Retrieved on 2007-08-10.
  15. ^ Royal Navy to Get New Attack Submarine. Royal Navy (2007-05-21). Retrieved on 2007-05-21.
  16. ^ Knight, Will. "UK unveils plans for a new submarine fleet", New Scientist (Environment), 2006-12-05. Retrieved on 2007-08-10. 
  17. ^ Joint operations. Royal Navy. Retrieved on 2007-08-07.
  18. ^ Core Capabilities. Royal Navy. Retrieved on 2007-08-07.
  19. ^ Fleet Deployments. Royal Navy (2007-08-07). Retrieved on 2007-08-07.
  20. ^ Royal Navy Dockyards. National Maritime Museum. Retrieved on 2007-08-10.
  21. ^ "Devonport 'secure' says minister", BBC, 2007-07-25. Retrieved on 2007-08-10. 
  22. ^ Use of the Union Jack at Sea. Flags of the World. Retrieved on 2007-07-14.
  23. ^ French top gun at Fleet Review. The Times (2005-06-26). Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  24. ^ (1964) Admiralty Manual of Seamanship. HMSO. 
  25. ^ FAQs;Royal Navy's nickname. National Maritime Museum. Retrieved on 2007-07-14.
  26. ^ a b Jolly, Rick. Jackspeak. Maritime Books Dec 2000. ISBN 0-9514305-2-1. 
  27. ^ Naval Slang. Royal Navy. Retrieved on 2007-07-14.
  28. ^ In Which we Serve at the Internet Movie Database
  29. ^ Devon Shipmates on TV. BBC. Retrieved on 2007-07-19.

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that FRUSI be merged into this article or section. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Royal Navy Portal
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Royal Navy
Commissioned Royal Navy Ships
List of Royal Navy ship names

  Results from FactBites:
 
Royal Navy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3896 words)
During the 19th century the Royal Navy enforced a ban on the slave trade and the suppression of piracy.
In the latter stages of the Cold War, the Royal Navy was reconfigured with three anti-submarine warfare aircraft carriers and a force of small frigates and destroyers.
The Royal Navy is established under the royal prerogative and the head of the Royal Navy, known as the Lord High Admiral, is Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (who is the overall head of the UK Armed Forces).
Encyclopedia4U - Royal Navy - Encyclopedia Article (632 words)
The Royal Navy is the navy of the United Kingdom.
The first reformation and major expansion of the Royal Navy occurred during the reign of King Henry VIII whose ships the "Great Harry" and the "Mary Rose" engaged the French navy in a battle in the Solent in 1545.
The incorporation of the royal navy was in contrast to the land forces, which are descended from parliamentary forces and hence are not royal.
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