FACTOID # 7: The top five best educated states are all in the Northeast.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Royal Mail
Royal Mail Group Ltd
Type Limited
Founded 1660
Headquarters London, United Kingdom
Industry postal service
Owner UK government
Subsidiaries Post Office Limited
Slogan "With us it's personal"
Website royalmailgroup.com
royalmail.com

Royal Mail is the national postal service of the United Kingdom. Historically, the General Post Office was a government department, which included — and still does — the Royal Mail delivery business; but it became The Post Office, a state-owned corporation, in 1969 and then a Public Limited Company wholly owned by HM Government in 2000. The name initially registered with Companies House was Consignia plc. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Limited can refer to: A private limited company by shares, a specific kind of limited company in Commonwealth of Nations commercial law; often used as a suffix (Mycompany, Limited or ); formerly used for all limited companies. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Mail (disambiguation). ... A subsidiary, in business, is an entity that is controlled by another entity. ... The Post Office in Oxford. ... Look up slogan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... For other uses, see Mail (disambiguation). ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... The initials PLC after a UK or Irish company name indicate that it is a public limited company, a type of limited company whose shares may be offered for sale to the public. ... Her Majestys Government, or when the sovereign is male, His Majestys Government, abbreviated HMG or HM Government, is the formal title used by the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the governments of some other kingdoms where executive authority is theoretically vested... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Companies House is an Executive Agency of the United Kingdom Government Department of Trade and Industry (DTI). ...


This new name was aimed at ending the confusion that had existed between the terms The Post Office (the whole organisation) and Post Offices (the customer accessible counters). Another reason was to have a unique name for the international market. This new name was unpopular with employees, the unions and the general public; and Consignia plc became Royal Mail Group plc in 2002. Also see: 2002 (number). ...


Unlike other former state monopolies such as The Stationery Office, British Gas and British Telecom, Royal Mail was not privatised in the 1980s and 1990s, but remains a public limited company wholly owned by the UK government. This was largely due to the successful campaigning of the Communication Workers Union on behalf of its postal members. In economics, government monopoly is a form of coercive monopoly in which a government agency is the sole provider of a particular good or service and competition is prohibited by law. ... The Stationery Office is a private publishing company that was created in 1995 when the publishing arm of Her Majestys Stationery Office was privatised. ... This page is about the former gas monopoly in the United Kingdom for information about the successor companies please see Centrica, BG Group and Transco. ... BT Group plc (which trades as just BT, and is commonly known by its former name, British Telecom) is the privatised former British state telecommunications operator. ... Privatization (sometimes privatisation, denationalization, or — especially in India — disinvestment) is the process of transferring property, from public ownership to private ownership. ... The initials PLC after a UK or Irish company name indicate that it is a public limited company, a type of limited company whose shares may be offered for sale to the public. ... The Politics of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland takes place in the framework of a constitutional monarchy in which the Monarch is head of state and the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom is the head of government. ... The Communication Workers Union is the main trade union in the United Kingdom for people working for telephone, cable and postal delivery companies, with 300,000 members. ...


A wholly owned subsidiary of Royal Mail is Post Office Limited, which operates the national network of post offices. As the activities of Royal Mail have been reduced, so the network of post offices has contracted. A subsidiary, in business, is an entity that is controlled by another entity. ... The Post Office in Oxford. ...


Royal Mail remains responsible for the universal mail collection and delivery service in the UK. Letters are deposited in a pillar or wall box, taken to a post office, or (by arrangement) collected in bulk from businesses. Deliveries are made at least once every day (except Sundays and Bank Holidays) at uniform charges for all destinations within the UK. // Collection of British Pillar boxes at the Inkpen Post Box Museum, near Taunton,Somerset In the UK, a pillar box is a free-standing post box where mail is deposited to be collected by the Royal Mail and forwarded to the addressee. ... Wall boxes are a type of post box or letter box found in the UK and commonwealth countries. ... Small-town post office and town hall in Lockhart, Alabama A post office is a facility (in most countries, a government one) where the public can purchase postage stamps for mailing correspondence or merchandise, and also drop off or pick up packages or other special-delivery items. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


According to its annual report for the year ended 26 March 2006, Royal Mail delivers 84 million items every working day and has a network of 14,376 post offices. Revenue for the year was £9.056 billion, and profits before tax were £312 million. March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

History

See also: General Post Office.

The Royal Mail traces its history back to 1516, when Henry VIII established a "Master of the Posts". The Royal Mail service was first made available to the public by Charles I on July 31, 1635, with postage being paid by the recipient, and the General Post Office (GPO) was officially established by Charles II in 1660. The British General Post Office (GPO) was officially established in 1660 by Charles II and it eventually grew to combine the functions of both the state postal system and telecommunications carrier. ... “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 10 - The Académie française in Paris is expanded to become a national academy for the artistic elite. ... The British General Post Office (GPO) was officially established in 1660 by Charles II and it eventually grew to combine the functions of both the state postal system and telecommunications carrier. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ...

A Victorian hexagonal red post box outside King's College, Cambridge. Traditionally UK post boxes carry the Latin initials of the reigning monarch at the time of their installation: in this case VR for Victoria Regina.

Between 1719 and 1763, Ralph Allen, Postmaster at Bath, signed a series of contracts with the post office to develop and expand Britain's postal network. He organised mail coaches which were provided by both Wilson & Company of London and Williams & Company of Bath. The early Royal Mail Coaches were similar to ordinary family coaches but with Post Office livery.[1] Download high resolution version (768x1090, 294 KB)A Penfold Hexagonal postbox. ... Download high resolution version (768x1090, 294 KB)A Penfold Hexagonal postbox. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her ascension to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... Full name The King’s College of Our Lady and St Nicholas in Cambridge Motto Veritas et Utilitas Truth and usefulness Named after Henry VI Previous names - Established 1441 Sister College(s) New College, Oxford Provost Prof. ... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... Ralph Allen (1693 - June 29, 1764) was baptised at St Columb Major Cornwall on July 24 1693. ... , Bath is a small city in Somerset, England most famous for its historic baths fed by three hot springs. ... A print showing a mail coach decorated in the black and scarlet Post Office livery near Newmarket, Suffolk in 1827. ... Rather unusually, these Angels wear white hart (deer) badges, with the personal livery of King Richard II of England, who commissioned this, the Wilton diptych, about 1400 A livery is a uniform or other sign worn in a non-military context on a person or object (such as an airplane...

The main post office in Oxford, England, in St Aldate's.
The main post office in Oxford, England, in St Aldate's.

The Oxford Post Office in St Aldates, 2004-01-24, Copyright Kaihsu Tai File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Oxford Post Office in St Aldates, 2004-01-24, Copyright Kaihsu Tai File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 ( 2001 census). ... Oxford Town Hall on St Aldates. ...

Uniform penny postage

Main article: Uniform Penny Post

In 1840 the mail underwent substantial reforms and the uniform penny post was introduced. A single rate for delivery anywhere in the UK was paid by the sender. To certify that postage had been paid on a letter, the sender would affix the first adhesive stamp, the Penny Black. The Uniform Penny Post was a component of the comprehensive reform of the Royal Mail, the UKs official postal service, that took place in the 19th-century. ... The Uniform Penny Post was a component of the comprehensive reform of the Royal Mail, the UKs official postal service, that took place in the 19th-century. ... A selection of Hong Kong postage stamps A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. ... The Penny Black, partially obscured by a red cancellation. ...


As the first country to issue stamps, British stamps are the only stamps that do not bear the name of the country of issue on them. This stamp of the Falkland Islands is a fine example of modern stamp design: minimal text, intense color, striking subject clearly represented. ...


It has been asserted that it is an act of treason to place a postage stamp bearing the British monarch upside down.[2] However, the newspaper that made this claim provides no source for this assertion, and none of the various Treason Acts make any mention of postage stamps. For other uses, see Treason (disambiguation) or Traitor (disambiguation). ...

A post box in front of Mansfield College, Oxford. It is marked ER VII for Edvardvs Rex, the seventh (King Edward VII).
A post box in front of Mansfield College, Oxford. It is marked ER VII for Edvardvs Rex, the seventh (King Edward VII).

Royal Mail collection box in front of Mansfield College, Oxford, 2004-01-24, Copyright Kaihsu Tai File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Royal Mail collection box in front of Mansfield College, Oxford, 2004-01-24, Copyright Kaihsu Tai File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... and of the Mansfield College College name Mansfield College Motto Deus locutus est nobis in Neanderthalus (God hath spoken unto us by [his] Caveman, Hebrews 1:1–2) Named after George and Elizabeth Mansfield Established 1886 Sister college Homerton College, Cambridge Principal Dr Diana Walford JCR president Alex Morris Undergraduates... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ...

Pillar boxes

Main article: pillar box

// Collection of British Pillar boxes at the Inkpen Post Box Museum, near Taunton,Somerset In the UK, a pillar box is a free-standing post box where mail is deposited to be collected by the Royal Mail and forwarded to the addressee. ...

1960 to present

In 1969 the GPO was changed from a government department to a state-owned company, and the position of Postmaster General was abolished. In the United Kingdom, the Postmaster General is a now defunct ministerial position. ...


In 2000, The Post Office renamed itself "'Consignia'". However, the change proved to be highly unpopular with both the public and even the organisation's own employees, with the Communication Workers' Union boycotting the name. In 2002, the organisation adopted the name "Royal Mail Group plc" with the following operating divisions: The Communication Workers Union is the main trade union in the United Kingdom for people working for telephone, cable and postal delivery companies, with 300,000 members. ...

Contrary to urban myth, Royal Mail does not own the trademark on the colour red, but a specific shade of the colour red: "Royal Mail, the Royal Mail Cruciform, the colour red and SmartStamp are all registered trademarks of Royal Mail Group plc.". Parcelforce is the parcel delivery arm of the Royal Mail postal service in the UK. Since 1986 regular daily mail services have been provided by the Royal Mail while retail postal outlets are operated by the Post Office. ... The Post Office in Oxford. ... Drawing of a self-service store. ...


[3]


In 2001 the government set up a postal regulator, Postcomm, and offered licences to private companies to deliver mail. In 2001, the Consumer Council for Postal Services, more commonly known as Postwatch, was created for consumers to express any concerns they may have with the postal service in the UK. Postwatch (also known as The Consumer Council for Postal Services) was set up in January of 2001 to help consumers with any issues or complaints they had with any of the Postal Services (including the Royal Mail) in the United Kingdom. ...


From January 1, 2006, the Royal Mail lost its 350-year monopoly and the UK postal market became fully open to competition. is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Timeline

London's largest sorting office, Mount Pleasant
London's largest sorting office, Mount Pleasant
  • 1516: Royal Mail established by Henry VIII under Master of the Posts.
  • 1635: Royal Mail service first made available to the public by Charles I.
  • 1654: Oliver Cromwell grants monopoly over service in England to "Office of Postage".
  • 1657: Fixed postal rates introduced.
  • 1660: General Post Office (GPO) officially established by Charles II.
  • 1661: First use of date stamp. First Postmaster General appointed.
  • 1784: First Mail coach (between Bristol and London).
  • 1793: First uniformed delivery staff. Post Office Investigation Branch formed, the oldest recognised criminal investigations authority in the world.
  • 1830: First mail train (on Liverpool and Manchester Railway).
  • 1840: First adhesive stamp (the Penny Black).
  • 1852: First Post Office pillar box erected in Jersey.
  • 1853: First post boxes erected in mainland Britain.
  • 1857: First wall boxes installed Shrewsbury and Market Drayton
  • 1870: Post Office begins telegraph service.
  • 1870: Post Office Act banned sending of `indecent or obscene` literature
  • 1880: First use of bicycles to deliver mail.
  • 1881: Postal order introduced.
  • 1883: Parcel post begins.
  • 1894: First picture postcards.
  • 1912: Post Office opens national telephone service.
  • 1919: First international air mail service.
  • 1968: Two-class postal system introduced. National Giro bank opens.
  • 1969: General Post Office changes from government department to nationalised industry.
  • 1974: Postcodes extended over all UK.
  • 1981: Telecommunications services split out as British Telecom. Remainder renamed as "Post Office".
  • 1986: Separated businesses of delivering letters, delivering parcels and operating post offices.
  • 1990: Girobank sold to the Alliance & Leicester Building Society.
  • 1990: Royal Mail Parcels re-branded as Parcelforce.
  • 2004: Reduction of deliveries to once daily. Travelling post office ("Mail Trains") end. SmartStamp is introduced.
  • 2005: Mail Trains re-introduced on some lines.
  • 2006: Royal Mail loses its monopoly when the regulator, PostComm, opens up the Postal Market 3 years ahead of the rest of Europe.[4] Competitors can carry mail, and pass it to Royal Mail for delivery, a service known as Downstream access Also introduces Pricing in Proportion (PiP) for first and second class inland mail.
  • 2006: Online postage allows Royal Mail customers to pay for postage on the web, without the need to buy traditional stamps.
  • 2007: Royal Mail Group PLC becomes Royal Mail Group Ltd in a slight change of legal status.
  • 2007: Official Industrial Action takes place for the first time in 11 years over pay, conditions and pensions.

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2848 × 2136 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2848 × 2136 pixel, file size: 1. ... “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... For other uses, see Oliver Cromwell (disambiguation). ... The British General Post Office (GPO) was officially established in 1660 by Charles II and it eventually grew to combine the functions of both the state postal system and telecommunications carrier. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... Franking is also the passing of franking credits to shareholders in countries that have dividend imputation to reduce or eliminate double taxation of company profits. ... A print showing a mail coach decorated in the black and scarlet Post Office livery near Newmarket, Suffolk in 1827. ... This article is about the English city. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... British Rail TPO vehicle NSA 80390 on display at Doncaster Works open day on 27th July 2003. ... Inaugural journey of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway The Liverpool and Manchester Railway (L&MR) was the worlds first intercity passenger railway in which all the trains were timetabled and operated for most of the distance solely by steam locomotives. ... A selection of Hong Kong postage stamps A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. ... The Penny Black, partially obscured by a red cancellation. ... // Collection of British Pillar boxes at the Inkpen Post Box Museum, near Taunton,Somerset In the UK, a pillar box is a free-standing post box where mail is deposited to be collected by the Royal Mail and forwarded to the addressee. ... Wall boxes are a type of post box or letter box found in the United Kingdom, the Commonwealth of Nations, Crown dependencies and Ireland. ... For other places with the same name, see Shrewsbury (disambiguation). ... Statistics Population: 10,407 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SJ673341 Administration District: North Shropshire Shire county: Shropshire Region: West Midlands Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Shropshire Historic county: Shropshire Services Police force: West Mercia Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: West Midlands Post office and telephone... Telegraphy (from the Greek words tele = far away and grapho = write) is the long distance transmission of written messages without physical transport of letters, originally over wire. ... For other uses, see Bicycle (disambiguation). ... A postal order is used for sending money through the postal system. ... For other uses, see Telephone (disambiguation). ... Airmail (or air mail) is mail that is transported by aircraft. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... BT Group plc (which trades as just BT, and is commonly known by its former name, British Telecom) is the privatised former British state telecommunications operator. ... Girobank was founded in 1968 and originally was known as National Girobank. ... Alliance & Leicester plc (LSE: AL.) is an awful British bank, formerly a building society. ... Parcelforce is the parcel delivery arm of the Royal Mail postal service in the UK. Since 1986 regular daily mail services have been provided by the Royal Mail while retail postal outlets are operated by the Post Office. ... British Rail TPO vehicle NSA 80390 on display at Doncaster Works open day on 27th July 2003. ... Downstream access (DSA) is the term used to describe mail which has been collected and distributed by a competitor, but is handed over to Royal Mail for delivery. ... Pricing in Proportion is a Royal Mail postal price structure in the United Kingdom introduced on 21 August 2006. ... Royal Mail Online Postage (OLP), introduced in early 2006 (but not promoted heavily until September 2006) is an online service provided by Royal Mail in conjunction with Lockheed Martin, where customers can print out their postage stamp (known as an Indicium, or Indicia as the plural) online onto a label...

Non-postal services

Royal Mail introduced telegraph services in 1870 and telephone services in 1912. It took over nearly all of the UK's municipal telephone companies (the sole exception being Kingston Communications in Hull) and was repsonsible for the resultant telephone network until British Telecommunications was demerged by the British Telecommunications Act 1981. BT was later privatised. For other uses, see Telephone (disambiguation). ... Kingston Communications PLC is a telecommunications provider based in Kingston upon Hull serving primarily the East Yorkshire area. ... BT Group plc (which trades as just BT, and is commonly known as, British Telecom or British Telecommunications) is the privatised former British state telecommunications operator. ...


The National Giro Bank was introduced in 1968, and sold to Alliance & Leicester in 1990. Girobank was a British financial institution which operated from 1968 to 2003. ... Alliance & Leicester plc (LSE: AL.) is an awful British bank, formerly a building society. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ...


Historically, many government benefits and state retirement pensions were paid in cash through the post office network. However, in recent years, an increasing proportion of benefit and pension payments have been made directly by bank transfer, leading to a loss of revenue for Post Office branches and many closures. For specific national programs, see Social Security (United States), National insurance (UK), Social Security (Sweden) Social security primarily refers to a field of social welfare concerned with social protection, or protection against socially recognized conditions, including poverty, old age, disability, unemployment, families with children and others. ... A wire transfer is an electronic transfer of funds. ...


Public interest

The Royal Mail is regulated by Postcomm, while consumer interests are represented by Postwatch. The relationship between the two has not always been good and in 2005 Postwatch took Postcomm to Judicial Review over its decision regarding rebates to late-paying customers. Judicial review is the power of a court to review the actions of public sector bodies in terms of their legality or constitutionality. ...


The Government department responsible for the Royal Mail is the Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform, however the public financial interest is managed by the Shareholder executive The Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (BERR) is a United Kingdom government department. ... The Shareholder Executive is the body within the British Government responsible for managing the governments financial interest in a range of public companies. ...


Although now a private company, the Royal Mail enjoys special protection under Government legislation which severely limits consumer rights. Under the Postal Services Act 2000, the Royal Mail is under no contractual obligation to deliver most mail, including special delivery items. In addition, no court action can be taken against the Royal Mail more than 12 months after an item is posted. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Royal Mail has, in some quarters, a poor reputation for losing mail despite more than 99.6% of mail arriving safely. According to Home Office figures from 2002 up to a million letters a week were lost or delivered to the wrong address [5] and one in five [citation needed] of these have been stolen, even letters or parcels sent via Recorded Delivery. However, most of these thefts are due to external crime rather than theft by staff[citation needed].


The Chief Executive of Royal Mail, Adam Crozier has been quoted on various occasions as saying that "every single letter is important." Adam Crozier (born January 26, 1964) is the Scottish chief executive of the Royal Mail. ...


Industrial relations

See also: 2007 Royal Mail industrial disputes
See also: Communication Workers Union (UK)

Royal Mail has been at the centre of a number of industrial disputes during its history - notably the national wildcat strikes in 2003[6] and a seven-week strike in 1971.[7] More recently, workers at Royal Mail set up the discussion forum royalmailchat "for all employees and customers of Royal Mail"[8] which has been central to the summer 2007 dispute over pay and conditions. By Autumn 2007, these disputes began to escalate into industrial action.[9] The 2007 Royal Mail industrial disputes are a series of industrial disputes between Royal Mail and the Communication Workers Union. ... The Communication Workers Union is the main trade union in the United Kingdom for people working for telephone, cable and postal delivery companies, with 300,000 members. ... Strike action (or simply strike) describes collective action undertaken by groups of workers in the form of a refusal to perform work. ...


In mid October a resolution to the dispute appears to be on the horizon.


Fleet

Royal Mail Ford Transit van

In addition to running a large number of road vehicles, Royal Mail uses trains, a ship and an aircraft, with an air hub at East Midlands Airport. Image File history File links RoyalMailVan. ... Image File history File links RoyalMailVan. ... The Ford Transit is a range of panel vans, minibuses and pickup trucks, produced by the Ford Motor Company in Europe. ... East Midlands Airport[1] (IATA: EMA, ICAO: EGNX) is an airport in the East Midlands of England, near Castle Donington in Leicestershire. ...


The following aircraft are included in the dedicated fleet:

The RMS St. Helena is a cargo and passenger ship that serves the British overseas territory of Saint Helena. It sails between Cape Town and Saint Helena, occasionally visiting the dependencies of Ascension Island and Tristan da Cunha. It also visits the Isle of Portland, England twice per year. It is one of the last remaining ocean-going ships to carry the designation Royal Mail Ship. The Boeing 737 is an American short to medium range, single aisle, narrow body jet airliner. ... Titan Airways is an airline based in Stansted, United Kingdom. ... The RMS St. ... A United Kingdom overseas territory (formerly known as a dependent territory or earlier as a crown colony) is a territory that is under the sovereignty and formal control of the United Kingdom but is not part of the United Kingdom proper (almost exclusively Great Britain and Northern Ireland). ... Nickname: Motto: Spes Bona (Latin for Good Hope) Location of the City of Cape Town in Western Cape Province Coordinates: , Country Province Municipality City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality Founded 1652 Government [1]  - Type City council  - Mayor Helen Zille  - City manager Achmat Ebrahim Area  - City 2,499 km²  (964. ... Anthem: God Save the Queen Capital Georgetown Largest city Georgetown Official languages English Government Dependency of St. ... Motto Our faith is our strength Anthem God Save the Queen Capital (and largest city) Edinburgh of the Seven Seas Official languages English Government Dependency of St. ... The Isle of Portland is a long by wide limestone island in the English Channel. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Royal Mail Ship (sometimes Steam-ship, Steamer), usually seen in its abbreviated form RMS, is the ship prefix used for seagoing vessels that carry mail under contract to the British Royal Mail. ...


Business services

The Royal Mail runs, alongside its stamped mail services, another sector of post called business mail. The large majority of Royal Mail's business mail service is for PPI or franked mail, where the sender prints their own 'stamp'. For PPI mail this involves either a simple rubber stamp and an ink pad, or a printed label. For franked mail, a dedicated franking machine [4] is used. It has been suggested that Franked_mail be merged into this article or section. ...


See also

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/3681547.stm A Guernsey Post pillar box. ... Isle of Man Post (Post Ellan Vannin in Manx, formerly the Isle of Man Post Office) operates postal delivery and post office counter services on the Isle of Man. ... Jersey Post is the official state-owned mail service for the island of Jersey. ... The British General Post Office (GPO) was officially established in 1660 by Charles II and it eventually grew to combine the functions of both the state postal system and telecommunications carrier. ... The Post Office in Oxford. ... Royal Mail Ship (sometimes Steam-ship, Steamer), usually seen in its abbreviated form RMS, is the ship prefix used for seagoing vessels that carry mail under contract to the British Royal Mail. ... USPS and Usps redirect here. ...


References

  1. ^ http://www.bathpostalmuseum.org/hop5.html
  2. ^ The Times. The World's Strangest Laws. Retrieved on 2007-08-25.
  3. ^ http://www.royalmail.com/portal/rm/jump2?catId=400138&mediaId=600023
  4. ^ http://www.postalconsumers.org/content/IPU/060701.pdf#search=%22royal%20mail%20competition%20europe%22
  5. ^ Postwatch, "Royal Mail's Lost Mail", press release, 12 August 2002(PDF)
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ [2]
  8. ^ [3]
  9. ^ Mark Tran and agencies. "Crozier hits out at striking postal workers", The Guardian, 2007-10-09. Retrieved on 2007-11-11. 
  10. ^ Airliners.net. G-ZAPV. Retrieved on 2007-04-25.
  • BBC report on loss of monopoly
  • Getting the Message - The Story of the British Post Office - Christopher Browne 1993 ISBN 0750903511
  • A brief history of the POST OFFICE - A GPO public relations publication 1965

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The International Standard Book Number, or ISBN (sometimes pronounced is-ben), is a unique[1] identifier for books, intended to be used commercially. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Royal Mail: Services (323 words)
Extensive was approached by Royal Mail to restore the floor to as near original condition as possible.
The large majority of Royal Mail's business mail service is for PPI or franked mail, where the sender prints their own 'stamp'.
Royal Mail’s business plan will result in 40,000 job losses, attacks on pension arrangements, closures of mail centres and delivery offices and a reduction in pay for postal workers to ‘the market rate’.
Royal Mail - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1128 words)
Royal Mail is the national postal service of the United Kingdom.
The Royal Mail service was first made available to the public by Charles I in 1635, with postage being paid by the recipient, and the General Post Office (GPO) was officially established by Charles II in 1660.
In 1840 the mail underwent substantial reforms and the uniform penny postage was introduced.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m