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Encyclopedia > Royal Festival Hall
The Royal Festival Hall reopening celebrations
The Royal Festival Hall reopening celebrations

The Royal Festival Hall is a concert, dance and talks venue within Southbank Centre in London, England. It is situated on the South Bank of the River Thames, not far from Hungerford Bridge. It is a Grade I listed building - the first post-war building to become so protected (in April 1988). Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 570 pixelsFull resolution (2756 × 1965 pixel, file size: 340 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 570 pixelsFull resolution (2756 × 1965 pixel, file size: 340 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Southbank Centre is a complex of arts buildings located in London, England on the South Bank of the River Thames between Hungerford Bridge and Waterloo Bridge. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II... The National Theatre is one of the collection of arts buildings that make up the South Bank Centre. ... The Thames is a river flowing through southern England, and one of the major waterways in England. ... Hungerford Bridge and Golden Jubilee Bridges, seen from the north The Hungerford Bridge runs over the River Thames in London, between Waterloo Bridge and Westminster Bridge. ... Buckingham Palace, a Grade I listed building. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ...


The foundation stone was laid by Clement Attlee, then Prime Minister, in 1949 on the site of the former Lion Brewery, built in 1837.[1] It was built as part of the Festival of Britain by Holland, Hannen & Cubitts for London County Council, and was officially opened on 3 May 1951. The original plan was that Arturo Toscanini would conduct the opening concerts, but he was unwell, and the inaugural concerts were conducted by Sir Malcolm Sargent and Sir Adrian Boult.[2][3] Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, PC (3 January 1883 – 8 October 1967) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland from 1945 to 1951. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Festival of Britain emblem, designed by Abram Games, from the cover of the South Bank Exhibition Guide, 1951 The Festival of Britain was a national exhibition which opened in London and around Britain in May 1951. ... Holland, Hannen & Cubitts was a major building firm responsible for many of the great buildings of London. ... London County Council emblem is still seen today on buildings, especially housing, from that era London County Council (LCC) was the principal local government body for the County of London from 1889 until 1965, when it was replaced by the Greater London Council. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arturo Toscanini (March 25, 1867 – January 16, 1957) was an Italian musician. ... Sir (Harold) Malcolm (Watts) Sargent (April 29, 1895 – October 3, 1967) was a British conductor, organist and composer. ... Sir Adrian Cedric Boult CH (April 8, 1889 – February 22, 1983) was an English conductor. ...


The Hall's design is unashamedly Modernist, the Festival's commissioning architect (Hugh Casson) having taken the decision to appoint only young architects. It was designed by Leslie Martin, Peter Moro and Robert Matthew from the LCC's Architects' Department; Martin was just 39 when he was appointed to lead the design team in late 1948. Martin designed the structure as an 'egg in a box', a term he used to describe the separation of the curved auditorium space from the surrounding building and the noise and vibration of the adjacent railway viaduct. Sir Thomas Beecham used similar imagery, calling the building a 'giant chicken coop'.[4] This article focuses on the cultural movement labeled modernism or the modern movement. See also: Modernism (Roman Catholicism) or Modernist Christianity; Modernismo for specific art movement(s) in Spain and Catalonia. ... An architect at his drawing board, 1893 An architect is a person who is involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... Sir Hugh Maxwell Casson (23 May 1910 – 15 August 1999) was a British architect, interior designer, artist, and influential writer and broadcaster on 20th century design. ... Sir John Leslie Martin KBE (Manchester, 17 August 1908 – 28 July 1999) was an English Architect. ... Robert Matthew (1906 - 1975) was a Scottish architect and a leading proponent of modernism. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Walk through fountains during reopening celebrations after 2007 refurbishment
Walk through fountains during reopening celebrations after 2007 refurbishment

The building was substantially altered in 1964 adding the foyers and terraces to the river side of the building and more dressing rooms to the rear. Alterations to the facades facing the river removed the playful Scandinavian Modernism of the building's primary public face in favour of a plainer and hard-edged style. The building's original entrance sequence was much compromised by these changes and the later additions of raised concrete walkways around the building to serve the neighbouring Queen Elizabeth Hall, Purcell Room and The Hayward, built in 1967/8 and also part of Southbank Centre. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 796 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2120 pixel, file size: 418 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 796 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2120 pixel, file size: 418 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... For Christian theological modernism, see Liberal Christianity and Modernism (Roman Catholicism). ... The Queen Elizabeth Hall (QEH) is a music venue on the South Bank in London, which hosts daily classical, jazz, and avant-garde music and dance performances. ... The Purcell Room is a concert and performance venue which forms part of the South Bank Centre, one of central Londons leading cultural complexes. ... The Hayward, London The Hayward is an art gallery within Southbank Centre, situated on the South Bank of the River Thames, in central London, England. ... Southbank Centre is a complex of arts buildings located in London, England on the South Bank of the River Thames between Hungerford Bridge and Waterloo Bridge. ...


The hall was the venue for the 1960 Eurovision Song Contest, hosted by Katie Boyle. Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The modern logo was introduced for the 2004 Contest (in Istanbul) to create a consistent visual identity. ... Catherine Katie Boyle was a television presenter, well known for presenting Whats My Line?. She also was the presenter for the 1960, 1963, 1968 and 1974 Eurovision Song Contests. ...


Since the late 1980s the hall has operated an 'open foyers' policy, opening up the substantial foyer spaces to the public throughout the day, even if there are no performances. This has proved very popular and the foyers are now one of the best used public spaces in London.


A large head and shoulders bust of Nelson Mandela (by Ian Walters, 1985) stands on the walkway between the hall and the Hungerford Bridge approach viaduct. Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela (IPA: ) (born 18 July 1918) is the former President of South Africa, and the first to be elected in fully representative democratic elections. ... Ian Walters is a sculptor from the United Kingdom. ... Hungerford Bridge and Golden Jubilee Bridges, seen from the north The Hungerford Bridge runs over the River Thames in London, between Waterloo Bridge and Westminster Bridge. ...

The Royal Festival Hall undergoing renovation work.
The Royal Festival Hall undergoing renovation work.

Originally made in glass-fibre it was repeatedly vandalised until re-cast in Bronze. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x750, 157 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Royal Festival Hall ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x750, 157 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Royal Festival Hall ...


The building is undergoing a substantial renovation by Allies and Morrison Architects which aims to improve the poor acoustics (which Simon Rattle said made performers 'lose the will to live')[5], production access and flexibility of the auditorium and the general quality of fabric, entrance spaces and cafe and the layouts of the foyers. The interior of the 1951 concert hall was almost entirely intact until this re-modelling, which saw it stage canopy and walls rebuilt in a plainer more rectangular forms. This was carried out in the face of opposition from conservationists, led by the Twentieth Century Society. A row of seven shop/catering units has been added on the river side of the hall, some of which were open by July 2005, and the section of the riverside walk next to these is being relandscaped. This has released space inside the original building which had been used for shops. Skateboarders, who have long congregated in the undercroft of the South Bank Centre and now constitute one of its most defining features, will soon be moved on as London's most iconic skate spot is redeveloped. The hall officially reopened to the public in June 2007 with a concert by the heavy metal band Motörhead, opening Jarvis Cocker's Meltdown.The still incomplete refurbishment is expected to cost in the region of £91 million. [1] Allies and Morrison are a London-based architecture practice. ... Simon Rattle recording Porgy and Bess with the London Symphony Orchestra at Abbey Road in 1988, aged 33. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ... Motörhead are a Grammy Award-winning British heavy metal band formed in 1975 by bassist, singer and songwriter Lemmy (real name Ian Kilmister), who has remained the sole constant member. ... Jarvis Branson Cocker (born 19 September 1963, in Sheffield, England) is an English musician, best known for fronting the band Pulp. ... Meltdown is an annual music festival held at the Royal Festival Hall, part of Londons South Bank Centre. ...


A film has been made documenting the refurbishment, entitled This Is Tomorrow; it is directed by Paul Kelly and produced by Andrew Hinton. The soundtrack was composed by the band Saint Etienne who performed it at the film's première in the Festival Hall.


When the Greater London Council (LCC's successor) was abolished in 1986, the Hall was taken over by the Arts Council. It is now run by Southbank Centre. Arms of the Greater London Council The Greater London Council (GLC) was the top-tier local government administrative body for Greater London from 1965 to 1986. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... The Arts Council of Great Britain was a Quango dedicated to the promotion of the fine arts in Britain. ... Southbank Centre is a complex of arts buildings located in London, England on the South Bank of the River Thames between Hungerford Bridge and Waterloo Bridge. ...


The Royal Festival Hall seats 2,900, the Queen Elizabeth Hall 917 and the Purcell Room 370.[6]


The closest tube stations are Waterloo and Embankment. The London Underground is a transit system that serves much of Greater London and some neighbouring areas. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... Embankment station, April 2002 Embankment tube station is a London Underground station in the City of Westminster. ...

Contents

See also

A Concert hall is a cultural building, which serves as performance venue, chiefly for classical instrumental music. ...

Notes

  1. ^ The Festival of Britain - Building the Future, accessed 1 April 2007
  2. ^ The Times, 21 November 1950, p. 6
  3. ^ The Times, 5 May 05 1951, p. 4
  4. ^ Jefferson, p. 102
  5. ^ The Independent, 17 June 2007
  6. ^ RFH.co.uk

is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

References

  • Jefferson, Alan(ed) (1979). Sir Thomas Beecham. London: Macdonald and Jane's. ISBN 035404205x. 

External links

Coordinates: 51°30′21.01″N, 00°07′00.44″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Preceded by
Palais des Festivals et des Congrès
Cannes
Eurovision Song Contest
Venue

1960
Succeeded by
Palais des Festivals et des Congrès
Cannes

  Results from FactBites:
 
Royal Festival Hall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (489 words)
The Royal Festival Hall is a concert, dance and talks venue within the South Bank Centre in London.
It was the contribution toward the Festival of Britain by London County Council, and was officially opened on 3 May 1951.
The Hall's design is unashamedly Modernist, the Festival's commissioning architect (Hugh Casson) having taken the decision to only appoint young architects.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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