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Encyclopedia > Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom
Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom
Versions

Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom as used in Scotland
Details
Armiger Elizabeth II
Adopted 1837
Crest A golden lion, royally crowned and standing on a royal crown; gold and ermine mantling
Escutcheon Quarterly: England, Scotland, and Ireland
Supporters A golden lion and a silver unicorn
Compartment Tudor rose, Shamrock, and Thistle
Motto French: Dieu et mon droit
Orders Order of the Garter
Earlier versions see below
Use On all Acts of Parliament; the cover of all UK passports; various government departments

The Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom is the official coat of arms of the British monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II. These arms are used by the Queen in her official capacity as monarch, and are officially known as her Arms of Dominion. Variants of the Royal Arms are used by other members of the Royal Family; and by the British Government in connection with the administration and government of the country. In Scotland, the Queen has a separate version of the Royal Arms, a variant of which is used by the Scotland Office. Image File history File links UK_Royal_Coat_of_Arms. ... Image File history File links Scottish_royal_coat_of_arms. ... The Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland, as used before 1603 The Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland was the official coat of arms of the monarchs of Scotland, and were used as the official coat of arms of the Kingdom of Scotland until the Union of the Crowns in... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Quartering in heraldry is a method of joining several different coats of arms together in one shield by dividing the shield into not more than four equal parts and placing different coats of arms in each division. ... The Coat of Arms of England The Coat of Arms of England is gules, three lions passant guardant in pale or armed & langued azure The Coat of Arms was introduced by King Richard I of England in the 1190s, apparently as a version of the arms of the Duchy of... The Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland, as used before 1603 The Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland was the official coat of arms of the monarchs of Scotland, and were used as the official coat of arms of the Kingdom of Scotland until the Union of the Crowns in... When Henry Tudor took the crown of England from Richard III in battle, he brought about the end of the Wars of the Roses between the House of Lancaster (Red Rose) and the House of York (White Rose). ... The Shamrock Oxalis acetosella as The Shamrock The shamrock, an unofficial symbol of Ireland and Boston, Massachusetts, is a three-leafed old white clover, sometimes (rarely nowadays) Trifolium repens (white clover, known in Irish as seamair bhán) but more usually today Trifolium dubium (lesser clover, Irish: seamair bhuí). However... Milk thistle flowerhead Thistledown a method of seed dispersal by wind. ... Dieu et mon droit (French for God and my [birth] right) has generally been used as the motto of the British monarch since it was adopted by Henry V (1413-22). ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... An Act of Parliament or Act is law enacted by the parliament (see legislation). ... UK biometric passport, issued since 2006. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen-in-Parliament) legislative power. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony The British Royal Family is shared between the Commonwealth Realms; this article focuses on the perspective of United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom is a unitary state and a democratic constitutional monarchy. ... This article is about the country. ... The Scotland Office (Oifis na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a department of the United Kingdom government, responsible for reserved Scottish affairs. ...


The shield is quartered, depicting in the first and fourth quarters the three lions passant guardant of England; in the second, the rampant lion and double tressure fleury-counter-fleury of Scotland; and in the third, a harp for Ireland. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fleur-de-lis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Harp (disambiguation). ...


The crest is a lion statant guardant wearing the imperial crown, itself on another representation of that crown. In heraldry, a crest is a component of a coat of arms. ...


The dexter supporter is a likewise crowned lion, symbolizing England; the sinister, a unicorn, symbolising Scotland. According to legend a free unicorn was considered a very dangerous beast; therefore the heraldic unicorn is chained,[1] as were both supporting unicorns in the Royal coat of arms of Scotland. The Coat of Arms of Prince Edward Island uses two foxes as supporters. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The gentle and pensive maiden has the power to tame the unicorn, in this fresco in Palazzo Farnese, Rome, probably by Domenichino, ca 1602 For other uses, see Unicorn (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... The gentle and pensive maiden has the power to tame the unicorn, in this fresco in Palazzo Farnese, Rome, probably by Domenichino, ca 1602 For other uses, see Unicorn (disambiguation). ... The Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland, as used before 1603 The Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland was the official coat of arms of the monarchs of Scotland, and were used as the official coat of arms of the Kingdom of Scotland until the Union of the Crowns in...


The coat features both the motto of English monarchs, Dieu et mon droit (God and my right), and the motto of the Order of the Garter, Honi soit qui mal y pense (Shamed be he who thinks ill of it) on a representation of the Garter behind the shield. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... -1... Dieu et mon droit (French for God and my [birth] right) has generally been used as the motto of the British monarch since it was adopted by Henry V (1413-22). ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ...


The official heraldic description of the Royal Arms is as follows:

Quarterly, first and fourth Gules three lions passant gardant in pale Or armed and langued Azure (for England), second quarter Or a lion rampant within a double tressure flory-counter-flory Gules (for Scotland), third quarter Azure a harp Or stringed Argent (for Ireland), the whole surrounded by the Garter; for a Crest, upon the Royal helm the imperial crown Proper, thereon a lion statant gardant Or imperially crowned Proper; Mantling Or and ermine; for Supporters, dexter a lion rampant gardant Or crowned as the Crest, sinister a unicorn Argent armed, crined and unguled Proper, gorged with a coronet Or composed of crosses patée and fleurs de lis a chain affixed thereto passing between the forelegs and reflexed over the back also Or. Motto 'Dieu et mon Droit' in the compartment below the shield, with the Union rose, shamrock and thistle engrafted on the same stem.[2]

Contents

Scotland

The Queen has a separate version of her arms for use in Scotland, giving the Scottish elements pride of place. The Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland, as used before 1603 The Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland was the official coat of arms of the monarchs of Scotland, and were used as the official coat of arms of the Kingdom of Scotland until the Union of the Crowns in... This article is about the country. ...


The shield is quartered, depicting in the first and fourth quarters the lion rampant of Scotland; in the second, the three lions passant guardant of England; and in the third, the harp of Ireland. This article is about the defensive device. ...


The crest atop the Crown of Scotland is a red lion, seated and forward facing, itself wearing the Crown of Scotland and holding the two remaining elements of the Honours of Scotland, namely the Sword of State and the Sceptre of Scotland. This was also the crest used in the Royal Arms of the Kingdom of Scotland. The motto, in Scots, appears above the crest, in the tradition of Scottish heraldry, and is taken from the battle cry 'In My Defens God Me Defend', abbreviated to 'In Defens'. In heraldry, a crest is a component of a coat of arms. ... The Crowns modern usage: The Crown of Scotland at the opening of the Scottish Parliament Building at Holyrood in 2004. ... The Honours of Scotland The Honours of Scotland, also known as the Scottish regalia and the Scottish crown jewels, dating from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, are the oldest set of Crown Jewels in the British Isles and are the second oldest in Europe. ... Motto Latin: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) (Scots: Wha daur meddle wi me) Capital Edinburgh¹ Language(s) Gaelic, Scots Government Monarchy King/Queen  - 843-860 Kenneth I  - 1587–1625 James VI  - 1702-1714 Anne Legislature Parliament of Scotland History  - United 843  - Union of the... This article is about the Anglic language of Scotland. ... Coat of arms of Scotland Scottish Heraldry is a distinct system of armorial practice devised and used in Scotland. ...


The supporters change sides and both appear wearing the crowns of their respective Kingdom. The dexter supporter is a crowned and chained unicorn, symbolising Scotland. The sinister supporter is a crowned lion, symbolising England. Between each supporter and the shield is a lance displaying the flag of their respective Kingdom. Dexter is the name of a number of places in the United States of America: Dexter, Alabama Dexter, Arkansas Dexter, Georgia Dexter, Illinois Dexter, Indiana Dexter, Iowa Dexter, Kansas Dexter, Kentucky Dexter, Maine Dexter, Michigan Dexter, Minnesota Dexter, Mississippi Dexter, Missouri Dexter, New Mexico Dexter, New York Dexter, North Carolina... In heraldry, supporters are figures placed on either side of the shield and depicted holding it up. ... Look up Sinister in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The coat also features both the motto Nemo me impune lacessit (No-one wounds (touches) me with impunity) and, surrounding the shield, the collar of the Order of the Thistle. Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one wounds me with impunity, literally meaning (lacessere = to appeal to, to provoke, to attack): No one provokes me with impunity) is the royal Scottish motto, used historically for the Kingdom of Scotland where it appeared on the Royal Arms of Scotland. ... Sir Thomas More wearing the Collar of Esses as Lord Chancellor, by Hans Holbein the Younger (1527). ... James VII ordained the modern Order. ...


Other nations in the United Kingdom

The official Irish royal crest (on a wreath Or and Azure, a tower triple-towered of the First, from the portal a hart springing Argent attired and unguled Or) is rarely if ever seen on the arms of the United Kingdom, as unlike the Act of Union 1707 with Scotland, the Act of Union 1800 with Ireland did not provide for a separate Irish version of the royal arms. The Acts of Union were twin Acts of Parliament passed in 1707 (taking effect on 26 March) by the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. ... The phrase Act of Union 1800 (or sometimes Act of Union 1801) (Irish: Acht an Aontais 1800) is used to describe two complementary Acts[1] whose official United Kingdom titles are the Union with Ireland Act 1800 (1800 c. ...


However, the harp quarter of the Royal Arms represents Ireland on both the English and Scottish versions. Likewise, one English quarter is retained in the Scottish version, and one Scottish quarter is retained in the English version. Thus, England, Scotland and Ireland are represented in all versions of the Royal Arms since they came under one monarch.


By contrast, there is no representation at all for Wales in the Royal Arms, as at the Act of Union 1707 Wales was considered an integral part of England due to the Laws in Wales Acts 1535-1542, thus it can be argued Wales is represented in the English Coat of arms. Wales was a kingdom when ruled by native Kings, some of whom united it under one Crown, but upon the English conquest of Wales it was downgraded to a principality. The Prince of Wales has ever since been the monarch's eldest son. Wales was given no place in the Royal Arms of the English (later British) Kings and Queens. This has been justified on the basis that the Royal Arms represent only kingdoms but, in fact, both the Principality of Orange (during the reign of William of Orange) and the Electorate of Hanover (in the 100 years before it was elevated to a Kingdom) were included on the Royal Arms in the 17th, 18th and early 19th centuries. Upon the accession of the Tudor Kings and Queens, who were themselves of Welsh descent, a Welsh dragon was used as a supporter on the Royal Arms. However, this was dropped by their successors, the Scottish House of Stuart, who replaced the Tudor's Welsh dragon supporter with the Scottish unicorn. In the twentieth century, the arms of the principality of Wales were added as an inescutcheon to the coat of arms of the Prince of Wales, and a banner of those arms with a green inescutcheon bearing the Prince of Wales' crown is flown as his royal standard in Wales. The so-called Prince of Wales feathers, are a heraldic badge rather than a coat of arms upon a shield, but they are not Welsh in any case. They derive, in fact, from the English Princes of Wales (who allegedly owe them to an exploit of Edward, the Black Prince at the Battle of Crécy) and carry a German motto. In any event, they do not form part of the Royal Arms, as opposed to the heraldic achievement of the Prince of Wales, who drops them upon his accession as King. This article is about the country. ... The Laws in Wales Acts 1535–1542 were a series of parliamentary measures by which the legal system of Wales was annexed to England and the norms of English administration introduced in order to create a single state and a single legal jurisdiction, which is frequently referred to as England... For the documentary series, see Monarchy (TV series). ... This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ... The Tudor dynasty or House of Tudor (Welsh Twdwr) is a series of five monarchs of Welsh origin who ruled England from 1485 until 1603. ... For other uses, see Dragon (disambiguation). ... The Coat of Arms of King James I, the first British monarch of the House of Stuart The House of Stuart or Stewart was a royal house of the Kingdom of Scotland, later also of the Kingdom of England, and finally of the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... The Coat of Arms of the Principality of Wales is a coat of arms used by the Prince of Wales. ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... The badge of the Prince of Wales The Prince of Waless feathers is the heraldic badge of the Prince of Wales. ... Edward of Woodstock, Prince of Wales, KG (15 June 1330 – 8 June 1376), popularly known as the Black Prince, was the eldest son of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault, and father to King Richard II of England. ... Crécy redirects here. ...


Uses

Royal Coat of Arms at Fingask Castle, Tayside, Scotland
Royal Coat of Arms at Fingask Castle, Tayside, Scotland
At Governor's Palace, Williamsburg, Virginia: the royal arms of the Hanoverian period.

The Royal Arms as shown above may only be used by the Queen herself. They also appear in court rooms, since the monarch is the fount of justice in the UK and the law Court is part of the Court of the monarch (hence its name). Judges are officially representatives of the crown, demonstrated by the Queen's Coat of Arms which sits behind the judge on the wall of every court in the land, with the exception of the magistrates court in the City of London, in which a sword stands vertically behind the judge which is flanked by the arms of the City and the Crown. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 724 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 828 pixel, file size: 762 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) from the owners, a photo: H. Molchanoff, March 2007. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 724 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 828 pixel, file size: 762 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) from the owners, a photo: H. Molchanoff, March 2007. ... Dr. Sir Stuart Threipland, of Fingask (1716-1805). ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Governors Palace from Palace Green The Governors Palace, home of the Colony of Virginias Royal Governors, is located on Duke of Gloucester Street in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... The House of Hanover (the Hanoverians) is a German royal dynasty which has ruled the Duchy of Braunschweig-Lüneburg, the Kingdom of Hanover and the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... A courtroom is the actual enclosed space in which a judge regularly holds court. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ...


The British Government also uses the Royal Coat of Arms as a national symbol of the United Kingdom, and, in that capacity, the Coat of Arms can be seen on several government documents and forms, passports, in the entrance to embassies and consulates, etc. However, when used by the government and not by the sovereign herself, the coat of arms is often represented without the helm. This is also the case with the sovereign's Scottish arms, a version of which is used by the Scotland Office. The Scotland Office (Oifis na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a department of the United Kingdom government, responsible for reserved Scottish affairs. ...


The Royal Arms have regularly appeared on the coinage produced by the Royal Mint including, for example, from 1663, the Guinea and, from 1983, the British one pound coin. In 2008, a new series of designs for all seven coins of £1 and below was unveiled by the Royal Mint, every one of which is drawn from the Royal Arms. The full Royal Arms appear on the one pound coin, and sections appear on each of the other six, such that they can be put together like a puzzle to make another complete representation of the Royal Arms.[3] The Royal Mint is the body permitted to manufacture, or mint, coins in the United Kingdom. ... The circulating British one pound (£1) coin is minted from a nickel-brass alloy of approximately 70% copper, 24. ...


The Queen awards Royal Warrants to various businesses that supply the Royal Household. This allows the business to display the Royal Arms on their packaging and stationery. It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ...


A banner of the arms, the Royal Standard is flown from the Royal Palaces when the Queen is in residence; and from public buildings only when the Queen is present. At royal residences such as Windsor Castle or Buckingham Palace, the Queen's main residence, the Royal Standard is flown to indicate when the monarch is in residence. This protocol equally applies to the monarch's principal residences in Scotland, (Holyrood Palace and Balmoral Castle), where the Royal Standard as used in Scotland is flown. When the monarch is not in residence the Union Flag, or in Scotland the ancient Royal Standard of Scotland, is flown. The Royal Standard used outside Scotland The Royal Standard used in Scotland For other monarchs standards, see Royal Standard (disambiguation). ... This article is about the castle in Windsor. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... A 19th century view of Holyrood Palace from Calton Hill. ... Balmoral Castle. ... Union Jack redirects here. ... The Royal Standard of Scotland The Royal Standard of Scotland, also known as the Royal Standard of the King of Scots or more commonly The Lion Rampant is the flag used historically by the King of Scots. ...


The Royal Arms is also a symbol for all the courts in British Columbia, Canada.[4] Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944...


History

The current Royal Arms are a combination of the arms of the Kingdoms that make up the United Kingdom, and can be traced back to the first arms of the Kings of England and Kings of Scots. Various alterations occurred over the years as the arms of other realms acquired or claimed by the Kings were added to the Royal Arms. The table below tracks the changes in the Royal Arms from the original arms of King Henry II of England, and William I, King of Scots.

Kingdom of England Kingdom of Scotland
Arms Dates Details
1154 - 1189 The first known English Royal arms, a golden lion, rampant, on a red field was first used by King Henry II[citation needed]
1189 - 1198 The first arms of King Richard I "The Lionheart", two golden lions, rampant, on a red field.
1198 - 1340 The later arms of King Richard I "The Lionheart", three golden leopards or lions, passant gardant, on a red field.[2]
1340 - 1367 King Edward III quartered the Royal Arms of England with the ancient arms of France, the fleurs-de-lis on a blue field, to signal his claim to the French throne.[2]
1367 - 1399 King Richard II impaled the Royal Arms of England with the ancient seal of King Edward the Confessor.[2]
1399 - 1422 King Henry IV updated the French arms to the modern version, three fleurs-de-lis on a blue field.[2]
1422 - 1461 King Henry VI impaled the French and English arms.[1]
1461 - 1470 King Edward IV restored the arms of King Henry IV.
1470 - 1471 King Henry VI restored the impaled French and English arms, upon his readeption.
1471 - 1554 King Edward IV restored the arms to quarterly France and England upon recapturing the throne.
1554 - 1558 Queen Mary I impaled her arms with those of her husband, King Philip.[2] Although Queen Mary I's father, King Henry VIII, assumed the title "King of Ireland" and this was further conferred upon King Philip, the arms were not altered to feature the Kingdom of Ireland.
1558 - 1603 Queen Elizabeth I restored the arms of King Henry IV.[2]
Arms Dates Details
12th century - 1558 A red lion, rampant, on a yellow field within a double royal tressure, flory counter-flory, first used by King William I, and later by his successors, and becoming the heraldic representation of Scotland.
1558 - 1559 Mary I, Queen of Scots, impaled with the arms of Francis, Dauphin of France, King consort of Scots.[5].
1559 - 1560 Mary I, Queen of Scots and Queen consort of France.
1560 - 1565 Mary I, Queen of Scots and Queen dowager of France.
1565 - 1603 Upon her (second) marriage to Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley in 1565, Mary discontinues the arms of Scotland and France impaled, reverting to those of the Kingdom of Scotland[6]. King James VI is the last monarch of Scotland to use these arms prior to the Union of the Crowns in 1603.
The Union of the Crowns places England, Ireland and Scotland under one monarch
Arms Dates Details
1603 - 1649 James VI, King of Scots inherits the English and Irish thrones in 1603, (Union of the Crowns), and quarters the Royal Arms of England with those of Scotland. For the first time, the Royal Coat of Arms of Ireland is added to represent the Kingdom of Ireland.[2] (Shown opposite is the English version of the arms. The Scottish version differed in that the Scottish elements took pride of place).
1649 - 1660 English Interregnum

During the Commonwealth and the Protectorate, the arms were changed, consisting of the flags of England, Scotland, and Ireland quartered and the arms of Oliver Cromwell on a shield in the center.[2] Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... Motto Latin: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) (Scots: Wha daur meddle wi me) Capital Edinburgh¹ Language(s) Gaelic, Scots Government Monarchy King/Queen  - 843-860 Kenneth I  - 1587–1625 James VI  - 1702-1714 Anne Legislature Parliament of Scotland History  - United 843  - Union of the... Image File history File links Henry_II_Arms. ... Heraldry is the science and art of designing, displaying, describing and recording coats of arms. ... Henry II of England (called Curtmantle; 25 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189), Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, Lord of Ireland and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland and western France. ... Image File history File links Richard_I_of_England_Arms. ... Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England and ruler of the Angevin Empire from 6 July 1189 until his death. ... Image File history File links England_COA.svg‎ Source own work created in Inkscape, based on Image:EnglishcoatofarmsGFDL.png Date 2006-11-21 Author MesserWoland Permission Own work, copyleft: Multi-license with GFDL and Creative Commons CC-BY-SA-2. ... In heraldry, a charge is an image occupying the field on an escutcheon (or shield). ... Image File history File links England_Arms_1340. ... This article is about the King of England. ... Fleurs-de-lys on the flag of Quebec The fleur-de-lis (also spelled fleur-de-lys; plural fleurs-de-lis or -lys) is used in heraldry, where it is particularly associated with the France monarchy (see King of France). ... The English claims to the French throne have a long and rather complex history between the 1340s and the 1800s. ... Image File history File links England_Arms_1367-impale_Confessor. ... Richard II (January 6, 1367 – February 14, 1400) was King of England from 1377 until he was deposed in 1399. ... St Edward the Confessor or Eadweard III (c. ... Image File history File links England_Arms_1405. ... Henry IV (3 April 1367 – 20 March 1413) was the King of England and France and Lord of Ireland from 1399 to 1413. ... Fleurs-de-lys on the flag of Quebec The fleur-de-lis (also spelled fleur-de-lys; plural fleurs-de-lis or -lys) is used in heraldry, where it is particularly associated with the France monarchy (see King of France). ... Image File history File links England_Arms_1422. ... Henry VI (December 6, 1421 – May 21, 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 (though with a Regent until 1437) and then from 1470 to 1471, and King of France from 1422 to 1453. ... Image File history File links England_Arms_1405. ... Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470–1471. ... Image File history File links England_Arms_1422. ... Henry VI (December 6, 1421 – May 21, 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 (though with a Regent until 1437) and then from 1470 to 1471, and King of France from 1422 to 1453. ... The Readeption is the technical term given to the restoration of Henry VI to the throne of England. ... Image File history File links England_Arms_1405. ... Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470–1471. ... Image File history File links England_Arms_1554-1558. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... Philip II (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples from 1554 until 1598, king consort of England (as husband of Mary I) from 1554 to 1558, Lord of the Seventeen Provinces (holding various titles for the individual territories... Henry VIII redirects here. ... The designation King of Ireland has been used during three periods of Irish history. ... This article is about the Irish kingdom existing from 1541 to 1800. ... Image File history File links England_Arms_1405. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Heraldry is the science and art of designing, displaying, describing and recording coats of arms. ... William I the Lion ( known in Gaelic as Uilliam Garm1 or William the Rough), (1142/1143 - December 4, 1214) reigned as King of Scots from 1165 to 1214. ... Mary, Queen of Scots redirects here. ... Francis II (French: François II) (January 19, 1544 – December 5, 1560) was a King of France (1559 – 1560). ... Coat of Arms of the Dauphins of France. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Queen Dowager or Dowager Queen is a title or status generally held by the widow of a deceased king. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Henry Stuart, Duke of Albany (7 December 1545 – 9 or 10 February 1567), commonly known as Lord Darnley, king consort of Scotland, was the first cousin and second husband of Mary, Queen of Scots, and the father of her son King James VI, who also succeded Elizabeth I of England. ... Motto Latin: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) (Scots: Wha daur meddle wi me) Capital Edinburgh¹ Language(s) Gaelic, Scots Government Monarchy King/Queen  - 843-860 Kenneth I  - 1587–1625 James VI  - 1702-1714 Anne Legislature Parliament of Scotland History  - United 843  - Union of the... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary... The Union of the Crowns refers to the accession of James VI, King of Scots, to the thrones of England and Ireland, in March 1603. ... Year 1603 (MDCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Union of the Crowns refers to the accession of James VI, King of Scots, to the thrones of England and Ireland, in March 1603. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... Image File history File links England_Arms_1603. ... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary... The Union of the Crowns refers to the accession of James VI, King of Scots, to the thrones of England and Ireland, in March 1603. ... The Coat of arms of Ireland is blazoned as azure a harp or, stringed argent - a gold harp with silver strings on a St. ... This article is about the Irish kingdom existing from 1541 to 1800. ... The Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland, as used before 1603 The Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland was the official coat of arms of the monarchs of Scotland, and were used as the official coat of arms of the Kingdom of Scotland until the Union of the Crowns in... The English Interregnum was the period of parliamentary and military rule in the land occupied by modern-day England and Wales after the English Civil War. ... Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 – 3 September 1658) was an English military and political leader best known for his involvement in making England into a republican Commonwealth and for his later role as Lord Protector of England, Scotland and Ireland. ...

1660 - 1689 Charles II restored the Royal Arms.
1689 - 1702 King James II & VII is deposed and replaced with his daughter Mary and her husband, William, Prince of Orange ruling jointly as William III & II and Mary II. An escutcheon of Nassau (the royal house to which William belonged) was added (a golden lion rampant on a blue field).[2]
1702 - 1707 Queen Anne inherits the throne upon the death of King William III & II, and the Royal Arms return to the 1603 version[2]
1707 - 1714 The Acts of Union 1707 created the Kingdom of Great Britain (1707-1800). The Royal Arms of England and Scotland are impaled and moved to the first and fourth quarters, France second quarter and Ireland third quarter.[2]
1714 - 1801 The Elector of Hanover inherits the throne following the death of Queen Anne under the provisions of the Act of Settlement 1701, becoming King George I. The fourth quarter of the arms is changed to reflect the new King's domains in Hanover (Brunswick-Lüneburg-Westphalia, surmounted by Imperial Crown of the Holy Roman Empire for the Holy Roman office of Archbannerbearer/Archtreasurer).[2]
1801 - 1837 The Act of Union 1801 unites the Kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland. King George III drops the ancient claim to the French throne. The Royal Arms change, with England now occuping the first and fourth quarters, Scotland the second, Ireland the third. For the Electorate of Hanover, there is an inescutcheon surmounted by the electoral bonnet. This is replaced in 1816 by a Royal Crown when Hanover was declared a Kingdom.[2]
1837 - present The accession of Queen Victoria ends the personal union between the UK and Hanover, as Salic law prevents a woman ascending the Hanoverian throne. The escutcheon of Hanover is removed and the Royal Arms remain the same.[2] There is no attempt to alter the Royal Arms to reflect later titles acquired by the British monarch such as Emperor of India. The Harp of the Kingdom of Ireland remains despite partition in 1921 and the successor to the Irish Free State, the Republic of Ireland, leaving the British Commonwealth in 1948. The Royal Arms do not incorporate any specific element for Northern Ireland or Wales, neither being a Kingdom. Consisting of six of the nine counties of Ulster (a Province of the Kingdom of Ireland), Northern Ireland remains an administrative division of the UK. Wales, once an independent Principality, following English conquest falls within the Kingdom of England. However, the Prince of Wales places arms for Wales at the centre of his personal arms. (A separate version of the Royal Arms are used in Scotland).

Image File history File links England_Arms_1603. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... Image File history File links UK_Arms_1689. ... James II and VII (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701)[2] was King of England, King of Scots,[1] and King of Ireland from 6 February 1685 to 11 December 1688. ... Mary II (30 April 1662–28 December 1694) reigned as Queen of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689, and as Queen of Scots (as Mary II of Scotland) from 11 April 1689 until her death. ... William III (14 November 1650 – 8 March 1702) was the Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28 June 1672, King of England and King of Ireland from 13 February 1689, and King of Scots (under the name William II) from... William III Mary II The phrase William and Mary usually refers to the joint sovereignty over the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of Scotland of King William III and his wife Queen Mary II. Their joint reign began in February, 1689, when they were called to the throne by... Shield Field Supporter Crest Wreath Mantling Helm Compartment Charge Motto Coat of arms elements Escutcheon is often the term used in heraldry for the shield displayed in a coat of arms. ... The House of Orange-Nassau (in Dutch: Huis van Oranje-Nassau), a branch of the German House of Nassau, has played a central role in the political life of the Netherlands - and at times in Europe - since William I of Orange (also known as William the Silent and Father of... Image File history File links England_Arms_1603. ... Anne (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714) became Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland on 8 March 1702, succeeding William III of England and II of Scotland. ... Image File history File links UK_Arms_1707. ... The Acts of Union were a pair of Acts of Parliament passed in 1706 and 1707 (taking effect on 1 May 1707) by, respectively, the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. ... For an explanation of terms such as Scotland, Wales, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom, see British Isles (terminology). ... Image File history File links UK_Arms_1714. ... George I (George Louis; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727)[1] was King of Great Britain and Ireland, from 1 August 1714 until his death. ... Act of Settlement The Electress Sophia of Hanover The Act of Settlement (12 & 13 Wm 3 c. ... Capital Hanover Head of State King of Hanover Hanover (German: Hannover) is a historical territory in todays Germany. ... Location of the Duchy of Brunswick within the German Empire Capital Braunschweig Government Monarchy Duke  - 1813-1815 Frederick William  - 1913-1918 Ernest Augustus History  - Restoration 1815  - Abdication 1918 Area  - 1910 3,672 km² Population  - 1910 est. ... Lüneburg (English: Lunenburg) is a city in Lower Saxony, Germany, about 50km southeast of Hamburg. ... For other places named Westphalia, see Westphalia (disambiguation). ... Etching of the Crown of the Holy Roman Empire by Johann Adam Delsenbach The Imperial Crown (in German: Reichskrone), is the crown of the Kings and Emperors of the Holy Roman Empire since the Late Middle Ages. ... Image File history File links UK_Arms_1801. ... The 1800 Act of Union merged the Kingdom of Ireland and the Kingdom of Great Britain (itself a merger of England and Scotland under the Act of Union 1707) to create the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on 1 January 1801. ... Union Flag (1606-1800 The united Kingdom of Great Britain, also sometimes known as the United Kingdom of Great Britain, was created by the merger of the Kingdom of Scotland and the Kingdom of England under the 1707 Act of Union to create a single kingdom encompassing the whole of... George III redirects here. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... Escutcheon is the term used in heraldry for the shield displayed in a coat of arms. ... Image File history File links UK_Arms_1837. ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ... It has been suggested that Dynastic union be merged into this article or section. ... // The Salic law (Lat. ... New Crowns for Old depicts Disraeli as Abanazer from the pantomime version of Aladdin offering Victoria an Imperial crown in exchange for a Royal one. ... This article is about the Irish kingdom existing from 1541 to 1800. ... The Partition of Ireland took place in May 1921, following the enactment in December 1920 of the Government of Ireland Act 1920, and was accepted in the ratification of the Anglo-Irish Treaty in January 1922 that ended the Anglo-Irish War and the union of the United Kingdom of... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article is about the prior state. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2008. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... This article is about the country. ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... This article is about the nine-county Irish province. ... A province is a territorial unit, almost always a country subdivision. ... A principality is a monarchical feudatory or sovereign state, ruled or reigned over by a Monarch with the title of prince or princess (a synonym is princedom) or (in the widest sense) a Monarch with another title within the generic use of the term prince. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... The Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland, as used before 1603 The Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland was the official coat of arms of the monarchs of Scotland, and were used as the official coat of arms of the Kingdom of Scotland until the Union of the Crowns in... This article is about the country. ...

Other variants

Royal Family

Members of the British Royal Family receive their own personalised arms which are based on the Royal Arms. Only children and grandchildren in the male line of the monarch are entitled to receive their own arms in this fashion. The arms of children of the monarch are differentiated by a three point label; grandchildren of the monarch are differentiated by a five point label. An exception is made for the eldest son of the Prince of Wales, who received a three point label. Since 1911, the arms of the Prince of Wales also has an inescutcheon of the ancient arms of the Principality of Wales. Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony The British Royal Family is shared between the Commonwealth Realms; this article focuses on the perspective of United Kingdom. ... A plain label of three points Azure of the Prince of Asturiass Coat of Arms In heraldry, a label is a charge closely resembling the strap with pendants which, from the saddle, crossed the horses chest. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Escutcheon is the term used in heraldry for the shield displayed in a coat of arms. ... The Coat of Arms of the Principality of Wales is a coat of arms used by the Prince of Wales. ...


Queen consorts and the wives of sons of the monarch also receive their own personalised coat of arms. Typically this will be the arms of their husband impaled with their own personal arms or those of their father. However, the consorts of a Queen regnant are not entitled to use the Royal Arms. Thus Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh uses his own personalised arms. The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (born Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark, 10 June 1921)[2] is the husband and consort of Queen Elizabeth II. Originally a royal Prince of Greece and Denmark, Prince Philip renounced these titles shortly before his marriage. ...


Currently the following members of the Royal Family have their own arms based on the Royal Arms:

Children and grandchildren of the monarch in the male line
Arms/Standard Royal Difference
HRH The Prince of Wales Plain three-point label, and inescutcheon of the Coat of Arms of the Principality of Wales.[2]
HRH Prince William of Wales Three-point label with a red escallop, alluding to the arms of his mother, Lady Diana Spencer.
HRH Prince Henry of Wales Five-point label with three red escallops in alternate points.
HRH The Duke of York Three-point label, the centre point bearing a blue anchor.[2]
HRH Princess Beatrice of York Five-point label with three Bees in alternate points.
HRH The Earl of Wessex Three-point label, the centre point bearing a Tudor rose.
HRH The Princess Royal Three-point label, the points bearing a red cross, a red heart and a red cross.[2]
HRH The Duke of Gloucester Five-point label, the first, third and fifth points bearing a red cross, the second and fourth points bearing a red lion.[2]
HRH The Duke of Kent Five-point label, the first, third and fifth points bearing a blue anchor, the second and fourth points bearing a red cross.[2]
HRH Prince Michael of Kent Five-point label, the first, third and fifth points bearing a red cross, the second and fourth points bearing a blue anchor.[2]
HRH Princess Alexandra Five-point label, the first and fifth points bearing a red heart, the second and fourth points bearing a blue anchor, and the third bearing a red cross.[2]
Consorts
HRH The Duke of Edinburgh Prince Philip was granted arms of his own in 1947, because men are not entitled to bear the arms of their wives. His arms are quarterly Denmark, Greece, and Mountbatten, representing his ancestry, and Edinburgh, representing his dukedom.[2]
HRH The Duchess of Cornwall The arms of the Prince of Wales impaled with those of her father, Major Bruce Shand, crowned by the single-arched Crown of Prince of Wales.[7]
HRH The Countess of Wessex The arms of the Earl of Wessex impaled with her own personal arms.

Image File history File links Prince_of_Wales_Arms. ... Royal Highness (abbreviation HRH) is a style (His Royal Highness or Her Royal Highness); plural Royal Highnesses (abbreviation TRH, Their Royal Highnesses). ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... The Coat of Arms of the Principality of Wales is a coat of arms used by the Prince of Wales. ... Image File history File links William_of_Wales_Arms. ... Prince William redirects here. ... Diana Spencer redirects here. ... Image File history File links Henry_of_Wales_Arms. ... Prince Henry of Wales (Henry Charles Albert David; born 15 September 1984), commonly known as Prince Harry, is the younger son of Charles, Prince of Wales, and his first wife, the late Diana, Princess of Wales. ... Image File history File links Andrew_Duke_of_York_Arms. ... The Prince Andrew, The Duke of York (Andrew Albert Christian Edward; born 19 February 1960) is a member of the British Royal Family, the third child and second son of Queen Elizabeth II. He has held the title of Duke of York since 1986. ... Image File history File links Beatrice_of_York_Arms. ... “Princess Beatrice” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Edward_Earl_of_Wessex_Arms. ... The Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, KG, KCVO, SOM (Edward Antony Richard Louis Mountbatten-Windsor; born 10 March 1964) is a member of the British Royal Family, the youngest child and third son of Queen Elizabeth II. He has held the title of Earl of Wessex since 1999. ... When Henry Tudor took the crown of England from Richard III in battle, he brought about the end of the Wars of the Roses between the House of Lancaster (Red Rose) and the House of York (White Rose). ... Image File history File links Anne_Princess_Royal_Arms. ... Princess Anne redirects here. ... Image File history File links Richard_Duke_of_Gloucester_Arms. ... Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester (Richard Alexander Walter George; born 26 August 1944) is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandson of George V. He has been Duke of Gloucester since his fathers death in 1974. ... Image File history File links Edward_Duke_of_Kent_Arms. ... Field Marshal Prince Edward, Duke of Kent (Edward George Nicholas Patrick Paul; born 9 October 1935) is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandchild of George V. He has held the title of Duke of Kent since 1942. ... Image File history File links Michael_of_Kent_Arms. ... Prince Michael of Kent, GCVO (Michael George Charles Franklin Windsor; born 4 July 1942) is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandson of King George V and Queen Mary. ... Image File history File links Princess_Alexandra_Arms. ... Princess Alexandra, The Honourable Lady Ogilvy (Alexandra Helen Elizabeth Olga Christabel; born 25 December 1936), is a member of the British Royal Family, a granddaughter of George V. She was married to the late Sir Angus Ogilvy. ... Image File history File links Philip_Duke_of_Edinburgh_Arms. ... The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (born Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark, 10 June 1921)[2] is the husband and consort of Queen Elizabeth II. Originally a royal Prince of Greece and Denmark, Prince Philip renounced these titles shortly before his marriage. ... Mountbatten is the family name adopted by two branches of the Battenberg family due to rising anti-German sentiment among the British public during World War I. On 14 July 1917, Prince Louis of Battenberg assumed the surname Mountbatten (a literal translation of the German Battenberg) for himself and his... The Coat of arms of the City of Edinburgh is the official emblem for the Scottish capital city. ... The Duke of Edinburgh is a dukedom associated with Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Image File history File links Duchess_of_Cornwall_Arms. ... Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (Camilla Rosemary; formerly Parker Bowles; née Shand, born 17 July 1947) is the second wife of Charles, Prince of Wales, heir apparent to the thrones of the United Kingdom and the other 15 Commonwealth Realms. ... Major Bruce Middleton Hope Shand MC and bar (born 22 January 1917), a Second World War war hero, is the father of Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, the wife of Charles, Prince of Wales, the Heir Apparent to the British throne. ... Crown of Louis XV It has eight half-arches. ... The Crown of Charles, Prince of Wales was the crown used by Charles, Prince of Wales at his investiture as Prince of Wales in 1969. ... Image File history File links Countess_of_Wessex_Arms. ... HRH The Countess of Wessex The Countess of Wessex (Sophie Helen Mountbatten-Windsor, née Rhys-Jones), (born January 20, 1965), is a member of the British Royal Family, the wife of HRH The Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, the youngest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke...

Government

The version used by the British Government.
The version used by the Scotland Office.

Her Majesty's Government uses a version of the Royal Arms but without the helm or crest. In relation to Scotland, the Scotland Office uses the Scottish version, again without the helm or crest, and the same was used as the day-to-day logo of the Scottish Executive until a rebranding exercise in September 2007. In both arms, the crown sits directly on the shield Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Arms_Scot_Exec. ... Image File history File links Arms_Scot_Exec. ... A logo of Her Majestys Government. ... The Scotland Office (Oifis na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a department of the United Kingdom government, responsible for reserved Scottish affairs. ... A person wearing a helmet. ... In heraldry, a crest is a component of a coat of arms. ... The Executives logo, shown with English and Scottish Gaelic caption The term Scottish Executive is used in two different, but closely-related senses: to denote the executive arm of Scotlands national legislature (i. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The Arms feature on

It is also used by the following government departments An Act of Parliament or Act is law enacted by the parliament (see legislation). ... UK biometric passport, issued since 2006. ...

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Whitehall, seen from St. ... The new eastern entrance to HM Treasury HM Treasury, in full Her Majestys Treasury, informally The Treasury, is the United Kingdom government department responsible for developing and executing the UK Governments financial and economic policy. ... The Ministry of Justice is a department of the government of the United Kingdom, reorganized from the former Department for Constitutional Affairs. ... The Scotland Office (Oifis na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a department of the United Kingdom government, responsible for reserved Scottish affairs. ... The Court of Session is the supreme civil court in Scotland. ... The Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service is a government department in Scotland that is responsible for the public prosecution of alleged criminals. ... The modern concept of Small Office and Home Office or SoHo , or Small or Home Office deals with the category of business which can be from 1 to 10 workers. ... The Royal Mint is the body permitted to manufacture, or mint, coins in the United Kingdom. ... The Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador is the superior court for the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ...

Blazon

This table breaks down the official blazons to enable comparison of the differences between the general coat and the coat used in Scotland.

Everywhere except Scotland Scotland
Quarterly I & IV Gules three lions passant gardant in pale Or armed and langued Azure Or a lion rampant Gules armed and langued Azure within a double tressure flory-counter-flory of the second
II Or a lion rampant Gules armed and langued Azure within a double tressure flory-counter-flory of the second Gules three lions passant gardant in pale Or armed and langued Azure
III Azure a harp Or stringed Argent Azure a harp Or stringed Argent
Surrounded by The Garter The collar of the Order of the Thistle
Crest Upon the Royal helm the imperial crown Proper, thereon a lion statant gardant Or imperially crowned Proper Upon the Royal helm the crown of Scotland Proper, thereon a lion sejant affronté Gules armed and langued Azure, Royally crowned Proper holding in his dexter paw a sword and in his sinister a sceptre, both Proper
Supporters Dexter a lion rampant gardant Or imperially crowned Proper, sinister a unicorn Argent, armed, crined and unguled Or, gorged with a coronet Or composed of crosses patée and fleurs de lis a chain affixed thereto passing between the forelegs and reflexed over the back also Or Dexter a unicorn Argent Royally crowned Proper, armed, crined and unguled Or, gorged with a coronet Or composed of crosses patée and fleurs de lis a chain affixed thereto passing between the forelegs and reflexed over the back also Or holding the standard of Saint Andrew, sinister a lion rampant gardant Or imperially crowned Proper holding the standard of Saint George
Motto Dieu et mon Droit (French) In My Defens God Me Defend, abbr. In Defens (Scots)
Order Motto Garter: Honi soit qui mal y pense (Old French) Thistle: Nemo me impune lacessit (Latin)

Originally an item of clothing, there are now several related meanings: Garter (clothing), the item of clothing Order of the Garter, a senior British order of chivalry List of female members of the mediaeval Order of the Garter List of Knights and Ladies of the Garter from 1348 Garter snake... Sir Thomas More wearing the Collar of Esses as Lord Chancellor, by Hans Holbein the Younger (1527). ... James VII ordained the modern Order. ... In heraldry, a crest is a component of a coat of arms. ... The Coat of Arms of Prince Edward Island uses two foxes as supporters. ... Lion of England, one of the replica set of the Queens beasts in the Kew Gardens, London, 2003-08-23. ... Interior of Westminster Hall - Photograph by Michael Reeve, 12 July 2002. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... This article is about the Anglic language of Scotland. ... See also Orders of Chivalry in the British honours system After the failure of the crusades, the crusading military orders became idealized and romanticized, resulting in the late medieval notion of chivalry, as reflected in the Arthurian romances of the time. ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... Honi soit qui mal y pense sometimes rendered as Honi soit quy mal y pense, Hony soyt qe mal y pense, Hony soyt ke mal y pense, Honni soit qui mal y pense, Hony soyt qui mal pence and various other phoneticizations, is the motto of the English chivalric Order... Old French was the Romance dialect continuum spoken in territories corresponding roughly to the northern half of modern France and parts of modern Belgium and Switzerland from around 1000 to 1300. ... James VII ordained the modern Order. ... Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one wounds me with impunity, literally meaning (lacessere = to appeal to, to provoke, to attack): No one provokes me with impunity) is the royal Scottish motto, used historically for the Kingdom of Scotland where it appeared on the Royal Arms of Scotland. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ...

See also

The Coat of Arms of Canada, formally known as The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of Canada,[1] is the official coat of arms of the Canadian monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II. These arms are used by the Queen in her official capacity as monarch, and are officially known...

References

  1. ^ Heraldic Sculptor| Accessed 29 April 2008
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w Brooke-Little, J.P., FSA [1950] (1978). Boutell's Heraldry, Revised Edition, London: Frederick Warne LTD, pp. 205-222. ISBN 0-7232-2096-4. 
  3. ^ http://www.royalmint.com/newdesigns/designsRevealed.aspx
  4. ^ http://www.courts.gov.bc.ca/index.asp
  5. ^ The Franco-Scots Coinage of Mary Stuart and Francis II
  6. ^ Scottish Coins ~ Mary (1542 - 1567)
  7. ^ BBC News "Camilla's coat of arms unveiled"

John Philip Rudolph Dominic Aloysius Mary Brooke-Little[1] CVO, KStJ, FSA, FSG, FHS, FHG (Hon), FRHSC (Hon), FHSNZ (6 April 1927–13 February 2006) was an influential and popular British writer on heraldic subjects and a long-serving officer of arms at the College of Arms in London. ...

External links

The list of unrecognized countries enumerates those geo-political entities which lack general diplomatic recognition, but wish to be recognized as sovereign states. ...  Southwest Asia in most contexts. ... The borders of the continents are the limits of the several continents of the Earth, as defined by various geographical, cultural, and political criteria. ...  The North American plate, shown in brown The North American Plate is a tectonic plate covering most of North America, extending eastward to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and westward to the Cherskiy Range in East Siberia. ...  The African plate, shown in pinkish-orange The African Plate is a tectonic plate covering the continent of Africa and extending westward to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
national symbols: royal coat of arms (313 words)
The Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom have evolved over many years and reflect the history of the Monarchy and of the country.
The shield shows the various royal emblems of different parts of the United Kingdom in its design: the three lions of England in the first and fourth quarters, the lion of Scotland in the second and the harp of Ireland in the third.
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NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland (5676 words)
The Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland was the official coat of arms of the monarchs of Scotland, and were used as the official coat of arms of the Kingdom of Scotland until the Union of the Crowns in 1603.
Coat of Arms of Canada (from 1994) The Royal Coat of Arms of Canada (formally known as The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of Canada) was proclaimed by King George V on November 21, 1921, as the Arms or Ensigns Armorial of the Dominion of Canada.
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