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Encyclopedia > Royal Albert Hall

The Royal Albert Hall is an arts venue situated in the Knightsbridge area of the City of Westminster, London, England, best known for holding the annual summer Proms concerts since 1941. Taken by A. Brady 27th March 2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Taken by A. Brady 27th March 2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Albert Hall, as a name, can refer to: Albert Hall (actor), an actor Albert Hall (baseball), an outfielder Albert R. Hall, a U.S. Representative from Indiana The phrase can also refer to: Albert Hall, Canberra, the building in Canberra, Australia Albert Hall, Launceston the building in Launceston, Tasmania, Australia... The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... Knightsbridge is a street and district spanning the City of Westminster and theRoyal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, London notable for its eclectic mix of rich, famous, and international residents including several billionaires Roman Abramovich, oligarchs from Russia, China and India, international businessman Lord Marshall of Knightsbridge, trend setters Charles... The City of Westminster is a borough of London, England with city status. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A Promenade concert in the Royal Albert Hall, 2004. ...


The Royal Albert Hall is one of the UK's most treasured and distinctive buildings, recognisable the world over. Since its opening by Queen Victoria in 1871, the world's leading artists from every kind of performance genre have appeared on its stage. Each year it hosts more than 350 performances including classical concerts, rock and pop, ballet and opera, tennis, award ceremonies, school and community events, charity performances and lavish banquets.


The Hall was originally supposed to have been called The Central Hall of Arts and Sciences, but the name was changed by Queen Victoria to Royal Albert Hall of Arts and Sciences when laying the foundation stone as a dedication to her husband and consort, Prince Albert. It forms the practical part of a national memorial to the Prince Consort - the decorative part is the Albert Memorial directly to the north in Kensington Gardens, now separated from the Hall by the heavy traffic along Kensington Gore. The Hall also accommodates the second largest pipe organ in the UK (Liverpool Cathedral regains the title with the addition of the Central organ), and is the home of The Proms. A prince consort, generally speaking, is the husband of a Queen regnant, unless he himself is a king. ... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (Francis Charles Augustus Albert Emmanuel, of the Saxe-Coburg-Gotha branch of the House of Wettin) (26 August 1819 - 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... A prince consort, generally speaking, is the husband of a Queen regnant, unless he himself is a king. ... The Albert Memorial is situated in Kensington Gardens, London, England, directly to the north of the Royal Albert Hall. ... See also Kensington Gardens, South Australia, a suburb of Adelaide, Australia Kensington Gardens, once the private gardens of Kensington Palace, is one of the Royal Parks of London, lying immediately to the west of Hyde Park. ... Kensington Gore is a street in central London, the same name having been formerly used for the piece of land on which it stands. ... Grand Organ (pipe organ) in Royal Albert Hall (behind stage) The Grand Organ situated in the Royal Albert Hall in London, is the largest pipe organ in the UK. It was originally built by Henry Father Willis and most recently rebuilt by Mander Organs, having 147 stops and 9997 speaking... North elevation of Liverpool Anglican Cathedral. ... A Promenade concert in the Royal Albert Hall, 2004. ...


As the best known building within the cultural complex known as Albertopolis, the Hall is commonly and erroneously thought to lie within the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. The Hall is actually within the area of the City of Westminster. The site was part of the former Kensington Gore estate which was historically part of Knightsbridge. Albertopolis is a nickname for the area centered around South Kensington, London, between Cromwell Road and Kensington Gore, which contains a large number of educational and cultural sites, including Imperial College London Natural History Museum Royal Albert Hall Royal College of Art Royal College of Music Royal Geographical Society Science... The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea (often abbreviated to RBKC) is a London borough in the west side of central London. ... The City of Westminster is a borough of London, England with city status. ... Knightsbridge is a street and district spanning the City of Westminster and theRoyal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, London notable for its eclectic mix of rich, famous, and international residents including several billionaires Roman Abramovich, oligarchs from Russia, China and India, international businessman Lord Marshall of Knightsbridge, trend setters Charles...

Contents

Introduction

The opening ceremony on March 29, 1871
The opening ceremony on March 29, 1871

Since its opening by Queen Victoria on March 29, 1871 the Royal Albert Hall has played host to a multitude of different events and legendary figures and has been affectionately titled 'The Nation's Village Hall'. On May 1, 1871, Arthur Sullivan's cantata, On Shore and Sea played at the hall.[1] ImageMetadata File history File links RAH_Opening_1871_ILN.jpg Summary The grand opening of the Royal Albert Hall in London, was conducted by Prince Alberts widow and eldest son, Queen Victoria and thePrince of Wales on 29 March 1871. ... ImageMetadata File history File links RAH_Opening_1871_ILN.jpg Summary The grand opening of the Royal Albert Hall in London, was conducted by Prince Alberts widow and eldest son, Queen Victoria and thePrince of Wales on 29 March 1871. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan (May 13, 1842 – November 22, 1900) was an English composer best known for his operatic collaborations with librettist W. S. Gilbert. ... A cantata (Italian, sung) is a vocal composition with an instrumental accompaniment and generally containing more than one movement. ... On Shore and Sea is a dramatic cantata, with words by Tom Taylor. ...


As well as hosting the Proms every summer since they were bombed out of the Queen's Hall in 1941, the Hall has been used for classical and rock concerts, conferences, ballroom dancing, poetry recitals, education, ballet, opera and even a circus (Cirque du Soleil). It has hosted many sporting events, including boxing, wrestling (including the first Sumo wrestling tournament ever to be held outside Japan) and tennis. It also hosts the annual Royal British Legion Festival of Remembrance, held the day before Remembrance Sunday. A Promenade concert in the Royal Albert Hall, 2004. ... The Queens Hall was a classical music concert hall in Central London, opened in 1893 but is best known for being where The Promenade Concerts were founded in 1895. ... Cirque du Soleil (French for Circus of the Sun) is an entertainment empire based in Montreal, Quebec, Canada and founded in Baie-Saint-Paul in 1984 by two former street performers, Guy Laliberté and Daniel Gauthier. ... A sumo match Sumo (相撲 Sumō), or sumo wrestling, is today a competition contact sport wherein two wrestlers or rikishi face off in a circular area. ... Categories: Stub | British Army | Royal Air Force | Royal Navy ... ... In the United Kingdom, Remembrance Sunday is the second Sunday of November, the Sunday nearest to 11 November (Remembrance Day), which is the anniversary of the end of the hostilities of the First World War at 11 a. ...

The Triumph of Arts and Sciences
The Triumph of Arts and Sciences

The hall, a Grade I listed building,[2] is oval in shape, measuring 83 m (272 feet) by 72 m (238 ft) around the outside, and has a capacity of 8,000 people and has accommodated as many as 9,000 (although modern safety restrictions mean that the maximum permitted capacity is now 5,544 including standing in the Gallery). The great glass and wrought-iron dome roofing the hall is 41 m (135 ft) high. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1824x1940, 2376 KB) Summary I took this photo on 10/06/06 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1824x1940, 2376 KB) Summary I took this photo on 10/06/06 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version... The Forth Bridge, designed by Sir Benjamin Baker and Sir John Fowler, opened in 1890, and now owned by Network Rail, is designated as a Category A listed building by Historic Scotland. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... For other uses, see Dome (disambiguation). ...


Around the outside of the hall is a great mosaic frieze, depicting "The Triumph of Arts and Sciences", in reference to the Hall's dedication. Proceeding anti-clockwise from the north side the sixteen subjects of the frieze are: (1) Various Countries of the World bringing in their Offerings to the Exhibition of 1851; (2) Music; (3) Sculpture; (4) Painting; (5) Princes, Art Patrons and Artists; (6) Workers in Stone; (7) Workers in Wood and Brick; (8) Architecture; (9) The Infancy of the Arts and Sciences; (10) Agriculture; (11) Horticulture and Land Surveying; (12) Astronomy and Navigation; (13) A Group of Philosophers, Sages and Students; (14) Engineering; (15) The Mechanical Powers; and (16) Pottery and Glassmaking. This article is about a decorative art. ...

More of The Triumph of Arts and Sciences, showing Peterborough Cathedral
More of The Triumph of Arts and Sciences, showing Peterborough Cathedral

Above the frieze is an inscription in one-foot high terracotta letters. This combines historical fact and Biblical quotations: "This hall was erected for the advancement of the arts and sciences and works of industry of all nations in fulfilment of the intention of Albert Prince Consort. The site was purchased with the proceeds of the Great Exhibition of the year MDCCCLI. The first stone of the Hall was laid by Her Majesty Queen Victoria on the twentieth day of May MDCCCLXVII and it was opened by Her Majesty the Twenty Ninth of March in the year MDCCCLXXI. Thine O Lord is the greatness and the power and the glory and the victory and the majesty. For all that is in the heaven and in the earth is Thine. The wise and their works are in the hand of God. Glory be to God on high and on earth peace." Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,048 × 1,536 pixels, file size: 546 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,048 × 1,536 pixels, file size: 546 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Peterborough Cathedral Plan Peterborough Cathedral is dedicated to Saint Peter, Saint Paul and Saint Andrew, and is very unusual amongst mediæval cathedrals in Britain because of its triple front (dominated by the statues of the three saints) and overall asymmetrical appearance. ... Terra cotta is a hard semifired waterproof ceramic clay used in pottery and building construction. ...


History

The first ever performance at the Royal Albert Hall, March 29, 1871
The first ever performance at the Royal Albert Hall, March 29, 1871

In 1851 the Great Exhibition was held in Hyde Park, London, for which the so-called Crystal Palace was built. The exhibition was a great success and led Prince Albert, the Prince Consort, to propose that a permanent series of facilities be built in the area for the enlightenment of the public. Progress on the scheme was slow and in 1861 Prince Albert died, without having seen his ideas come to fruition. However, a memorial was proposed for Hyde Park, with a Great Hall opposite. The proposal was approved and the site was purchased with some of the profits from the Exhibition. Once the remaining funds had been raised, in April 1867 Queen Victoria signed the Royal Charter of the The Corporation of the Hall of Arts and Sciences which was to operate the Hall and on 20 May, laid the foundation stone. ImageMetadata File history File links RAH_Grand_Opening_by_Queen_Victoria_29_March_1871_The_Graphic. ... ImageMetadata File history File links RAH_Grand_Opening_by_Queen_Victoria_29_March_1871_The_Graphic. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Great Exhibition: Paxtons Crystal Palace enclosed full-grown trees in Hyde Park. ... “Hyde Park” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Crystal Palace. ... For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Hall was designed by Captain Francis Fowke and Colonel H.Y. Darracott Scott of the Royal Engineers. They were heavily influenced by ancient amphitheatres, but had also been exposed to the ideas of Gottfried Semper while he was working at the South Kensington Museum. The recently-opened Cirque d'Hiver in Paris was seen in the contemporary press as the design to outdo. The Hall was constructed mainly of Fareham Red brick, with terra cotta block decoration made by Gibbs and Canning Ltd. of Tamworth. The dome (designed by Rowland Mason Ordish) on top was made of steel and glazed. There was a trial assembly made of the steel framework of the dome in Manchester, then it was taken apart again and transported down to London via horse and cart. When the time came for the supporting structure to be removed from the dome after re-assembly in situ, only volunteers remained on site in case the structure dropped. It did drop - but only by five-eighths of an inch! The Hall was scheduled to be completed by Christmas Day 1870 and the Queen visited a few days beforehand to inspect. She was reported as saying "It looks like the British Constitution". Francis Fowke (1823-1865) was a British engineer and architect. ... The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army. ... Gottfried Semper Gottfried Semper (1803-1879) was a German architect, art critic, and professor of architecture, who designed and built the Semper Oper in Dresden between 1838 and 1841. ... The Cromwell Road entrance to the Victoria and Albert Museum The Victoria and Albert Museum (the V&A) is on Cromwell Road in Kensington, West London. ... The Cirque dhiver, Paris Since 1852 the Cirque dhiver (the Winter Circus), at the juncture of the rue des Filles Calvaires and rue Amelot, Paris 11ème, has been a prominent venue for circuses, exhibitions of dressage, musical concerts and other events, today also including fashion shows. ... Fareham Red Bricks - famous red tinged clay bricks, from Fareham, Hampshire ... Terra cotta is a hard semifired waterproof ceramic clay used in pottery and building construction. ... Rowland Mason Ordish (11 April 1824-1886) was an English engineer. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... Joseph and Mary with baby Jesus, at the first Christmas Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a holiday in the Christian calendar, usually observed on December 25, which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ...

Postcard of the Royal Albert Hall (circa 1903) with an inset of the Albert Memorial
Postcard of the Royal Albert Hall (circa 1903) with an inset of the Albert Memorial

The official opening ceremony of the Royal Albert Hall was on 29 March 1871. After a welcoming speech by Edward, the Prince of Wales, Queen Victoria was too overcome to speak, so the Prince had to announce that "The Queen declares this Hall is now open". A concert followed, when the Hall's acoustic problems became immediately apparent. These were not properly tackled until 1969 when a series of large fibreglass acoustic diffusing discs (commonly referred to as "mushrooms" or "flying saucers") were installed in the roof to cut down the notorious echo. It used to be said that the hall was the only place where a British composer could be sure of hearing his work twice. Postcard of the Royal Albert hall from 1903 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Postcard of the Royal Albert hall from 1903 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Albert Memorial is situated in Kensington Gardens, London, England, directly to the north of the Royal Albert Hall. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ...


Initially lit by gas (when thousands of gas jets were lit by a special system within 10 seconds), full electric lighting was installed in 1897. During an earlier trial when a partial installation was made, one disgruntled patron wrote to The Times newspaper declaring it to be " a very ghastly and unpleasant innovation". Gas lighting is the process of burning piped natural gas or coal gas for illumination. ... Most of the industrialized world is lit by electric lights, which are used both at night and to provide additional light during the daytime. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ...


In 1936, the Hall was the scene of a giant rally celebrating the British Empire, the occasion being the centenary of Joseph Chamberlain's birth. The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... The Rt. ...

A 1986 photo of the Albert Hall looking north and west. This shows the small South Porch replaced during the 2000 refurbishment.
A 1986 photo of the Albert Hall looking north and west. This shows the small South Porch replaced during the 2000 refurbishment.

The Hall has more recently undergone a rolling programme (1996 - 2004) of renovation and development to enable it to meet the demands of the next century of events and performances. Thirty "discrete projects" were undertaken by BDP without disrupting events [3]. Although the exterior of the building is largely unchanged, the south steps leading down to Prince Consort Road were demolished to allow reconstruction of the original underground vehicle access to take modern vehicles. The steps were then reconstructed around a new south porch on the same scale and in the same style as the three pre-existing porches: these works were undertaken by Taylor Woodrow Construction[4]. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1765x1065, 456 KB) Summary Photograph of Royal Albert Hall, Kensington, london, UK, looking north and down. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1765x1065, 456 KB) Summary Photograph of Royal Albert Hall, Kensington, london, UK, looking north and down. ... The BDP logo Building Design Partnership (BDP) is a firm of architects employing over 800 staff in the UK and over 140 more internationally. ... Taylor Woodrow Holdings Limited is one of the largest British based housebuilding and general construction companies. ...


The works included a major rebuilding of the great organ, originally built by "Father" Henry Willis, subsequently rebuilt by Harrison & Harrison and most recently rebuilt by Mander Organs; The organ is now again the second largest pipe organ in the British Isles with 9,997 pipes (Liverpool Cathedral has 10,268). Grand Organ (pipe organ) in Royal Albert Hall (behind stage) The Grand Organ situated in the Royal Albert Hall in London, is the largest pipe organ in the UK. It was originally built by Henry Father Willis and most recently rebuilt by Mander Organs, having 147 stops and 9997 speaking... Reading Town Hall Organ, built by Willis in 1864, extended in 1882 and rebuilt by Harrison & Harrison in 1999 Henry Willis & Sons is a firm of pipe organ builders in the UK, examples of whose work can also be found in other countries. ... New organ at St Davids Cathedral built by Harrison & Harrison in 2000. ... Mander Organs is an English pipe organ maker and refurbisher based in London. ... The baroque organ in Roskilde Cathedral, Denmark The pipe organ is a musical instrument that produces sound by forcing pressurized air (referred to as wind) through a series of pipes. ...


Now the hall is used primarily as a live events venue — it has featured bands such as Led Zeppelin and the Beatles. Graduation ceremonies for students for Imperial College are also held in the hall. In addition to these events, it is possible to take guided tours of the interior of the hall For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... Royal School of Mines Entrance Imperial College London is a college of the University of London which focuses on science and technology, and is located in South Kensington in London. ...


Famous concerts

The Proms - founded by Sir Henry Wood - now the world's largest festival of Western classical music - have been held in the hall every summer since 1941 (after the original venue, The Queen's Hall in Langham Place was destroyed by a bomb). The Last Night of the Proms is broadcast in several countries. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... A Promenade concert in the Royal Albert Hall, 2004. ... Sir Henry Wood Kt CH (3 March 1869 – 19 August 1944) was an English conductor, forever associated with the Promenade Concerts which he conducted for half a century. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ...


The Hall has also been used for concerts by a wide range of popular artistes:


Listed in chronological order with name of artist and date of concert

Poster for Petula Clark's 1969 Albert Hall concert
  • Hiawatha seasons (Samuel Coleridge-Taylor) 1928 - 1940 conducted by Sir Malcolm Sargent
  • Lebanese diva Fairuz performed at the Royal Albert Hall in 1962.
  • 15 September 1963 The Beatles and The Rolling Stones performed on the same bill for the only time.
  • 1966, Bob Dylan performs.
  • 6 April 1968: 13th Eurovision Song Contest. Katie Boyle introduced entries from 17 countries. Spain won with "La la la" performed by Massiel. She finished one vote ahead of the UK entry, "Congratulations" by Cliff Richard.
  • 30 October 1968, Tiny Tim performs.
  • 26 November 1968: Cream farewell show.
  • 24 September 1969 - Deep Purple recorded & performed a Concerto for Group and Orchestra: Concerto for Group and Orchestra (restaged 25/26 September 1999)
  • On 26 October 1969, Petula Clark performed in a concert celebrating her 30th anniversary in show business. The concert was filmed and aired as the first program ever broadcast in colour by the BBC on Clark's 37th birthday, 15 November 1969.
  • 19691988 - Miss World beauty pageants
  • 1969 - Pink Floyd performed at the Albert Hall and received a life-time ban for setting two cannons off during their show.
  • Jimi Hendrix performed on 18 and 24 February 1969 with The Jimi Hendrix Experience featuring Noel Redding and Mitch Mitchell
  • Janis Joplin performed on 21 April 1969 with her Kozmic Blues Band.
  • Led Zeppelin performed on 9 January 1970, footage of which was filmed for a planned documentary. Though no documentary was ever made due to the poor quality of the film, the material was re-mastered over thirty years later and virtually the entire show was released on the Led Zeppelin DVD
  • Joni Mitchell and James Taylor performed a concert on October 28, 1970 for Radio BBC containing a number of solo songs and duets with the two. This was around the time when Mitchell and Taylor are said to have been romantically linked. Bootleg copies of the concert still circulate today.
  • Lata Mangeshkar, the greatest of Indian singers, performed her first concert abroad in 1974.
  • Renowned Indian singer Talat Mahmood performed in 1979. The second Indian to have been given the opportunity.
  • September 1976 - 6th Festival of Evangelical Choirs under the auspices of the London Emmanuel Choir. Triennial festival of Christian music, with massed choirs of 1000 voices plus 5000 in the congregation. Released on Pilgrim record label.
  • ABBA ended their 1977 European tour at the Hall with two sold-out concerts. Tickets for the concerts were available only by mail application and it was later revealed that the box-office received, astonishingly, 3.5 million requests for tickets. Reportedly, the concerts were partially filmed for ABBA: The Movie, but the footage was eventually not included in the final version of the film and to this day remains unreleased.
  • Dusty Springfield performed her last full-scale concert in Britain at Royal Albert Hall in 1979.
  • Siouxsie & the Banshees recorded double live album and video Nocturne at the Royal Albert Hall in London on 30 September and 1 October 1983, This was the first Banshees album on their own Wonderland label, Released in November 1983.
Clannad leaving the stage after performing at the venue in 1989.
Clannad leaving the stage after performing at the venue in 1989.

A famous and widely bootlegged concert by Bob Dylan at the Free Trade Hall in Manchester on 17 May 1966 was mistakenly labeled the "Royal Albert Hall Concert." In 1998 Columbia Records released an official recording, The Bootleg Series Vol. 4: Bob Dylan Live 1966, The "Royal Albert Hall" Concert, that maintains the erroneous title, but does include details of the actual concert location. Dylan actually did close his European tour on 26 and 27 May and of that year; these were his last concerts before Dylan got into a motorcycle accident and became a recluse for a brief period of time. Image File history File links AlbertHall. ... Image File history File links AlbertHall. ... A 1912 obituary in the African Methodist Episcopal Church Review Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (August 15, 1875–September 1, 1912) was a black, English composer who achieved such success he was called The Black Mahler. ... Sir Harold Malcolm Watts Sargent (April 29, 1895 – October 3, 1967) was a British conductor, organist and composer. ... Fairuz (Arabic: , also spelled Fairouz or Fayrouz) is a distinguished Lebanese singer and legend. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Eurovision redirects here. ... Catherine Katie Boyle was a television presenter, well known for presenting Whats My Line?. She also was the presenter for the 1960, 1963, 1968 and 1974 Eurovision Song Contests. ... Massiel Massiel (real name María de los Ángeles Santamaría Espinosa) is a Spanish singer. ... Congratulations, song performed by Cliff Richard as the UK entry in the Eurovision Song Contest 1968. ... Sir Cliff Richard OBE (born Harry Rodger Webb on 14 October 1940) is an English singer, actor and businessman. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Herbert Buckingham Khaury (April 12, 1932 – 30 November 1996), better known by the stage name Tiny Tim, was an American singer, ukulele player, and musical archivist. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cream were a classic 1960s British rock band, which consisted of guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce and drummer Ginger Baker. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... This article is about the rock band. ... The Concerto for Group and Orchestra is a concerto performed by Deep Purple and The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra in 1969, composed by Jon Lord. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Petula Clark, CBE (born 15 November 1932), is an English singer, actress and composer best known for her upbeat popular international hits of the 1960s. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... The Jimi Hendrix Experience was a highly influential, though short-lived, English/American rock band famous for the guitar work of frontman Jimi Hendrix on songs such as Purple Haze, Foxy Lady, Fire, Hey Joe, Voodoo Child (Slight Return), All Along the Watchtower and Spanish Castle Magic. // Hendrix arrived in... Noel David Redding (25 December 1945 – 11 May 2003) was a rock & roll guitarist best known as the bassist for The Jimi Hendrix Experience. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Janis Lyn Joplin (19 January 1943 – 4 October 1970) was an American singer, songwriter, and music arranger, from Port Arthur, Texas. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Led Zeppelin is a double DVD set by the English rock band Led Zeppelin. ... Joni Mitchell, CC (born Roberta Joan Anderson on November 7, 1943) is a Canadian musician, songwriter, and painter. ... James Vernon Taylor (born March 12, 1948) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, born in Belmont, Massachusetts. ... Lata Mangeshkar (Marathi/Hindi:लता मंगेशकर) (born September 28, 1929) is an Indian singer. ... Talat Mahmood (February 24, 1924 -- May 9, 1998) was an Indian Bollywood singer and actor. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Abba redirects here. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Dusty Springfield OBE (16 April 1939–2 March 1999) was a popular English singer whose career spanned four decades. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Siouxsie and the Banshees were a British rock band that formed in 1976. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the Irish musical group. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Genesis is an English rock band formed in 1967. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Les Miserables - The Dream Cast in Concert aka Les Miserables in Concert is a film adaptation of the theatre play based upon the Victor Hugo novel, Les Miserables. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Sarah Brightman (born August 14, 1960) is an English classical crossover soprano, actress and dancer. ... Andrew Lloyd Webber, Baron Lloyd-Webber (born 22 March 1948) is a highly successful English composer of musical theatre, and also the elder brother of cellist Julian Lloyd Webber. ... Ocean Colour Scene (often abbreviated to OCS) are an English rock band from Birmingham. ... Paul Weller (born John Weller 25 May 1958, Sheerwater, near Woking, Surrey) is an English singer-songwriter. ... For the English rock band, see Oasis (band). ... The Corrs are a multi-platinum, Grammy-nominated Celtic folk-rock and pop rock group from Dundalk, Republic of Ireland. ... St. ... Ladysmith Black Mambazo is a Grammy Award-winning male group from South Africa that sings in the vocal style of isicathamiya and mbube. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Chris de Burgh (born Christopher John Davison on October 15, 1948) is an Irish musician and songwriter. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... The Who are a British rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Teenage Cancer Trust is a charity that focuses on the needs of teenagers and young adults with cancer, leukaemia, Hodgkin’s and related diseases by providing specialist teenage units in NHS hospitals. ... Julian Lloyd Webber (born April 14, 1951) is a British cellist. ... The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra (RPO) is an English orchestra based in London. ... The Princes Trust is a UK based charity headed by HRH The Prince of Wales. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... For other people with the same name, see Robbie Williams (disambiguation). ... Swing When Youre Winning is a swing covers album by British pop singer Robbie Williams, released in 2001. ... Sinatra redirects here. ... // The Australian Pink Floyd Show (aka TAPFS) are a tribute band of Pink Floyd. ... bond is an Australian/British string quartet that specialize in classical crossover music. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Morrissey (disambiguation). ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... DVD Cover For the released album, see Concert for George (album). ... Junoon (Urdu: جنون) (meaning obsession in Urdu and craziness in Arabic) is one of Pakistan and South Asias most popular Rock bands, based out of Lahore, Pakistan, and formed in 1990 by guitarist/songwriter/medical doctor Salman Ahmad. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Siti Nurhaliza binti Tarudin (born January 11, 1979) is a multiple-award winning Malaysian pop singer-songwriter. ... Cream were a classic 1960s British rock band, which consisted of guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce and drummer Ginger Baker. ... This article is about the band. ... For the Canadian writer and television journalist, see David Gilmour (writer), for the jazz guitarist see David Gilmore. ... Remember That Night: Live at the Royal Albert Hall is a live concert recording of Pink Floyd guitarist David Gilmours solo concert at the Royal Albert Hall in May 2006 as part of his On an Island tour. ... This article is about the singer. ... This article describes the album by Meat Loaf. ... Noel Thomas David Gallagher (born May 29, 1967 in Longsight, Manchester, England) is an English songwriter, guitarist and occasional vocalist with the Manchester rock band Oasis. ... Atif Aslam (Urdu: عاطف اسلم) is a Pakistani pop singer. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... 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Another concert that was mislabeled as being at the Royal Albert Hall was by Creedence Clearwater Revival. An album by CCR titled The Royal Albert Hall Concert was released in 1980. When it was discovered that the show on the album actually took place at the Oakland Coliseum, Fantasy Records retitled the album The Concert. Creedence Clearwater Revival (commonly referred to by its initials CCR or simply as Creedence) was an American rock band, which consisted of John Fogerty (vocals, guitar, harmonica, piano), Tom Fogerty (guitar, vocals, piano), Stu Cook (bass guitar, vocals), and Doug Clifford (drums, percussion, vocals). ... Fantasy Records is a United States based record label, which was founded by Max and Sol Weiss in 1949 in San Francisco, California. ...


Depictions in popular culture

Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... The Man Who Knew Too Much is a 1934 suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... The Man Who Knew Too Much is a 1956 suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, starring James Stewart and Doris Day. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The London Symphony Orchestra (LSO) is one of the major orchestras of the United Kingdom. ... Arthur Leslie Benjamin (September 18, 1893, Sydney - April 10, 1960, London) was an Australian composer. ... The Ipcress File is a 1965 film adaptation of Len Deightons novel the The IPCRESS File. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... For other uses, see A Day in the Life (disambiguation). ... For the song, see Yellow Submarine (song). ... Jeremy Hilary Boob Ph. ... The X Files (sometimes known just as The X Files: Fight the Future) is a 1998 movie which is part of the television series The X Files. ... Hitler has only got one ball refers to the many variations on a set of vulgar lyrics to the popular Colonel Bogey March. These are four-line lyrics making fun of the Nazi leaders. ... Look up testes in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Paul Francis Jennings (June 20, 1918 - December 26, 1989) was a British humorist. ... Brassed Off (1996) is a British film written and directed by Mark Herman. ... Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Königsberg on December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian, and playwright. ... Scoop is a 2006 UK-set romantic comedy/murder mystery written and directed by Woody Allen and starring Hugh Jackman, Scarlett Johansson, Ian McShane, and Allen himself. ... Scarlett Johansson (born November 22, 1984) is an American actress. ... DangerMouse is a British animated television series which was produced by Cosgrove Hall Films. ... List of episodes of the animated television comedy, DangerMouse. ... The Spice Girls are a British all-female pop group, formed in London in 1994. ... Spiceworld is the debut feature film of the four-time BRIT Award-winning English pop girl group Spice Girls directed by Bob Spiers and written by Kim Fuller and Jamie Curtis. ... The Prestige is a 2006 period film directed by Christopher Nolan, with a screenplay adapted from the 1995 World Fantasy Award-winning novel of the same name by Christopher Priest. ... Nikola Tesla (1856-1943)[1] was a world-renowned Serbian inventor, physicist, mechanical engineer and electrical engineer. ... City lights viewed in a motion blurred exposure. ...

References

  1. ^ From the G&S discography site
  2. ^ CharitiesDirect.com - UK Charity Information
  3. ^ http://www.buildingdesignpartnership.co.uk/flash/index.asp#p_rah retrieved 14 March 2007
  4. ^ Royal Albert Hall South Porch

See also

The Albert Memorial is situated in Kensington Gardens, London, England, directly to the north of the Royal Albert Hall. ... Albertopolis is a nickname for the area centered around South Kensington, London, between Cromwell Road and Kensington Gore, which contains a large number of educational and cultural sites, including Imperial College London Natural History Museum Royal Albert Hall Royal College of Art Royal College of Music Royal Geographical Society Science... A Concert hall is a cultural building, which serves as performance venue, chiefly for classical instrumental music. ... Sir Harold Malcolm Watts Sargent (April 29, 1895 – October 3, 1967) was a British conductor, organist and composer. ... Sir Henry Wood Kt CH (3 March 1869 – 19 August 1944) was an English conductor, forever associated with the Promenade Concerts which he conducted for half a century. ... A 1912 obituary in the African Methodist Episcopal Church Review Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (August 15, 1875–September 1, 1912) was a black, English composer who achieved such success he was called The Black Mahler. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Royal Albert Hall
  • Official site with timeline
  • Royal Albert Hall in the Structurae database
  • Royal Albert Hall Survey of London entry
  • Albert Hall (Victorian London)
  • Royal Engineers Museum Royal Engineers and the Royal Albert Hall
  • Ballet at the Royal Albert Hall

Coordinates: 51°30′03.40″N, 00°10′38.77″W Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Structurae is an on-line database containing works of structural and civil engineering of all kinds such as Bridges, High-rise buildings, towers, dams, etc. ... The Survey of London is an ongoing project to produce a very thorough historical and architectural survey of the former County of London. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Preceded by
Groser Festsaal der Wiener Hofburg
Vienna
Eurovision Song Contest
Venue

1968
Succeeded by
Teatro Real
Madrid
For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... Eurovision redirects here. ... The Eurovision Song Contest 1968 was the thirteenth Eurovision Song Contest. ... Teatro Real The Teatro Real (literally Royal Theater) or simply The Real (as it is known colloquialy), is an opera house located in Madrid, Spain. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Royal Albert Hall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1881 words)
Postcard of the Royal Albert Hall (circa 1903) with an inset of the Albert Memorial
The official opening ceremony of the Royal Albert Hall was on March 29, 1871.
A famous and widely bootlegged concert by Bob Dylan at the Free Trade Hall in Manchester on May 17, 1966 was mistakenly labeled the "Royal Albert Hall Concert." In 1998 Columbia Records released an official recording, The Bootleg Series Vol.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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