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Encyclopedia > Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force


Founded 1 April 1918
Country United Kingdom
Size 45,710 personnel
998 aircraft
Part of Ministry of Defence
Command HQ RAF High Wycombe
Motto Per Ardua ad Astra
latin:"Through Adversity to the Stars"
March Royal Air Force March Past
Commanders
Chief of the Air Staff Air Chief Marshal Sir Glenn Torpy
Notable
commanders
Lord Trenchard
Lord Portal
Insignia
Roundels
Fin flash
Aircraft flown
Attack Tornado GR.4, Harrier
Fighter Typhoon
Interceptor Typhoon
Patrol Nimrod MR.2
Reconnaissance Nimrod R.1, Sentinel R1, Islander
Trainer Tutor, Tucano, Hawk, Vigilant, Viking, Squirrel, Dominie, King Air
Transport C-17, Hercules, VC-10, Tristar, Merlin, Chinook, Puma

The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the air force branch of the British Armed Forces. The RAF was formed on 1 April 1918 and has since taken a significant role in British military history since then, playing a large part in World War II and in conflicts such as the recent war in Iraq. The RAF has 998 aircraft and, as of 2007, 45,710 regular personnel. RAF is an abbreviation for Royal Air Force -- the Air Force of the United Kingdom (see also Air Ministry) Red Army Faction (Rote Armee Fraktion) -- a German terror organisation Rigas Autobusu Fabrika -- a factory making buses in Riga, Latvia Rapid Action Force in India RAF is also an Italian musician... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for implementation of government defence policy and is the headquarters of the British Armed Forces. ... RAF High Wycombe is a Royal Air Force station, outside High Wycombe in Buckinghamshire. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The Royal Air Force March Past is the official march of the Royal Air Force (RAF). ... Air Chief Marshal Sir Glenn Torpy. ... Hugh Montague Trenchard, 1st Viscount Trenchard (February 3, 1873 - February 10, 1956) was the British Chief of the Air Staff during World War I, and was instrumental in establishing the Royal Air Force (RAF). ... RAF Air Chief Marshal Charles Portal (left) and Polish Commander in Chief Władysław Sikorski (right) visit an airbase of the 300th Polish Bomber Squadron in England. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links RAF-Roundel. ... Image File history File links RAF-Finflash-Noncombat. ... A ground attack aircraft is an aircraft that is designed to operate very close to the ground, supporting infantry and tanks directly in battle. ... The Panavia Tornado is a family of twin-engine fighters, which was jointly developed by the United Kingdom, Germany and Italy. ... The BAE Systems/Boeing Harrier II (GR5/GR7/GR9 series) is a second generation vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) jet aircraft used by the Royal Air Force (RAF). ... An A-10 Thunderbolt II, F-86 Sabre, P-38 Lightning and P-51 Mustang fly in formation during an air show at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. ... This article is about a fighter aircraft. ... The MiG-25 is a Russian interceptor that was the mainstay of the Soviet air defence. ... This article is about a fighter aircraft. ... A patrol bomber, or patrol aircraft, is an airplane designed to operate for long times over water in an anti-shipping or anti-submarine role. ... The BAE Systems (formerly Hawker-Siddeley) Nimrod maritime patrol aircraft is derived from the De Havilland Comet, the worlds first jet airliner. ... English Electric Canberra PR.9 photo reconnaissance aircraft CP-140 Aurora long-range patrol aircraft of the Canadian Air Force. ... The BAE Systems (formerly Hawker-Siddeley) Nimrod maritime patrol aircraft is derived from the De Havilland Comet, the worlds first jet airliner. ... The Raytheon Sentinel is under development as the RAFs ASTOR (Airborne STand-Off Radar) aircraft. ... The Britten-Norman Islander (also known as the BN-2) is a light utility aircraft manufactured by Britten-Norman of the United Kingdom. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Grob Tutor is a single-engined low-wing monoplane used as a basic training aircraft by the RAF. The aircraft has fixed tricycle undercarriage with spatted wheels, a short nose, and a cabin with a broad canopy and two windows each side. ... Short Tucano of No. ... The BAE Systems (BAE) Hawk is an advanced jet trainer which first flew in 1974 as the Hawker Siddeley Hawk. ... The Vigilant T1 is a Grob 109B adapted by the Royal Air Force for use on Volunteer Gliding Squadrons. ... The ‘Twin II’ is a high performance two-seater sailplane made by Grob Aerospace. ... This article is about the AStar helicopter. ... BAe 125-1000 The twin-engined BAe 125 is the worlds best selling mid-size corporate jet, now marketed as the Raytheon Hawker 800. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into articles entitled Beechcraft King Air and Beechcraft Super King Air, accessible from a disambiguation page. ... For the Lockheed aircraft with this designation, see C-17 Super Vega. ... The Lockheed C-130 Hercules is a four-engine turboprop cargo aircraft and the main tactical airlifter for many military forces worldwide. ... The VC-10 airliner was designed and built by Vickers (part of the British Aircraft Corporation) in the 1960s. ... The Lockheed L-1011 TriStar, commonly referred to as just L-1011 (pronounced ell-ten-eleven), was the third widebody passenger jet airliner to enter operation, following the Boeing 747 and the McDonnell Douglas DC-10. ... Lockheed Martin US101 The AgustaWestland EH101 is a medium-lift helicopter originally developed as a joint venture between Westland Helicopters in the UK and Agusta in Italy for military applications but also marketed for civil use. ... The Boeing CH-47 Chinook is a versatile, twin-engine, tandem rotor heavy-lift helicopter. ... The Aerospatiale Puma is a medium-sized twin-engined transport/utility helicopter originally manufactured by Aerospatiale of France. ... For a particular Air Force, see List of air forces. ... The armed forces of the United Kingdom, commonly known as the British Armed Forces or Her Majestys Armed Forces, and sometimes legally the Armed Forces of the Crown[1], encompasses a navy, army, and an air force. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... British military history is a long and varied topic, extending from the prehistoric and ancient historic period, through the Roman invasions of Julius Cæsar and Claudius and subsequent Roman occupation; warfare in the Mediaeval period, including the invasions of the Saxons and the Vikings in the Early Middle Ages... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Flying machine redirects here. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Mission

The RAF's mission is to "Produce a battle-winning agile air force: fit for the challenges of today; ready for the tasks of tomorrow; capable of building for the future; working within Defence to achieve shared purpose."[1] This is to support the objectives of the UK's Ministry of Defence (MOD), which are to "provide the capabilities needed: to ensure the security and defence of the United Kingdom and Overseas Territories, including against terrorism; to support the Government’s foreign policy objectives particularly in promoting international peace and security."[2] The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for implementation of government defence policy and is the headquarters of the British Armed Forces. ...


History

Whilst the British were not the first to make use of heavier-than-air military aircraft, the RAF is one of the world's oldest air forces independent of army or naval control. It was founded on 1 April 1918, during the First World War, by the amalgamation of the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Naval Air Service. After the war, the service was cut drastically and its inter-war years were relatively quiet, with only minor actions being undertaken in some parts of the British Empire. The history of the Royal Air Force, the air force of the United Kingdom, spans nearly a century of British military aviation. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... The Royal Flying Corps (RFC) was the over-land air arm of the British military during most of World War I. // Formed by Royal Warrant on 13 May 1912, the RFC superseded the Air Battalion of the Royal Engineers. ... Personnel of No 1 Squadron RNAS in late 1914 The Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) was the air arm of the Royal Navy until near the end of World War I, when it merged with the British Armys Royal Flying Corps (RFC) to form the Royal Air Force. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ...

The RAF Memorial on the Victoria Embankment, London, commemorating RAF personnel killed in the two World Wars
The RAF Memorial on the Victoria Embankment, London, commemorating RAF personnel killed in the two World Wars

The RAF underwent rapid expansion prior to and during the Second World War. Under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan of December 1939, the air forces of British Commonwealth countries trained and formed squadrons for service with RAF formations. Many individual personnel from these countries, and exiles from Occupied Europe also served with RAF squadrons. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1122x1448, 563 KB) The RAF Memorial on the Victoria Embankment, London (opposite the London Eye). ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1122x1448, 563 KB) The RAF Memorial on the Victoria Embankment, London (opposite the London Eye). ... Victoria Embankment, London The Victoria Embankment, previously the Thames Embankment is a road and walkway along the north bank of the River Thames in London in the cities of Westminster and London. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... RCAF Harvards were used as a trainer aircraft by thousands of Commonwealth aviators from 1940 onwards. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2006 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Don McKinnon since 1 April 2000 Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total... Occupied Europe was the name given to the countries of Europe which were occupied by the military forces of Nazi Germany at various times between 1939 and 1945. ...


During the Second World War's Battle of Britain in 1940, the RAF's valiant defence of the skies over Britain against the German Luftwaffe foiled Hitler's plans for an invasion of the British Isles, prompting Prime Minister Winston Churchill to say in the House of Commons on August 20, "Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few".[3] Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... This article is about military history. ... The Deutsche Luftwaffe or   (German: air force, literally Air Weapon, pronounced lufft-va-fa, IPA: ) is the commonly used term for the German air force. ... This article describes the archipelago in north-western Europe. ... Churchill redirects here. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... World War II poster The Never was so much owed by so many to so few speech was a speech made by Winston Churchill to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom on August 20, 1940, at the height of the Battle of Britain. ...


The largest and most controversial RAF effort during the war was the strategic bombing campaign against Germany by Bomber Command. Under the leadership of Air Chief Marshal Harris, RAF forces conducted an area bombing campaign against Dresden and other German cities. At the same time, however, precision bombing was developed by 617 Squadron using Barnes Wallis' Earthquake bombs; these operations minimized collateral damage. [4] The city heart of Rotterdam after being terror bombed by Germany in 1940, the ruin of the (now restored) Laurens Kerk is the only building that reminds people of Rotterdams medieval architecture. ... Bomber Command badge RAF Bomber Command was the organisation that controlled the RAFs bomber forces. ... Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Arthur Travers Harris, 1st Baronet GCB OBE AFC RAF (April 13, 1892 - April 5, 1984), commonly known as Bomber Harris by the press, and often within the RAF as Butcher Harris[1], was commander of RAF Bomber Command and later a Marshal of... Area bombardment is the policy of indiscriminate bombing of an enemys cities, for the purpose of destroying civilian morale. ... The bombing of Dresden in World War II by the Allies remains controversial after more than 50 years. ... Sir Barnes Neville Wallis, Kt, CBE, FRS, RDI, commonly known as Barnes Wallis, (26 September 1887 – 30 October 1979) was an English scientist, engineer and inventor. ... This article is about the natural seismic phenomenon. ...


During the Cold War years the main role of the RAF was the defence of the continent of Europe against potential attack by the Soviet Union, including holding the UK's nuclear deterrent for a number of years. Since the end of the Cold War, several large scale operations have been undertaken by the RAF, including the Kosovo War, the 2001 invasion of Afghanistan and the 2003 invasion of Iraq. For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The United Kingdom was the third country to test an independently developed nuclear weapon in October 1952. ... The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... For other uses of War in Afghanistan, see War in Afghanistan (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ...


Structure of the RAF

Royal Air Force
Components
Royal Air Force
History
History of the Royal Air Force
Timeline of the Royal Air Force
Aircraft
List of RAF aircraft
Structure
Air Command
No. 1 Group
No. 2 Group
JFACHQ
No. 22 Group
List of stations
Personnel
Officer ranks
Other ranks
Royal Air Force
Components

The professional head of the RAF is the Chief of the Air Staff (CAS), currently Air Chief Marshal Sir Glenn Torpy. The CAS heads the Air Force Board, which is a committee of the Defence Council. The Air Force Board (AFB) is the management board of the RAF and consists of the Commander-in-Chief of RAF Air Command, together with several other high ranking officers. The CAS also has a deputy known as the Assistant Chief of the Air Staff (ACAS); currently this post is held by Air Vice-Marshal Chris Moran. Image File history File links Ensign_of_the_Royal_Air_Force. ... The Royal Auxiliary Air Force (RAuxAF) is the volunteer reserve part of the Royal Air Force. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the air force branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The Royal Air Force Police (RAFP) is the military police branch of the British Royal Air Force. ... The history of the Royal Air Force, the air force of the United Kingdom, spans nearly a century of British military aviation. ... // 1900-1918 1901 29 October - The Aero Club of Great Britain is established. ... Many aircraft types have served in the Royal Air Force since it was formed in 1918 by the merger of the Royal Flying Corps and Royal Naval Air Service. ... The formation of Royal Air Force Air Command was announced to Parliament by the Defence Secretary, Rt Hon Des Browne on 15 March 2007. ... Number 1 Group of the Royal Air Force is one of the two groups in Strike Command. ... Number 2 Group of the Royal Air Force is one of the two groups in RAF Strike Command. ... The Joint Force Air Component Headquarters is the United Kindgdoms deployable air Command and Control Unit. ... Number 22 Group is one of only three groups currently active in the Royal Air Force and the only group subordinate to Personnel and Training Command. ... List of RAF stations is a comprehensive list of all stations of the Royal Air Force past and present. ... // Origins Lieutenant-General David Henderson originally proposed that Royal Air Force officers use a combination of British Army and Royal Navy ranks. ... The term used in the Royal Air Force to refer to all ranks below commissioned officer level is Other Ranks (ORs). ... The Air Force Board of the Defence Council is responsible for the management of the Royal Air Force. ... The formation of Royal Air Force Air Command was announced to Parliament by the Defence Secretary, Rt Hon Des Browne on 15 March 2007. ... Number 1 Group of the Royal Air Force is one of the two groups in Strike Command. ... Number 2 Group of the Royal Air Force is one of the two groups in RAF Strike Command. ... Number 22 Group is one of only three groups currently active in the Royal Air Force and the only group subordinate to Personnel and Training Command. ... Chief of the Air Staff can also refer to the head of the Canadian Forces Air Command or the head of the Indian Air Force. ... Air Chief Marshal Sir Richard Johns in RAF No 1 Dress uniform Air Chief Marshal (Air Chf Mshl or ACM) is a senior air officer rank in the Royal Air Force of the United Kingdom as well as in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) and in the air forces... Air Chief Marshal Sir Glenn Torpy. ... The Air Force Board of the Defence Council is responsible for the management of the Royal Air Force. ... The Defence Council of the United Kingdom is the body legally entrusted with the defence of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories and with control over the British armed forces, and is part of the Ministry of Defence. ... The formation of Royal Air Force Air Command was announced to Parliament by the Defence Secretary, Rt Hon Des Browne on 15 March 2007. ... Assistant Chief of the Air Staff (ACAS) is the Deputy to the Chief of the Air Staff in the Royal Air Force. ... An Air Vice Marshals sleeve/shoulder insignia Air Vice Marshal is the third most senior rank active in the Royal Air Force today, after the inactivation of Marshal of the Royal Air Force as a substantive rank in peacetime during defence cuts of the 1990s. ... Air Vice-Marshal Chris Moran. ...


Commands

Authority is delegated from the AFB to the RAF's commands. While there were once individual commands responsible for bombers, fighters, training, etc, only one command now exists: This is a list of Royal Air Force commands. ...

The formation of Royal Air Force Air Command was announced to Parliament by the Defence Secretary, Rt Hon Des Browne on 15 March 2007. ... RAF High Wycombe is a Royal Air Force station, outside High Wycombe in Buckinghamshire. ...

Groups

Groups are the subdivisions of operational Commands, these are responsible for certain types of operation or for operations in limited geographical areas. As from 1 April 2007, three Groups exist: This is a list of Royal Air Force groups. ... Group is a term used by different air forces for an element of military organization. ...

  • 1 Group — the Air Combat Group, controls the RAF's combat fast jet aircraft, including Joint Force Harrier, and has seven airfields in the UK plus RAF Unit Goose Bay in Canada, which is used extensively as an operational training base.
  • 2 Group — the Air Combat Support Group, controls the Strategic and Tactical air transport aircraft, the RAF Regiment, the RAF's Air to Air Refuelling aircraft as well as ISTAR and Search & Rescue assets.
  • 22 Group - responsible for personnel management, training and selection.

Number 1 Group of the Royal Air Force is one of the two groups in Strike Command. ... Missing image RAF Harrier GR7 Joint Force Harrier is a defence proposal brought by the British Government as part of Strategic Defence Review. ... Number 2 Group of the Royal Air Force is one of the two groups in RAF Strike Command. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the program run by NASAs Marshall Space Propulsion Center see: Integrated Systems Test of an Air-Breathing Rocket It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with C4ISR (Discuss) // Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition, and Reconnaissance ISTAR stands for Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition, and Reconnaissance. ... Number 22 Group is one of only three groups currently active in the Royal Air Force and the only group subordinate to Personnel and Training Command. ...

Stations

Main article: RAF station

An RAF Station is ordinarily subordinate to a Group and it is administratively sub-divided into Wings. Since the mid to late 1930s RAF stations have controlled a number of flying squadrons or other units at one location by means of a station headquarters. An RAF station is a Royal Air Force military base. ... An RAF station is a Royal Air Force military base. ...


Wings

A Wing is either a sub-division of a Group acting independently or a sub-division of an RAF Station. This is a list of Royal Air Force aircraft Wings. ... Wing is a term used by different air forces for a unit of command. ...


Independent Wings are a grouping of two or more squadrons, either flying squadrons or ground support squadrons. In former times, numbered flying Wings have existed, but more recently they have only been created when required, for example during Operation Telic, Tornado Wings were formed to operate from Ali Al Salem and Al Udeid Air Bases; each of these were made up of aircraft and crews from several squadrons. Operation (or Op) TELIC is the codename under which all British operations of the 2003 Invasion of Iraq and after are being conducted. ... The Tornado GR4 is a Multi-Role Combat Aircraft (MRCA) used for low-level penetration to attack ground targets. ... Ali Al Salem is an airfield situated in Kuwait approximately 23 miles from the Iraqi border. ... Al Udeid Air Base is a military base near Doha, Qatar. ...


On 31 March 2006, the RAF formed nine Expeditionary Air Wings (EAW). The Expeditionary Air Wings have been established to support operations. They have been formed at the nine main operating bases; RAF Coningsby, RAF Cottesmore, RAF Kinloss, RAF Leeming, RAF Leuchars, RAF Lossiemouth, RAF Lyneham, RAF Marham, and RAF Waddington. These units will be commanded by a Group Captain who is also the Station Commander. The EAW is comprised of the non-formed unit elements of the station that are required to support a deployed operating base, i.e. the Command and Control, Logistics and administration functions amongst others. They are designed to be flexible and quickly adaptable for differing operations. They are independent of flying squadrons, Air Combat Support Units (ACSU) and Air Combat Service Support Units (ACSSU) who are attached to the EAW dependent upon what task it has been assigned to do. [5] is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... On 1st April 2006 Expeditionary Air Wings (EAWs) were formed at nine of the RAFs Main Operating Bases. ... RAF Coningsby, is a Royal Air Force station in Lincolnshire, England. ... RAF Cottesmore is a Royal Air Force station in Rutland, England, situated between Cottesmore and Market Overton. ... RAF Kinloss is an Royal Air Force station on the Moray Firth in the north of Scotland. ... RAF air defence bases RAF Leeming is a Royal Air Force station in North Yorkshire, England. ... RAF Leuchars is the most northerly air defence station in the United Kingdom. ... RAF Lossiemouth (IATA: LMO, ICAO: EGQS) is a Royal Air Force station to the west of the town of Lossiemouth in Moray, Scotland. ... RAF Lyneham is a Royal Air Force station in Wiltshire, England. ... RAF Marham is a Royal Air Force station in Norfolk, England. ... Waddington-based Hawker-Siddeley (now BAE Systems) Nimrod R.1 RAF Waddington is a Royal Air Force station in Lincolnshire England. ... A Group Captains sleeve/shoulder insignia Group Captain (Gp Capt in the RAF, GPCAPT in the RNZAF and RAAF, G/C in the former RCAF) is a senior commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries. ...


On RAF Stations, a Wing is an administrative sub-division. For a flying station these will normally be Engineering Wing, Operations Wing and Administration Wing. Aside from these, the only Wings currently in permanent existence are the Air Combat Service Support wings of 2 Group which provide support services such as communications, supply and policing to operationally deployed units.


Squadrons

The term squadron (sqn) can be used to refer to an administrative sub-unit of a station, e.g. Air Traffic Control sqn, Personnel Management sqn; there are also ground support squadrons, e.g. 2 (MT) Sqn. This is a list of Royal Air Force aircraft squadrons. ... A Squadron is a small unit or formation of cavalry, aircraft (including balloons), or naval vessels. ...


The primary use for the term is as the name of the flying squadrons which carry out the primary tasks of the RAF. RAF squadrons are somewhat analogous to the regiments of the British Army, in that they have histories and traditions going back to their formation, regardless of where they are currently based, which aircraft they are operating, etc. They can be awarded standards and battle honours for meritorious service. For other uses, see Flag (disambiguation). ... Battle Honours are awarded by the Sovereign to Royal Air Force squadrons to commemorate the squadrons role in a particular operation. ...


Whilst every squadron is different, most flying squadrons are commanded by a Wing Commander and, for a fast-jet squadron, have an establishment of around 100 personnel and 12 aircraft, but 16 aircraft for Tornado F3 Squadrons. A Wing Commanders sleeve/shoulder insignia A Wing Commanders command flag Wing Commander is a commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries. ...


Flights

A flight is a sub-division of a squadron. Flying squadrons are often divided into two flights, under the command of a Squadron Leader; administrative squadrons on a station are also divided into flights. A flight is a military unit in an air force, naval air service, or army air corps. ...


There are several flying units formed as Flights rather than Squadrons, due to their small size.

See also: List of Royal Air Force independent flights

This is a list of Royal Air Force independent flights. ...

RAF Personnel

In 2007 the RAF employed 45,710 active duty personnel and more than 34,000 regular reservists[citation needed], including the Royal Auxiliary Air Force, RAF Volunteer Reserve and Sponsored Reserve. At its height during the Second World War, in excess of 1,000,000 personnel were serving at any one time. The only founding member of the RAF still living is Henry Allingham at age 111. [6] The Royal Auxiliary Air Force (RAuxAF) is the volunteer reserve part of the Royal Air Force. ... The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the air force branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Henry William Allingham (born 6 June 1896) has been the oldest surviving British veteran of the First World War since 20 July 2003 upon the death of then 108-year-old Jack Davis. ...

See also: List of famous Royal Air Force members and Comparative military ranks

This article lists those members of the Royal Air Force of the United Kingdom who have become either nationally or internationally famous. ... Comparative military ranks are a means of comparing military rank systems of different nations as a means of categorizing the hierarchy of an armed force compared to another. ...

Officers

Main article: RAF officer ranks

Officers hold a commission from the Sovereign, which provides the legal authority for them to issue orders to subordinates. The commission is granted after successfully completing the 32-week-long Initial Officer Training course at the RAF College, Cranwell. // Origins Lieutenant-General David Henderson originally proposed that Royal Air Force officers use a combination of British Army and Royal Navy ranks. ... In military organizations, a commissioned officer is a member of the service who derives authority directly from a sovereign power, and as such holds a commission from that power. ... This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see... The Royal Air Force College (RAFC) is the Royal Air Force training and education academy which provides initial training to all RAF personnel who are preparing to be commissioned officers. ...


The titles and insignia of RAF Officers were derived from those used by the Royal Navy, specifically the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) during World War I. For example, the rank of Squadron Leader derived its name from the RNAS rank of Squadron Commander. RAF officers fall into three categories: air officers, senior officers and junior officers. This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... Personnel of No 1 Squadron RNAS in late 1914 The Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) was the air arm of the Royal Navy until near the end of World War I, when it merged with the British Armys Royal Flying Corps (RFC) to form the Royal Air Force. ... A Squadron Leaders sleeve/shoulder insignia Squadron Leader (Sqn Ldr in the RAF, SQNLDR in the RNZAF and RAAF and S/L in the former RCAF) is a commissioned rank in some air forces. ... An Air Officer is a U.K. Royal Air Force officer of rank Air Commodore or higher. ... The term junior officer is sometimes used to make clear that an officer in a military or para-military command is not in over-all command. ...


Other Ranks

Main article: RAF enlisted ranks

Other Ranks attend the Recruit Training Squadron at RAF Halton for basic training, with the exception of the RAF Regiment, which trains its recruits at RAF Honington. The term used in the Royal Air Force to refer to all ranks below commissioned officer level is Other Ranks (ORs). ... RAF Halton is one of the larger Royal Air Force (RAF) stations in the United Kingdom, located near the village of Halton, Buckinghamshire. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... RAF Honington (IATA: BEQ, ICAO: EGXH) is a Royal Air Force station 6 miles south of Thetford near Ixworth in Suffolk, England. ...


The titles and insignia of Other Ranks in the RAF was based on that of the Army, with some alterations in terminology. Over the years, this structure has seen significant changes, for example there was once a separate system for those in technical trades and the rank of Chief Technician continues to be held only by personnel in technical trades. RAF other ranks fall into four categories: warrant officers, senior non-commissioned officers, junior non-commissioned officers and airmen. The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Chief Technician (CT or Ch Tech) is a non_commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force which is only held by airmen in technical trades and by musicians. ...


Branches and Trades

  • All Pilots and Weapon Systems Officers (formerly known as Navigators) in the RAF are commissioned officers on the General Duties list.
  • Non-commissioned aircrew fulfil the specialist roles of Air Engineer (E), Air Electronics Operator (AEOp), Air Loadmaster (ALM), and Air Signaller (S). Though they are now known collectively as Weapon Systems Operators individual trade specialisations remain.

The majority of the members of the RAF serve in vital support roles on the ground. For other uses, see Aviator (disambiguation). ... For the web browser of the same name, see Netscape Navigator A navigator is the person onboard a ship responsible for the navigation of the vessel. ...

  • Officers and Gunners in the RAF Regiment, which was created during World War II, defend RAF airfields from attack. They have infantry and light armoured units to protect against ground attack and until recently they operated Rapier surface-to-air missiles to defend against air attack - this role was given to the Royal Artillery in 2005 and was taken against the wishes of the RAF, which wanted to retain and maintain its organic ground-to-air defence capability.
  • The RAF Police are the military police of the RAF and are located wherever the RAF is located. Unlike the UK Civil Police, the RAF Police are armed as needed. Since 2003 the RAF Police have stop and search, arrest, and search and seizure powers outside RAF Stations.
  • Intelligence Officers and Analysts of the RAF Intelligence Branch support all operational activities by providing timely and accurate Indicators and Warnings. They conduct military intelligence fusion and analysis by conducting imagery and communications analysis, targeting, and assessment of the enemies' capabilities and intent.
  • Engineering Officers and technicians are employed to maintain and repair the equipment used by the RAF. This includes routine preparation for flight and maintenance on aircraft, as well as deeper level repair work on aircraft systems, IT systems, ground based radar, MT vehicles,ground support equipment(GSE), etc.
  • Fighter Controllers (FC) and Air Traffic Controllers (ATC) control RAF and NATO aircraft from the ground. The FC control the interception of enemy aircraft while the ATC provide air traffic services at RAF stations and to the majority of en-route military aircraft in UK airspace.
  • Administrative Officers and associated trades are involved with training management, physical education, catering, infrastructure management, accounts, dress and discipline, personnel and recruitment.
  • Royal Air Force Chaplains are trained by the Armed Forces Chaplaincy Centre at Amport House.
  • The Royal Air Force Medical Branch provides healthcare at home and on deployed operations, including aeromedical evacuation services. Medical officers are the doctors of the RAF and have specialist expertise in aviation medicine to support aircrew and their protective equipment. Medical Officers can go on aeromedical evacuations, providing vital assistance on search-and-rescue missions or emergency relief flights worldwide.
  • The RAF Legal Branch provides legal advice on discipline / criminal law and operations law.

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I Infantry or footmen are very highly disciplined and trained soldiers who fight primarily with small arms(rifles), but are trained to use everything from their bare hands to missle systems in order to neutralize... Type SAM Surface-to-air missile Nationality UK Era Cold War Launch platform vehicle Target aircraft History Builder British Aerospace now MBDA (UK) Ltd Date of design Production period Service duration Operators United Kingdom, Indonesia, Turkey, Iran, Malaysia, Switzerland, Singapore, Australia Variants Mk1 (Hittile), Mk2B (Missile) Number built ? Specifications Type... Tactical Recognition Flash of the Royal Artillery The Royal Regiment of Artillery, generally known as the Royal Artillery (RA), is, despite its name, a corps of the British Army. ... The Royal Air Force Police (RAFP) is the military police branch of the British Royal Air Force. ... The Singapore Armed Forces Military Police Command providing security coverage at the Padang in Singapore during the National Day Parade in 2000. ... The British police are a group of similar but independent police services which operate in the United Kingdom. ... Intelligence Officers are staff that specialise in the gathering, fusion and analysis of information and intelligence sources in order to provide advise to the Government or organisation that they work for. ... RAF Intelligence Crest The Royal Air Force (RAF) Intelligence branch is a dedicated organisation within the RAF that maintains intelligence staff and equipment. ... Military intelligence (abbreviated MI, int. ... Air traffic controllers are persons who operate the air traffic control system to expedite and maintain a safe and orderly flow of air traffic and help prevent mid-air collisions. ... Amport House is a manor house near Andover, Hampshire used by the British military. ... The Royal Air Force Legal Branch (RAFLB) or Directorate Legal Services (DLS) - as it is better known - is the uniformed legal service provider for the Royal Air Force of the United Kingdom. ...

Aircraft

Further information: List of aircraft of the RAF
Further information: List of active United Kingdom military aircraft

The code which follows each aircraft's name describes the role of the variant. For example, the Tornado F3 is designated as a fighter by the 'F', and is the third variant of the type to be produced. Many aircraft types have served in the Royal Air Force since it was formed in 1918 by the merger of the Royal Flying Corps and Royal Naval Air Service. ... This is a list of currently-active military aircraft in use by the United Kingdom. ... Generally, aircraft in British military service were known by names assigned by their manufacturer, or (for various imported types) bestowed upon them by the first military service to bring them into service. ...


Strike, attack and offensive support aircraft

The mainstay of the Offensive Support fleet is the Tornado GR4. This supersonic aircraft can carry a wide range of weaponry, including Storm Shadow cruise missiles, laser-guided bombs and the ALARM anti-radar missile. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x721, 127 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Panavia Tornado No. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x721, 127 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Panavia Tornado No. ... The Panavia Tornado is a family of twin-engine fighters, which was jointly developed by the United Kingdom, Germany and Italy. ... The Panavia Tornado is a family of twin-engine fighters, which was jointly developed by the United Kingdom, Germany and Italy. ... Storm Shadow is an Anglo-French air-launched cruise missile, manufactured by MBDA and used by Britain, France, and Italy. ...


The Tornado is supplemented by the Harrier GR7/GR7A which is used in the strike and close air support roles, and to counter enemy air defences. The Harrier is being upgraded to GR9/GR9A standard with newer systems and more powerful engines. The Harrier GR9 was formally accepted into RAF service in late September 2006. The BAE Systems/Boeing Harrier II (GR5, GR7, and GR9 series) is a second generation vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) jet aircraft used by the Royal Air Force (RAF) and, since 2006, the Royal Navy. ...


Air defence and Airborne Early Warning Aircraft

The Tornado F3 and Eurofighter Typhoon F2 are the RAF's air defence fighter aircraft, based at RAF Leuchars and RAF Leeming and RAF Coningsby respectively to defend the UK’s airspace. In October 2007 it was announced that RAF Boscombe Down will become a quick reaction alert airbase from early 2008, offering around the clock fighter coverage for the South and South West of UK airspace. [7] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 450 pixelsFull resolution (1114 × 627 pixels, file size: 362 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Eurofighter Typhoon. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 450 pixelsFull resolution (1114 × 627 pixels, file size: 362 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Eurofighter Typhoon. ... This article is about a fighter aircraft. ... The Tornado Air Defence Variant (ADV) is a fighter/interceptor version of the Panavia Tornado in service with the Royal Air Force. ... A Typhoon T1 The Eurofighter Typhoon is in service with four nations; Britain, Germany, Italy and Spain. ... RAF Leuchars is the most northerly air defence station in the United Kingdom. ... RAF air defence bases RAF Leeming is a Royal Air Force station in North Yorkshire, England. ... RAF Coningsby, is a Royal Air Force station in Lincolnshire, England. ... MoD Boscombe Down is an aircraft testing site located south of Amesbury, Wiltshire, England. ...


The Tornado, in service in the air defence role since the late 1980s, is being replaced by the Eurofighter Typhoon F2, currently based at RAF Coningsby. The RAF's second operational Typhoon unit, 11 Sqn, reformed on 29 March 2007, joining 3 Sqn, also based at RAF Coningsby. A Typhoon T1 The Eurofighter Typhoon is in service with four nations; Britain, Germany, Italy and Spain. ... RAF Coningsby, is a Royal Air Force station in Lincolnshire, England. ... No. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... No. ... RAF Coningsby, is a Royal Air Force station in Lincolnshire, England. ...


The Sentry AEW1 provides airborne early warning to detect incoming enemy aircraft and to co-ordinate the aerial battlefield. Both the Sentry and the Tornado F3 have been involved in recent operations including over Iraq and the Balkans. rolling out of the Boeing factory in the 1970s A Sentry AEW1 of the RAF takes off USAF E-3 Sentry prepared for flight at 4 Wing Cold Lake, Canada The NATO E-3s have the Coat of arms of Luxembourg and the registration LX on the tail. ...


Reconnaissance Aircraft

The Tornado GR4A is fitted with a range of cameras and sensors in the visual, infra-red and radar ranges of the spectrum. Raytheon ASTOR From [1] These photographs may be freely reproduced but credit should be given to Raytheon. This image is copyrighted. ... Raytheon ASTOR From [1] These photographs may be freely reproduced but credit should be given to Raytheon. This image is copyrighted. ... The Raytheon Sentinel is under development as the RAFs ASTOR (Airborne STand-Off Radar) aircraft. ... A RAF Tornado GR4A The Tornado GR.4A, an upgrade of the Tornado GR1. ...


Providing electronic and signals intelligence is the Nimrod R1. The BAE Systems (formerly Hawker-Siddeley) Nimrod maritime patrol aircraft is derived from the De Havilland Comet, the worlds first jet airliner. ...


The new Sentinel R1 provides an ASTOR, ground radar-surveillance platform based on the Bombardier Global Express long range business jet. The Raytheon Sentinel is under development as the RAFs ASTOR (Airborne STand-Off Radar) aircraft. ...


A pair of MQ-9 Reaper Unmanned aerial vehicles have been purchased to support operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. They are operated by No. 39 Squadron RAF. A third MQ-9 is in the process of being purchased.[8] The MQ-9 Reaper (originally the RQ-9 Predator B) is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) developed by General Atomics Aeronautical Systems for use by the United States Air Force, the United States Navy, and the British Royal Air Force. ... The £124 million Taranis UAV built by BAE Systems An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is an aircraft with no onboard pilot. ... No. ...


Search and Rescue Aircraft

Three squadrons of helicopters exist with the primary role of military search and rescue; the rescuing of aircrew who have ejected or crash-landed their aircraft. These are 22 Sqn and 202 Sqn with the Sea King HAR.3/HAR3A in the UK and 84 Sqn with the Griffin HAR2 in Cyprus. Westland Sea King HAR.3 search and rescue helicopter (ZH545), Ilfracombe, north Devon, England . ... Westland Sea King HAR.3 search and rescue helicopter (ZH545), Ilfracombe, north Devon, England . ... For the original Viking use of the name, see Sea-King. ... No. ... No. ... For the original Viking use of the name, see Sea-King. ... No. ...


Although established with a primary role of military search and rescue, most of their operational missions are spent in their secondary role of conducting civil search and rescue; that is, the rescue of civilians from at sea, on mountains and other locations.


Both rescue roles are shared with the Sea King helicopters of the Royal Navy's Fleet Air Arm, while the civil search and rescue role is also shared with the helicopters of HM Coastguard. The Fleet Air Arm is the branch of the Royal Navy responsible for the operation of the aircraft on board their ships. ... Her Majestys Coastguard is the agency of the government of the United Kingdom concerned with co-ordinating rescue at sea. ...


The Operational Conversion Unit is 203(Reserve) Sqn RAF based at RAF St. Mawgan, equipped with the Sea King HAR3. An Operational Conversion Unit (OCU) is a unit within an air force whose role is to support preparation for the operational missions of a specific aircraft type by providing trained personnel. ...


The related Royal Air Force Mountain Rescue Service comprises four teams of trained mountaineers stationed in the mainland United Kingdom, first established in 1943.


Maritime Patrol

The Nimrod MR2's primary role is that of Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and Anti-Surface Unit Warfare (ASUW). The Nimrod MR2 is additionally used in a Search and Rescue (SAR) role, where its long-range and extensive communications facilities allow it to co-ordinate rescues by acting as a link between rescue helicopters, ships and shore bases. It can also drop pods containing life rafts and survival supplies to people in the sea. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1840x1164, 166 KB) Summary from http://pao. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1840x1164, 166 KB) Summary from http://pao. ... The Nimrod is a maritime patrol aircraft developed in the United Kingdom. ... The BAE Systems (formerly Hawker-Siddeley) Nimrod maritime patrol aircraft is derived from the De Havilland Comet, the worlds first jet airliner. ... “A/S” redirects here. ... Anti-surface warfare, or ASUW (sometimes ASuW or less commonly, anti-surface unit warfare) is a type of naval warfare directed against surface ships. ... The BAE Systems (formerly Hawker-Siddeley) Nimrod maritime patrol aircraft is derived from the De Havilland Comet, the worlds first jet airliner. ... Search and Rescue (acronym SAR) is an operation mounted by emergency services, often well-trained volunteers, to find someone believed to be in distress, lost, sick or injured either in a remote or difficult to access area, such as mountains, desert or forest (Wilderness search and rescue), or at sea...


The Nimrod MR2 will be replaced from 2009 by 12 Nimrod MRA4 aircraft.


Support helicopters

An important part of the work of the RAF is to support the British Army by ferrying troops and equipment at the battlefield. However, RAF helicopters are also used in a variety of other roles, including support of RAF ground units and heavy-lift support for the Royal Marines. The support helicopters are organised into the tri-service Joint Helicopter Command (JHC), along with helicopters of the British Army and Royal Navy. Download high resolution version (1500x1063, 460 KB) Chinook HC2 (ZA677) of the RAF at an air display at Kemble airfield, Gloucestershire, England. ... Download high resolution version (1500x1063, 460 KB) Chinook HC2 (ZA677) of the RAF at an air display at Kemble airfield, Gloucestershire, England. ... The Royal Air Force is the second largest operator of the Boeing CH-47 Chinook (40 airframes - soon to be 48)[1] of the 16 nations that use the type. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The Royal Marines (RM) are the marines and amphibious infantry of the United Kingdom and, along with the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary, form the Naval Service [2]. They are also the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in mountain and Arctic warfare. ... A Royal Air Force Merlin HC3 is an example of a helicopter of Joint Helicopter Command. ...


The large twin-rotor Chinook HC2/HC2A, based at RAF Odiham provides heavy-lift support and is supported by the Merlin HC3 and the smaller Puma HC1 medium-lift helicopters, based at RAF Benson and RAF Aldergrove. The Royal Air Force is the second largest operator of the Boeing CH-47 Chinook (40 airframes - soon to be 48)[1] of the 16 nations that use the type. ... RAF Odiham crest RAF Odiham is a Royal Air Force station situated a little to the south of the historic small town of Odiham in Hampshire, England. ... The AgustaWestland EH101 is a medium-lift helicopter for military applications but also marketed for civil use. ... The Aerospatiale Puma is a medium-sized twin-engined transport/utility helicopter originally manufactured by Aerospatiale of France. ... RAF Benson (IATA: BEX, ICAO: EGUB) is a Royal Air Force station near Benson in Oxfordshire, England. ... Aldergrove Crest USAF C-17 operating from Aldergrove in support of U.S. Presidential visit, 2003. ...


It was announced in March 2007 that the RAF will take delivery of six additional Merlins. The aircraft were originally ordered by Denmark, and six new aircraft will be built for Denmark. Also announced, eight Chinook HC3s, that are in storage, will be modifed for the battlefield support role. The AgustaWestland EH101 is a medium-lift helicopter for military applications but also marketed for civil use. ... The Royal Air Force is the second largest operator of the Boeing CH-47 Chinook (40 airframes - soon to be 48)[1] of the 16 nations that use the type. ...


Transport and air-to-air refuelling aircraft

Lockheed Tristar K1
Lockheed Tristar K1

Having replaced the former Queen's Flight in 1995, 32 (The Royal) Squadron uses the BAe 125 CC3, Agusta A109 and BAe 146 CC2 in the VIP transport role, based at RAF Northolt in west London. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1759x1104, 661 KB) A Royal Air Force Lockheed Tristar does a pass over Kemble airfield, Gloucestershire, England, during Kemble Air Day. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1759x1104, 661 KB) A Royal Air Force Lockheed Tristar does a pass over Kemble airfield, Gloucestershire, England, during Kemble Air Day. ... The Lockheed L-1011 TriStar, commonly referred to as just L-1011 (pronounced ell-ten-eleven), was the third widebody passenger jet airliner to enter operation, following the Boeing 747 and the McDonnell Douglas DC-10. ... No. ... BAe 125-1000 The twin-engined BAe 125 is the worlds best selling mid-size corporate jet, now marketed as the Raytheon Hawker 800. ... The Agusta A109 is a helicopter manufactured by Agusta (now AgustaWestland) of Italy. ... The BAe 146 (also known as the Avro RJ) is a medium-sized commercial aircraft manufactured by BAE SYSTEMS. It carries its four jet engines on a high wing above the fuselage; not below, or at mid-fuselage, as on most conventional civilian aircraft. ... RAF Northolt (IATA: NHT, ICAO: EGWU) is a Royal Air Force station in the London Borough of Hillingdon, in North West Greater London, England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


More routine, strategic airlift transport tasks are carried out by the Tristars and VC10s based at RAF Brize Norton; both used to transport passengers and cargo, and for air-to-air refuelling of other aircraft. The Lockheed L-1011 TriStar, commonly referred to as just L-1011 (pronounced ell-ten-eleven), was the third widebody passenger jet airliner to enter operation, following the Boeing 747 and the McDonnell Douglas DC-10. ... The Vickers VC10 is a British airliner designed and built by Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) Ltd and first flown in 1962. ... RAF Brize Norton is a Royal Air Force station in Oxfordshire about 50 miles west of London, England, United Kingdom. ...


Shorter-range, tactical-airlift transport is provided by the C-130 Hercules, the fleet including both older K-model and new J-model aircraft. based at RAF Lyneham in Wiltshire The Lockheed C-130 Hercules is a four-engine turboprop cargo aircraft and the main tactical airlifter for many military forces worldwide. ...


The RAF has leased 4 C-17 Globemaster IIIs from Boeing to provide a heavy, strategic airlift capability; it was announced in 2004 that these will be purchased, together with a further example. The fifth C-17 is due to be delivered in March 2008, with an in service date of June 2008. The MOD has expressed a wish to buy a further 3 C-17s, which could be delivered before mid-2009, when the C-17 production line may be closed. This would leave the RAF with a total of 8 C-17 aircraft, providing a significantly enhanced strategic airlift capability. On 26th July 2007, the MOD announced that the RAF would be receiving a sixth C-17 to help bolster operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.[1] For the Lockheed aircraft with this designation, see C-17 Super Vega. ... The Boeing Company (NYSE: BA, TYO: 7661) is a major aerospace and defense corporation, originally founded by William Edward Boeing. ...


Training aircraft

A wide range of aircraft types are used for training aircrew in their duties. At the more advanced stage in training, variants of front-line aircraft have been adapted for operational conversion of trained pilots; these include the Harrier T10 and Typhoon T1. Advanced flying training for fast-jet, helicopter and multi-engine pilots is provided using the Hawk T1, Griffin HT1 and B200 King Air respectively. BAE Hawk T.1 (XX232), photographed at the Classic Jet preview day, Kemble Airfield, England, in June 2003. ... BAE Hawk T.1 (XX232), photographed at the Classic Jet preview day, Kemble Airfield, England, in June 2003. ... The BAE Systems (BAE) Hawk is an advanced jet trainer which first flew in 1974 as the Hawker Siddeley Hawk. ... The BAE Systems/Boeing Harrier II (GR5, GR7, and GR9 series) is a second generation vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) jet aircraft used by the Royal Air Force (RAF) and, since 2006, the Royal Navy. ... This article is about a fighter aircraft. ... The BAE Systems (BAE) Hawk is an advanced jet trainer which first flew in 1974 as the Hawker Siddeley Hawk. ... It has been suggested that CH-146 Griffon be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into articles entitled Beechcraft King Air and Beechcraft Super King Air, accessible from a disambiguation page. ...


Basic pilot training for fixed-wing and helicopter pilots is provided on the Tucano T1 and Squirrel HT1, while Weapon Systems Officer and Weapon Systems Operator training is conducted in the Dominie T1. Short Tucano of No. ... This article is about the AStar helicopter. ... The twin-engined British Aerospace BAe 125 is the worlds best selling mid-size corporate jet, now marketed as the Raytheon Hawker 800. ...


Elementary flying training is conducted on the Tutor T1, depending on the new pilot's route of entry to the service. The Tutor is also used, along with the Viking T1 and Vigilant T1 gliders, to provide air experience training and basic pilot training for Air Cadets. The Grob Tutor is a single-engined low-wing monoplane used as a basic training aircraft by the Royal Air Force (RAF). ... Grob G109B motor glider, built in 1986 Grob Aircraft SPn at ILA 2006 This article is about aircraft manufacturer. ... Grob G109B motor glider, built in 1986 Grob Aircraft SPn at ILA 2006 This article is about aircraft manufacturer. ... The Air Cadet Organisation (or ACO) is the collective name for the UK cadet forces sponsored by the Royal Air Force. ...


Future aircraft

F-35 Lightning II
F-35 Lightning II

Aircraft in development, or soon to be deployed, include the Airbus A400M, of which 25 are to be used to replace the remaining Hercules C-130Ks. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 571 pixelsFull resolution (2100 × 1500 pixel, file size: 441 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 571 pixelsFull resolution (2100 × 1500 pixel, file size: 441 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The F-35 Lightning II is a single-seat, single-engine, stealth-capable military strike fighter, a multi-role aircraft that can perform close air support, tactical bombing, and air-to-air combat. ... The Airbus A400M is a four-engine turboprop aircraft, designed by Airbus Military to meet the demand of European nations for military airlift. ...


A new version of the Chinook, the HC3, with improved avionics and increased range, was developed mainly for special forces missions. Service entry has been delayed due to software problems and legal issues. On 1 April 2007, the MoD confirmed the intention of making the eight Chinook HC.3 aircraft operational, after conversion to battlefied support configuration. The Eurofighter Typhoon is entering service and the RAF will be the largest operator of the type. The Boeing CH-47 Chinook is a versatile, twin-engine, tandem rotor heavy-lift helicopter. ... The Royal Air Force is the second largest operator of the Boeing CH-47 Chinook of the 16 nations which use the type. ... For other uses, see Special forces (disambiguation). ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about a fighter aircraft. ...

The Typhoon is intended to replace, by 2010, the Tornado F3 interceptor and the Jaguar GR3A ground attack aircraft (retired in 2007). The Hawk 128 will replace the existing Hawks in service; the newer model being more similar in equipment and performance to modern front line aircraft. The ageing aerial refuelling fleet of VC10s and Tristars should be replaced with the Airbus A330 MRTT under the Future Strategic Tanker Aircraft programme. Problems with contract negotiations have led to unsolicited proposals for the conversion of civil Tristars or DC-10s. RAF A330 MRTT File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... RAF A330 MRTT File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Airbus A330 Multi Role Tanker Transport (MRTT) is an aerial refueling tanker aircraft based on the civilian A330-200. ... The SEPECAT Jaguar is an Anglo-French ground attack aircraft still in service with several export customers, notably the Indian Air Force and the Royal Air Force of Oman. ... The BAE Hawk is an advanced jet trainer manufactured by BAE SYSTEMS and used by the Royal Air Force and other countries. ... The Airbus A330 Multi Role Tanker Transport (MRTT) is an aerial refueling tanker aircraft based on the civilian A330-200. ... The Future Strategic Tanker Aircraft (FSTA) will provide aerial refueling (AR) and Air Transport (AT) for the Royal Air Force using a version of the Airbus A330 MRTT. The Royal Australian Air Force announced in April 2004 that they had selected Airbus to provide tankers to a similar specification. ... Biman Bangladesh Airlines McDonnell Douglas DC-10 The McDonnell Douglas DC-10 is a three-engined long-range airliner, with two engines mounted on underwing pylons and a third engine at the base of the vertical stabilizer. ...


The Joint Combat Aircraft (the British designation for the F-35 Lightning II) will replace the Harrier GR7 and GR9. Studies have begun regarding the long term replacement for the Tornado GR4 (Although the Future Offensive Air System project was cancelled in 2005). The RAF transport helicopter force, the Puma and Sea Kings, are to be replaced by the Support Amphibious and Battlefield Rotorcraft (SABR) project, likely a mix of Merlins and Chinooks. The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) is a military fighter aircraft designed by the United States and the United Kingdom. ... BAE SYSTEMS FOAS Concept The Future Offensive Air System is the system which will replace the RAFs strike capability currently provided by the Tornado GR4. ...


RAF deployments

Country Dates Deployment Details
Indonesia 2005 Support and transport RAF dispatched to South East Asia following the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake disaster to provide aid relief support
Lithuania 2004 Baltic Air Policing 4 Tornado F3 for a 3 months rotation under NATO monitoring mission
Afghanistan 2001– Operation Veritas Chinooks provided airlift support to coalition forces. Since late 2004 six Harriers have provided reconnaissance and close air support to the ISAF.
Bosnia 1995– Various helicopters RAF enforced no-fly zones over the Balkans in the late 1990s and participated in the NATO interventions in Bosnia and Kosovo. Today, RAF helicopters remain to provide support to the United Nations.
Middle East 1990– Various RAF fighters based in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait prior to and during the 1990 Gulf War, and later to enforce no-fly zones over Iraq. Following the 2003 invasion of Iraq and the occupation of southern Iraq by British Forces, the RAF is deployed at Basra. SH is provided in Iraq by Merlin, Puma and Chinook
Falkland Islands 1984– RAF Mount Pleasant Built after the Falklands War to allow a fighter and transport facility on the islands, and to strengthen the defence capacity of the British Forces. A detachment of RAF Regiment provides anti-aircraft support.
Ascension Island 1981– Ascension Island Base Used as an air bridge between the UK and the Falkland Islands. United States Air Force also stationed at this base.
Norway 1960s– Bardufoss Air Station RAF fighter and/or helicopter squadrons undergo winter-training here most years.
Cyprus 1956– RAF Akrotiri Located in the British Sovereign Base Area on Cyprus, the airfield acts a forward base for deployment of UK forces in the Middle East
Canada 1940s– RAF Unit Goose Bay, Canada RAF aircraft train in low-level tactical flying at CFB Goose Bay, a NATO air force base of the Canadian Air Force.
Gibraltar 1940s– RAF Gibraltar No permanently stationed aircraft. RAF aircraft, e.g. Hercules transports, make regular visits.

[9] The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake,[1] was a great undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) December 26, 2004 with an epicentre off the west coast of Sumatra, Indonesia. ... The three Baltic states: Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. ... Operation Veritas was the codename used for British military operations against the Taliban government of Afghanistan in 2001. ... Logo of ISAF. Pashto writing: Ú©Ù…Ú© Ùˆ همکاری (Komak wa Hamkari) means Help and Cooperation. International Security Assistance Force (10) (ISAF) is the name of a NATO-led security and development mission in Afghanistan which was established by the United Nations Security Council on 20 December 2001[1] and consists of about 35... This article is about the country of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... This article is about the city of Basra. ... The AgustaWestland EH101 is a medium-lift helicopter for military applications but also marketed for civil use. ... Species P. concolor P. yagouaroundi Puma is a Felidae genus that contains the Cougar (also known as the Puma, among other names) and the Jaguarundi. ... Chinook has several meanings: The Chinookan nation of Native Americans, and their language. ... RAF Mount Pleasant (IATA: MPN, ICAO: EGYP) (also known as Mount Pleasant Airport or Mount Pleasant Complex)[1] is a military base for the Royal Air Force in the British Overseas Territory of the Falkland Islands. ... Combatants Argentina United Kingdom Commanders President Leopoldo Galtieri Vice-Admiral Juan Lombardo Brigadier-General Ernesto Crespo Brigade-General Mario Menéndez Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher Admiral Sir John Fieldhouse Rear-Admiral John “Sandy” Woodward Major-General Jeremy Moore Casualties 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner 75 fixed... Anthem: God Save the Queen Capital Georgetown Largest city Georgetown Official languages English Government Dependency of St. ... Ascension Island Base is a British airbase on Ascension Island in the Atlantic Ocean. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... -1... RAF Akrotiri is one of the few full-scale Royal Air Force stations left outside the United Kingdom. ... The UK Sovereign Base Areas are those British military base areas located in countries formerly ruled by the United Kingdom which were retained by it and not handed over when those countries attained independence. ... Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Goose Bay, also referred to as 5 Wing Goose Bay or Goose Bay Airport, (IATA: YYR, ICAO: CYYR) is an air force base in eastern Canada, located in the town of Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Labrador. ... This article is about the military alliance. ... Canadian Forces Air Command (AIRCOM) is the air force element of the Canadian Forces. ... RAF Gibraltar is a Royal Air Force station on Gibraltar. ...


Symbols, flags, emblems and uniform

Further information: Royal Air Force roundels
Further information: Royal Air Force uniform

Following the tradition of the other British fighting services, the RAF has adopted symbols to represent it and act as a rallying point for its members. Image File history File links Ensign_of_the_Royal_Air_Force. ... Image File history File links Ensign_of_the_Royal_Air_Force. ... Royal Air Force Ensign The Royal Air Force Ensign is the official flag which used to represent the Royal Air Force. ... The Royal Air Force has employed several versions of the roundel during its existence. ... The Royal Air Force uniform is the standardized military dress worn by members of the Royal Air Force. ...


The RAF Ensign is flown from the flagstaff on every RAF station during daylight hours. The design was approved by King George V in 1921, after much opposition from the Admiralty, who have the right to approve or veto any flag flown ashore or on board ship. Royal Air Force Ensign The Royal Air Force Ensign is the official flag which used to represent the Royal Air Force. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ...


British aircraft in the early stages of the First World War carried the Union Flag as an identifying feature, however this was easy to confuse with the German Iron Cross motif. Therefore in October 1914 the French system of three concentric rings was adopted, with the colours reversed to a red disc surrounded by a white ring and an outer blue ring. The relative sizes of the rings have changed over the years and during World War II an outer yellow ring was added. Aircraft serving in the Far East during World War II had the red disc removed to prevent confusion with Japanese aircraft. Since the 1970s, camouflaged aircraft carry low-visibility roundels, either red and blue on dark camouflage, or washed-out pink and light blue on light colours. Most uncamouflaged training and transport aircraft retain the traditional red-white-blue roundel. “Union Jack” redirects here. ... The far east as a cultural block includes East Asia, Southeast Asia, Northeast Asia and South Asia. ...


The Latin motto of the RAF, "Per Ardua ad Astra", is usually translated as "Through Adversity to the Stars". The choice of motto is attributed to a junior officer by the name of J S Yule, in response to a request from a Commander of the RFC, Colonel Sykes, for suggestions. For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Major-General Right Honourable Sir Frederick Hugh Sykes (1877–1954) was an English statesman and politician. ...

Badge of the Royal Air Force

The Badge of the Royal Air Force is in heraldic terms: "In front of a circle inscribed with the motto Per Ardua Ad Astra and ensigned by the Imperial Crown an eagle volant and affronty Head lowered and to the sinister." It was approved in 1923 based on a design by a tailor at Gieves Ltd of Savile Row, although the original had an albatross rather than the eagle.[citation needed] This image is Crown copyright protected. ... This image is Crown copyright protected. ... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... A tailor attending to a customer in Hong Kong. ... Gieves & Hawkes is a well-known tailor based in Savile Row, London. ... Savile Row Savile Row 3 Savile Row, 2007 Savile Row occupies a quiet corner of Mayfair in central London near Bond Street and is famous for its mens bespoke tailoring. ...


Since 2006 the RAF has adopted a new official logotype, shown at the top of this article. The logotype is used on all correspondence and publicity material, and aims to provide the Service with a single, universally-recognisable brand identity. This article or section should include material from logo design, discuss it at Talk:Logo design A logotype, commonly known as a logo, is the graphic element of a trademark or brand, which is set in a special typeface/font, or arranged in a particular, but legible, way. ...


Future

In 2006, Colonel Tim Collins, the former Army officer described as a hero during the Iraq war, prompted controversy by calling for the RAF to be disbanded as a separate arm; allowing the Fleet Air Arm and Army Air Corps to absorb aircrew and aircraft dedicated to specific sea and ground roles. The Ministry of Defence responded saying, "There is no question of the RAF being disbanded. The skills and challenges in the air environment are totally different to those faced in maritime or land environments."[10] Tim Collins OBE (born Belfast, Northern Ireland, April 1960) is a former colonel in the British Army. ... The Fleet Air Arm is the branch of the Royal Navy responsible for the operation of the aircraft on board their ships. ... The Army Air Corps is a component of the British Army. ... The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for implementation of government defence policy and is the headquarters of the British Armed Forces. ...


Additionally, Nick Cook who edits the aviation section of Jane's Defence Weekly, voiced his disagreement with Tim Collins' idea saying: Nick Cook is a British journalist and author of fiction and non-fiction works. ... Janes Defence Weekly (abbreviated as JDW) is a weekly magazine reporting on military and corporate affairs. ...

"In an era when money is tight there is a lot of introspection about where scant resources should go, but this doesn't make any sense. You can't do without air power. It's totally unrealistic."[10]

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force Portal
Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Navy
Note: In 1968 the RCAF was amalgamated with the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) and Canadian Army to form initially the Canadian Armed Forces, then the Canadian Forces (CF).

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links Ensign_of_the_Royal_Air_Force. ... List of RAF stations is a comprehensive list of all stations of the Royal Air Force past and present. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This is a list of currently-active military aircraft in use by the United Kingdom. ... The Fleet Air Arm is the branch of the Royal Navy responsible for the operation of the aircraft on board their ships. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2006 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Don McKinnon since 1 April 2000 Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total... The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) is the Air Force branch of the Australian Defence Force. ... The Royal Malaysian Air Force (Malay: Tentera Udara DiRaja Malaysia) was formed in 1958 as the Royal Malayan Air Force (Tentera Udara Diraja Persekutuan). ... The Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) is the air force arm of the New Zealand Defence Force. ... This article is about the Air Force of Brunei. ... “RCAF” redirects here. ... For history after 1968, see Canadian Forces Maritime Command The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) was the navy of Canada from 1911 until 1968 when the three Canadian armed services were unified to form the Canadian Forces. ... Canadian Forces Land Force Command (LF) is responsible for army operations within the Canadian Armed Forces. ... The Canadian Forces (CF) (French: Forces canadiennes (FC)) are the unified armed forces of Canada, governed by the National Defence Act, which states: The Canadian Forces are the armed forces of Her Majesty raised by Canada and consist of one Service called the Canadian Armed Forces. ... Danish Air Forces F-16 MLU at Radom Air Show 2005 History The Danish armed forces received 38 Supermarine Spitfire H. F. Mk. ... Roundel of the Royal Netherlands Air Force. ... Ranks Norwegian military ranks The Royal Norwegian Air Force (RNoAF) (Norwegian: Luftforsvaret) is the air force of Norway. ... The Royal Saudi Air Force (Arabic: , ), is the air force branch of Saudi Arabian armed forces. ... The Royal Thai Air Force (Thai: กองทัพอากาศไทย, Kong Thab Akat Thai) is the air force of the Kingdom of Thailand. ... The Royal Air Force of Oman is the air arm of the Sultan of Omans Armed Forces Mainly supported by the United Kingdom and the Royal Air Force Fighter Aircraft SEPECAT Jaguar BAC Strikemaster Transport Aircraft C-130 Hercules Shorts Skyvan De Havilland Canada DHC-4 Caribou Helicopters Westland...

References

  1. ^ www.raf.mod.uk The Royal Air Force Mission
  2. ^ Defence Analytical Services Agency The MOD Mission
  3. ^ The Churchill Centre - Speeches & Quotes
  4. ^ Paul Brickhill "The Dambusters"
  5. ^ www.raf.mod.uk 31st March 2006. Command Structure.
  6. ^ BBC News Fly-past for Britain's oldest man
  7. ^ Air base in front line fully-armed - Salisbury Journal, Monday 29 October 2007
  8. ^ Air Forces Monthly, December 2007 issue, p.6.
  9. ^ www.raf.mod.uk Deployments
  10. ^ a b Disband the RAF, says Iraq war's inspirational colonel, The Daily Telegraph, 13 May 2006.

The Salibury Journal is the local Newspaper for the Salisbury Area. ... Air Forces Monthly is a military aviation magazine published by Key Publishing, based in Stamford, United Kingdom. ... December 2007 is the twelfth month of that year and has yet to occur. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
RAF Royal Air Force Museum - aircraft, military aviation pictures & information (0 words)
Royal Air Force Museum London is situated on the historic site of the London Aerodrome and houses over 100 aircraft from around the world.
RAF Museum London is Britain's only national air museum dedicated to aviation and has a total collection of well over two hundred aircraft; over a hundred full-size aircraft from all over the world are displayed under cover on the historic site of the original London Aerodrome.
RAF Museum Cosford aims to preserve an important part of Britain's national aviation heritage and to display it for future generations.
Royal Air Force - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (3899 words)
The RAF was formed on April 1, 1918 and has taken a significant role in British military history since then, playing a large part in World War II and in conflicts such as the recent war in Iraq.
The Air Force Board (AFB) is the management board of the RAF and consists of the Commanders-in-Chief of the Commands, together with several other high ranking officers.
RAF squadrons are somewhat analogous to the regiments of the British army, in that they have histories and traditions going back to their formation, regardless of where they are currently based, which aircraft they are operating, etc. They can be awarded standards and battle honours for meritorious service.
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