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Encyclopedia > Rowan
Rowan
European Rowan fruit
European Rowan fruit
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Rosales
Family: Rosaceae
Subfamily: Maloideae
Genus: Sorbus
Subgenus: Sorbus
Species

Sorbus subgenus Sorbus
Sorbus aucuparia - European Rowan
Sorbus americana - American mountain ash
Sorbus cashmiriana - Kashmir Rowan
Sorbus commixta - Japanese Rowan
Sorbus decora - Showy mountain ash
Sorbus glabrescens - White-fruited Rowan
Sorbus hupehensis - Hubei Rowan
Sorbus matsumurana
Sorbus sargentiana - Sargent's Rowan
Sorbus scalaris - Ladder Rowan
Sorbus sitchensis - Sitka mountain ash
Sorbus vilmoriniana - Vilmorin's Rowan
Plus several other species
Sorbus subgenus Aria
Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x608, 151 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... For other uses, see Scientific classification (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... Classes Magnoliopsida - Dicots Liliopsida - Monocots The flowering plants or angiosperms are the most widespread group of land plants. ... Magnoliopsida is the botanical name for a class: this name is formed by replacing the termination -aceae in the name Magnoliaceae by the termination -opsida (Art 16 of the ICBN). ... Families Barbeyaceae Cannabaceae (hemp family) Dirachmaceae Elaeagnaceae Moraceae (mulberry family) Rosaceae (rose family) Rhamnaceae (buckthorn family) Ulmaceae (elm family) Urticaceae (nettle family) For the Philippine municipality, see Rosales, Pangasinan. ... Global distribution of Rosaceae Subfamilies Rosoideae Spiraeoideae Maloideae Amygdaloideae or Prunoideae The Rosaceae or rose family is a large family of plants, with about 3,000-4,000 species in 100-120 genera. ... Genera Amelanchier - serviceberry, juneberry Aronia - chokeberry Chaenomeles - Japanese quince Cotoneaster - cotoneaster Crataegus - hawthorn Cydonia - quince Eriobotrya - loquat Eriolobus (Malus pro parte) Heteromeles - Toyon Malus - apple, crabapple Mespilus - medlar Osteomeles Photinia Pyracantha - firethorn Pyrus - pear Rhaphiolepis - Indian hawthorn Sorbus - rowan, whitebeam, service tree Stranvaesia - (Photinia pro parte) The Maloideae, or the... Subgenera Sorbus Aria Micromeles Cormus Torminaria Chamaemespilus The genus Sorbus is a genus of about 100-200 species of trees and shrubs in the subfamily Maloideae of the Rose family Rosaceae. ... Binomial name L. Sorbus aucuparia (Rowan or European Rowan), is a species of rowan (Sorbus subgenus Sorbus), native to most of Europe except for the far south, and northern Asia. ... Binomial name Sorbus americana, also known as Rowan, American Mountain Ash, or Pyrus americana, is a small tree of the eastern United States. ... Binomial name Otherwise known as the Kashmir Rowan, Sorbus cashmiriana is an attractive conical-shaped smaller tree (reaches 8m/ 25ft) which was given its name due to specimens seen in Kashmir early in the 20th century. ... Species Sorbus subgenus Aria Sorbus alnifolia - Korean Whitebeam Sorbus aria - Common Whitebeam Sorbus arranensis - Arran Whitebeam Sorbus bristoliensis - Bristol Gorge Whitebeam Sorbus devoniensis - Devon Whitebeam Sorbus folgneri - Folgners Whitebeam Sorbus intermedia - Swedish Whitebeam Sorbus latifolia - Service Tree of Fontainebleau Sorbus mougeotii - Vosges Whitebeam Sorbus rupicola - Rock Whitebeam Sorbus thibetica...

Sorbus Other subgenera

The rowans are plants of the Family Rosaceae, in the Genus Sorbus, Subgenus Sorbus. They are native throughout the cool temperate regions of the northern hemisphere, with the highest species diversity in the mountains of western China and the Himalaya, where numerous apomictic microspecies occur. Subgenera Sorbus Aria Micromeles Cormus Torminaria Chamaemespilus The genus Sorbus is a genus of about 100-200 species of trees and shrubs in the subfamily Maloideae of the Rose family Rosaceae. ... Rowan is the name of several things, including: the rowans - a genus of deciduous trees notable for their red berries The Rowan - a novel by Anne McAffrey several places in the United States of America: Rowan, Iowa Rowan County, Kentucky Rowan County, North Carolina Rowan University in New Jersey Rowan... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... Global distribution of Rosaceae Subfamilies Rosoideae Spiraeoideae Maloideae Amygdaloideae or Prunoideae The Rosaceae or rose family is a large family of plants, with about 3,000-4,000 species in 100-120 genera. ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... Subgenera Sorbus Aria Micromeles Cormus Torminaria Chamaemespilus The genus Sorbus is a genus of about 100-200 species of trees and shrubs in the subfamily Maloideae of the Rose family Rosaceae. ... Northern hemisphere highlighted in yellow. ... Perspective view of the Himalaya and Mount Everest as seen from space looking south-south-east from over the Tibetan Plateau. ... In botany, apomixis is asexual reproduction, without fertilization. ...


Rowans are mostly small deciduous trees 10-20 m tall, though a few are shrubs. The leaves are arranged alternately, and are pinnate, with (8)-11-35 leaflets. The flowers are borne in dense corymbs; each flower is creamy white, and 5-10 mm across with five petals. Deciduous means temporary or tending to fall off (deriving from the Latin word decidere, to fall off) and is typically used in reference to trees or shrubs that lose their leaves seasonally. ... The coniferous Coast Redwood, the tallest tree species on earth. ... A broom shrub in flower A shrub or bush is a horticultural rather than strictly botanical category of woody plant, distinguished from a tree by its multiple stems and lower height, usually less than 6 m tall. ... Look up foliage in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Pinnate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Flower (disambiguation). ... White-fruited Rowan (Sorbus glabrescens) corymb; note the branched structure A panicle is a compound raceme; a branched, indeterminate inflorescence with pedicellate flowers (and fruit) attached along the secondary branches (in another words, a branched cluster of flowers in which the branches are racemes). ...

White-fruited Rowan Sorbus glabrescens, a Chinese species with pure white fruit

The fruit is a small pome 4-8 mm diameter, bright orange or red in most species, but pink, yellow or white in some Asian species. The fruit are soft and juicy, which makes them a very good food for birds, particularly waxwings and thrushes, which then distribute the rowan seeds in their droppings. Rowan is used as a food plant by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species - see list of Lepidoptera which feed on Sorbus. Download high resolution version (720x845, 85 KB)Sorbus glabrescens (White-berry Rowan) leaf & fruit - photo MPF File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (720x845, 85 KB)Sorbus glabrescens (White-berry Rowan) leaf & fruit - photo MPF File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ... An apple is an example of a pome fruit. ... For other uses, see Bird (disambiguation). ... Species B. garrulus B. cedrorum The waxwings are a group of passerine birds characterised by soft silky plumage and unique red tips to some of the wing feathers. ... Genera 22 genera, see text The Thrushes, family Turdidae, are a group of passerine birds that occur mainly but not exclusively in the Old World. ... A ripe red jalapeño cut open to show the seeds For other uses, see Seed (disambiguation). ... A larval insect A larva (Latin; plural larvae) is a juvenile form of animal with indirect development, undergoing metamorphosis (for example, insects or amphibians). ... The order Lepidoptera is the second most speciose order in the class Insecta and includes the butterflies, moths and skippers. ... Sorbus species are used as food plants by the larvae of a number of Lepidoptera species including: Autumnal Moth (Epirrita autumnata) - recorded on rowan Brimstone Moth (Opisthograptis luteolata) - recorded on rowan Brown-tail (Euproctis chrysorrhoea) Bucculatrix leaf-miners: Coleophora case-bearers: - recorded on Common Emerald (Hemithea aestivaria) - recorded on rowan...


The best known species is the European Rowan, Sorbus aucuparia, a small tree typically 4-12 m tall growing in a variety of habitats throughout northern Europe and in mountains in southern Europe and southwest Asia. Its berries are a favourite food for many birds and are a traditional wild-collected food in Britain and Scandinavia. It is one of the hardiest European trees, occurring to 71° north in Vardø in arctic Norway, and has also become widely naturalized in northern North America. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mountain (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Scandinavia is a historical and geographical region centered on the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe which includes the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... County Finnmark Landscape Municipality NO-2002 Administrative centre Vardø Mayor (2003) Rolf Einar Mortensen (Ap) Official language form BokmÃ¥l Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 183 600 km² 586 km² 0. ... Naturalization is the process whereby a person becomes a national of a nation, or a citizen of a country, other than the one of his birth. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ...


North American native rowans include the American mountain ash Sorbus americana and Showy mountain ash Sorbus decora in the east and Sitka mountain ash Sorbus sitchensis in the west.


The greatest diversity of form as well as the largest number of species is in Asia, with very distinctive species such as Sargent's Rowan Sorbus sargentiana with large leaves 20-35 cm long and 15-20 cm broad and very large corymbs with 200-500 flowers, and at the other extreme, Small-leaf Rowan Sorbus microphylla with leaves 8-12 cm long and 2.5-3 cm broad. While most are trees, the Dwarf Rowan Sorbus reducta is a low shrub to 50 cm tall. Several of the Asian species are widely cultivated as ornamental trees. For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... A broom shrub in flower A shrub or bush is a horticultural rather than strictly botanical category of woody plant, distinguished from a tree by its multiple stems and lower height, usually less than 6 m tall. ...


For other Sorbus species, see whitebeam (Sorbus subgenus Aria) and the genus article Sorbus. Species Sorbus subgenus Aria Sorbus alnifolia - Korean Whitebeam Sorbus aria - Common Whitebeam Sorbus arranensis - Arran Whitebeam Sorbus bristoliensis - Bristol Gorge Whitebeam Sorbus devoniensis - Devon Whitebeam Sorbus folgneri - Folgners Whitebeam Sorbus intermedia - Swedish Whitebeam Sorbus latifolia - Service Tree of Fontainebleau Sorbus mougeotii - Vosges Whitebeam Sorbus rupicola - Rock Whitebeam Sorbus thibetica... Species Sorbus subgenus Aria Sorbus alnifolia - Korean Whitebeam Sorbus aria - Common Whitebeam Sorbus arranensis - Arran Whitebeam Sorbus bristoliensis - Bristol Gorge Whitebeam Sorbus devoniensis - Devon Whitebeam Sorbus folgneri - Folgners Whitebeam Sorbus intermedia - Swedish Whitebeam Sorbus latifolia - Service Tree of Fontainebleau Sorbus mougeotii - Vosges Whitebeam Sorbus rupicola - Rock Whitebeam Sorbus thibetica... Subgenera Sorbus Aria Micromeles Cormus Torminaria Chamaemespilus The genus Sorbus is a genus of about 100-200 species of trees and shrubs in the subfamily Maloideae of the Rose family Rosaceae. ...

Contents

Uses

Ripening European Rowan berries.
Ripening European Rowan berries.

Rowans are excellent small ornamental trees for parks, gardens and wildlife areas. Several of the Chinese species, such as White-fruited rowan (S. glabrescens) are popular for their unusual berry colour, and Sargent's rowan (S. sargentiana) for its exceptionally large clusters of fruit. They are very attractive to fruit-eating birds, which is reflected in the old name "bird catcher". The wood is dense and used for carving and turning and for tool handles and walking sticks. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x1024, 216 KB)Photoshopped version of Image:Ripening rowan cropped. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x1024, 216 KB)Photoshopped version of Image:Ripening rowan cropped. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Mythology & folklore

The European rowan (S. aucuparia) has a long tradition in European mythology and folklore. It was thought to be a magical tree and protection against malevolent beings.


The density of the rowan wood makes it very usable for walking sticks and magician's staves. This is why druid staffs, for example, have traditionally been made out of rowan wood, and its branches were often used in dowsing rods and magic wands. Rowan was carried on vessels to avoid storms, kept in houses to guard against lightning, and even planted on graves to keep the deceased from haunting. It was also used to protect one from witches [1]. Often birds' droppings contain rowan seeds, and if such droppings land in a fork or hole where old leaves have accumulated on a larger tree, such as an oak or a maple, they may result in a rowan growing as an epiphyte on the larger tree. Such a rowan is called a "flying rowan" and was thought of as especially potent against witches and their magic, and as a counter-charm against sorcery [2]. Rowan's alleged protection against enchantment made it perfect to be used in making rune staves (Murray, p. 26), for metal divining, and to protect cattle from harm by attaching sprigs to their sheds. The giant Galligantua and the wicked old magician transform the dukes daughter into a white hind. ... Dowsing is a controversial method of divination which dowsers say empowers them to find water, metals, gem stones and hidden objects by carrying some form of stick and watching its motion while walking over a piece of land. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Witchcraft. ... Species See List of Quercus species The term oak can be used as part of the common name of any of several hundred species of trees and shrubs in the genus Quercus (from Latin oak tree), and some related genera, notably Cyclobalanopsis and Lithocarpus. ... Distribution Species See List of Acer species Trees or shrubs in the genus Acer are commonly called Maples. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Runic calendar (or Rune staff) appears to have been a medieval Swedish invention, whereas clog almanacs appear in several European countries. ...


In Finland and Sweden, the number of berries on the trees was used as a predictor of the snow cover during winter. While this has been considered mere superstition, one hypothesis has been presented that genuine efficacy might stem from the causal connection of amount of berries and the amount of rainfall during summer. While in general no absolute connection between summer rainfall and snowfall in winter can be made, it is conceivable that in certain specific microclimates there might be some predictive value therein. This interpretation is supported by the fact that in some geographical areas, rowans replete with berries were thought to signify a thick snow cover, in others many berries meant very little snow. Snow is a type of precipitation in the form of crystalline water ice, consisting of a multitude of snowflakes that fall from clouds. ... Winter is one of the four seasons of temperate zones. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... This article is about precipitation. ... For other uses, see Summer (disambiguation). ... Tree ferns thrive in a protected dell at Heligan Gardens, in Cornwall, England, latitude 50° 15N A microclimate is a local atmospheric zone where the climate differs from the surrounding area. ... A prediction is a statement or claim that a particular event will occur in the future in more certain terms than a forecast. ...


Leaves and berries were added to divination incense for better scrying. It has been suggested that Crystal ball be merged into this article or section. ...


Folk-medicinal uses

Fresh rowan berry juice is usable as a laxative, gargle for sore throats, inflamed tonsils, hoarseness, and as a source of vitamins A and C. Rowan berry jam will remedy diarrhea. An infusion of the berries will benefit hemorrhoids and strangury. The bark can also be used as an astringent for loose bowels and vaginal irritations. Rowan is also used for eye irritations, spasmic pains in the uterus, heart/bladder problems, neuralgia, gout and waist constrictions. Retinol (Vitamin A) For the record label, see Vitamin Records A vitamin is an organic compound required in tiny amounts for essential metabolic reactions in a living organism. ... Vitamin A is an essential human nutrient. ... This article is about the nutrient. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Strangury is a frequent need to urinate but with slow urine production. ...


Rowan berries as food

Rowan berries on Prince Edward Island.
Rowan berries on Prince Edward Island.

Rowan berries can be made into a slightly bitter jelly which in Britain is traditionally eaten as an accompaniment to game, and into jams and other preserves, on their own, or with other fruits. The berries can also be a substitute for coffee beans, and have many uses in alcoholic beverages: to flavour liqueurs and cordials, to produce country wine, and to flavour ale. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1390 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1390 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Jam from berries Fruit preserves refers to fruit, or vegetables, that have been prepared and canned for long term storage. ... Game is any animal hunted for food or not normally domesticated (such as venison). ... Jam from berries Jam (also known as jelly or preserves) is a type of sweet spread or condiment made with fruits or sometimes vegetables, sugar, and sometimes pectin if the fruits natural pectin content is insufficient to produce a thick product. ... For the several U.S. counties named Coffee, see Coffee County. ... Alcoholic beverages. ... Bottles of strawberry liqueur A liqueur is a sweet alcoholic beverage, often flavoured with fruits, herbs, spices, flowers, seeds, roots, plants, barks, and sometimes cream. ... Look up cordial in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Fruit wine. ... For other uses, see Ale (disambiguation). ...


Rowan cultivars with superior fruit for human food use are available but not common; mostly the fruits are gathered from wild trees growing on public lands. This Osteospermum Pink Whirls is a successful cultivar. ...


Rowan berries contain sorbic acid, an acid that takes its name from the Latin name of the genus Sorbus. Raw berries also contain parasorbic acid (about 0.4%-0.7% in the European rowan[3]), which causes indigestion and can lead to kidney damage, but heat treatment (cooking, heat-drying etc.) and, to a lesser extent, freezing, neutralises it, by changing it to the benign sorbic acid. Luckily, they are also usually too astringent to be palatable when raw. Collecting them after first frost (or putting in the freezer) cuts down on the bitter taste as well. Chemical structure Sorbic acid (also known as trans, trans-2,4-hexadienoic acid) has the chemical formula C6H8O2. ... Indigestion is a condition that is frequently caused by eating too fast, especially by eating high-fat foods quickly. ... The kidneys are organs that filter wastes (such as urea) from the blood and excrete them, along with water, as urine. ... For other uses, see Heat (disambiguation) In physics, heat, symbolized by Q, is energy transferred from one body or system to another due to a difference in temperature. ... Cooking is the act of preparing food. ... A whole potato, sliced pieces (right), and dried sliced pieces (left) Drying is a method of food preservation that works by removing water from the food, which prevents the growth of microorganisms and decay. ... In physics and chemistry, freezing is the process whereby a liquid turns to a solid. ...


Etymology, and other names

Rowan flowers

The name "rowan" is derived from the Old Norse name for the tree, raun or rogn. Linguists believe that the Norse name is ultimately derived from a proto-Germanic word *raudnian meaning "getting red" and which referred to the red foliage and red berries in the autumn. Rowan is one of the most familiar wild trees in the British Isles, and has acquired numerous English folk names. The following are recorded folk names for the rowan: Delight of the eye (Luisliu), Mountain ash, Quickbane, Quickbeam, Quicken (tree), Quickenbeam, Ran tree, Roan tree, Roden-quicken, Roden-quicken-royan, Round wood, Round tree, Royne tree, Rune tree, Sorb apple, Thor's helper, Whispering tree, Whitty, Wicken-tree, Wiggin, Wiggy, Wiky, Witch wood, Witchbane, Witchen, Witchen tree. Many of these can be easily linked to the mythology and folklore surrounding the tree. In Gaelic, it is Rudha-an (red one, pronounced quite similarly to English "rowan"). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 587 KB) Summary Rowan flowers Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 587 KB) Summary Rowan flowers Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Old Norse is the Germanic language spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article describes the archipelago in north-Western Europe. ... Goidelic is one of two major divisions of modern-day Celtic languages (the other being Brythonic). ...


One somewhat confusing name for the rowan, used in both the UK and North America, is "mountain ash", which implies that it is a species of ash (Fraxinus). The name arises from the superficial similarity in leaf shape of the two trees; in fact, the rowan does not belong to the ash family, but is closely related to the apples and hawthorns in the rose family. North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Subgenera Sorbus Aria Micromeles Cormus Torminaria Chamaemespilus The genus Sorbus is a genus of about 100-200 species of trees and shrubs in the subfamily Maloideae of the Rose family Rosaceae. ... Species See text European Ash in flower Narrow-leafed Ash (Fraxinus angustifolia) shoot with leaves Closeup of European Ash seeds 19th century illustration of Manna Ash (Fraxinus ornus) An ash can be any of four different tree genera from four very distinct families (see end of page for disambiguation), but... Look up foliage in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Genera Abeliophyllum- Chionanthus- Fringetree Comoranthus- Dimetra- Fontanesia- Forestieria- Swamp-privet Forsythia- Forsythia Fraxinus- Ash Haenianthus- Hesperelaea- Jasminum- Jasmine Ligustrum- Privet Menodora- Myxopyrum- Nestegis- Noronhia- Notelaea- Nyctanthes- Olea- Olive Osmanthus- Osmanthus Phillyrea- Mock-privet Picconia- Priogymnanthus- Schrebera- Syringa- Lilac Oleaceae, the olive family, is a plant family containing 24 extant genera... Binomial name Borkh. ... Species See text Crataegus (Hawthorn) is a large genus of in the family Rosaceae, native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere in Europe, Asia and North America. ... Global distribution of Rosaceae Subfamilies Rosoideae Spiraeoideae Maloideae Amygdaloideae or Prunoideae The Rosaceae or rose family is a large family of plants, with about 3,000-4,000 species in 100-120 genera. ...


Notes and references

  1. ^ Sir James Frazer, The Golden Bough, p620, Papermac Edition, 1987, ISBN 0-333-43430-7
  2. ^ Sir James Frazer, The Golden Bough, p702, Papermac Edition, 1987, ISBN 0-333-43430-7
  3. ^ O Raspe, C Findlay, AL Jacquemart. Sorbus aucuparia L. The Journal of Ecology, 2000

Sir James George Frazer (January 1, 1854 - May 7, 1941), a social anthropologist influential in the early stages of the modern studies of mythology and comparative religion, was born in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion is a wide-ranging comparative study of mythology and religion, written by Scottish anthropologist Sir James George Frazer (1854–1941). ... Sir James George Frazer (January 1, 1854 - May 7, 1941), a social anthropologist influential in the early stages of the modern studies of mythology and comparative religion, was born in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion is a wide-ranging comparative study of mythology and religion, written by Scottish anthropologist Sir James George Frazer (1854–1941). ...

See also

  • Internet Celebrity

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Sorbus

  Results from FactBites:
 
Rowan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1091 words)
Often birds' droppings contain rowan seeds, and such droppings if they land in a fork or hole where old leaves have accumulated in a larger tree, such as an oak or a maple, may result in a rowan growing as an epiphyte on the larger tree.
Fresh rowan berry juice is usable as a laxative, gargle for sore throats, inflamed tonsils, hoarseness, and as a source of vitamins A and C.
Rowan cultivars with superior fruit for human food use are available but not common; mostly the fruits are gathered from wild trees growing on public lands.
Rowan County, North Carolina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (602 words)
Rowan County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina.
It was named for Matthew Rowan, acting governor of North Carolina from 1753 to 1754.
Rowan County is a member of the regional Centralina Council of Governments.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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