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Encyclopedia > Rouen

Coordinates: 49°26′38″N 1°06′12″E / 49.4439, 1.1033 Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Commune of Rouen

Location
Administration
Country France
Region Haute-Normandie (capital)
Department Seine-Maritime (préfecture)
Arrondissement Rouen
Canton Chief town of 7 cantons
Intercommunality Communauté de l'agglomération Rouennaise
Mayor Valérie Fourneyron (PS)
(2008-2014)
Statistics
Elevation 2 m–152 m
(avg. 10 m)
Land area¹ 21.38 km²
Population²
(1999)
106,592
 - Density 4,986/km²
Miscellaneous
INSEE/Postal code 76540/ 76000
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.
2 Population sans doubles comptes: single count of residents of multiple communes (e.g. students and military personnel).
France

Rouen (pronounced [ʁwɑ̃] in French) is the historical capital city of Normandy, in northwestern France on the River Seine, and currently the capital of the Haute-Normandie (Upper Normandy) région. Once one of the largest and most prosperous cities of medieval Europe, Rouen was the seat of the Exchequer of Normandy in the Middle Ages. It was one of the capitals of the Anglo-Norman dynasties, which ruled both England and large parts of modern France from the 11th century to the 15th century. It was in Rouen where Joan of Arc was burnt in 1431. People from Rouen are called Rouennais. Image File history File links Paris_plan_pointer_b_jms. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Capital Rouen Land area¹ 12,318 km² Regional President Alain Le Vern (PS) (since 1998) Population  - Jan. ... Departments (French: IPA: ) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ... Seine-Maritime is a French département in Normandy. ... In France, a préfecture is the capital city of a département. ... The 100 French departments are divided into 342 arrondissements, which may be translated into English as districts. ... The arrondissement of Rouen is an arrondissement of France, located in the Seine-Maritime département, of the Haute-Normandie région. ... The cantons of France are administrative divisions subdividing arrondissements and départements. ... Map of the 36,568 communes of metropolitan France. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... The Socialist Party (Parti Socialiste, PS) is one of the largest political parties in France. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2014 (MMXIV) will be a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... INSEE is the French abbreviation for the French National Institute for Statistics and Economic Studies (French: Institut National de la Statistique et des Études Économiques). ... Postal codes were introduced in France in 1972, when La Poste introduced automated sorting. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Río de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... This page lists English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations, such as and . ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Normandy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the river in France. ... Capital Rouen Land area¹ 12,318 km² Regional President Alain Le Vern (PS) (since 1998) Population  - Jan. ... France is divided into 26 régions: 21 of these are in the continental part of metropolitan France, one is Corse on the island of Corsica (although strictly speaking Corse is in fact a territorial collectivity, not a région, but is referred to as a région in common... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The Exchequer was (and in some cases still is) a part of the governments of England (latterly to include Wales, Scotland and Ireland) that was responsible for the management and collection of revenues. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Joan of Arc (disambiguation). ... Year 1431 was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ...


The population of the metropolitan area (in French: aire urbaine) at the 1999 census was 518,316 inhabitants and 541,410 inhabitants at the 2007 estimate. The city proper has an estimated population of 109,000 in 2007.

Contents

Administration

Rouen is the capital of the Haute-Normandie (Upper Normandy) région, as well as a commune and the préfecture (capital) of the Seine-Maritime département. Capital Rouen Land area¹ 12,318 km² Regional President Alain Le Vern (PS) (since 1998) Population  - Jan. ... The commune is the lowest level of administrative division in the French Republic. ... In France, a préfecture is the capital city of a département. ... Seine-Maritime is a French département in Normandy. ... The départements (or departments) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ...


Rouen and 36 suburban communes of the metropolitan area form the Community of Agglomeration of Rouen Haute-Normandie, with 393,621 inhabitants in it at the 1999 census. In descending order of population, the largest of these suburbs are Sotteville-lès-Rouen, Saint-Étienne-du-Rouvray, Le Grand-Quevilly, Le Petit-Quevilly, and Mont-Saint-Aignan, each with a population exceeding 20,000 inhabitants. A communauté dagglomération is a metropolitan government structure in France, created by the Loi Chevénement in 1999. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... Sotteville-lès-Rouen is a commune in the département of Seine-Maritime and the Haute-Normandie region of France. ... Saint-Étienne-du-Rouvray is a commune in the département of Seine-Maritime and the Haute-Normandie region of France. ... Le Grand-Quevilly is a commune in the département of Seine-Maritime and the Haute-Normandie region of France. ... Le Petit-Quevilly is a commune in the département of Seine-Maritime and the Haute-Normandie region of France. ... Mont-Saint-Aignan is a town of Normandy in northwestern France. ...


History

Rouen was founded by the Gauls who called it Ratumacos; the Romans later renamed it to Rotomagus. Rouen was the chief city of the Secunda Provincia Lugdunensis under Constantine. In the 5th century it became the seat of the bishopric and later a capital of Neustria. In the 9th century, it was overrun by Normans and since 912 has been the capital of Normandy and residence of the dukes. Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Head of Constantines colossal statue at Musei Capitolini Gaius Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[1] (February 27, 272–May 22, 337), commonly known as Constantine I, Constantine the Great, or (among Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic[2] Christians) Saint Constantine, was a Roman Emperor, proclaimed Augustus by his troops on... Europe in 450 The 5th century is the period from 401 to 500 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Neustria & Austrasia The territory of Neustria originated in A.D. 511, made up of the regions from Aquitaine to the English Channel, approximating most of the north of present-day France, with Paris and Soissons as its main cities. ... As a means of recording the passage of time the 9th century was the century that lasted from 801 to 900. ... Norman conquests in red. ... Events Orso II Participazio becomes Doge of Venice Patriarch Nicholas I Mysticus becomes patriarch of Constantinople Births November 23 - Otto I the Great Holy Roman Emperor (+ 973) Abd-ar-rahman III - prince of the Umayyad dynasty Deaths Oleg of Kiev Categories: 912 ... The Duchy of Normandy stems from the Viking invasions of France in the 8th century. ... Bold textInsert non-formatted text here This statue of Rollo the Viking (founder of the fiefdom of Normandy) stands in Falaise, Calvados, birthplace of his descendant William I the Conqueror (the Duke of Normandy who became King of England). ...


In the 1100s, Rouen was the site of a yeshiva; at that time, about 6,000 Jews lived in the town, comprising about 20% of the population, in addition to a large number of Jews scattered about another 100 communities in Normandy. The well-preserved remains of the yeshiva were discovered in the 1970s under the Rouen Law Courts, and the community has begun a project to restore them. Centuries: 11th century - 12th century - 13th century Decades: 1050s 1060s 1070s 1080s 1090s - 1100s - 1110s 1120s 1130s 1140s 1150s Years: 1100 1101 1102 1103 1104 1105 1106 1107 1108 1109 Events and Trends 1107 Emperor Toba ascends the throne of Japan The great Buddhist centre of learning at Nalanda is... This article is about the Jewish male educational system. ... For other uses, see Normandy (disambiguation). ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...


On June 24, 1204 Philippe Auguste entered Rouen and definitively annexed Normandy to the French Kingdom. is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... [Neilhughandafriendlypeasant. ... Philip II (French: Philippe II), called Philip Augustus (French: Philippe Auguste) (August 21, 1165 - July 14, 1223), was King of France from 1180 to 1223. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


During the Hundred Years' War, on January 19, 1419, Rouen surrendered to Henry V of England who made Normandy a part of England. Joan of Arc was burned at the stake in Rouen on May 30, 1431. The French recaptured the town in 1449. Combatants France Castile Scotland Genoa Majorca Bohemia Crown of Aragon Brittany England Burgundy Brittany Portugal Navarre Flanders Hainaut Aquitaine Luxembourg Holy Roman Empire The Hundred Years War was a conflict between France and England, lasting 116 years from 1337 to 1453. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 19 – Hundred Years War: Rouen surrenders to Henry V of England which brings Normandy under the control of England. ... Henry V of England (16 September 1387 – 31 August 1422) was one of the great English warrior kings of the Middle Ages. ... For other uses, see Normandy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Joan of Arc (disambiguation). ... Burning of two sodomites at the stake (execution of individuals by fire. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1431 was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ...


The city was heavily damaged during World War II on D-day and its famed cathedral was almost destroyed by Allied bombs. During the Nazi occupation, the German Navy had its headquarters located in a chateau on the École Supérieure de Commerce de Rouen campus. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Land on Normandy In military parlance, D-Day is a term often used to denote the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... German frigate Karlsruhe rescuing shipwrecked people off the coast of Somalia while participating in the international anti-terror operation ENDURING FREEDOM, April 2005 The Laboe Naval Memorial for sailors who lost their lives at sea during the World Wars and while on duty at sea and U 995 Modern air... The École Supérieure de Commerce de Rouen (ESC Rouen or Rouen School of Management in English) is one of the leading business schools in France. ...


Ecclesiastical history

The chapter of Rouen, (which consists of the archbishop, a dean, fifty canons, and ten prebendaries), have, ever since the year 1156, enjoyed the annual privilege of pardoning, on Ascension day, some individual confined within the jurisdiction of the city for murder. On the morning of Ascension day, the chapter, having heard many examinations and confessions read, proceed to the election of the criminal who is to be pardoned; and, the choice being made, his name is transmitted in writing to the parliament, which assemble on that day at the palace. The parliament then walk in procession to the great chamber, where the prisoner is brought before them in irons, and placed on a stool; he is informed that the choice has fallen upon him, and that he is entitled to the privilege of St. Romain. The Archbishop of Rouen is Primate of Normandy and one of the fifteen Archbishops of France. ... Events Prince Yuriy Dolgorukiy fortifies Moscow, regarded as the date of the founding of the city Establishment of the Carmelite Order Hogen Rebellion in Japan January 20 - According to legend, freeholder Lalli slays English crusader Bishop Henry with an axe on the ice of the lake Köyliönjärvi... Also refers to the process of gaining Enlightenment and several meditation techniques. ...


After this form, he is delivered into the hands of the chaplain, who, accompanied by fifty armed men, conveys him to a chamber, where the chains are taken from his legs and bound about his arms; and in this condition he is conducted to a place named the Old Tower, where he awaits the coming of the procession. After some little time has elapsed, the procession sets out from the cathedral; two of the canons bear the shrine in which the relics of St. Romain are presumed to be preserved. When they have arrived at the Old Tower, the shrine is placed in the chapel, opposite to the criminal, who appears kneeling, with the chains on his arms. Then one of the canons, having made him repeat the confession, says the prayers usual at the time of giving absolution; after which service, the prisoner kneeling still, lifts up the shrine three times, amid the acclamations of the people assembled to behold the ceremony. The procession then returns to the cathedral, followed by the criminal, wearing a chaplet of flowers on his head, and carrying the shrine of the saint. After mass has been performed, he has a very serious exhortation addressed to him by a monk; and, lastly, he is conducted to an apartment near the cathedral, and is supplied with refreshments and a bed for that night. In the morning he is dismissed. This privilege was justified by the legend of the Gargouille, a fearsome dragon, and how St. Romain defeated him with the help of a prisoner... The gargouille was a mythological creature originating from France. ...


Sights

Rouen Cathedral
Rouen Cathedral
The entrance to Rouen Cathedral
The entrance to Rouen Cathedral
The Church of Jeanne d'Arc
The Church of Jeanne d'Arc
Abbey church of Saint-Ouen, (chevet) in Rouen
Abbey church of Saint-Ouen, (chevet) in Rouen
Rouen, medieval house
Rouen, medieval house
Rue St-Romain on a rainy day in Rouen
Rue St-Romain on a rainy day in Rouen

Rouen is known for its Notre Dame cathedral, with its Tour de Beurre (butter tower). The cathedral was the subject of a series of paintings by Claude Monet, some of which are exhibited in the Musée d'Orsay in Paris. Image File history File links Cathédrale of Rouen - Photographer Richard Groult (2001) Copyleft : cette Å“uvre est libre, vous pouvez la redistribuer et/ou la modifier selon les termes de la Licence Art Libre. ... Image File history File links Cathédrale of Rouen - Photographer Richard Groult (2001) Copyleft : cette Å“uvre est libre, vous pouvez la redistribuer et/ou la modifier selon les termes de la Licence Art Libre. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 618 KB) The entrance to Rouen Cathedral I attest that I am the copyright holder for this image and I release it for use under the Creative Commons 2. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 618 KB) The entrance to Rouen Cathedral I attest that I am the copyright holder for this image and I release it for use under the Creative Commons 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2048 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2048 pixel, file size: 2. ... Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1141 KB)Abbey church of Saint-Ouen, Rouen, Seine-Maritime/ Photo taken by Urban, December 2004/ GFDL File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1141 KB)Abbey church of Saint-Ouen, Rouen, Seine-Maritime/ Photo taken by Urban, December 2004/ GFDL File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article is about an architectural feature; for the astronomical term see apsis. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 227 KB) Rouen, old house in the city, Seine-Maritime, France / Personal picture of Urban/ GFDL Urban 2004 File links The following pages link to this file: Rouen ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 227 KB) Rouen, old house in the city, Seine-Maritime, France / Personal picture of Urban/ GFDL Urban 2004 File links The following pages link to this file: Rouen ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 380 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (499 × 787 pixel, file size: 119 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Rouen ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 380 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (499 × 787 pixel, file size: 119 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Rouen ... Rouen Cathedral (French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen) is a Gothic cathedral in Rouen, in northwestern France. ... Not to be confused with Édouard Manet, another painter of the same era. ... Vincent Van Gogh: Starry Night Over the Rhone, painted in September 1888 at Arles Pierre-Auguste Renoir: Bal au moulin de la Galette, Montmartre, 1876 Édouard Manet: The Luncheon on the Grass, 1862-3 Gustave Courbet: The Artists Studio (detail), 1855 Paul Cézanne: Apples and Oranges, circa 1899... This article is about the capital of France. ...


The Gros Horloge is an astronomical clock (dating back to the16th century) though the movement is considerably older (1389). It is located in the Gros Horloge street. Prague astronomical clock Astronomical clock in Lund Cathedral An astronomical clock is a clock with special mechanisms and dials to display the relative positions of the sun, moon, zodiacal constellations, and sometimes major planets. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Events February 24 - Margaret I defeats Albert in battle, thus becoming ruler of Denmark, Norway and Sweden June 28 - Battle of Kosovo between Serbs and Ottomans. ...


Other famous structures include the Gothic Church of Saint Maclou (15th century); the Tour Jeanne d'Arc, where Joan of Arc was brought in 1431 to be threatened with torture (contrary to popular belief, she was not imprisoned there); the Church of Saint Ouen (12th15th century); the Palais de Justice, which was once the seat of the Parlement (French court of law) of Normandy and the Museum of Fine Arts and Ceramics which contains a splendid collection of faïence and porcelain for which Rouen was renowned during the 16th to 18th centuries. The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Year 1431 was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Palais de Justice (literally Palace of Justice) is French for Hall of Justice. See: Paris Hall of Justice for the one in Paris. ... This article is for the Ancien Régime institution. ... Faience or faïence is the conventional name in English for fine tin-glazed earthenware on a delicate pale buff body. ... “Fine China” redirects here. ...


Rouen is noted for its surviving half-timbered buildings. Timber framing is the modern term for the traditional half-timbered construction in which timber provides a visible skeletal frame that supports the whole building. ...


There are many museums in Rouen: Musée des beaux-arts de Rouen, an art museum with pictures of well-known painters such as Monet, Musée maritime fluvial et portuaire, a museum on the history of the port of Rouen and navigation, Musée des antiquités, an art and history museum with antic or gothic works, Musée de la céramique, Musée Le Secq des Tournelles... Oscar-Claude Monet (November 14, 1840 - December 5, 1926), French impressionist painter. ... Sulzer Motor of 400 cv and 28 tons which equipped a trawler (1937) The musée maritime fluvial et portuaire de Rouen is about the history of the port of Rouen , which is one the greatest port of France. ...


In the centre of the Place du Vieux Marché is the modern church of Saint Joan of Arc. This is a large, modern structure which dominates the square. The form of the building represents the pyre on which Joan of Arc was burnt. For other uses, see Joan of Arc (disambiguation). ...


Rouen was also home to the French Grand Prix, hosting the race at the nearby Rouen-Les-Essarts track sporadically between 1952 and 1968. The French Grand Prix (Grand Prix de France) is a race held as part of Fédération Internationale de lAutomobiles annual Formula One automobile racing championships. ... Rouen-les-Essarts as it looked between 1955 and 1970. ... The 1952 Formula One season was the 3rd FIA Formula One World Championship season. ... Season Summary Season Review 1968 Constructors Championship final standings 1968 Drivers Championship final standings Categories: Formula One seasons ...


Transport

Rouen is served by a light rail system opened in 1994, the Métro. It branches into two lines out of a metro tunnel running through the city center. Rouen is also served by buses run in conjunction with the tramway by the local transport authority, Metrobus. This article is about light rail systems in general. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... The Tramway de Rouen was a network of tramway lines in the Norman city of Rouen, France. ... Autobus redirects here. ... Metrobus may refer to: MCW Metrobus, a bus model manufactured by MCW in the 1970s and 1980s. ...


Education

Higher education in Rouen is provided by University of Rouen, École Supérieure de Commerce de Rouen, located at nearby Mont-Saint-Aignan, INSA ROUEN and ESIGELEC. The École Supérieure de Commerce de Rouen The École Supérieure de Commerce de Rouen (ESC Rouen or Rouen School of Management in English) is a leading French business school. ... Mont-Saint-Aignan is a town of Normandy in northwestern France. ...


Births

Rouen was the birthplace of:

The text below is generated by a template, which has been proposed for deletion. ... Events The community of Rauma, Finland was granted its town rights. ... Events The São Tomé settlement is founded. ... Isaac Oliver c. ... Events February 27 - The Treaty of Berwick, which would expel the French from Scotland, is signed by England and the Congregation of Scotland The first tulip bulb was brought from Turkey to the Netherlands. ... Events Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed I (1603-1617) to Mustafa I (1617-1623). ... Some links to this page should perhaps link to miniature (illuminated manuscript). ... Samuel Bochart (30 May 1599 - 16 May 1667) was a French scholar born in Rouen. ... Year 1599 was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... // Events January 20 - Poland cedes Kyiv, Smolensk, and eastern Ukraine to Russia in the Treaty of Andrusovo that put a final end to the Deluge, and Poland lost its status as a Central European power. ... Theology is literally rational discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, rational discourse). By extension, it also refers to the study of other religious topics. ... Orientalism is the study of Near and Far Eastern societies and cultures, by Westerners. ... Pierre Corneille. ... Events January 27 - The trial of Guy Fawkes and other conspirators begins ending in their execution on January 31 May 17 - Supporters of Vasili Shusky invade the Kremlin and kill Premier Dmitri December 26 - Shakespeares King Lear performed in court Storm buries a village of St Ismails near... Events France under Louis XIV makes Truce of Ratisbon separately with the Empire and Spain. ... For other uses, see Tragedy (disambiguation). ... Adrien Auzout ( January 28th, 1622– May 23rd, 1691) was a French astronomer. ... Events January 1 - In the Gregorian calendar, January 1 is declared as the first day of the year, instead of March 25. ... Events March 5 - French troops under Marshal Louis-Francois de Boufflers besiege the Spanish-held town of Mons March 20 - Leislers Rebellion - New governor arrives in New York - Jacob Leisler surrenders after standoff of several hours March 29 - Siege of Mons ends to the city’s surrender May 6... Galileo is often referred to as the Father of Modern Astronomy. ... Thomas Corneille at the age of 81 Thomas Corneille (August 20, 1625 - December 8, 1709) was a French dramatist. ... Events March 27 - Prince Charles Stuart becomes King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... // Events January 12 - Two-month freezing period begins in France - The coast of the Atlantic and Seine River freeze, crops fail and at least 24. ... A dramatist is an author of dramatic compositions, usually plays. ... Noel Alexandre (1630-August 21st, 1724) was a French theologian and ecclesiastical historian, born in Rouen, France. ... Events February 22 - Native American Quadequine introduces Popcorn to English colonists. ... Events January 14 - King Philip V of Spain abdicates the throne February 20 - The premiere of Giulio Cesare, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel, takes place in London June 23 - Treaty of Constantinople signed. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Marie Champmeslé (18 February 1642 - 15 May 1698) was a French actress. ... Events January 4 - Charles I attempts to arrest five leading members of the Long Parliament, but they escape. ... Events January 4 - Palace of Whitehall in London is destroyed by fire. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Engraving of Cavelier de La Salle A later engraving of Robert de LaSalle Memorial Plaque to de La Salle in Rouen René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, or Robert de LaSalle (November 22, 1643 – March 19, 1687) was a French explorer. ... // Events January 21 - Abel Tasman discovers Tonga February 6 - Abel Tasman discovers the Fiji islands. ... Events March 19 - The men under explorer Robert Cavelier de La Salle murder him while searching for the mouth of the Mississippi River. ... This list of explorers is sorted by surname. ... Gabriel Daniel (February 8, 1649 - 1728), French Jesuit historian, was born at Rouen. ... // Events January 30 - King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland is beheaded. ... Events Astronomical aberration discovered by the astronomer James Bradley Swedish academy of sciences founded at Uppsala The founding of the University of Havana (Universidad de la Habana), Cubas most well-established university. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... For other uses, see Historian (disambiguation). ... Nicolas Lémery (November 17, 1645-June 19, 1715) French chemist, was born at Rouen. ... // Events January 10 - Archbishop Laud executed on Tower Hill, London. ... Year 1715 (MDCCXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Jean-Baptiste Jouvenet (1647 - April 5, 1717) was a French painter He came from an artistic family, one of whom Noel Jouvenet may have taught Nicolas Poussin. ... 1647 (MDCXLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... // Events January 4 — The Netherlands, Britain & France sign Triple Alliance February 26-March 6 What is now the northeastern United States was paralyzed by a series of blizzards that buried the region. ... This entry concerns French artists working in visual or plastic media (plus, for some artists of the 20th century, performance art). Please go elsewhere for information on French literature, French music, French Cinema and French Culture. ... Jacques Basnages De Beauval (1653 - September 23, 1723) was a celebrated Protestant divine, born at Rouen; distinguished as a linguist and man of affairs; wrote a History of the Reformed Churches and on Jewish Antiquities. ... Events February 2 - New Amsterdam (later renamed New York City) is incorporated. ... Events February 16 - Louis XV of France attains his majority Births February 24 - John Burgoyne, British general (d. ... For other uses of Fontenelle, see Fontenelle (disambiguation). ... Events January 8 - Miles Sindercombe, would-be-assassin of Oliver Cromwell, and his group are captured in London February - Admiral Robert Blake defeats the Spanish West Indian Fleet in a battle over the seizure of Jamaica. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Pierre Antoine Motteux (or Peter Motteux, February 25, 1663 - February 18, 1718), English translator and dramatist, of French parentage, was born at Rouen. ... Year 1663 (MDCLXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1718 (MDCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Look up Translator in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Pierre François le Courayer (November 17, 1681 - October 17, 1776), was a French Catholic theological writer. ... Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... François dAgincourt [also dAgincour, Dagincourt, Dagincour] (Rouen, 1684 - April 30, 1758) was a French composer, harpsichordist and organist. ... Events France under Louis XIV makes Truce of Ratisbon separately with the Empire and Spain. ... Year 1758 (MDCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... A harpsichordist is a person who plays the harpsichord. ... An organist is a musician who plays any type of organ. ... Jean Restout (26 March 1692 - 1 January 1768) was a French Neoclassical painter, born in Rouen, was the son of Jean Restout, the first of that name, and of Marie M. Jouvenet, sister and pupil of the then well-known Jean Jouvenet. ... Events February 13 - Massacre of Glencoe March 1 - The Salem witch trials begin in Salem Village, Massachusetts Bay Colony with the charging of three women with witchcraft. ... 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Jeanne Marie Leprince de Beaumont French novelist, (Rouen, 1711-Chavanod, Savoy, 1780). ... 1711 (MDCCXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Jacques-François Blondel (January 17, 1705-January 9, 1774) was a French architect. ... // Events Construction begins on Blenheim Palace, in Oxfordshire, England. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... Urban, city, or town planning, deals with design of the built environment from the municipal and metropolitan perspective. ... Jacques Duphly (January 12, 1715 - July 15, 1789) was a French harpsichordist and composer. ... Year 1715 (MDCCXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Harpsichord in the Flemish style A harpsichord is a musical instrument played by means of a keyboard. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... François-Adrien Boieldieu (December 16, 1775 – October 8, 1834) was a French composer, mainly of operas. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... Pierre Louis Dulong (February 12, 1785 - July 19, 1838) was a French physicist and chemist. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... A chemist pours from a round-bottom flask. ... Monument at Gericaults tomb. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Raft of the Medusa is the name applied to an infamous catastrophic shipwreck of the French ship Medusa (original French name: La Méduse) in 1816 in the Atlantic Ocean off the west coast of Africa. ... Jean-Baptiste Nicolas Armand Carrel (May 8, 1800 _ July 25, 1836) was a French writer. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Pierre Adolphe Chéruel (January 17, 1809 - May 1, 1891), was a French historian. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Historian (disambiguation). ... Gustave Flaubert Gustave Flaubert (December 12, 1821 – May 8, 1880) was a French writer who is counted among the greatest Western novelists. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... For the film, see Madame Bovary (1949 film) Madame Bovary is a novel by Gustave Flaubert that was attacked for obscenity by public prosecutors when it was first serialised in La Revue de Paris between 1 October 1856 and 15 December 1856, resulting in a trial in January 1857 that... Eugène Ketterer (1831 Rouen, France - 1870 Paris) was a French composer and pianist. ... Maurice Leblanc Maurice Leblanc Maurice-marie-émile Leblanc (11 December 1864 - 6 November 1941) was a French novelist and writer of short stories, known primarily as the creator of the fictional gentleman thief and detective Arsène Lupin, often described as a French counterpart to Conan Doyles creation Sherlock... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Arsène Lupin is the name of a fictional gentleman thief who appears in a book series of detective fiction / crime fiction novels written by French writer Maurice Leblanc, as well as a number of non-canonical sequels and numerous film, television, stage play and comic book adaptations. ... Dr. Charles Jules Henry Nicolle (September 21, 1866 - February 28, 1936) was a bacteriologist who earned the 1928 Nobel Prize in Medicine for his identification of lice as the transmitter of epidemic typhus. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Microbiology (in Greek micron = small and biologia = studying life) is the study of microorganisms, including unicellular (single-celled) eukaryotes and prokaryotes, fungi, and viruses. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physiology or Medicine from 1901 to the present day. ... Georges Charles Guillain (March 3, 1876 - June 29, 1961) was a French neurologist. ... Year 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) // January 31 - United States orders all Indigenous peoples in the United States to move onto reservations February 2 - The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs of Major League Baseball is formed. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Neurology is the branch of medicine that deals with the nervous system and disorders affecting it. ... Marcel Dupré Marcel Dupré (May 3, 1886–May 30, 1971), was a French organist, pianist, composer, and pedagogue. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... An organist is a musician who plays any type of organ. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Philippe Étancelin, born December 29, 1896 - died October 13, 1981, was a French Grand Prix motor racing driver who joined the new Formula One circuit at its inception. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Grand Prix motor racing has its roots in organised automobile racing that began in France as far back as 1894. ... Roger Apéry (1916 - 1994) was a French mathematician most remembered for Apérys theorem, to the effect that ζ(3) is an irrational number where ζ denotes the Riemann zeta function. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Jacques Rivette (born March 1, 1928) is a French film director. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Director Herbert Brenon with actress Alla Nazimova on the set of War Brides, 1916 A director is a person who directs the making of a film. ... Stéphan Caron (born July 1, 1966 in Rouen, Seine-Maritime) is a former freestyle swimmer from France, whos name is sometimes also spelled as Stéphane Caron. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Freestyle is one of the official swimming competitions according to the rules of FINA. However, it is technically not a style, as there are very few regulations about the way freestyle has to be swum. ... Swimming is the method by which humans (or other animals) move themselves through water. ... Vincent Delerm (born August 31, 1976) is a French singer-songwriter and composer. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... David Sergio Trezeguet (IPA: []) (born 15 October 1977 in Rouen, France) is a French-Argentine football striker who plays for Juventus and France. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Strikers, also known as forwards and attackers, and formerly inside forwards, are the players on a team in football in the row nearest to the opposing teams goal, who are therefore principally responsible for scoring goals. ... Guillaume Couture (or Cousture) (1617-April 4, 1701) was a citizen of New France. ... Events Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed I (1603-1617) to Mustafa I (1617-1623). ... Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Twin towns

Rouen is twinned with:

Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... , Hanover(i) (German: , IPA: ), on the river Leine, is the capital of the federal state of Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... For other places with the same name, see Norwich (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Ningbo (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ning-po; literally Tranquil Waves) is a seaport sub-provincial city with a population of 1,219,900 in northeastern Zhejiang province, Peoples Republic of China. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Salerno is a town in Campania, south-western Italy, the capital of the province of the same name. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... Wejherowo (Kashubian/Pomeranian: Wejrowò, German: formerly Neustadt in Westpreußen), is a town in Eastern Pomerania, northern Poland, with 47,000 inhabitants (1 October 2006). ...

In fiction and popular culture

Fine Art

Rouen Cathedral, Full Sunlight, by Claude Monet, 1894

Download high resolution version (559x874, 55 KB)Rouen Cathedral, Full Sunlight, by Claude Monet, 1894. ... Download high resolution version (559x874, 55 KB)Rouen Cathedral, Full Sunlight, by Claude Monet, 1894. ... Not to be confused with Édouard Manet, another painter of the same era. ... Claude Monet painted a series of paintings of the Rouen Cathedral. ... This article is about the art movement. ... Not to be confused with Édouard Manet, another painter of the same era. ... The West building of the National Gallery of Art with the East building visible behind and to to the left The National Gallery of Art is an art museum, located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. The museum was established in 1937 by the Congress, with funds for... ... The National Museum (Serbian: Народни музеј/Narodni Muzej) in Belgrade, Serbia was founded in 1844. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ...

Literature

Rouen also played a major part in the Flaubert novel "Madame Bovary." Gaston Leroux. ... This article is about the Gaston Leroux novel. ...


Music

This article is about the type of musical group. ... For the witnesses who betray information about associated criminals, see Supergrass (informer). ... Road to Rouen is the fifth studio album by British rock band Supergrass, released in the UK on 15 August 2005 (see 2005 in music). ...

Film

  • In the 2001 movie A Knight's Tale, the protagonist William Thatcher played by Heath Ledger poses as a noble and competes in his first jousting tournament at Rouen.

Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Heath Andrew Ledger (April 4, 1979 – January 22, 2008) was an Academy Award, BAFTA, Golden Globe, and SAG Award-nominated Australian-born film actor who lived in New York City. ...

Computer games

  • The game Call of Duty 3 features a map set in Rouen. The map, entitled Rouen, is mainly city and offers fierce city fighting, much like that seen in World War II.
  • In the Soul Calibur series of fighting games, Raphael, a playable character, is explained as being born in Rouen. Interestingly, his fighting style involves an English rapier.
  • Rouen appears as an important location to protagonist Alice Elliot in the game Shadow Hearts.

Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Raphael Sorel ) is a fictional character designed for the Soul Series of fighting games. ... For the UK Surface-to-air missile system, see Rapier missile. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Saint Ouen (609 in Sancy close to Soissons, France - 686 in Clichy, France), Dado to his contemporaries lived at the court of Clotaire II and Dagobert I. He was the constant companion of Saint Eligius, whose vita he wrote, and was consecrated bishop of Rouen in 640. ...

External links

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... In France, a préfecture is the administrative town of a département. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Strasburg. ... Elsaß redirects here. ... For other uses, see Bordeaux (disambiguation). ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Dordogne Gironde Landes Lot-et-Garonne Pyrénées-Atlantiques Arrondissements 18 Cantons 235 Communes 2,296 Statistics Land area1 41,308 km² Population (Ranked 6th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Clermont-Ferrand is a city of France, in the Auvergne region, with a population of approximately 140,000. ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Clermont-Ferrand Regional President René Souchon (PS) (since 2006) Departments Allier Cantal Haute-Loire Puy-de-Dôme Arrondissements 14 Cantons 158 Communes 1,310 Statistics Land area1 26,013 km² Population (Ranked 19th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Dijon ( , IPA: ) is a city in eastern France, the préfecture (administrative capital) of the Côte-dOr département and of the Bourgogne région. ... (Région flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Yonne Côte-dOr Nièvre Saône-et-Loire Arrondissements 15 Cantons 174 Communes 2,045 Statistics Land area1 31,582 km² Population (Ranked 16th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... For other uses, see Rennes (disambiguation). ... (Région flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Rennes Regional President Jean-Yves Le Drian (PS) (since 2004) Departments Côtes-dArmor Ille-et-Vilaine Morbihan Finistère Arrondissements 15 Cantons 201 Communes 1,268 Statistics Land area1 27,208 km² Population (Ranked 7th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Orléans (Latin, meaning golden) is a city and commune in north-central France, about 130 km (80 miles) southwest of Paris. ... Châlons-en-Champagne is a city and commune in France. ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Aube Ardennes Haute-Marne Marne Arrondissements 15 Cantons 146 Communes 1,947 Statistics Land area1 25,606 km² Population (Ranked 18th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Ajaccio (IPA: , Latin: ; French: ; Corsican: ), is a town in France. ... For other uses, see Corsica (disambiguation). ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Utinam (Latin: If God wills) Citadel Vauban of Besançon Location Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Franche-Comté Department Doubs (25) Intercommunality Grand Besançon Mayor Jean-Louis Fousseret (PS) (since 2001) City Statistics Land area¹ 65. ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Doubs Haute-Saône Jura Territoire de Belfort Arrondissements 8 Cantons 116 Communes 1,786 Statistics Land area1 16,202 km² Population (Ranked 20th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Essonne Hauts-de-Seine Paris Seine-Saint-Denis Seine-et-Marne Val-de-Marne Val-dOise Yvelines Arrondissements 25 Cantons 317 Communes 1,281 Statistics Land area1 12,012 km² Population (Ranked 1st)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Montpellier (Occitan Montpelhièr) is a city in the south of France. ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Aude Gard Hérault Lozère Pyrénées-Orientales Arrondissements 14 Cantons 186 Communes 1,545 Statistics Land area1 27,376 km² Population (Ranked 10th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... This article is about the French commune. ... This article is about the modern French region of Limousin. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Si paix dedans, paix dehors (French: If peace inside, peace outside) Cathedral St. ... (Région flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Meurthe-et-Moselle Meuse Moselle Vosges Arrondissements 19 Cantons 157 Communes 2,337 Statistics Land area1 23,547 km² Population (Ranked 11th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... New city flag (Occitan cross) Traditional coat of arms Motto: (Occitan: For Toulouse, always more) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Midi-Pyrénées Department Haute-Garonne (31) Intercommunality Community of Agglomeration of Greater Toulouse Mayor Jean-Luc Moudenc  (UMP) (since 2004) City Statistics Land... (Region flag) (Occitan cross) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Ariège Aveyron Gers Haute-Garonne Hautes-Pyrénées Lot Tarn Tarn-et-Garonne Arrondissements 22 Cantons 293 Communes 3,020 Statistics Land area1 45,348 km² Population (Ranked 8th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... For other uses, see Lille (disambiguation). ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Nord Pas-de-Calais Arrondissements 13 Cantons 156 Communes 1,546 Statistics Land area1 12,414 km² Population (Ranked 4th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... , Caen (pronounced ) is a commune of northwestern France. ... Capital Caen Land area¹ 17,589 km² Regional President Philippe Duron (PS) (since 2004) Population  - Jan. ... Capital Rouen Land area¹ 12,318 km² Regional President Alain Le Vern (PS) (since 1998) Population  - Jan. ... Traditional city flag City coat of arms Motto: Favet Neptunus eunti (Latin: Shall Neptune favour the traveller) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Pays de la Loire Department Loire-Atlantique (44) Mayor Jean-Marc Ayrault  (PS) (since 1989) City Statistics Land area¹ 65. ... Capital Nantes Land area¹ 32,082 km² Regional President Jacques Auxiette (PS) (since 2004) Population  - Jan. ... Amiens is a city and commune in the north of France, 120 km north of Paris. ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Amiens Regional President Claude Gewerc (PS) (since 2004) Departments Aisne Oise Somme Arrondissements 13 Cantons 129 Communes 2,292 Statistics Land area1 19,399 km² Population (Ranked 12th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Location within France Poitiers (population 85,000) is a small city located in west central France. ... Categories: Stub | Regions of France ... City flag Coat of arms Motto: By her great deeds, the city of Massilia shines The Old Port of Marseille Location Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (13) Subdivisions 16 arrondissements (in 8 secteurs) Intercommunality Urban... (Région flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Alpes-de-Haute-Provence Alpes-Maritimes Bouches-du-Rhône Hautes-Alpes Var Vaucluse Arrondissements 18 Cantons 237 Communes 963 Statistics Land area1 31,400 km² Population (Ranked 3rd)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... This article is about the French city. ... (Région flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Lyon Regional President Jean-Jack Queyranne (PS) (since 2004) Departments Ain Ardèche Drôme Isère Loire Rhône Savoie Haute-Savoie Arrondissements 25 Cantons 335 Communes 2,879 Statistics Land area1 43,698 km² Population (Ranked 2nd)  - January 1, 2006... Overseas region (French: Région doutre-mer), is a recent designation given to the overseas departments which have similar powers to those of the regions of metropolitan France. ... Cayenne is the capital of the French overseas région of French Guiana. ... Basse-Terre Island (top) from space, September 1994 Basse-Terre is the name of the western of the two largest islands of Guadeloupe. ... Fort-de-France is the capital of Frances Caribbean département doutre-mer of Martinique. ... Saint-Denis de la Réunion, (or just Saint-Denis or St-Denis for short) is the préfecture (administrative capital) of the French overseas département Réunion. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Rouen (2684 words)
Archdiocese of Rouen was curtailed in 1802 by giving the Archdeanery of Pontoise to the Diocese of Versailles; the Deaneries of Pont Audemer and Bourgtheroulde, and a part of the Deanery of Périer, to the Diocese of Evreux; several parishes of the Deanery of Aumale were annexed to the Diocese of Beauvais.
Rouen, is one of the finest specimens of calligraphy of the Middle Ages.
Rouen in 1666 by the Minim Barré and the priest Antoine de Lahaye, and the Sisters of the
Rouen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1031 words)
It is in Rouen that the English burnt Joan of Arc in 1431.
Rouen and 36 suburban communes of the metropolitan area form the Community of Agglomeration of Rouen Haute-Normandie, with 393,621 inhabitants in it at the 1999 census.
Rouen was the chief city of the Secunda Provincia Lugdunensis under Constantine.
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