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Encyclopedia > Ross Ice Shelf
Ross Ice Shelf in 1997.
Ross Ice Shelf in 1997.
Crevasse, Ross Ice Shelf in 2001.
Crevasse, Ross Ice Shelf in 2001.

The Ross Ice Shelf (81°30′S, 175°00′W) is the largest ice shelf of Antarctica (an area of roughly 487 000 km², and about 800 km across: about the size of Spain). It is several hundred meters thick. The nearly vertical ice front to the open sea is more than 600 km long, and between 15 and 50 meters high above the water surface. 90 percent of the floating ice, however, is below the water surface. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 521 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,536 × 1,000 pixels, file size: 923 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A CrevasseRoss Ice Shelf in Ross Sea Photograped by Mila Zinkova in January of 2001 File historyClick on a date/time to view the... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 521 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,536 × 1,000 pixels, file size: 923 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A CrevasseRoss Ice Shelf in Ross Sea Photograped by Mila Zinkova in January of 2001 File historyClick on a date/time to view the... Measuring snowpack in a crevasse on the Easton Glacier, North Cascades, USA A crevasse is a crack or fissure in a glacier or snow field. ... Ross Ice Shelf An ice shelf is a thick, floating platform of ice that forms where a glacier or ice sheet flows down to a coastline and onto the ocean surface. ...


Most of Ross Ice Shelf is located within the Ross Dependency claimed by New Zealand. Political status Dependency of New Zealand Governor Anand Satyanand Area   – Total  450 000 km² (174 000 mi²) Population Scott Base: 10-80 seasonally McMurdo Station: 200-1000 seasonally Currency New Zealand dollar The Ross Dependency comprises an area of Antarctica (and other land masses in the Southern Ocean) claimed by...


The ice shelf was named after Captain James Clark Ross who discovered it on January 28, 1841. It was originally named the Ice Barrier as it prevented sailing further south. Ross mapped the ice front eastward to 160°W. Sir James Clark Ross (April 15, 1800 – April 3, 1862), was a British naval officer and explorer. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The Ross Ice Shelf acquired a grimmer reputation in 1912, when it became the final resting place of Antarctic explorer Robert Falcon Scott and his party. Territorial claims of Antarctica List of Antarctica expeditions is a chronological list of expeditions involving Antarctica. ... Scott of the Antarctic redirects here. ...

Contents

Overview

On the 5th of January 1841, a British Admiralty team in the Erebus and the Terror, three masted ships with specially strengthened wooden hulls, was going through the pack ice of the Pacific near Antarctica in an attempt to determine the position of the South Magnetic Pole. Four days later, they found their way into open water and were hoping that they would have a clear passage to their destination; but on January 11, the men were faced with an enormous mass of ice. is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... HMS Erebus was a Hecla-class bomb vessel constructed by the Royal Navy in Pembroke Dockyard, Wales in 1826. ... HMS Terror in the Arctic HMS Terror was a bomb vessel designed by Sir Henry Peake and constructed by the Royal Navy in the Davy shipyard in Topsham, Devon. ... mizzen mast, mainmast and foremast Grand Turk The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ... A hull is the body or frame of a ship or boat. ...


Sir James Clark Ross, who was the expedition's leader, remarked: '"Well, there's no more chance of sailing through that than through the cliffs of Dover".' Ross, who in 1831 had located the North Magnetic Pole, spent the next two years vainly searching for a sea passage to the South Pole; later, his name was given to the ice shelf and the sea surrounding it. Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Part of the Carta Marina of 1539 by Olaus Magnus, depicting the location of magnetic north vaguely conceived as Insula Magnetu[m] (Latin for Magnetic Island) off modern day Murmansk. ...


The Ross Ice Shelf is about the size of France, and reaches into Antarctica from the south. The ice mass is about 500 miles (800 km) wide and 600 miles (970km) long. In some places, namely its southern areas, the ice shelf can be almost 2,450 ft (750 m) thick. The Ross Ice Shelf pushes out into the sea at the rate of between 5ft (1.5 m) and 10 ft (3 m) a day. There are other glaciers that gradually adds bulk to it. At the same time, the freezing of seawater below the ice mass increases the thickness of the ice from 15 in (38 cm) to 20 in (51 cm). Sometimes, fissures and cracks may cause the shelf to break off; the largest known is about 12,000 square miles (31,000 km²), that is slightly larger than the size of Belgium. A mile is any of several units of distance, or, in physics terminology, of length. ... This article is about a foot as a unit of length. ... Austrias longest glacier, the Pasterze, winds its 8 km (5 mile) route at the foot of Austrias highest mountain, the Grossglockner A glacier is a large, long-lasting river of ice that is formed on land and moves in response to gravity. ... In physics and chemistry, freezing is the process whereby a liquid turns to a solid. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Fissure is a groove, natural division, deep furrow, or cleft found in the brain, spinal cord, and liver; or an unnatural tract found most commonly in the anus. ...


Ross Ice Shelf in popular culture

For centuries the shelf's southern areas remain undiscovered and unexplored, although the ancient Greeks came to a conclusion that there must be a large southern landmass to balance the northern landmass of Eurasia. This belief was portrayed in all early European maps; the famous Dutch map maker Mercator (1512-1595) showed a gigantic island around the South Pole which he named Terra Australis Incognita, despite the fact that, in 1578, Sir Francis Drake who was forced to the south by violent storms, saw no signs of the mythical continent. For other uses, see Eurasia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see South Pole (disambiguation). ... Terra Australis is the large continent on the bottom of the map Terra Australis (more completely Terra Australis Incognita, (the) unknown southern land) was an imaginary continent, appearing on European maps from the fifteenth to the eighteenth century. ... Sir Francis Drake, c. ...


The first section of stage 3 of the Capcom videogame Strider 2 (arcade/PlayStation) takes place on the Ross Ice Shelf. For the original NASA meaning, see capsule communicator. ... This article is about the 1999 Capcom-produced sequel to Strider. ... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ...


See also

This is a list of glaciers: Adams Glacier Vatnajokull Iceland Agassiz Icecap - Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, Canada Aletsch Glacier - Swiss Alps, largest in Alps Angel Glacier - Cavell Meadows, Jasper National Park, Canada Antarctica -Continental glacier Athabasca Glacier - Canadian Rockies Aurora Glacier - Glacier Bay, Alaska Austfonna - Nordaustlandet, Svalbard Barnard Glacier - Alaska Beardmore...

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