FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Rose Schneiderman
Rose Schneiderman
Born April 6, 1882
Poland
Died August 11, 1972
Occupation U.S. labor union leader

Rose Schneiderman (April 6, 1882August 11, 1972) was a prominent United States labor union leader and socialist of the first part of the twentieth century. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... April 6 is the 96th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (97th in leap years). ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... A trade union or labor union is a continuous association of wage-earners for the purpose of maintaining or improving the conditions of their employment. ... April 6 is the 96th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (97th in leap years). ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... A trade union or labor union is a continuous association of wage-earners for the purpose of maintaining or improving the conditions of their employment. ... Socialism refers to a broad array of doctrines or political movements that envisage a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community. ...

Contents

Early years

Born in either Saven or Chelm, Poland under Russian rule, she and her family emigrated to the United States in 1890. Her father died two years later, forcing her mother to place her in an orphanage for more than a year. Chełm is a town in eastern Poland with 68,595 inhabitants (2004). ... 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ...


Schneiderman went to work in 1895, first as a cashier in a department store and then in 1898 as a lining stitcher in a cap factory in New York City's Lower East Side. In 1902 she and the rest of her family moved briefly to Montreal, where she developed an interest in both radical politics and trade unionism. 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... New York, NY redirects here. ... Categories: Manhattan neighborhoods | Stub ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (salvation through harmony) Coordinates: Country Canada Province Quebec Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ...


She returned to New York in 1903 and, with a fellow worker, started organizing the women in her factory. When they applied for a charter to the United Cloth Hat and Cap Makers Union, the union told them to come back after they had succeeded in organizing twenty five women. They did that within days and the union then chartered its first women's local. 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ...


Schneiderman obtained wider recognition during a citywide capmakers' strike in 1905. Elected secretary of her local and a delegate to the New York City Central Labor Union, she came into contact with the New York Women's Trade Union League, an organization that lent moral and financial support to the organizing efforts of women workers. She quickly became one of the most prominent members, elected the New York branch's vice president in 1908. She left the factory to work for the league, attending school with a stipend provided by one of the League's wealthy supporters. She was an active participant in the Uprising of the 20,000, the massive strike of shirtwaist workers in New York City led by the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union in 1909. 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Womens Trade Union League was an organization of both working class and more well-off women formed in 1903 to support the efforts of women to organize labor unions and to eliminate sweatshop conditions. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The New York shirtwaist strike of 1909, also known as the Uprising of the 20,000, was a labor strike primarily involving Jewish women working in New York shirtwaist factories. ... The International Ladies Garment Workers Union was once one of the largest labor unions in the United States, one of the first U.S. unions to have a primarily female membership, and a key player in the labor history of the 1920s and 1930s. ...


Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire

The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in 1911, in which more than 100 garment workers were burned alive or died jumping from the ninth floor of a factory building, dramatized the conditions that Schneiderman, the WTUL and the union movement were fighting. The WTUL had documented similar unsafe conditions — factories without fire escapes or that had locked the exit doors to keep workers from stealing materials — at dozens of sweatshops in New York City and surrounding communities; twenty-five workers had died in a similar sweatshop fire in Newark, New Jersey shortly before the Triangle disaster. Schneiderman expressed her anger at the memorial meeting held in the Metropolitan Opera House on April 2, 1911 to an audience largely made up of the well-heeled members of the WTUL: The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City on March 25, 1911, was the largest industrial disaster in the history of the city of New York, causing the death of 146 garment workers who either died in the fire or jumped to their deaths. ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Nickname: The Brick City Map of Newark in Essex County Coordinates: County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]    - City 67. ...

I would be a traitor to these poor burned bodies if I came here to talk good fellowship. We have tried you good people of the public and we have found you wanting. The old Inquisition had its rack and its thumbscrews and its instruments of torture with iron teeth. We know what these things are today; the iron teeth are our necessities, the thumbscrews are the high-powered and swift machinery close to which we must work, and the rack is here in the firetrap structures that will destroy us the minute they catch on fire.
This is not the first time girls have been burned alive in the city. Every week I must learn of the untimely death of one of my sister workers. Every year thousands of us are maimed. The life of men and women is so cheap and property is so sacred. There are so many of us for one job it matters little if 146 of us are burned to death.
We have tried you citizens; we are trying you now, and you have a couple of dollars for the sorrowing mothers, brothers and sisters by way of a charity gift. But every time the workers come out in the only way they know to protest against conditions which are unbearable the strong hand of the law is allowed to press down heavily upon us.
Public officials have only words of warning to us – warning that we must be intensely peaceable, and they have the workhouse just back of all their warnings. The strong hand of the law beats us back, when we rise, into the conditions that make life unbearable.
I can't talk fellowship to you who are gathered here. Too much blood has been spilled. I know from my experience it is up to the working people to save themselves. The only way they can save themselves is by a strong working-class movement.

Rose Schneidermann, Needs citation.

Pre-1920 poster for a Rose Schneidermann event.
Pre-1920 poster for a Rose Schneidermann event.

Despite her harsh words, Schneiderman continued working in the WTUL as an organizer, returning to it after a frustrating year on the staff of the male-dominated ILGWU. She subsequently became president of its New York branch, then its national president for more than twenty years until it disbanded in 1950. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


She also served on the National Recovery Administration’s Labor Advisory Board in the 1930s, was a member of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's "brain trust" during that decade, and worked as secretary of the New York State Department of Labor from 1937 to 1944. She was a founding member of the American Civil Liberties Union, active in the American Labor Party in the 1930s and a close associate of Eleanor Roosevelt, who joined the WTUL in 1922. NRA Blue Eagle poster. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is a major American non-profit organization with headquarters in New York City, whose stated mission is to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed to every person in this country by the Constitution and laws of the United States.[1] It... The American Labor Party was a socialist political party in the United States active almost exclusively in the state of New York. ... Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American political leader who used her stature as First Lady of the United States from 1933 to 1945 to promote her husbands (Franklin D. Roosevelts) New Deal, as well as civil rights. ...


Women's suffrage

Schneiderman was an active feminist, campaigning for women's suffrage as a member of the National American Women Suffrage Association and running for the United States Senate as the candidate of the Farmer Labor Party in 1920, receiving just 15,086 votes and finishing behind Prohibitionist Ella A. Boole (159,623 votes) and Socialist Jacob Panken, (151,246).[1] Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... Farmer-Labor Party was a political party of Minnesota. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1920 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of Warren G. Harding as President. ... National Prohibition Convention, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1892. ... Ella Alexander Boole (July 26, 1858 - March 13, 1952) was a U.S. temperance leader. ... The Socialist Party of America (SPA) is a socialist political party in the United States. ...


Schneiderman saw suffrage as part and parcel of her fight for economic rights. When a state legislator warned in 1912 that "Get women into the arena of politics with its alliances and distressing contests--the delicacy is gone, the charm is gone, and you emasculize women", Schneiderman replied: 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

We have women working in the foundries, stripped to the waist, if you please, because of the heat. Yet the Senator says nothing about these women losing their charm. They have got to retain their charm and delicacy and work in foundries. Of course, you know the reason they are employed in foundries is that they are cheaper and work longer hours than men. Women in the laundries, for instance, stand for 13 or 14 hours in the terrible steam and heat with their hands in hot starch. Surely these women won't lose any more of their beauty and charm by putting a ballot in a ballot box once a year than they are likely to lose standing in foundries or laundries all year round. There is no harder contest than the contest for bread, let me tell you that.

Rose Schneidermann, Needs citation.

She helped pass the New York state referendum in 1917 that gave women the right to vote. On the other hand, Schneiderman opposed passage of the Equal Rights Amendment to the United States Constitution proposed by the National Woman's Party on the ground that it would deprive working women of the special statutory protections for which the WTUL had fought so hard. Year 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution that was intended to guarantee equal rights under the law for Americans regardless of gender. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Constitution of the United States of America Page one of the original copy of the Constitution. ... NWP members picket the White House in 1917, the banner reads Mr. ...


Legacy

Schneiderman is also credited with coining one of the most memorable phrases of the women's movement and the labor movement of her era:

What the woman who labors wants is the right to live, not simply exist — the right to life as the rich woman has the right to life, and the sun and music and art. You have nothing that the humblest worker has not a right to have also. The worker must have bread, but she must have roses, too. Help, you women of privilege, give her the ballot to fight with.

Rose Schneidermann, Needs citation.

Her phrase "Bread and Roses", became associated with a 1912 textile strike of largely immigrant, largely women workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts. The slogan Bread and Roses originated in the strike of women textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts in 1912. ... Massachusetts militiamen with fixed bayonets surround a parade of peaceful strikers Flyer distributed in Lawrence, September 1912 The Lawrence textile strike was a strike of immigrant workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts in 1912 led by the Industrial Workers of the World. ...   Settled: 1655 â€“ Incorporated: 1847 Zip Code(s): 01840 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Schneiderman was a close personal and working associate of Maud O'Farrell Swartz, another working class woman active in the WTUL, until Swartz' death in 1937. As Schneiderman noted in a letter to a fellow WTUL member, 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...

Maud and I are still at it in the world of labor where struggle goes on unendingly and often we have to fight to regain what we lost. Progress is slow, especially where women are concerned.

Rose Schneidermann, Needs citation.

Schneiderman published her memoirs, All for One, in 1967.


External links

Portal:Organized Labour
Organized Labour Portal

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

References

  1. ^ Johnson, Willis Fletcher; Roscoe C. E. (Roscoe Conkling Ensign) Brown, Walter Whipple Spooner, Willis Holly (1922). History of the State of New York, Political and Governmental. The Syracuse Press, 347 - 348, 350. 

Further reading

  • Endelman, Gary E., Solidarity Forever: Rose Schneiderman & the Women's Trade Union League,Beaufort Books 1981
  • Orleck, Annalise Common Sense and a Little Fire: Women and Working-Class Politics in the United States, 1900-1965, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press 1995
  • Schneiderman, Rose, All for one, New York, P. S. Eriksson 1967

  Results from FactBites:
 
Rose Schneiderman Summary (2286 words)
Rose Schneiderman was born in a Polish village on April 6, 1882.
As Schneiderman grew disillusioned with the male-dominated labor movement and with the difficulties of organizing women workers she increasingly saw the ballot as the essential pre-condition to obtaining protective legislation and to unionizing women workers.
Schneiderman was an active feminist, campaigning for women's suffrage as a member of the National American Women Suffrage Association and running for the United States Senate as the candidate of the Farmer Labor Party in 1920, receiving just 27,934 votes and finishing behind Prohibitionist Ella A. Boole (159,623 votes).
Rose Schneiderman (667 words)
Rose Schneiderman, the labor organizer who taught ER everything she "knew about trade unionism," was born in Russian Poland, April 6, 1882.
Schneiderman tutored ER on the issues confronting women workers, the challenges facing the trade union movement, and the problems inherent in labor-management relations.
Rose Schneiderman and Luch Goldthwaite, All for One (New York: P.S. Eriksson, 1967), 251.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m