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Encyclopedia > Rosary
Our Lady of Lourdes appearing at Lourdes with Rosary beads.
Our Lady of Lourdes appearing at Lourdes with Rosary beads.

The Rosary (from Latin rosarium, meaning "rose garden"[1] or "garland of roses"[2]) is a popular traditional Roman Catholic devotion. The term denotes both a set of prayer beads and the devotional prayer itself, which combines vocal (or silent) prayer and meditation. The prayers consist of repeated sequences of the Lord's Prayer followed by ten recitations of the Hail Mary and a single recitation of "Glory Be to the Father"; each of these sequences is known as a decade. The recitation of each decade is accompanied by meditation on one of the Mysteries of the Rosary, which are events in the lives of Jesus Christ and his mother, the Blessed Virgin Mary. generally available marian image - no copyright issues File links The following pages link to this file: Rosary Blessed Virgin Mary Categories: Images with unknown source ... generally available marian image - no copyright issues File links The following pages link to this file: Rosary Blessed Virgin Mary Categories: Images with unknown source ... The apparitions of Our Lady of Lourdes began when Bernadette Soubirous, a 14-year old peasant girl from Lourdes, when questioned by her mother, admitted that she had seen a lady in the cave of Massabielle, about a mile from the town, on 11 February 1858, while she was gathering... This article is about the French pilgrimage location. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Prayer (disambiguation). ... For other senses of this word, see Meditation (disambiguation). ... The Sermon on the Mount by Carl Heinrich Bloch. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Hail Mary... Glory Be to the Father, also known as Gloria Patri, is a doxology, a short hymn of praise to God in various Christian liturgies. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Our Lady redirects here. ...


The traditional fifteen Mysteries of the Rosary were finalized by the 16th century. The mysteries are grouped into three sets: the joyful mysteries, the glorious mysteries, and the sorrowful mysteries. In 2002, Pope John Paul II announced five new optional mysteries, the luminous mysteries, bringing the total number of mysteries to twenty. (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


The Roman Catholic emphasis on the rosary is part of the Roman Catholic focus on Mariology, as exemplified by Pope John Paul II's Apostolic Letter Rosarium Virginis Mariae[3] which builds on the "total Marian devotion" pioneered by Saint Louis de Montfort. On the Roman Catholic liturgical calendar the Feast of Our Lady of the Rosary is celebrated on October 7. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: , Polish: ) born   IPA: ; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of the Roman Catholic Church and Sovereign of the State of the Vatican City from 16 October 1978, until his death, almost 27 years later, making his the second-longest... Louis-Marie Grignion de Montfort, French priest and Catholic saint, born in 31 January 1673 at Montfort and died at Saint Laurent sur Sevre on 28 April 1716. ... For the General Roman Calendar as it was in 1955, see Traditional Catholic Calendar. ... FYI: The page is a Google translation. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The rosary is sometimes used by other Christians, especially in the Anglican Communion and the Old Catholic Church, and also by some Lutherans. Evangelical Protestants, however, such as Baptists and Presbyterians do not use it and actively discourage their members from using this method of prayer. For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Main article: Anglicanism The Anglican Communion is a world-wide affiliation of Anglican Churches. ... The Old Catholic Church is a community of Christian churches. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Evangelicalism is a theological perspective in Protestant Christianity which identifies with the gospel. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ...


Many similar prayer practices exist in popular Roman Catholicism, each with its own set of prescribed prayers and its own form of prayer beads. These other devotions and their associated beads are usually referred to as "chaplets." Prayer beads are traditionally used to keep count of the repetitions of prayers, chants or devotions by adherents of religion. ... The term Chaplet is used commonly to designate Roman Catholic prayer forms which use prayer beads, but are not necessarily related to the Rosary. ...

Contents

History

There are differing views on the history of the rosary. According to tradition, the rosary was given to Saint Dominic in an apparition by the Blessed Virgin Mary in the year 1214 in the church of Prouille. This Marian apparition received the title of Our Lady of the Rosary.[4] However, most scholarly research suggests a more gradual and organic development of the rosary.[5] For other saints named Dominic, see the disambiguation page for Dominic Saint Dominic (Spanish: Domingo), also known as Dominic of Osma, often called Dominic de Guzmán and Domingo de Guzmán Garcés (1170 – August 6, 1221) was the founder of the Friars Preachers, popularly called the Dominicans or... Apparition of The Virgin to St Bernard by Filippino Lippi (1486) Oil on panel, 210 x 195 cm Church of Badia, Florence A Marian apparition is an event in which the Virgin Mary is believed to have supernaturally appeared to one or more persons, typically Catholics, although not always devout... Our Lady redirects here. ... Events Simon Apulia becomes Bishop of Exeter. ... Prouille convent Prouille, where the first Dominican convent was founded in late 1206 or early 1207, is a hamlet in Languedoc. ... Apparition of The Virgin to St Bernard by Filippino Lippi (1486) Oil on panel, 210 x 195 cm Church of Badia, Florence A Marian apparition is an event in which the Virgin Mary is believed to have supernaturally appeared to one or more persons, typically Catholics, although not always devout... FYI: The page is a Google translation. ...


Prayers with beads like the rosary may have begun as a practice by the laity to imitate the monastic Liturgy of the Hours, during the course of which the monks prayed the 150 Psalms daily. As many of the laity and even lay monastics could not read, they substituted 150 repetitions of the Our Father (Pater noster in Latin) for the Psalms, sometimes using a cord with knots on it to keep an accurate count.[5] During the middle ages, evidence suggests that both the Our Father and the Hail Mary were recited with prayer beads. In the 7th century, Saint Eligius wrote of using a counting device to keep track of the 150 Hail Marys of the Psalter of Mary.[6] In 13th century Paris, four trade guilds existed of prayer bead makers, who were referred to as paternosterers, and the beads were referred to as paternosters, suggesting a continued link between the Our Father (Pater noster in Latin) and the prayer beads.[5] In the 12th century, the rule of the English anchorites, the Ancrene Wisse, specified how groups of fifty Hail Marys were to be broken into five decades of ten Hail Marys each.[5] Gradually, the Hail Mary came to replace the Our Father as the prayer most associated with beads. Eventually, each decade came to be preceded by an Our Father, which further mirrored the structure of the monastic Liturgy of the Hours. In religious organizations, the laity comprises all lay persons collectively. ... The Order of Friars Minor is a major mendicant movement founded by Saint Francis of Assisi. ... The Liturgy of the Hours is usually recited in full in monastic communities. ... For other uses, see Monk (disambiguation). ... Psalms (Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים, or praises) is a book of the Hebrew Bible included in the collected works known as the Writings or Ketuvim. ... Lay brothers are Catholic religious occupied solely with manual labour and with the secular affairs of a monastery or friary. ... The Sermon on the Mount by Carl Heinrich Bloch. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Hail Mary... Signature of St. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... A guild is an association of people of the same trade or pursuits (with a similar skill or craft), formed to protect mutual interests and maintain standards of morality or conduct. ... A hermit (from the Greek erēmos, signifying desert, uninhabited, hence desert-dweller) is a person who lives to some greater or lesser degree in seclusion from society. ... Ancrene Wisse (also Ancrene Riwle) or Guide for Anchoresses is a monastic rule (or manual) for anchorite nuns, written in the early 13th century in Middle English. ...


The practice of meditation during the recitation of the Hail Marys can be attributed to Dominic of Prussia (1382-1461), a Carthusian monk.[5] Regardless of the origin of the rosary, it was greatly promoted by the preaching of the Dominican priest Alan de Rupe, who helped to spread the devotion in France, Flanders, and the Netherlands between 1460 and his death in 1475.[7] Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Hail Mary... Dominic may refer to Saint Dominic of Silos (1000–1073), Spanish abbot Saint Dominic de Guzman (c. ... Coat of arms of the Carthusian order Monasterio de la Cartuja, a former Carthusian monastery in Seville The Carthusian Order, also called the Order of St. ... For other uses, see Monk (disambiguation). ... This article is about religious workers. ... For other uses, see Flanders (disambiguation). ...


From the 16th to the early 20th century, the structure of the rosary remained essentially unchanged.[5] There were fifteen mysteries, one for each of the fifteen decades. In the 20th century the addition of the Fatima Prayer to the end of each decade became popular. There were no other changes until 2002 when John Paul II instituted five optional new Luminous Mysteries. The Fatima Prayer (pron. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Official papal image of John Paul II. His Holiness Pope John Paul II, né Karol Józef Wojtyła (born May 18, 1920 in Wadowice, Poland), is the current Pope — the Bishop of Rome and head of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary Beads. ...


Key dates

The following table are key dates in the development of the rosary.

  • 4th century prayer rope used by the Desert Fathers to count repetitions of the Jesus Prayer
  • In the 7th century, St. Eligius (c.588-660) wrote of making a chair adorned with 150 gold and silver nails to aid in the recitation of the Psalter of Blessed Mary, which substituted one Hail Mary for each of the Psalms. [8]
  • In the early 8th century, Venerable Bede (d. 733) attests that churches and public places in France and England had prayer beads available for the faithful to use. [9]
  • c. 1075 Lady Godiva refers in her will to "the circlet of precious stones which she had threaded on a cord in order that by fingering them one after another she might count her prayers exactly" (Malmesbury, "Gesta Pont.", Rolls Series 311)[5]
  • A rule for anchorites in mid-12th century England gives directions on how fifty Hail Marys are to be said divided into sets of ten, with prostrations and other marks of reverence.[5]
  • It is recorded in 12th century Mary-legends (Marien-legenden) that a certain Eulalia was told to pray five decades slowly and devoutly instead of fifteen decades in a hurry.[5]
  • It is recorded by a contemporary biographer that St. Aibert, who died in 1140, recited 150 Hail Marys daily, 100 with genuflexions and 50 with prostrations.[10][11]
  • 1160 Saint Rosalia is buried with a string of prayer beads[5]
  • 1214 traditional date of the legend of Saint Dominic's reception of the rosary from the Virgin Mary as Our Lady of the Rosary[12]
  • It is recorded of St. Louis of France, who lived in the 13th century, that "without counting his other prayers the holy King knelt down every evening fifty times and each time he stood upright then knelt again and repeated slowly an Ave Maria." [13]
  • Mid-13th century word "Rosary" first used (by Thomas of Champitre, in De apibus, ii. 13),[14] not referring to prayer beads but in a Marian context
  • 1268 A reference to guild of "paternosterers" in Paris in "Livre des métiers" of Stephen Boyleau.[5]
  • Early 15th century, Dominic of Prussia, a Carthusian, introduces 50 mysteries, one for each Ave Maria[15][16]
  • c. 1514 Hail Mary prayer attains its current form.[17]
  • 1569 Pope Pius V established the current form of the original 15 mysteries[18]
  • 1587 A Book on the Rosary entitled Rosario della Sacratissima Vergine Maria by Ven. Luis de Granada is published in Italian, which uses a similar method to the fourth method of the five methods of praying the rosary by St. Louis-Marie de Montfort.[19]
  • 1597 first recorded use of the term "rosary" to refer to prayer beads.[20]
  • 1917 Our Lady of Fatima is said to ask that the Fatima Prayer be added to the Rosary. Her visionaries state that she also asks for the Rosary to be said to stop the war, and as part of the Immaculate Heart's reparation.
  • 1974 Pope Paul VI issues the Apostolic Letter Marialis Cultus which devotes 14 sections to the use of the rosary within the Roman Catholic Church.[21]
  • 2002 Pope John Paul II introduces the Luminous Mysteries as an option for Roman Catholics in an Apostolic Letter on the Rosary, Rosarium Virginis Mariae.[22]

-1... The Desert Fathers were Christian Hermits who lived in the Sahara desert of Egypt, beginning in about the third century. ... Christogram with Jesus Prayer in Romanian: Doamne Iisuse Hristoase, Fiul lui Dumnezeu, miluieÅŸte-mă pe mine păcătosul. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Hail Mary... Psalms (Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים, or praises) is a book of the Hebrew Bible included in the collected works known as the Writings or Ketuvim. ... Bede, commonly known as the Venerable Bede, (c. ... For other uses of Godiva, see Godiva (disambiguation). ... The Rolls Series, official title The Chronicles and Memorials of Great Britain and Ireland during the Middle Ages, is a major collection of Britich and Irish historical materials and primary sources, published in the second half of the nineteenth century. ... A hermit (from the Greek erēmos, signifying desert, uninhabited, hence desert-dweller) is a person who lives to some greater or lesser degree in seclusion from society. ... Santa Rosalia is the patron saint of Palermo, Sicily. ... For other uses, see Legend (disambiguation). ... For other saints named Dominic, see the disambiguation page for Dominic Saint Dominic (Spanish: Domingo), also known as Dominic of Osma, often called Dominic de Guzmán and Domingo de Guzmán Garcés (1170 – August 6, 1221) was the founder of the Friars Preachers, popularly called the Dominicans or... Our Lady redirects here. ... FYI: The page is a Google translation. ... The Gateway Arch, shown here behind the Old Courthouse, is the most recognizable part of the St. ... Dominic may refer to Saint Dominic of Silos (1000–1073), Spanish abbot Saint Dominic de Guzman (c. ... Coat of arms of the Carthusian order Monasterio de la Cartuja, a former Carthusian monastery in Seville The Carthusian Order, also called the Order of St. ... Bold textHe was born as Antonio Ghislieri at Bosco in the duchy of Milan. ... Luís de Granada (1504 - December 31, 1588), was a Spanish preacher and ascetic writer. ... Our Lady of Fatima Our Lady of Fatima (pron. ... The Fatima Prayer (pron. ... Jacinta and Francisco Marto and Lúcia Santos Lúcia de Jesus Rosa Santos – Sister Lúcia of Jesus and of the Immaculate Heart, better known as Sister Lúcia of Jesus – (March 22, 1907 – February 13, 2005) was a Roman Catholic Carmelite nun. ... The Immaculate Conception is a Roman Catholic doctrine which asserts that Mary, the mother of Jesus, was preserved by God from the stain of original sin at the time of her own conception. ... Paul VI, Giovanni Battista Enrica Antonia Maria Montini (September 26, 1897 – August 6, 1978), served as Pope from 1963 to 1978. ... Ecclesiastical letters are publications or announcements of the organs of Roman Catholic ecclesiastical authority, e. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Official papal image of John Paul II. His Holiness Pope John Paul II, né Karol Józef Wojtyła (born May 18, 1920 in Wadowice, Poland), is the current Pope — the Bishop of Rome and head of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Our Lady of Lourdes appearing at Lourdes with Rosary beads. ...

Rosary beads

Rosary beads

A rosary provides a physical method of keeping track of the number of Hail Marys said. The fingers are moved along the beads as the prayers are recited. By not having to keep track of the count mentally, the mind is more able to meditate on the mysteries. A five decade rosary contains five groups of ten beads (a decade), with additional large beads before each decade. The Hail Mary is said on the ten beads within a decade, while the Our Father is said on the large bead before each decade. A new mystery is meditated upon at each of the large beads. Some rosaries, particularly those used by religious orders, contain fifteen decades, corresponding to the traditional fifteen mysteries of the rosary. Both five and fifteen decade rosaries are attached to a shorter strand, which starts with a crucifix followed by one large, three small, and one large beads before connecting to the rest of the rosary. The recitation of the rosary is started on the short strand, reciting the Apostle's Creed at the crucifix, an Our Father at the first large bead, three Hail Marys on the next three beads, then a Glory be to the Father on the next large bead. The recitation of the decades then follows. Although counting the prayers on a string of beads is customary, the prayers of the rosary do not actually require a set of beads, but can be said using any type of counting device, by counting on one's fingers, or by counting by oneself without any device at all. Image File history File linksMetadata CarvedRosary. ... Image File history File linksMetadata CarvedRosary. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Hail Mary... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Hail Mary... The Sermon on the Mount by Carl Heinrich Bloch. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Crucifix (disambiguation). ... The Apostles Creed is an early statement of Christian belief, probably from the first or second century. ... Glory Be to the Father, also known as Gloria Patri, is a doxology, a short hymn of praise to God in various Christian liturgies. ...


The beads can be made from a wide variety of materials including wood, bone, glass, crushed flowers, semi-precious stones such as agate, jet, amber, or jasper, or precious materials including coral, crystal, silver, and gold. Rosaries are sometimes made from the seeds of the "rosary pea" or "bead tree". Today, the vast majority of rosary beads are made of glass, plastic, or wood. Early rosaries were strung on strong thread, often silk, but modern ones are more often made as a series of chain-linked beads. Our Lady's Rosary Makers produce some 7 million rosaries annually that are distributed to those in economic and spritual need.[23] Precious coral or red coral is the common name given to Corallium rubrum and several related species of marine coral. ... Species Melia azedarach The Chinaberry or Bead Tree (Melia azedarach), is a small tree in the mahogany family Meliaceae, native to China, also occasionally known as Persian Lilac. ... Our Ladys Rosary Makers is a non-profit apostolate in Louisville, Kentucky dedicated to spreading devotion to the Blessed Mother and the Rosary. ...


It is especially common for beads to be made of material with some special significance, such as jet from the shrine of St. James at Santiago de Compostela, or olive seeds from the Garden of Gethsemane. Beads are sometimes made to enclose sacred relics, or drops of holy water. A set of blessed Rosary Beads is a sacramental. For people and places called Saint James, see the diambiguation page. ... Location Location of Santiago de Compostela Coordinates : , , Time zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer : CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Santiago de Compostela (Galician) Spanish name Santiago de Compostela Postal code 15700 Website santiagodecompostela. ... The Garden of Gethsemane. ... For other uses, see Relic (disambiguation). ... This article is about water that has been blessed. ... Sacramentals are things (sacramentalia) set apart or blessed by the Catholic Church to manifest the respect due to the Sacraments, and so to excite good thoughts and to increase devotion, and through these movements of the heart to remit venial sin, according to the Council of Trent (Session XXII, 15). ...


In addition to a string of beads the rosary comes in other forms for ease of use. A ring rosary is a finger ring with eleven knobs on it, ten round ones and one crucifix. A rosary bracelet is one with ten beads and often a cross or medal as well. The most modern form is the rosary card. A rosary card is either one with a "handle" that moves like a slide rule to count the decade, or it has a whole rosary with bumps similar to Braille. A typical 10 inch student slide rule (Pickett N902-T simplex trig). ... Listen to this article ( info/dl) This audio file was created from a revision dated 2006-09-06, and may not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ...


Rosary beads for other prayers

Main article: Rosary based prayers

Rosary beads are at times used to say Roman Catholic rosary based prayers which do not involve the Hail Mary and the mysteries of the rosary. Examples include the Chaplet of Divine Mercy introduced by Saint Faustina Kowalska and the Rosary of the Holy Wounds introduced by the Venerable Sister Mary Martha Chambon.[24] These prayers often use rosary beads, but their words and format do not correspond to the usual mysteries. Both Saint Faustina Kowalska and the Venerable Sister Mary Martha Chambon attributed these prayers to Jesus as part of their visions of Jesus Christ.[25] The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Chaplet of Divine Mercy is a traditional devotion of the Catholic Church. ... Missing image Saint Faustina Saint Faustina, of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy in Poland (August 25, 1905 - October 5, 1938), born Maria Helena Kowalska, is perhaps best known for her promotion of the devotion to the Divine Mercy, and her inspired painting of the same name. ... A Stained Glass image of Venerable Father Samuel Mazzuchelli in St. ... Since the Crucifixion of Jesus Christ in Calvary until today, a number of people have claimed to have had visions (and indeed personal conversations) with Him and with Saint Mary in person. ...


The Mysteries

The Crucifixion of Jesus - the fifth of the Sorrowful Mysteries
The Crucifixion of Jesus - the fifth of the Sorrowful Mysteries

The recitation of the Rosary is traditionally dedicated to one of three sets of "Mysteries" to be said in sequence, one per a day: the Joyful (sometimes Joyous) Mysteries; the Sorrowful Mysteries; and the Glorious Mysteries. Each of these three sets of Mysteries has within it five different themes to be meditated on, one for each decade of ten Hail Marys. Pope John Paul II, in his apostolic letter Rosarium Virginis Mariae (October 2002), recommended an additional set called the Luminous Mysteries (or the "Mysteries of Light").[22] Catholic faithful who prefer the original fifteen mysteries point to the belief that the Rosary is Mary's Psalter, containing 150 Hail Marys in its body for the 150 Psalms. The Luminous Mysteries make the total 200, but incorporate Christ's ministry. Christ on the Cross cropped. ... Christ on the Cross cropped. ... Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: , Polish: ) born   IPA: ; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of the Roman Catholic Church and Sovereign of the State of the Vatican City from 16 October 1978, until his death, almost 27 years later, making his the second-longest... Psalms (Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים, or praises) is a book of the Hebrew Bible included in the collected works known as the Writings or Ketuvim. ...


In addition to meditating upon the events of the mysteries, many people associate certain virtues, or fruits, with each mystery. (The following list of mysteries and the fruits associated with them[26] corresponds to moments in the life, passion, and death of Jesus and Mary's participation in them chronologically.) The Seven Virtues were derived from the Psychomachia (Contest of the Soul), an epic poem written by Aurelius Clemens Prudentius (c. ... The Passion is the theological term used for the suffering, both physical and mental, of Jesus in the hours prior to and including his trial and execution by crucifixion. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Saint Mary and Saint Mary the Virgin both redirect here. ...


Joyful Mysteries

  1. The Annunciation. Fruit of the Mystery: Humility
  2. The Visitation. Fruit of the Mystery: Love of Neighbor
  3. The Nativity. Fruit of the Mystery: Poverty (poor in spirit), Detachment from the things of the world, Contempt of Riches, Love of the Poor
  4. The Presentation of Jesus at the Temple. Fruit of the Mystery: Purity
  5. The Finding of the Child Jesus in the Temple. Fruit of the Mystery: True Wisdom and True Conversion.

For other uses, see Annunciation (disambiguation). ... For the medieval saint of the same name, see Saint Humility. ... The Visitation is a Catholic feast day (2 July) commemorating the visit of the Virgin Mary to Elizabeth as recorded in the Gospel of Luke. ... The Nativity by Petrus Christus, c. ... Please note: This page is an Abrahamic interpretation of candlemas. To avoid dispute between religious groups please see Imbolc for a non-Abrahamic view. ... This 15th century page from a Book of Hours shows the typical medieval composition Depiction of Jesus at age twelve from Jesus and the doctors of the Faith, a painting by the entourage of Giuseppe Ribera. ...

Sorrowful Mysteries

  1. The Agony in the Garden. Fruit of the Mystery: Sorrow for Sin, Uniformity with the will of God
  2. The Scourging at the Pillar. Fruit of the Mystery: Mortification
  3. The Crowning with Thorns. Fruit of the Mystery: Contempt of the world
  4. The Carrying of the Cross. Fruit of the Mystery: Patience
  5. The Crucifixion. Fruit of the Mystery: Salvation

Les Très Riches Heures du duc de Berry, Christ in Gethsemane The Agony in the Garden is the name given to the time in the life of Jesus between the Last Supper and His arrest. ... The Passion is the theological term used for the suffering, both physical and mental, of Jesus in the hours prior to and including his trial and execution by crucifixion. ... For other uses, see Crown of Thorns (disambiguation). ... The Passion is the theological term used for the suffering, both physical and mental, of Jesus in the hours prior to and including his trial and execution by crucifixion. ... The Passion is the theological term used for the suffering, both physical and mental, of Jesus in the hours prior to and including his trial and execution by crucifixion. ...

Glorious Mysteries

  1. The Resurrection. Fruit of the Mystery: Faith
  2. The Ascension. Fruit of the Mystery: Hope and desire for Heaven
  3. The Descent of the Holy Spirit. Fruit of the Mystery: Holy Wisdom to know the truth and share with everyone
  4. The Assumption of Mary. Fruit of the Mystery: Grace of a Happy Death and True Devotion towards Mary
  5. The Coronation of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Fruit of the Mystery: Perseverance and Crown of Glory

A diagram of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre based on a german documentary, claimed to be the site of Calvary and the Tomb of Jesus. ... Also refers to the process of gaining Enlightenment and several meditation techniques. ... The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... This article is about the theological concept. ... Agnolo Gaddis version is typical of the smaller Gothic depictions The Coronation of the Virgin or Coronation of Mary is a subject in Christian art, especially popular in Italy in the 13th to 15th centuries, but continuing in popularity until the 18th century and beyond. ... Our Lady redirects here. ...

Luminous Mysteries

  1. The Baptism of Jesus in the Jordan. Fruit of the Mystery: Openness to the Holy Spirit
  2. The Wedding at Cana. Fruit of the Mystery: To Jesus through Mary
  3. Jesus' Proclamation of the Kingdom of God. Fruit of the Mystery: Repentance and Trust in God
  4. The Transfiguration. Fruit of the Mystery: Desire for Holiness
  5. The Institution of the Eucharist. Fruit of the Mystery: Adoration

In the synoptic gospels, Jesus is baptised by John the Baptist. ... In the Christian New Testament, the Gospel of John refers a number of times to a town called Cana of Galilee. ... Kingdom of Heaven redirects here. ... Icon of the Transfiguration (15th century, Novgorod) The Transfiguration of Jesus is an event reported by the Synoptic Gospels in which Jesus was transfigured upon a mountain (Matthew 17:1-9, Mark 9:1-8, Luke 9:28-36). ... For other uses, see The Last Supper (disambiguation). ...

Days of recitation

Day of recitation With the Luminous Mysteries Without the Luminous Mysteries
Sunday The Glorious Mysteries

Advent to Sunday before Septuagesima: The Joyful Mysteries
Septuagesima to Palm Sunday: The Sorrowful Mysteries
Easter to Sunday before Advent: The Glorious Mysteries

Monday The Joyful Mysteries The Joyful Mysteries
Tuesday The Sorrowful Mysteries The Sorrowful Mysteries
Wednesday The Glorious Mysteries The Glorious Mysteries
Thursday The Luminous Mysteries The Joyful Mysteries
Friday The Sorrowful Mysteries The Sorrowful Mysteries
Saturday The Joyful Mysteries The Glorious Mysteries

Approved form

  • A sign of the cross on the Crucifix and then the "Apostles' Creed";
  • An "Our Father" on the first large bead;
  • A "Hail Mary" on each of the three small beads with the following intentions (the theological virtues):
    1. For the increase of faith
    2. For the increase of hope
    3. For the increase of charity
  • A "Glory Be to the Father" on the next large bead;
  • Announce the mystery
  • An "Our Father" on the large bead
  • A "Hail Mary" on each of the adjacent ten small beads;
  • A "Glory Be to the Father" on the next large bead;
  • Again an Our Father, ten Hail Marys, the Glory Be to the Father, and Fatima Prayer for each of the following decades;
  • A "Hail Holy Queen" and a sign of the cross.

Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The... The Sermon on the Mount by Carl Heinrich Bloch. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Hail Mary... Glory Be to the Father, also known as Gloria Patri, is a doxology, a short hymn of praise to God in various Christian liturgies. ... The Fatima Prayer (pron. ... The Salve Regina or Hail Holy Queen is a Christian hymn and prayer to the Virgin Mary. ...

Common pious additions

Many people add a recitation of the Fatima Decade Prayer at the end of each Decade. In the practice of the Brothers of the Christian Schools, they have an additional decade for the intentions of the students or the Blessed Virgin Mary. The Fatima Prayer (pron. ... The Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools is a Roman Catholic religious teaching order, founded by John Baptiste De La Salle, born in 1651 in Reims, France. ... Our Lady redirects here. ...


A pious German custom is to insert a phrase in the middle of each Hail Mary (after "... blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus ... "), which refers to the specific mystery being meditated upon. [27][28] This custom was incorporated into St. Louis de Montfort's second method out of his five Methods of Praying the Rosary.[29] Louis-Marie Grignion de Montfort, French priest and Catholic saint, born in 31 January 1673 at Montfort and died at Saint Laurent sur Sevre on 28 April 1716. ...


In the practice of the Dominican Order, the opening prayers of the rosary mirror the opening of the Divine Office: “Dominicans” redirects here. ... The Liturgy of the Hours is usually recited in full in monastic communities. ...

  1. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.
  2. Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee.
  3. Blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
  4. O Lord, open my lips.
  5. And my mouth will proclaim your praise.
  6. Incline your aid to me, O God.
  7. O Lord, make haste to help me.
  8. Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit, as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Rosary as a family prayer

Rosary is usually prayed in Church during afternoon or evening hours. Many Catholics pray the rosary on their own, when alone. But the rosary is also an old family prayer. This specific family devotion has been supported be several popes including Pope Pius XII in his encyclical Ingruentium Malorum: Pius XIIs signature Pope Pius XII (Latin: ), born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (March 2, 1876 – October 9, 1958), reigned as the 260th pope, the human head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City, from March 2, 1939 until his death in 1958. ...

  • The custom of the family recitation of the Holy Rosary is a most efficacious means. What a sweet sight - most pleasing to God - when, at eventide, the Christian home resounds with the frequent repetition of praises in honor of the High Queen of Heaven! Then the Rosary, recited in the family, assembled before the image of the Virgin, in an admirable union of hearts, the parents and their children, who come back from their daily work. It unites them piously with those absent and those dead. It links all more tightly in a sweet bond of love, with the most Holy Virgin, who, like a loving mother, in the circle of her children, will be there bestowing upon them an abundance of the gifts of concord and family peace. [30]

Other forms of the Roman Catholic Rosary

Paternosters

In Monastic Houses, monks were expected to pray the Divine Office daily in Latin, the liturgical language of the Roman Catholic Church. In some Houses, lay brothers who did not understand Latin or who were illiterate were required to say the Lord's Prayer a certain number of times per day while meditating on the Mysteries of the Incarnation of Christ. Since there were 150 Psalms, this could number up to 150 times per day. To count these repetitions, they used beads strung upon a cord and this set of prayer beads became commonly known as a Pater noster, which is the Latin for "Our Father". Lay people adopted this practice as a form of popular worship. The Paternoster could be of various lengths, but was often made up of 5 “decades” of 10 beads, which when performed three times made up 150 prayers. Other Paternosters, most notably those used by lay persons, may have had only had 10 beads, and may have also been highly ornamented. As the Rosary (ring of flowers) incorporating the Hail Mary prayer became more common, it was often still referred to as a Paternoster. Monasticism (from Greek: monachos—a solitary person) is the religious practice of renouncing all worldly pursuits in order to fully devote ones life to spiritual work. ... Canonical hours are ancient divisions of time (also called offices), developed by the Christian Church, serving as increments between prayers. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... The Sermon on the Mount by Carl Heinrich Bloch. ... Icon of Christ in a Greek Orthodox church This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ... Psalms (Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים, or praises) is a book of the Hebrew Bible included in the collected works known as the Writings or Ketuvim. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Hail Mary...


The Servite Rosary

In 1233, seven of the members of a Florentine Confraternity devoted to the Holy Mother of God were gathered in prayer under the presidency of Alessio Falconieri. According to tradition, Mary appeared to the young men and exhorted them to devote themselves to her service, in retirement from the world. They retired to the deserted slopes of Monte Senario near Florence, where they experienced another vision of Mary. There they formed a new Order called the Servants of Mary, or Servites, in recognition of their special manner of venerating Our Lady of Sorrows. The seven-"week" Servite Rosary is variously called the Servite Chaplet; Rosary of the Seven Dolors of the Blessed Virgin Mary; and the Seven Swords Rosary. A set of introductory prayers for the Servite Rosary was written by St. Alphonsus Liguori in his book The Glories of Mary.[31] The Servite Friars or Servants of Mary are one of the five original mendicant orders. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Seven Dolours of the Virgin. ... ...


"St. Anthony's Rosary"

The Irish (specifically the Gaelic-speaking) and their descendants have a tradition of saying thirteen Aves rather than ten, in honour of St. Anthony of Padua, whose feast day is 13 June, and in Ireland is commemorated on Friday the 13th in non-English speaking communities. Also called the St. Anthony Chaplet, its prayers are accompanied by a poem called the Miraculous Responsory or si quideris, written by Saint Bonaventure. Like most chaplets, it is available at Catholic supply stores. Saint Anthony of Padua Saint Anthony of Padua, also venerated as Anthony of Lisbon, particularly in Portugal (August 15, 1195 – June 13, 1231) is a Catholic saint who was born in Lisbon as Fernando de Bulhões, to a wealthy family. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Saint Bonaventura, John of Fidanza, Franciscan theologian, was born in 1221 at Bagnarea in Tuscany. ...


The Franciscan Crown

In 1263, Saint Bonaventure, Minister General of the Order, encouraged liturgical devotion honoring the mystery of The Visitation. The Franciscan rosary, or as it is properly called, The Franciscan Crown, developed in early part of the 15th century, and was officially established in 1422. The Franciscan Crown consists of seven decades of Hail Marys, each preceded by an Our Father and followed by a Glory Be, and completed by two more Hail Marys after the 7th decade to complete the number 72 which is thought to be the age of Mary at the time of her Assumption. The Crown recalls the seven joys of Mary and how she responded to the grace of God in her life. In addition to developing this Marian devotion, the Franciscans are credited with adding the final words to the Hail Mary: Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners (from the writings of St. Bernardino of Siena) now and at the hour of our death (from the writings of the Servite Fathers and the Roman Breviary).' The Visitation is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from February 15 to February 23, 1982. ... The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Saint Bernardino of Siena (sometimes Bernardine, September 8, 1380 – May 20, 1444) was an Italian preacher, Franciscan missionary and Christian saint. ... The Servite Friars or Servants of Mary are one of the five original mendicant orders. ...


The Birgittine Rosary

The rosary as prayed by the Birgittine order comprises 7 Our Fathers (to honour the joys and sorrows of the Blessed Virgin), and 63 Hail Marys, one for each (presumed) year of her life before the Assumption. The layout of the beads is a loop containing six decades, together with a short string of beads leading to the crucifix.[32] The Bridgettine church in Naantali, Finland The Bridgettine or Briggittine order is a monastic religious order of Augustinian canonesses founded by Saint Birgitta (Saint Bridget) of Sweden approximately 1350, and approved by Pope Urban V in 1370. ... This article is about the theological concept. ...


An example of the Birgittine rosary may be seen depicted on the Statue of the Crowned Virgin in the Sanctuary of Our Lady of Lourdes. There is another Lourdes with a different pronunciation, see Lourdes, Brazil Our Lady of Lourdes Basilica Lourdes (Lorda in Occitan) is a town in the Hautes-Pyrénées département in France. ...

A Single-decade ring rosary
An alternative design.
An alternative design.

Irish Penal Rosary The Irish Penal Rosary was a single-decade rosary used in Ireland during penal times when religious objects were forbidden. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (481x623, 59 KB) Photograph I took of a single-decade ring rosary. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (481x623, 59 KB) Photograph I took of a single-decade ring rosary. ... A finger ring is a metal band worn as an ornament around a finger; it is the most common current meaning of the word ring. ... Image File history File links Finger_rosary. ... Image File history File links Finger_rosary. ...

Single-decade rosaries

Religious persecution of Catholics began in England and Ireland under Henry VIII in 1540 and continued until about 1731. During what has been called the Penal Times, death became the common penalty for attending a Mass or harboring a priest. Small, easily hidden Rosaries were used to avoid detection. Sometimes rather than a cross, other symbols of specific meanings were used: For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... In the most general sense, penal is the body of laws that are enforced by the State in its own name and impose penalties for their violation, as opposed to civil law that seeks to redress private wrongs. ... For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... This article is about religious workers. ...

  • Hammer: nails of the cross;
  • Nails: crucifixion;
  • Spear: wound;
  • Halo: crown of thorns;
  • Cords: scourging;
  • Chalice: Last Supper;
  • Rooster: crowing/resurrection.

These rosaries, especially the smaller ring-type, have since become known as soldiers' rosaries, because they were often taken into battle by soldiers, most notably during WWI. These single-decade Rosary variations can be worn as a ring or carried easily and are still popular. A rosary ring is a ring worn around the finger with 10 indentations and a cross on the surface, representing one decade of a rosary. This is often worn as jewelry, and used through the day. Some ring Rosaries use a small bearing on the inside of the ring to permit easy turning. A finger Rosary is similar to a ring, but is a bit larger. Rosaries like these are used by either rotating or just holding them between a finger and thumb while praying. A hand Rosary is a decade in a complete loop, with one bead separated from ten other beads, this is meant to be carried while walking or running, so as not to entangle the larger type. Credit card-sized Rosaries have also appeared, especially among members of militaries, where holes or bumps represent the prayers and the persons praying move their fingers along the bumps to count prayers.


Rosaries in other Christian traditions

While use of the Roman Catholic rosary has gradually been adopted by many Eastern Catholics, many Eastern Catholic churches have undertaken a campaign of liturgical de-Latinization, removing imported devotions and practices (such as the rosary) that have obscured and replaced traditional and authentic devotions and practices of the Eastern Catholic Churches. Subsequently, the most common prayer used in the Eastern Christian Churches (Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic) is the Jesus Prayer, which makes use of the more ancient prayer rope (chotki), a knotted rope (rather than beads) joined together with a knotted cross. The prayer rope is not as fixed in form as the Western rosary (it may have 10, 33, 50, 100, or 500 knots on it), and it normally makes use of beads only as dividers between sections. The Eastern prayer rope is often divided into decades, but it may also be divided into sections of 25 or some other number, or not divided at all. The term Eastern Rites may refer to the liturgical rites used by many ancient Christian Churches of Eastern Europe and the Middle East that, while being part of the Roman Catholic Church, are distinct from the Latin Rite or Western Church. ... Liturgical Latinisation is the process by which the liturgical practices of the Churches of Eastern Christianity (particularly the Eastern Catholic Churches, but also those of the Eastern Orthodox Churches and the Oriental Orthodox Churches) are changed to resemble more closely the practices of the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic... Eastern Christianity refers collectively to the Christian traditions which developed in Greece, the Near East and Eastern Europe. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... The term Eastern Rites may refer to the liturgical rites used by many ancient Christian Churches of Eastern Europe and the Middle East that, while being part of the Roman Catholic Church, are distinct from the Latin Rite or Western Church. ... Christogram with Jesus Prayer in Romanian: Doamne Iisuse Hristoase, Fiul lui Dumnezeu, miluieşte-mă pe mine păcătosul. ... -1...


Among Anglican churches, the use of a particular set of prayer beads called Anglican prayer beads is fairly popular. This set is also known as the "Anglican Rosary"[33] or as "Christian prayer beads," the latter term arising from the popularity this set has gained among Christians of various other traditions. Anglican bead sets contain 28 beads in groups of seven called "weeks," with an additional large bead before each. In total, there are 33 beads representing the years of Jesus' life on Earth. A number of Anglicans use the Jesus Prayer, just like the Eastern Christians, but there are no Church-appointed prayers or meditations in the Anglican practice. Some Anglo-Catholics use the traditional Roman Catholic rosary. The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... Anglican Prayer Beads Sometimes known as the Anglican Rosary, Christian prayer beads, or ecumenical prayer beads, Anglican Prayer Beads are a loop of strung beads which Anglicans and other Christians use as a focus for prayer. ... The terms Anglo-Catholic and Anglo-Catholicism describe people, groups, ideas, customs and practices within Anglicanism that emphasise continuity with Catholic tradition. ...


A recent creation known as the Ecumenical Miracle Rosary uses the same beads as the Roman Catholic rosary but with different prayers and with mysteries which focus on Christ's miracles. It is proposed that this article be deleted, because of the following concern: No source outside the web pages. ... Icon of Christ in a Greek Orthodox church This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ...


Wearing of the Rosary

Wearing of a Rosary that one actually uses to pray is neither uncommon nor sacrilegious in various Roman Catholic-adherent cultures and was a common practice in the Medieval and Renaissance periods, particularly among monastics (monks and nuns). Rosaries are also worn hanging from or looped over a belt, particularly with some religious habits, pinned to and hanging from a shoulder or neckline, or wrapped around a wrist or arm as a bracelet. Some Christians feel that it is sacrilegious for a non-believer to wear a rosary around the neck. This is particularily true in Roman Catholic cultures that have histories of persecution, particularily among the Irish and English catholics. Because Irish Catholic tradition is often seen as normative in the United States and Canada, this has been the source of some conflict in the past. The Roman Catholic Church states: "Sacred objects, set aside for divine worship by dedication or blessing, are to be treated with reverence. They are not to be made over to secular or inappropriate use, even though they may belong to private persons"[34]. Thus it is acceptable to wear a rosary if one is doing so to show veneration, however it is not acceptable if one is wearing the rosary irreverently, such as wearing it as a piece of jewelry. Many saints have worn their Rosary around the neck, and in the Secret of the Rosary, it is mentioned that a person put his rosary round his neck to keep devils away from him. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... For other uses, see Monk (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Nun (disambiguation). ... St. ... The Secret of the Rosary is a book about the Holy Rosary written by Saint Louis de Montfort a French priest and Catholic saint who died in 1761. ...


Rosaries or rosary-like necklaces are often worn for non-religious purposes as a fashion or jewelry item, and are sold in different variations in popular jewelry and clothing stores. Such ornamental use, especially the wearing of a rosary around the neck, was heavily popularized by singer Madonna in the early 1980s and has experienced a come-back in recent years. Wearing a rosary around the neck can be considered disrespectful if the person wearing it does not affiliate with the Christian religion. Ornate or medieval-style rosary sets are occasionally featured in goth fashion. This article is about the American entertainer. ... This article is about the subculture. ...


As penance or reparation

Praying the rosary may be prescribed by priests as a form of penance after confession. Penance in this form is not generally intended as a "punishment"; rather, it is meant to encourage reflection upon and spiritual growth from past sins.[citation needed] For other uses, see Penance (disambiguation). ... In Roman Catholic teaching, the Sacrament of Penance (commonly called Confession, Reconciliation or Penance) is the method given by Christ to the Church by which individual men and women may be freed from sins committed after receiving Baptism. ...


Some forms of the Roman Catholic rosary are aimed at reparation for the sins of others. An example is the Rosary of the Holy Wounds first introduced at the beginning of the 20th century by the Venerable Sister Mary Martha Chambon, a lay Roman Catholic Sister of the Monastery of the Visitation Order in Chambery, France. [35] This rosary is somewhat similar in structure to the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, is said on the usual rosary beads and is intended as an Act of Reparation to Jesus Christ for the sins of the world.[36] A Stained Glass image of Venerable Father Samuel Mazzuchelli in St. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The city and arrondissement of Chamb ry in Savoie, France, is the historical capital of Savoy, was independent, then formed part of the Kingdom of Sardinia until 1860. ... The Chaplet of Divine Mercy is a traditional devotion of the Catholic Church. ...


Power of the Rosary

The rosary has been featured in the writings of Roman Catholic figures from saints to popes and continues to be mentioned in reported Marian apparitions, with a number of promises attributed to the power of the rosary. Saints redirects here. ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... Apparition of The Virgin to St Bernard by Filippino Lippi (1486) Oil on panel, 210 x 195 cm Church of Badia, Florence Marian apparitions are events in which the Virgin Mary is purported to have supernaturally appeared to one or more persons, typically Catholics, in various settings. ...


As early as the fifteenth century, legend alleged that through Saint Dominic and Blessed Alan de Rupe the Blessed Virgin Mary made fifteen specific promises to Christians who pray the rosary.[37] The fifteen rosary promises range from protection from misfortune to meriting a high degree of glory in heaven.[38] In support of this statement Patrick Cardinal Hayes of New York provided his imprimatur to this effect.[39] For other uses, see Legend (disambiguation). ... For other saints named Dominic, see the disambiguation page for Dominic Saint Dominic (Spanish: Domingo), also known as Dominic of Osma, often called Dominic de Guzmán and Domingo de Guzmán Garcés (1170 – August 6, 1221) was the founder of the Friars Preachers, popularly called the Dominicans or... Blessed may refer to: The state of having received a blessing. ... The term Virgin Mary has several different meanings: Mary, the mother of Jesus, the historical and multi-denominational concept of Mary Blessed Virgin Mary, the Roman Catholic theological and doctrinal concept of Mary Marian apparitions shrines to the Virgin Mary Virgin Mary in Islam, the Islamic theological and doctrinal concept... Patrick Joseph Hayes, later Patrick Cardinal Hayes, (November 20, 1867–September 4, 1938) was the eighth bishop (fifth archbishop) of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York. ... This article is about the state. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In the 18th century, the French priest Louis de Montfort elaborated on the importance of the rosary and its power in his widely read book the Secret of the Rosary.[40] He emphasized the power of the rosary and provided specific instructions on how it should be prayed, e.g. with attention, devotion and modesty (reverence), with reflective pauses [41] between the beads and smaller pauses between phrases of the prayers.[42] St. ... The Secret of the Rosary is a book about the Holy Rosary written by Saint Louis de Montfort a French priest and Catholic saint who died in 1761. ...


Rosary manufacturing and distribution

Rosaries are in rare cases made of expensive materials from gold and silver to mother of pearl and Swarovski black diamond designs. Yet most rosaries used in the world today for praying are made of simple plastic or wooden beads connected by cords or strings. Roman Catholic missionaries in Africa have reported that rosaries made of tree bark have been used there for praying for the lack of conventional rosaries. It is widely reported that the demand for rosaries in third world countries far outweighs the supply. GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... This article is about the chemical element. ... A piece of nacre Nacre, also known as mother of pearl, is an organic mixture of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in the form of platy crystals of aragonite and conchiolin (a scleroprotein). ... Swarovski crystal beads Swarovski Wattens Der Firmengründer Daniel Swarovski (1862 † 1956) Swarovskistraße Wattens September 2007 Swarovski is the luxury brand name for the range of precision-cut lead crystal glass products produced by companies owned by Swarovski AG of Feldmeilen, near Zürich, Switzerland. ... For other uses, see Plastic (disambiguation). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Bark (disambiguation). ...


Plastic beads are inexpensive to make, but not easy to assemble. Hence the major cost component for making simple rosaries is the assembly effort. A large number of inexpensive rosary beads are manufactured in the orient, specially in China and Taiwan, although Italy has a strong manufacturing presence in moderate cost and high end rosaries.


Assembled rosaries are often purchased as retail religious items. Yet literally hundreds of millions of rosaries have been made and distributed free of charge by Roman Catholic volunteers worldwide. A number of rosary making clubs exist around the world for the purpose of making and distributing rosaries to missions, hospitals, prisons, etc. free of charge. The largest such non-profit organization in the United States is Our Lady's Rosary Makers whose 17,000 members annually distribute roughly 7 million free rosaries. A good number of other volunteer-based clubs and groups exist worldwide and distribute tens of millions of free rosaries every year. Our Ladys Rosary Makers is a non-profit apostolate in Louisville, Kentucky dedicated to spreading devotion to the Blessed Mother and the Rosary. ...


See also

Look up rosary in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... Catholic devotions are prayer forms which are not part of the official public liturgy of the Church but are part of the popular spiritual practices of Catholics. ... This article is about a religious devotion. ... -1... Prayer beads are traditionally used to keep count of the repetitions of prayers, chants or devotions by adherents of religion. ... Our Ladys Rosary Makers is a non-profit apostolate in Louisville, Kentucky dedicated to spreading devotion to the Blessed Mother and the Rosary. ... St. ... The Secret of the Rosary is a book about the Holy Rosary written by Saint Louis de Montfort a French priest and Catholic saint who died in 1761. ... For the new religious movement in Africa, see Legio Maria. ... An encyclical was a circular letter sent to all the churches of a particular area in the ancient Christian church. ... Pius XIIs signature Pope Pius XII (Latin: ), born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (March 2, 1876 – October 9, 1958), reigned as the 260th pope, the human head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City, from March 2, 1939 until his death in 1958. ... Ecclesiastical letters are publications or announcements of the organs of Roman Catholic ecclesiastical authority, e. ... Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: , Polish: ) born   IPA: ; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of the Roman Catholic Church and Sovereign of the State of the Vatican City from 16 October 1978, until his death, almost 27 years later, making his the second-longest... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Western Rite Orthodoxy or Western Orthodoxy or Orthodox Western Rite includes congregations and groups which are in communion with Eastern Orthodox Churches or Oriental Orthodox Churches but have retained the historic Western liturgies rather than adopting Eastern liturgies such as the Divine Liturgy of St. ... A japa mala or mala is a set of prayer beads popular in India and Tibet, often with 108 beads in number. ... Tasbeeh (Arabic: تسبیح) is, in Islam, the ritual process of glorifying or praising Allah (God) or the Prophet Muhammad. ...

References

  1. ^ "Rosary." Online Etymology Dictionary. Douglas Harper. 03 May. 2008.
  2. ^ "Rosary". Wedgewood, Hensleigh. A Dictionary of English Etymology. 2nd ed. London: Trubner & Co., 1872. pg 544.
  3. ^ Pope John Paul II's Apostolic Letter Rosarium Virginis Mariae
  4. ^ Catherine Beebe, St. Dominic and the Rosary ISBN 0898705185
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k New Advent CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: The Rosary. Retrieved on 2008-04-17.
  6. ^ O'Reilly, Bernard. True Men as We Need Them: A Book of Instruction for Men in the World. New York: P.J. Kennedy and Sons. (1878) p. 217.
  7. ^ McNicholas, J.T. "Alanus de Rupe". The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1907.
  8. ^ O'Reilly, Bernard. True Men as We Need Them: A Book of Instruction for Men in the World. New York: P.J. Kennedy and Sons. (1878) p. 217.
  9. ^ O'Reilly, Bernard. True Men as We Need Them: A Book of Instruction for Men in the World. New York: P.J. Kennedy and Sons. (1878) p. 217.
  10. ^ CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Rosary
  11. ^ CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Hail Mary
  12. ^ Catherine Beebe, St. Dominic and the Rosary ISBN 0898705185
  13. ^ New Advent CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Hail Mary
  14. ^ Rosary - LoveToKnow 1911. Retrieved on 2007-02-10.
  15. ^ Mysteries of the life of
  16. ^ New Advent CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dominic of Prussia. Retrieved on 2007-02-10.
  17. ^ New Advent CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Hail Mary. Retrieved on 2007-02-10.
  18. ^ CONSUEVERUNT ROMANI Pope Pius V. Retrieved on 2007-02-10.
  19. ^ http://books.google.com/books?id=QnsEXlVs-uwC&printsec=frontcover&dq=inauthor:Luis+inauthor:Granada+Rosario&as_brr=1&ei=EvgHSPuwD5yMjAGp0Zi8Dg
  20. ^ Online Etymology Dictionary - Rosary. Retrieved on 2007-02-10.
  21. ^ Pope Paul VI's Apostolic Letter Marialis Cultus http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/paul_vi/apost_exhortations/documents/hf_p-vi_exh_19740202_marialis-cultus_en.html
  22. ^ a b Apostolic Letter Rosarium Virginis Mariae. Retrieved on 2007-02-10.
  23. ^ "Our Lady's Rosary Makers" website. <www.olrm.org>. Access date: 15 May 2008.
  24. ^ Ann Ball, 2003 Encyclopedia of Catholic Devotions and Practices ISBN 087973910X
  25. ^ Michael Freze, 1993, Voices, Visions, and Apparitions, OSV Publishing ISBN 087973454X
  26. ^ St. Louis-Marie de Montfort, Methods for saying the rosary, first and third method
  27. ^ Rosary Prayers in German
  28. ^ Rosary Prayers in Several Languages
  29. ^ Methods for Saying the Rosary
  30. ^ Ingruentium Marlorum 13
  31. ^ Liguori, Alphonsus. The Glories of Mary. (trans. from Italian) London: Redemptorist Fathers, St. Mary's. (1852) pp. 611-614
  32. ^ New Advent CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Use of Beads at Prayers.
  33. ^ http://www.episcopalian.org/grace/anglican_rosary.htm
  34. ^ Quick Questions (This Rock: October 2004)
  35. ^ Ann Ball, 2003 Encyclopedia of Catholic Devotions and Practices ISBN 087973910X
  36. ^ Michael Freze, 1993, Voices, Visions, and Apparitions, OSV Publishing ISBN 087973454X
  37. ^ Dominican Fathers on the Rosary http://www.rosary-center.org/nconobl.htm
  38. ^ Holyrosary.org http://www.theholyrosary.org/power.html
  39. ^ Rosary promises http://www.catholic.org/clife/mary/promises.php
  40. ^ Saint Louis de Montfort http://www.themontfortacademy.org/Pages/BioStLouisdeMontfort1.html
  41. ^ De Montfort, St. Louis-Marie. Secret of the Rosary, Forty-Fourth Rose (paragraph 127)
  42. ^ Writings of Saint Louis de Montfort http://www.montfort.org.uk/Writings/MontWork.html

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Further Reading

  • Five for Sorrow, Ten for Joy: A Consideration of the Rosary by J. Neville Ward (Doubleday, 1973); revised as Five for Sorrow, Ten for Joy: Meditations on the Rosary (Seabury Classics, 2005) - an ecumenical Methodist minister's book on the Rosary. ISBN 1596280123
  • Rosary of Our Lady of Sorrows, Friar Servants of Mary, Chicago, Illinois, 1990.
  • "Stories of the Rose: The Making of the Rosary in the Middle Ages" by Anne Winston-Allen (1997, Pennsylvania State University Press) - the most current source in English on the history and development of the Rosary in its earliest years. ISBN 0-2710-1631-0
  • The Lourdes Pilgrim, by Oliver Todd, Matthew James Publishing, 2003, p. 41.
  • God Alone: The Collected Writings of St. Louis Marie De Montfort, by Saint Louis de Montfort, Montfort Publications, 1995 ISBN 0910984557
  • Pope Pius XII Rosary encyclical Ingruentium Malorum on the Vatican website
  • Pope John Paul II Apostolic Letter Rosarium Virginis Mariaeon the Vatican website

Louis-Marie Grignion de Montfort, French priest and Catholic saint, born in 31 January 1673 at Montfort and died at Saint Laurent sur Sevre on 28 April 1716. ...

External links

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Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sign of the cross (disambiguation). ... Glory Be to the Father, also known as Gloria Patri, is a doxology, a short hymn of praise to God in various Christian liturgies. ... Mea Culpa is a Latin phrase that translates into English as my fault, or my own fault. In order to emphasize the message, the adjective maxima may be inserted, resulting in mea maxima culpa, which would translate as my most [grievous] fault. ... Kyrie is the vocative case of the Greek word κύριος (kyrios - lord) and means O Lord; it is the common name of an important prayer of Christian liturgy, also called Kyrie eleison which is Greek for Lord, have mercy. ... Gloria in Excelsis Deo (Latin for Glory to God in the highest) is the title and beginning of the Great Doxology used in the Roman Catholic Mass, Divine Service of the Lutheran Church and in the services of many other [1] Christian churches. ... Icon depicting the Holy Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea holding the Nicene Creed. ... Sanctus is the Latin word for holy, and is the name of an important hymn of Christian liturgy. ... The Sermon on the Mount by Carl Heinrich Bloch. ... A lamb holding a Christian banner is a typical symbol for Agnus Dei. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The following Marian devotions are intercessions to God through the mediation of Mary, the mother of Jesus, or acts of devotions focusing on Mary . ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Hail Mary... The Salve Regina or is one of four Marian antiphons sung at different seasons. ... Alma Redemptoris Mater or, in English, Loving Mother of our Savior, is one of four liturgical Marian anthems (the other three being: Ave Maria; Salve Regina; and Queen of Heaven, Rejoice) used as a part of the office of compline. ... Ave Regina Caelorum is one of four Marian antiphons, with following versicles and prayers, traditionally said or sung after night prayer immediately before going to sleep. ... The Regina Caeli or Regina Coeli (Queen of Heaven), an ancient latin Marian Hymn of the Roman Catholic Church, is one of the four seasonal Marian antiphons of the Blessed Virgin Mary, prescribed to be sung or recited in the Liturgy of the Hours at the conclusion of the last... This article is about a religious devotion. ... The Visitation in the Book of Hours of the Duc of Berry For the David and the Giants album, see Magnificat (album) The Magnificat (also known as the Song of Mary) is a canticle frequently sung (or said) liturgically in Christian church services. ... The Fatima Prayer (pron. ... Memorare (Remember O Most Gracious Virgin Mary) is a Catholic prayer to the Blessed Virgin Mary. ... Sub tuum praesidium or, in English, Under your protection is the oldest anthem to the Blessed Virgin Mary from the see of Alexandria in the third century. ... Ave Maris Stella (Hail Star of the Sea) is a plainsong hymn to the Virgin Mary. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The... The Athanasian Creed (Quicunque vult) is a statement of Christian doctrine traditionally ascribed to St. ... The Benedictus (also Song of Zechariah or Canticle of Zachary), given in Luke 1:68-79, is one of the three great canticles in the opening chapters of this Gospel, the other two being the Magnificat and the Nunc dimittis. ... The Act of Contrition is a prayer recited by the penitent during the Latin Rite Roman Catholic sacrament of Confession. ... This article should be transwikied to Wikibooks or Wikisource Psalms 51 1 Have mercy upon me, O God, according to thy lovingkindness: according unto the multitude of thy tender mercies blot out my transgressions. ... LATIN VERSION from the Latin Bible: Latin Vulgate canticum graduum 1. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wikisource. ... The Anima Christi is an ancient devotional prayer of the Catholic Church. ... Insert non-formatted text hereTantum ergo are the opening words of the Vespers for Corpus Christi, also sung during veneration of the Blessed Sacrament. ... O Salutaris Hostia is one of three Eucharistic hymns written by St. ... The Divine Praises is a Roman Catholic prayer and an integral part of the liturgy of Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament. ... Michael the archangel by Guido Reni The Prayer to Saint Michael is a Christian prayer addressed to Michael the archangel. ... The Prayer of Saint Francis is a Christian prayer for Peace widely attributed to the 13th century saint Francis of Assisi, although the prayer in its present form cannot be traced back further than 1912, when it was printed in France in French, in a small spiritual magazine called La... Te Deum is an early Christian hymn of praise. ... Veni Creator Spiritus is a hymn normally sung in Gregorian Chant and is considered the most famous of hymns. ... In the Roman Catholic Church, the prayer Eternal Rest Grant Unto Them, O Lord is a prayer that is offered for deceased members of the Church. ... The start of the Nunc dimittis in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry The Nunc dimittis (also Song of Simeon or Canticle of Simeon) is a canticle from a text in the second chapter of Luke (Luke 2:29–32) named after its first words in Latin. ... The Preces is a prayer said by members of Roman Catholic group Opus Dei. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Rosary Introduction (819 words)
The rosary (from Latin rosarium, "rose garden") is a religious exercise where a defined number of prayers are recited and a string of beads (a chaplet, often called a rosary) is used to keep count.
Those who are faithful to recite the rosary shall have during their life and at their death the light of God and the plenitude of His graces; at the moment of death they shall participate in the merits of the saints in paradise.
"The rosary is the scourge of the devil" -- Pope Adrian VI "The rosary is a treasure of graces" -- Pope Paul V
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: The Rosary (3605 words)
That the Rosary is pre-eminently the prayer of the people adapted alike for the use of simple and learned is proved not only by the long series of papal utterances by which it has been commended to the faithful but by the daily experience of all who are familiar with it.
The Russian rosary is divided by the four large beads so as to represent the different parts of the canonical Office which the recitation of the rosary replaces, while the four large beads themselves represent the four Evangelists.
In Russian monasteries the rosary is usually said five times a day, while in the recitation of it the "great reverences" are reduced to ten, the remainder being simply sixty "little reverences" (bowing of the head no further than the waist) and sixty recitations of the penitential form of the prescribed prayer.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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