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Encyclopedia > Ronald D. Moore
Ronald D. Moore

Ron Moore at a Battlestar Galactica Convention
Born: July 5, 1964 (1964-07-05) (age 43)
Chowchilla, California
Occupation: Screenwriter/Television producer
Nationality: American
Genres: Drama/Science Fiction
Debut works: ST:TNG episode "The Bonding"

Ronald Dowl Moore (born 1964 in Chowchilla, California) is an Emmy-nominated American screenwriter and television producer who is known for his work on Star Trek and the re-imagined Battlestar Galactica television series, which he created and runs. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (841x2021, 234 KB)Ronald D. Moore at a Battlestar Galactica Convention on August 27, 2006 in Burbank, California, taken by User:Cbrown1023s father. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Chowchilla is a city in Madera County, California, United States. ... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... Screenwriters, scenarists or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... A Television producer oversees the making of television penis programs. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... The Bonding was the 53rd episode of the science fiction television series Star Trek: The Next Generation and the fifth episode of the shows third season. ... Ronald Moore may refer to: Ronald D. Moore - Screenwriter and television producer Ronald B. Moore - Visual Effects Supervisor for several Star Trek productions. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Chowchilla is a city in Madera County, California, United States. ... An Emmy Award. ... Screenwriters, scenarists or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... A Television producer oversees the making of television penis programs. ... The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. ... The Battlestar Galactica science fiction franchise, which began as a 1978 TV series, was reimagined in 2003 into the TV miniseries. ... Show runner (alternatively showrunner,[1] or show-runner)[2] is a term used in the United States television industry referring to the person who is responsible for the day-to-day operation of a television series, in other words, the person who runs the show. ...

Contents

Background

Growing up in Chowchilla as the son of a teacher and school superintendent who moonlighted as a football coach, Moore dabbled in writing and drama in high school. He went on to study Government at Cornell University, originally on a Navy ROTC scholarship, but failed his senior year after losing interest in his studies. He was then disqualified from Navy service due to a high school knee injury. He did serve for one summer on the frigate USS W. S. Sims.[1] “Cornell” redirects here. ... The multinational Combined Task Force One Five Zero (CTF-150) The British Grand Fleet, the supreme naval force of World War I A rare occurrence of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ... ROTC links here. ... The USS (FF-1059) was a Knox class frigate. ...


During his time at Cornell, he became a brother of the Kappa Alpha Society[2]. The Kappa Alpha Society (ΚΑ), founded in 1825, is the progenitor of the modern fraternity system in North America according to Bairds Manual. ...


Career

Star Trek: The Next Generation

In 1988, he managed to arrange a tour of the Star Trek: The Next Generation sets through his girlfriend. While on the tour, he passed a script to one of Gene Roddenberry's assistants, who liked the script enough to help him get an agent who submitted the script through the proper channels. About seven months later, executive producer Michael Piller read the script, bought it and it became the third season episode "The Bonding". Based on that script he was offered the opportunity to write a second script and that led to a staff position as a script editor. Two years later, he was promoted to co-producer, then producer for the series' final year (1994). Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... Eugene Wesley Roddenberry (August 19, 1921 – October 24, 1991) was an American scriptwriter and producer. ... Michael Piller (born May 30, 1948) is an American television and cinema screenwriter. ... The Bonding was the 53rd episode of the science fiction television series Star Trek: The Next Generation and the fifth episode of the shows third season. ... Script Editor is a program included with Mac OS that allows AppleScripts to be written, debugged, and ran. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ...


Moore developed a reputation as the Klingon expert on the writing staff, being responsible for writing a number of episodes that developed the Klingon race and culture, starting with "Sins of the Father" which introduced the Klingon homeworld, the Klingon High Council and the Klingon Chancellor and continuing with "Reunion", "Redemption, Part 1 and 2", "Ethics" and "Rightful Heir". This article is about the fictional race. ... Sins of the Father is the title of an episode from the third season of Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... Redemption is the name of a two-part Star Trek: The Next Generation episode. ... Ethics is a fifth season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... Rightful Heir was the 149th episode of the science fiction television series Star Trek: The Next Generation and the 22nd episode of the shows sixth season. ...


During his time on The Next Generation, he was credited with writing or co-writing 27 episodes. A number of times he co-wrote episodes with Brannon Braga, developing a successful working relationship that led to them being offered the chance to write the series television finale, "All Good Things..." (which won the 1995 Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation). The series also received an Emmy Award nomination in its final year for Outstanding Drama Series, losing to Picket Fences. Brannon Braga at a 2006 lecture Brannon Braga (born August 14, 1965 in Bozeman, Montana) is an American television producer and screenwriter who is mostly known for his significant contributions to the Star Trek series since 1990. ... All Good Things. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... The Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation is one of the annual Hugo Award categories, presented by members of the World Science Fiction Convention. ... An Emmy Award. ... Picket Fences is a 60-minute drama which initially ran from September 18, 1992 to June 26, 1996 on the CBS television network in the United States. ...


The pair also wrote the screenplay for the Next Generation crew's first big screen appearance, Star Trek: Generations; it was Moore's idea to kill off original Star Trek captain James T. Kirk in that movie. [1] Star Trek: Generations (Paramount Pictures, 1994, see also 1994 in film) is the seventh feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... James Tiberius Kirk, played by William Shatner, is the main character in the original Star Trek television series and the films based on it. ...


Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Moore then joined the production staff of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine for its third season as a supervising producer, being promoted to a co-executive producer position for the series' final two years. During this time he also worked again with Braga on the script for the second Next Generation motion picture, Star Trek: First Contact and on a draft of the Mission: Impossible II script that was re-written by Robert Towne for which they received a "story by" credit. Space station Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (ST:DS9 or STDS9 or DS9 for short) is a science fiction television series produced by Paramount and set in the Star Trek universe. ... Star Trek: First Contact (Paramount Pictures, 1996; see also 1996 in film), is the eighth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Mission: Impossible II, or M:I-2 as it is also known, is the 2000 John Woo-directed sequel to Brian De Palmas 1996 Mission: Impossible motion picture, based on the TV series of the same name. ... Towne in the 1960 movie Last Woman on Earth Robert Towne (born November 23, 1934) is an American actor, screenwriter and director. ...


During his time on Deep Space Nine, he continued to write episodes that expanded on Klingon culture such as "The House of Quark", "Sons of Mogh", "Rules of Engagement", "Looking for par'Mach in All the Wrong Places", "Soldiers of the Empire", "You Are Cordially Invited..." and "Once More Unto the Breach". He also wrote episodes that dealt with controversial subjects such as genetic engineering ("Doctor Bashir, I Presume?"), co-wrote the episode that featured Star Trek's first same-sex kiss ("Rejoined") and killed off another popular character, Vedek Bareil Antos ("Life Support"). The House of Quark is an episode of Star Trek:Deep Space Nine, the third episode of the third season. ... Sons of Mogh is the fourteenth episode of the fourth season of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. ... Rules of Engagement is the title of a fourth season episode of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. ... Looking for parMach in All the Wrong Places is a fifth season episode of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and the 99th of the series. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it more accessible to a general audience, this article may require cleanup. ... You are Cordially Invited. ... Once More Unto the Breach is an episode from the seventh season of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. ... An iconic image of genetic engineering; this autoluminograph from 1986 of a glowing transgenic tobacco plant bearing the luciferase gene, illustrating the possibilities of genetic engineering. ... Doctor Bashir, I Presume? features a familiar face from Star Trek: Voyager: Robert Picardo. ... The Passenger is the sixth episode in the fourth season of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, Bareil Antos was a Bajoran Vedek. ... Life Support is the title of a third season episode of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. ...


During his time on Deep Space Nine, he also made an effort to engage with fans; frequently posting on AOL forums where he would answer fan questions or address their concerns about the show,[3] a practice he has continued with Battlestar Galactica through his weblog and in his podcasts. It has been suggested that AOL search data scandal be merged into this article or section. ... An orange square with waves indicates that an RSS feed is present on a web page. ...


Star Trek: Voyager

With the end of Deep Space Nine in 1999, Moore transferred over to the production staff of Star Trek: Voyager at the start of its sixth season, where his writing partner Braga was executive producer. However Moore left Voyager only a matter of weeks later, with "Survival Instinct" and "Barge of the Dead" as his only credits. In a January 2000 interview for Cinescape magazine, Moore cited problems in his working relationship with Brannon Braga for his short stay: This article is about the year. ... The starship Voyager (NCC-74656), an Intrepid-class starship. ... Survival Instinct is the second episode of the sixth season of the television series Star Trek: Voyager. ... Barge of the Dead is an episode of the science fiction television series Star Trek:Voyager, the third episode of the sixth season. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Brannon Braga at a 2006 lecture Brannon Braga (born August 14, 1965 in Bozeman, Montana) is an American television producer and screenwriter who is mostly known for his significant contributions to the Star Trek series since 1990. ...

"I have very hurt feelings about Brannon. What happened between he and I is just between he and I. It was a breakdown of trust. I would have quit any show where I was not allowed to participate in the process like that. I wasn’t allowed to participate in the process, and I wasn’t part of the show. I felt like I was freelancing my own show. ... I was very disappointed that my long-time friend and writing partner acted in that manner, that crossed lines to the point where I felt like I had to walk away from STAR TREK, which was something that meant a lot to me for a very long time, from my childhood right through my entire professional career." [4]

Since he left Voyager, Moore has often been suggested by fans as a possible successor to head the Trek franchise.


Post-Trek

After leaving Voyager, Moore briefly worked as a consulting producer on Good vs Evil before joining Roswell as a co-executive producer and staff writer at the start of its second season in 2000. Moore and series creator Jason Katims jointly ran Roswell until the show ended in 2002. Moore wrote some of the show's most popular episodes, including "Ask Not" and the series finale "Graduation," which he co-wrote with Katims. He also wrote the episode "Cry Your Name." To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Jason Katims works in the television industry as a writer and producer. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


During this time, Moore also developed a pilot based on Anne McCaffrey's Dragonriders of Pern for The WB, but production on the project was halted due to 'creative differences' between Moore and the network. Anne Inez McCaffrey (born April 1, 1926) is an American science fiction author best known for her Dragonriders of Pern series. ... The Dragonriders of Pern is an extensive fantasy/science fiction series of novels and short stories primarily written by Anne McCaffrey. ... The WB Television Network, casually referred to as The WB, or sometimes as The Frog (referring to the networks former mascot, the animated character Michigan J. Frog), is a television network in the United States, founded as a joint venture between the Warner Bros. ...


In 2002, after a previous attempt by Bryan Singer and Tom DeSanto had failed, David Eick (whom Moore worked with on Good vs Evil) approached Moore about a new four-hour Battlestar Galactica mini-series for Universal. Moore developed the mini-series with Eick, writing the scripts and updating the old series, also developing a back-story that could work for a regular weekly series should the mini-series be successful. At the same time, Moore was approached by HBO about running a new television series called Carnivàle, however they decided to offer the position to Henry Bromell instead and offered Moore a consultant position on the writing staff. He accepted, but then Bromell left soon after production started and Moore became show runner. While Moore worked on the first year of Carnivàle, Eick ran the day-to-day production of the Galactica mini-series in Canada. Galactica aired in 2003 to record ratings, being the highest-rated miniseries on cable that year and receiving the best ratings for any show on Sci-Fi in 2003. After Carnivàle reached the end of its first season and the Sci-Fi Channel ordered a thirteen episode weekly series of Galactica, Moore left Carnivàle to assume a full-time executive producer role on Galactica. Also see: 2002 (number). ... Bryan Singer (born September 17, 1965) is an American film director. ... Tom DeSanto (born in Edison, New Jersey, 1968) is an American film producer and screenwriter. ... David Eick (born 1968) is a producer, best known as the producer of Battlestar Galactica. ... HBO (Home Box Office) is a premium cable television network with headquarters in New York City. ... Carnivàle, pronounced // (“car-nih-VAL”), was an American dramatic television series produced by HBO. Created by Daniel Knauf, it starred Nick Stahl and Clancy Brown. ... Henry Bromell (born 1947) is an American author, screenwriter, and director. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Moore is currently working on the script for the remake of the 1982 B-movie, The Thing.[5] This article is about the 1982 remake of The Thing from Another World. ...


Battlestar Galactica

The Galactica series debuted in October 2004 in the United Kingdom and January 2005 in the United States. Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Moore's re-imagining of Galactica is noted for taking a more serious tone than its predecessor, something that was foreshadowed in the January 2000 Cinescape interview, where he discussed what he saw as the root problem with Voyager. Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ...

"The premise has a lot of possibilities. Before it aired, I was at a convention in Pasadena, and Sternbach and Okuda were on stage, and they were answering questions from the audience about the new ship. It was all very technical, and they were talking about the fact that in the premise this ship was going to have problems. It wasn’t going to have unlimited sources of energy. It wasn’t going to have all the doodads of the Enterprise. It was going to be rougher, fending for themselves more, having to trade to get supplies that they want. That didn’t happen. It doesn’t happen at all, and it’s a lie to the audience. I think the audience intuitively knows when something is true and something is not true. Voyager is not true. If it were true, the ship would not look spic-and-span every week, after all these battles it goes through. How many times has the bridge been destroyed? How many shuttlecrafts have vanished, and another one just comes out of the oven? That kind of bullshitting the audience I think takes its toll. At some point the audience stops taking it seriously, because they know that this is not really the way this would happen. These people wouldn’t act like this." [6]

Moore wrote the first two episodes of the new series, with the first episode "33" winning the 2005 Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form, the second that Moore has received during his career.[7] In 2007, Moore was nominated once again for an Emmy Award for writing the episodes Occupation and Precipice, which aired together as the third season opener.[8] Richard Michael Sternbach (born in 1951 in Bridgeport Connecticut) is an illustrator who is best known for his space illustrations and his work on the Star Trek television series. ... Michael Okuda is an graphic designer who is best known for his work on Star Trek. ... 33 is the pilot episode of the reimagined Battlestar Galactica television series. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Hugo Awards are given annually by members of the World Science Fiction Convention for the best science fiction or fantasy works. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... An Emmy Award. ... Occupation is the season premiere of the third season of Battlestar Galactica. ... Precipice is the second episode of the third season from the science fiction television series Battlestar Galactica. ...


With the success of Battlestar Galactica, the Sci Fi Channel announced in April 2006 that Moore and fellow Galactica executive producer David Eick would be producing a spin-off called Caprica with 24 scriptwriter Remi Aubuchon and NBC Universal Television Studio. This show will be set 50 years before the events of the series and deal with the creation of the Cylon race. [9] David Eick (born 1968) is a producer, best known as the producer of Battlestar Galactica. ... This article is about the television series. ... For other uses, see 24 (disambiguation). ... Remi Aubuchon is an American screenwriter. ... NBC Universal Television Studio is the sister television arm of NBC Universal, formerly known in other incarnations as Revue Studios, and Universal Television. ... Old Cylon Centurion shown in a museum display in the 2003 Battlestar Galactica miniseries The Cylons are a cybernetic civilization at war with the Twelve Colonies of humanity in the Battlestar Galactica science fiction franchise, in the original 1978/1980 series and movie, as well as the 2003 reimagining. ...


Awards

Emmy Awards An Emmy Award. ...

Hugo Awards The Primetime Emmy Award for best drama has changed names many times in its history. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... The 59th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards will be held at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, California on Sunday, September 16, 2007 and will be telivised on FOX at 8:00 p. ... This article is about the 2004 television series. ... Occupation is the season premiere of the third season of Battlestar Galactica. ... Precipice is the second episode of the third season from the science fiction television series Battlestar Galactica. ... The Hugo Award is given every year for the best science fiction or fantasy stories of the previous year, and for related areas in fandom, art and dramatic presentation. ...

Peabody Awards The Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation is one of the annual Hugo Award categories, presented by members of the World Science Fiction Convention. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... All Good Things. ... The Hugo Awards are given annually by members of the World Science Fiction Convention for the best science fiction or fantasy works. ... This article is about the 2004 television series. ... 33 is the pilot episode of the reimagined Battlestar Galactica television series. ... The George Foster Peabody Awards, more commonly known as simply the Peabody Awards, are annual awards given for excellence in radio and television broadcasting and cable television within the United States. ...

The George Foster Peabody Awards, more commonly referred to as the Peabody Awards, are annual international awards given for excellence in radio and television broadcasting. ... This article is about the 2004 television series. ...

References

  1. ^ Podcast:The Captain's Hand. battlestarwiki.org. Retrieved on 2007-03-25. Transcript of the official podcast.
  2. ^ Robert Falconer (April 2, 2004). Fashioning Verisimilitude. Hollywood North Report. Retrieved on 2006-11-19.
  3. ^ Ronald D. Moore. Ronald D. Moore Q&A Archive. TrekWeb.com. Retrieved on 2007-01-21.
  4. ^ Anna L. Kaplan (January 18, 2000). STAR TREK Profile: Fan-Writer-Producer Ronald D. Moore Part 1. Cinescape. Retrieved on 2005-10-20.
  5. ^ Battlestar Galactica: Ronald Moore talks about Earth
  6. ^ Anna L. Kaplan (January 19, 2000). STAR TREK: Ronald D. Moore, Part II. Cinescape. Retrieved on 2005-10-20.
  7. ^ Hugo Awards by Year (2005). Retrieved on 2007-07-21.
  8. ^ John Kubicek (July 19, 2007). Emmys Finally Notice 'Battlestar Galactica'. BuddyTV. Retrieved on 2007-07-21.
  9. ^ SCI FI Announces Caprica. SCI FI Wire (April 27, 2006).

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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