FACTOID # 18: Alaska spends more money per capita on elementary and secondary education than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Romsey" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Romsey
Romsey


Arms of Romsey Town Council Romsey is a town in Victoria, Australia with a population of about 4,500. ... Arms of Romsey Town Council. ...


Romsey shown within Hampshire
District Test Valley
Shire county Hampshire
Region South East
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town ROMSEY
Postcode district SO51
Dialling code 01794
Police Hampshire
Fire Hampshire
Ambulance South Central
UK Parliament Romsey
European Parliament South East England
Website: Romsey Town Council
List of places: UKEnglandHampshire

Coordinates: 50°59′20″N 1°29′48″W / 50.989, -1.4966 Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Test Valley is a local government district and borough in Hampshire, England. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... South East England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping, concerning these countries; thus the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has used the phrase in reference to the parts of former Yugoslavia... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The SO postcode area, also known as the Southampton postcode area[1], is a group of postal districts around Alresford, Brockenhurst, Eastleigh, Lymington, Lyndhurst, Romsey, Southampton, Stockbridge and Winchester in England. ... +44 redirects here. ... Hampshire Constabulary is the Home Office police force responsible for policing Hampshire and the Isle of Wight in southern England. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for the area of Hampshire, on the south coast of England. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The South Central Ambulance Service NHS Trust is the authority responsible for providing NHS ambulance services in Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hampshire, Milton Keynes, Oxfordshire, Portsmouth, and Southampton, in the South East England region. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Romsey is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... South East England is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a list of settlements and places of interest in the ceremonial county of Hampshire, England. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Romsey, located at 50°59′21″N, 1°29′51″W (50.9890, -1.4994) is a small market town, in the county of Hampshire, England. For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


It is 8 miles (13 km) north-west of Southampton and 11 miles (18 km) south-west of Winchester. Just under 13,000 people live in Romsey, which has an area of about 4.93 square kilometres[1]. “Miles” redirects here. ... “km” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... Winchester is a historic city in southern England, with a population of around 40,000 within a 3 mile radius of its centre. ...


Romsey lies on the River Test, which is famous for fly fishing, predominantly trout.[2]. It is one of the principal towns in the Test Valley Borough. A large Norman abbey dominates the centre of the town. The Test downstream of Sadlers Mill, Romsey The Test is tidal in Southampton and is lined with quays The River Test is a river in Hampshire, England. ... Fly rod and reel with a wild brown trout from a chalk stream. ... Rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss Biwa trout (or Biwa salmon), Oncorhynchus masou rhodurus Trout is the common name given to a number of species of freshwater fish belonging to the salmon family, Salmonidae. ... Test Valley is a local government district and borough in Hampshire, England. ... Norman conquests in red. ...


Romsey was home of the late Lord Mountbatten of Burma, the 19th century British prime minister Lord Palmerston, and the 17th century philosopher and economist William Petty. Admiral of the Fleet Louis Francis Albert Victor Nicholas George Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, KG, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCIE, GCVO, DSO, PC (25 June 1900–27 August 1979) was a British admiral and statesman and an uncle of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ... The Right Honourable Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (October 20, 1784 - October 18, 1865) was a British statesman who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in the mid 19th century. ... Sir William Petty (May 27, 1623 – December 16, 1687) was an English economist, scientist and philosopher. ...


Romsey's MP has been Sandra Gidley of the Liberal Democrats since a by-election in 2000 after the previous Conservative MP Michael Colvin died with his wife in a house fire[3]. Gidley's majority was cut to 125 votes in the 2005 General Election, possibly because she was targeted by supporters of fox hunting[4]. Sandra Gidley. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Michael Keith Beale Colvin (1932–2000) was a politician in the United Kingdom. ... It has been suggested that Marginal constituencies in the United Kingdom be merged into this article or section. ...


Romsey is twinned with Paimpol in Brittany, France and Battenberg, Germany[5]. Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ... Paimpol (Pempoull in Breton) is a small town with an approximate population of 10,000 people and it is also a commune of the Côtes-dArmor département, in the French region of Brittany. ... Historical province of Brittany, showing the main areas with their name in Breton language The traditional flag of Brittany (the Gwenn-ha-du), formerly a Breton nationalist symbol but today used as a general civic flag in the region. ... Battenberg (Eder) is a town of 5000 inhabitants in Northern Hesse, Germany. ...

Contents

History

Romsey town centre
Romsey town centre

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 462 KB)Romsey town centre, Hampshire, UK, including a statue of Lord Palmerston. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 462 KB)Romsey town centre, Hampshire, UK, including a statue of Lord Palmerston. ...

Middle Ages to The Civil War

The name Romsey is believed to have originated from the term Rūm's Eg, meaning "Rūm's area surrounded by marsh". Rūm is probably an abbreviated form of a personal name, like Rūmwald (glorious leader).


What was to become Romsey Abbey was founded in 907 AD. Nuns, led by Elflaeda daughter of Edward the Elder, son of Alfred the Great, founded a community — at his direction — in what was then a small village. Later, King Edgar refounded the nunnery, circa 960 AD, as a Benedictine house under the rule of St. Ethelflaeda whose devotional acts included chanting psalms while standing naked in the cold water of the River Test. Romsey Abbey. ... Events Oleg leads Kievan Rus in a campaign against Constantinople Yelü Abaoji establishes Liao (Khitan) dynasty Births Deaths Categories: 907 ... Edward the Elder (Old English: Ä’adweard se Ieldra) (c. ... For the 10th century Bishop of Sherborne, see Alfred (bishop). ... This article is about an abbey as a religious building. ... Events Edgar the Peaceable crowned King of England. ... For the college, see Benedictine College. ... Psalms (from the Greek: Psalmoi) (originally meaning songs sung to a harp, from psallein play on a stringed instrument, Ψαλμοί; Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים, or praises) is a book of the Hebrew Bible, Tanakh or Old Testament. ... The Test downstream of Sadlers Mill, Romsey The Test is tidal in Southampton and is lined with quays The River Test is a river in Hampshire, England. ...


The village swelled alongside the religious community. The CBK sacked Romsey in 993 AD, burning down the church. But the village recovered, and the abbey was rebuilt in stone in circa 1000 AD. The religious community flourished as a seat of learning — especially for the children of the nobility. A market was established outside the abbey gates. Events July 4 - Saint Ulrich of Augsburg canonized Births Deaths Categories: 993 ... Europe in 1000 The year 1000 of the Gregorian Calendar was the last year of the 10th century as well as the last year of the first millennium. ...


The Normans built the large current abbey that dominates the town (between circa 1120 and 1140 AD) on the site of the original Saxon church. By 1240 AD, 100 nuns lived in the convent. Norman conquests in red. ... Events Welcher of Malvern creates a system of measurement for the earth using degrees, minutes, and seconds of latitude and longitude. ... Events Henry Jasomirgott was made count palatine of the Rhine. ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... Events Batu Khan and the Golden Horde sack the Ruthenian city of Kyiv Births Pope Benedict XI Deaths April 11 - Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, also known as Llywelyn The Great Prince of Gwynedd Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Castile...


King Henry I granted Romsey its first charter. This allowed a market to be held every Sunday, and a four-day annual fair in May. In the 13th century, Henry III permitted an additional fair in October. Henry I (c. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John Lackland as King of England, reigning for fifty-six years from 1216 to his death. ...


The lucrative woollen industry appears to have powered Romsey's growth during the Middle Ages. Wool was woven and then fulled — pounded with wooden hammers whilst being washed. It was dyed, and then exported from nearby Southampton. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... For other uses, see Wool (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ...


Romsey continued to grow and prosper until plague struck the town in 1348-9. The Black Death is thought to have killed up to half of the Romsey's population of 1000. The number of nuns fell as low as 19. Prosperity never returned to the abbey. It was finally suppressed by Henry VIII during the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1539. Many religious buildings were destroyed during this time. The bubonic plague or bubonic fever is the best-known variant of the deadly infectious disease caused by the enterobacteria Yersinia pestis (Pasteurella pestis). ... April 7 - Charles University is founded in Prague. ... // Events January 9 - The Jewish population of Basel, Switzerland is rounded up and incinerated, believed by the residents to be the cause of the ongoing bubonic plague. ... This article concerns the mid fourteenth century pandemic. ... “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... For other uses of the term dissolution see Dissolution. ... Events May 30 - In Florida, Hernando de Soto lands at Tampa Bay with 600 soldiers with the goal to find gold. ...


But the abbey was saved from demolition because part of it was a parish church for the people of Romsey. The town purchased the abbey from the Crown for £100 in 1544. Ironically, the part of the abbey that had saved the abbey, the church of St Lawrence, was then demolished. This article refers to the Commonwealths concept of the monarchys legal authority. ... Events April 11 - Battle of Ceresole - French forces under the Comte dEnghien defeat Imperial forces under the Marques Del Vasto near Turin. ... This page concerns the Christian martyr. ...


By the mid-16th century Romsey's population was about 1,500; its woollen and tanning industries fuelled growth. On 6th April 1607 King James I granted the town a charter making it a borough. This gave official status to an informal local government that had been running the affairs of the town since the Dissolution of Romsey Abbey in 1539. Romsey could now have a corporation comprising a mayor, six aldermen and twelve chief burgesses, with a town clerk for 'office work'. Furthermore, there was to be a local law court under a Court Recorder, assisted by two sergeants-at-mace. Over all, was the prestigious position of High Steward, the first of whom was the Earl of Southampton. (Lord Brabourne, grandson of Lord Mountbatten of Burma, is the current High Steward.) Year 1607 (MDCVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Look up Borough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Events May 30 - In Florida, Hernando de Soto lands at Tampa Bay with 600 soldiers with the goal to find gold. ... Admiral of the Fleet Louis Francis Albert Victor Nicholas George Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, KG, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCIE, GCVO, DSO, PC (25 June 1900–27 August 1979) was a British admiral and statesman and an uncle of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ...


Romsey changed hands several times during the English Civil War. Both Royalist and Parliamentary or Roundhead troops occupied and plundered the town. Royalists remained in control of the borough until January 1645. For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... Prince Rupert of the Rhine Cavaliers was the name used by Parliamentarians for the Royalist supporters of King Charles I during the English Civil War (1642–1651). ... A parliamentarian is a specialist in parliamentary procedure. ... The Roundheads was the nickname given to the supporters of Parliament during the English Civil War. ... // Events January 10 - Archbishop Laud executed on Tower Hill, London. ...


The 18th, 19th and 20th centuries

The town's woollen industry survived until the middle of the 18th century, but was beaten by competition from the north of England. But new fast-growing enterprises soon filled the gap with brewing, papermaking and sackmaking — all reliant upon the abundant waters of the Test. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... A 16th century brewer A 21st century brewer This article concerns the production of alcoholic beverages. ... The Diamond Sutra of the Chinese Tang Dynasty, the oldest dated printed book in the world, found at Dunhuang, from 868 AD. Papermaking is the process of making paper, a material which is ubiquitous today for writing and packaging. ...


By 1794 a canal connected Romsey to Redbridge — at the mouth of the River Test — and Andover. Industry continued to grow. Romsey was a reasonably large town for the early 19th century: its population was 4,274 in the first census of 1801 — compared with just 8,000 for Southampton. 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Canal (disambiguation). ... Redbridge is a district of the city of Southampton. ... The Test downstream of Sadlers Mill, Romsey The Test is tidal in Southampton and is lined with quays The River Test is a river in Hampshire, England. ... Statistics Population: 52,000 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SU3645 Administration District: Test Valley Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Hampshire Historic county: Hampshire Services Police force: Hampshire Constabulary Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South Central Post office and telephone Post town... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ...


But expansion slowed, despite the railway arriving in 1847. In 1851 Romsey's population was 5,654 and was almost the same half a century later (5,597 in the 1901 census). 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Lord Palmerston, the 19th century British Prime Minister, was born and lived at Broadlands, a large country estate on the outskirts of the town. His statue stands in the Market Place outside the Town Hall. The Right Honourable Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (October 20, 1784 - October 18, 1865) was a British statesman who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in the mid 19th century. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... Broadlands Estate, Romsey. ...


Romsey was famous for making collapsible boats during the 19th and early 20th centuries, invented by the Rev. Edward Lyon Berthon in 1851. The Berthon Boatyard in Romsey made the boats from 1870 until 1917. They were used as lifeboats on ocean-going liners, including the Titanic. For other uses, see Titanic (disambiguation). ...


Broadlands later became the home of Lord Mountbatten of Burma, known locally as "Lord Louis". He was buried in Romsey Abbey after being killed in an IRA bomb explosion in Ireland on 27 August 1979. In 1947, Mountbatten was given his earldom and the lesser title "Baron Romsey, of Romsey in the County of Southampton". Admiral of the Fleet Louis Francis Albert Victor Nicholas George Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, KG, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCIE, GCVO, DSO, PC (25 June 1900–27 August 1979) was a British admiral and statesman and an uncle of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (Irish: Óglaigh na hÉireann) (IRA; also referred to as the PIRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the Army or the RA.[2]) is an Irish Republican, left wing[3] paramilitary organisation that, until the Belfast Agreement, sought to end Northern... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


After Lord Mountbatten of Burma died, his titles passed to his elder daughter, Lady Brabourne, who thus became Lady Mountbatten of Burma. Her eldest son was styled by the courtesy title "Lord Romsey" until he inherited the title of Lord Brabourne in 2005[6]. Patricia Edwina Victoria Mountbatten, 2nd Countess Mountbatten of Burma (born February 14, 1924) succeeded her father, the 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, when he was assassinated in 1979. ... A courtesy title is a form of address in the British peerage system used for wives, children, and other close relatives of a peer. ...


The Prince and Princess of Wales spent the first night of their honeymoon at Broadlands “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... Princess Diana redirects here. ... Broadlands Estate, Romsey. ...


During 2007 Romsey celebrated the 400th Anniversary of the granting of its Charter by King James I with a programme of events from March through September, including a visit on 8 June from the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh [7]. Subsequently. the cost of the visit has created some local political controversy [8].


Present Day

Romsey today appears to be in sound economic health. Whilst there is significant commuting out of the town for work - particularly to Southampton and Winchester and also, to some extent, London - it could not be described as a dormitory town. This article or section should be merged with Bedroom community A dormitory town is generally a rural town where a large proportion of its population commute to nearby cities. ...


Whilst heavy industry in the town has long since declined, three industrial and trading estates focus mainly on service industries and small scale manufacturing. Three major scientific and high tech employers - Roke Manor Research, Chilworth Science Park and IBM - have large establishments in the nearby countryside. Heavy industry does not have a single fixed meaning compared to light industry. ... An industrial park is an area of land set aside for industrial development. ... The tertiary sector of industry, also called the service sector or the service industry, is one of the three main industrial categories of a developed economy, the others being the secondary industry (manufacturing and primary goods production such as agriculture), and primary industry (extraction such as mining and fishing). ... Manufacturing (from Latin manu factura, making by hand) is the use of tools and labor to make things for use or sale. ... For other uses, see IBM (disambiguation) and Big Blue. ...


The recently-renovated town centre contains a Waitrose supermarket, a small department store, and over 100 other retail outlets of various kinds, including both high street chains and local independent shops. Unlike some similar market towns, shop vacancy rates in Romsey are currently very low. [citation needed] The town centre is usually the commercial or geographical centre of a town. ... Waitrose is a British supermarket chain owned by the John Lewis Partnership, with 184 branches (November 2006). ... Packaged food aisles in a Fred Meyer store in Portland, Oregon A supermarket is a departmentalized self-service store offering a wide variety of food and household merchandise. ... The interior of a typical Macys department store. ... Chain stores are a range of retail outlets which share a brand and central management, usually with standardised business methods and practices. ...


Mills and milling

Sadler's Mill
Sadler's Mill

Watermills have played an important part in Romsey's history as an industrial town. The Domesday Book of 1086 provides the earliest record of watermills in Romsey, which identifies three (possibly four) mills. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1840x1232, 846 KB) Sadlers Mill, Romsey, Hampshire, England South East Elevation Autumn 2005 Source: Anthony de Sigley File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1840x1232, 846 KB) Sadlers Mill, Romsey, Hampshire, England South East Elevation Autumn 2005 Source: Anthony de Sigley File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A watermill is a machine constructed by connecting a water wheel to a pair of millstones. ... A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... Events Domesday Book is completed in England Emperor Shirakawa of Japan starts his cloistered rule Imam Ali Mosque is rebuilt by the Seljuk Malik Shah I after being destroyed by fire. ... Watermill of Braine-le-Château, Belgium (12th century) A watermill is a structure that uses a water wheel or turbine to drive a mechanical process such as flour or lumber production, or metal shaping (rolling, grinding or wire drawing). ...


Sadler's Mill is probably the best known of Romsey's surviving mills and is apparently the only mill to be developed on the main course of the River Test. The existence of Sadler's Mill is first recorded in the 16th century, when it was owned by the manor of Great and Little Spursholt. Functioning as a corn and grist mill, it has passed through a succession of owners including Lord Palmerston who rebuilt it in 1747 and sold it in 1777 to one Benjamin Dawkins. Following another succession of owners it returned to the Broadlands estate in 1889. Milling ceased in 1932, when the mill building became redundant. The Broadlands estate sold the building in 2003, at which point it was close to collapse having been derelict for many years. The new owners, Anthony and Sarah de Sigley, restored the building in 2005, rebuilding much of the original structure. During the restoration evidence of an earlier structure was found; carbon 14 dating established the age of this to be circa 1650. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Test downstream of Sadlers Mill, Romsey The Test is tidal in Southampton and is lined with quays The River Test is a river in Hampshire, England. ... Henry Temple, 1st Viscount Palmerston (c. ... Year 1747 (MDCCXLVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Broadlands Estate, Romsey. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Broadlands Estate, Romsey. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Radiocarbon dating is a radiometric dating method that uses the naturally occurring isotope carbon-14 (14C) to determine the age of carbonaceous materials up to about 60,000 years. ... Year 1650 (MDCL) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Yearly and Other Events

The Mayor's Picnic takes place in early-mid summer and is held in Romsey's Memorial Park. There is music performed by local schools, a variety of stalls, and the popular Duck Race, in which numbered plastic ducks 'race' each other along the river Test, to be scrupulously retrieved before awarding a prize to whoever chose the winning duck.


The Beggars Fair is held in the streets and pubs of Romsey on the 2nd Saturday in July. It is a free festival featuring all types of music, together with dance and other street entertainment.


Romsey Carnival week takes place during a week in July with the highlight being the procession through the streets of Romsey on the final Saturday evening. In the last few years the number of floats and number of people turning out for the event has fallen markedly, raising fears in the local press about its future.


The Romsey Show is a large agricultural show which takes place every September at Broadlands. In addition, Broadlands has twice hosted the CLA Game Fair, the largest agricultural show in the world, most recently in September 2007.


The Winter Carnival takes places each year when Romsey's Christmas lights are switched on.


Shortly afterwards, on a Friday evening in December, to the delight of local children, Santa Claus appears on the rooftops, to be rescued by the local fire brigade, who bring a vintage fire-engine to the event. This marks the beginning of Romsey's Christmas late night shopping. A typical depiction of Santa Claus. ...


The Romsey Arts Festival occurs every 3 years, showcasing talent from local area. The next festival is due in 2008.


Romsey Charter Celebrations 1607-2007 Programme of Events run from 21st March to 30th September 2007.


People from Romsey

Wilbert Vere Awdry, OBE, (June 15, 1911 – March 21, 1997), better known as the Reverend W. Awdry, was a clergyman, railway enthusiast and childrens author. ... Enthusiasm (from Gr. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: The Railway Series The Railway Series is a set of story books about a fictional railway system located on the fictional Island of Sodor and the engines that lived on it. ... Thomas the Tank Engine This article is about the fictional tank engine. ... For other persons of the same name, see Charles Butler. ... Martin Butler (born in 1960, in Romsey, Hampshire, England) is a musician and composer of classical music. ... Andy Cook (born Andrew Charles Cook, 10 August 1969, in Romsey, Hampshire, England) is a former professional football player. ... Southampton Football Club is a professional English football team, nicknamed The Saints and based in the city of Southampton. ... Portsmouth Football Club are an English football club based in the south coast city of Portsmouth. ... Charlie Dimmock (born 10 August 1966 in Romsey, Hampshire, England) is a british gardening expert and presenter. ... A gardener Gardening is the practice of growing flowering plants, vegetables, and fruits. ... A television presenter is a British term for a person who is known for introducing or hosting television programmes. ... Sir William Petty (May 27, 1623 – December 16, 1687) was an English economist, scientist and philosopher. ... Alan Greenspan, former chairman, United States Federal Reserve. ... This article is about the profession. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... Tim Sills (born 10 September 1979 in Romsey) is an English footballer who currently plays for Hereford United as a striker. ... Hereford United Football Club is a football club based in Hereford, England. ... Nigel James Spackman (born December 2, 1960 in Romsey Hampshire) is a football manager and former player who is currently without a job, as he recently left Millwall. ... Chelsea Football Club (also known as The Blues or previously The Pensioners) are an English professional football club based in west London. ... Liverpool Football Club are an English professional football club based in Liverpool, Merseyside, who play in the Premier League; they are historically the most successful club in the history of English football, having won more trophies than any other English club. ... Kerrie Taylor is a British Actress born in 1973 in Romsey, Hampshire, in the UK. Kerrie Taylor is best known for the role of Beth Enright/Beresford, in the ITV1 family drama Where The Heart Is. ... Sandra Gidley. ...

Education

State

Primary:

Secondary: Halterworth Primary School is a primary school situated in Romsey, Hampshire, England. ...

The Mountbatten School is a secondary school located on Whitenap Lane in Romsey, Hampshire, England. ... The Romsey School is a mixed specialist school in Romsey, Hampshire, England, focussing on maths and computing. ...

Independent

Primary:

  • Stroud School

Secondary:

  • Hampshire Collegiate School
  • Stanbridge Earls

Transport

Romsey is within 10 miles of both the M27 and M3 motorways, providing fast links along the south coast and to London, and to the Midlands and the North via the A34. The A36 runs a few miles west of the town, providing a direct but not particularly quick route to the West of England and South Wales. Looking down onto the M27 from Portsdown Hill. ... M3 is also the name of the motorway that connects the capitals of two largest states in Europe, Moscow and Kiev. ... Motorway symbol in UK, France and Ireland. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The midlands of a territory are its central regions. ... The North of England , also the North country or simply The North, is a term which strictly refers to any part of Northern England north of a line from the Humber to the Dee estuaries. ... The A34 is a major road in England. ... The A36 is a trunk road in the UK that links the port city of Southampton to the city of Bath. ... The West of England is a loose term given to the area surrounding the City and County of Bristol, England and includes the counties of Gloucestershire, Somerset and Wiltshire and, possibly, Dorset. ... Approximate extent of South East Wales. ...


Romsey has a railway station with frequent services (operated by First Great Western) running on the route between Portsmouth and Cardiff, via Southampton, Salisbury and Bristol. Romsey railway station is a railway station located in Romsey in the county of Hampshire in England. ... First Great Western is the operating name of First Greater Western Ltd,[1] a British train operating company owned by FirstGroup, which operates services in the west and south west of England and South Wales. ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Salisbury (disambiguation). ... This article is about the English city. ...


Additionally, a new hourly South West Trains service which runs to Chandler's Ford and Eastleigh and then down to Southampton and Totton started in 2004. The noise from these new services attracted many complaints from local residents, who demanded their withdrawal, and there were also suggestions that some of the journeys regularly carried no passengers. However, its future is now assured under the new South West Trains franchise, which will see the service altered from December 2007 to run from Romsey to Southampton via Eastleigh as currently, then back to Romsey directly and on to Salisbury. The net result will be more train services for Romsey than at any other time in its history, with particular improvements for passengers travelling to Southampton or Salisbury. South West Trains (SWT) is a train operating company operating in the United Kingdom, providing train services to the south-west of London, chiefly in Greater London and the counties of Surrey, Hampshire, Dorset, Devon, Somerset, Berkshire and Wiltshire (the area largely covered before 1923 by the London and South... Chandlers Ford is a largely residential area in the borough of Eastleigh in southern England. ... This article is about the town in Hampshire. ... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... Totton and Eling is a town in Hampshire, England with a population of around 28,000 people. ... South West Trains (SWT) is a train operating company operating in the United Kingdom, providing train services to the south-west of London, chiefly in Greater London and the counties of Surrey, Hampshire, Dorset, Devon, Somerset, Berkshire and Wiltshire (the area largely covered before 1923 by the London and South...


A dedicated bus shuttle links Romsey with fast London trains at Winchester. The ticket bought from the bus driver in Romsey covers the entire journey, which ironically is cheaper in some off-peak cases than an eqivalent Winchester to London ticket. The combined journey time from Romsey Bus Station to London Waterloo is just 90 minutes, making the service popular with commuters. This service is being discontinued Campaign to save bus defeated This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Winchester railway station is a railway station located in Winchester in the county of Hampshire in England. ... Facade of Waterloo Station, London Waterloo is a major train station and transport interchange located in the Waterloo district of London, which was itself named after the Battle of Waterloo in which Napoleon was defeated near Brussels. ...


Other bus services are provided by Wilts and Dorset within the town and to Eastleigh and Salisbury, Solent Blue Line to Southampton and Stagecoach to Winchester. Wilts & Dorset Bus Company is a bus company based in Poole, Dorset in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the town in Hampshire. ... For other uses, see Salisbury (disambiguation). ... The Solent Blue Line logo. ... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... Stagecoach Group plc (LSE: SGC) is a leading international transport group operating bus, train, tram, express coach and ferry operations. ... Winchester is a historic city in southern England, with a population of around 40,000 within a 3 mile radius of its centre. ...


Miscellaneous

King John's House & Tudor Cottage was allegedly a hunting lodge used by King John of England whilst hunting in the New Forest. However the existing building dates from much later. It does contain a number of extremely unusual and exciting historical features - including medieval wall decorations and graffiti as well as a floor made of animal bones. This article is about the King of England. ... For other uses, see New Forest (disambiguation). ...


The body of King William II "Rufus" was carried through Bell Street in Romsey on its way to Winchester, after he had been killed whilst hunting in the New Forest. William II (c. ...


The town's memorial park contains a Japanese World War II artillery gun, one of a pair captured by the British and brought back to Romsey by Lord Mountbatten of Burma. One was donated to the town by Lord Mountbatten and the other was retained in the grounds of his country estate, Broadlands. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Broadlands Estate, Romsey. ...


The town contains a swimming pool, the Romsey Rapids.


The local amateur dramatics group, RAODS, is highly unusual in owning its own fully equipped 230-seat theatre (The Plaza) in which it stages about seven productions each year. The Plaza, previously a cinema and then a bingo hall, is also hired out for other local productions, concerts and functions.


In the 1980/90s, Romsey was used as the location of 'Kingsmarkham' in The Ruth Rendell Mysteries. Filmed by Meridian TV, numerous Romsey locations appear throughout the series concerning Inspector Wexford played by George Baker The Ruth Rendell Mysteries is a British television series made by TVS and Meridian Television for ITV between 1987 and 2000. ... George Baker (born 1 April 1931) is a English actor, who was born in Varna, Bulgaria. ...


In the "New Years" episode of the BBC comedy Absolutely Fabulous (1995), Patsy Stone and Edina Monsoon are discussing a New Year's Eve Party to which they have been invited and is so posh and exclusive that its whereabouts are unknown to all but the rich and famous. Patsy finally reveals it to be located in "an underground car park in Romsey." There is no underground car park in Romsey. Absolutely Fabulous is a British sitcom written by and starring Jennifer Saunders and co-starring Joanna Lumley, Julia Sawalha, June Whitfield and Jane Horrocks. ...


References

  1. ^ Hampshire County Council.Romsey Retrieved 2007-11-03
  2. ^ Environment Agency (2006).Fact file on the River Test Retrieved 2007-11-03
  3. ^ BBC News (2000).MP feared dead in fire Retrieved 2007-11-01
  4. ^ This is Hampshire (2004).Fox-hunting strategy could see battle for Gidley seatRetrieved 2007-11-01
  5. ^ Romseynet.Romsey twinningRetrieved 2007-11-01
  6. ^ BBC News (2005).Death on the Nile producer dies Retrieved 2007-11-01
  7. ^ BBC News (2007).Queen marks charter anniversaryRetrieved 2007-11-01
  8. ^ BBC News (2007).Town left with royal toilet bill Retrieved 2007-11-03

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Romsey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1269 words)
Romsey is situated 4 miles (6 km) north-west of the city of Southampton and 11 miles (18 km) south-west of Winchester.
Romsey's MP is Sandra Gidley of the Liberal Democrats, who contested the seat in a by-election in 2000 after the death of the Conservative Michael Colvin, who died with his wife in a house fire.
Romsey continued to grow and prosper until plague, in the shape of the Black Death, struck the town in 1348-9.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m