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Encyclopedia > Rome
Comune di Roma
Skyline of Comune di Roma
Official flag of Comune di Roma
Flag

Seal
Nickname: "The Eternal City"
Motto: "Senatus Populusque Romanus" (SPQR)  (Latin)
Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey)
Coordinates: 41°54′N 12°30′E / 41.9, 12.5
Region Lazio
Province Province of Rome
Founded 21 April 753 BC
Government
 - Mayor Walter Veltroni
Area
 - City 1,285 km² (580 sq mi)
 - Urban 5,352 km² (2,066 sq mi)
Elevation +20 m (66 ft)
Population (December 2006)[1]
 - City 2,705,603
 - Density 2,105.5/km² (4,664.8/sq mi)
 - Urban 4,013,057
 - Metro 5,493,308
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 - Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Postal codes 00121 to 00199
Area code(s) 06
Patron saints Saint Peter and Saint Paul
Website: http://www.comune.roma.it

Rome (Italian: Roma) is the capital city of Italy and of the Lazio region, as well as the country's largest and most populous comune, with more than 2.7 million residents.[2] The metropolitan area has a population of about 4 million. It is located in the central-western portion of the Italian peninsula, where the river Aniene joins the Tiber. The Mayor of Rome is Walter Veltroni. Look up Rome in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 470 pixelsFull resolution (4827 × 2833 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Rome. ... Image File history File links Coat_of_arms_of_Rome. ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For the series of murder mystery novels, see SPQR series. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Roma_posizione_3. ... Rome (It. ... For the football club, see S.S. Lazio Lazio (Latium in Latin) is a regione of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzi, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... For the football club, see S.S. Lazio Lazio (Latium in Latin) is a regione of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzi, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... In Italy, a province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of intermediate level between municipality (comune) and region (regione). ... Rome (It. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Centuries: 9th century BC - 8th century BC - 7th century BC Decades: 800s BC 790s BC 780s BC 770s BC 760s BC - 750s BC - 740s BC 730s BC 720s BC 710s BC 700s BC Events and Trends 756 BC - Founding of Cyzicus. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: nonsense that has nothing to do with the rome or mayors If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... Walter Veltroni (Rome, 03 July, 1955) is a Italian politician and lead member of the Democrats of the Left party. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Summer Time (CEST) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Eastern European Time Central Africa Time Israel Standard Time South Africa Standard Time Central European Summer Time West Africa Summer Time Category: ... “St Peter” redirects here. ... Paul of Tarsus (b. ... For the football club, see S.S. Lazio Lazio (Latium in Latin) is a regione of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzi, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... A municipality is an administrative entity composed of a clearly defined territory and its population and commonly referring to a city, town, or village, or a small grouping of them. ... Satellite view of the Peninsula in spring The Italian Peninsula or Apennine Peninsula (Italian: Penisola italiana or Penisola appenninica) is one of the greatest peninsulas of Europe, spanning 1,000 km from the Alps in the north to the central Mediterranean Sea in the south. ... The Aniene River (in Latin: Anio, formerly called the Teverone) is a 98 km river in Lazio, Italy. ... Tiber River in Rome. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: nonsense that has nothing to do with the rome or mayors If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... Walter Veltroni (Rome, 03 July, 1955) is a Italian politician and lead member of the Democrats of the Left party. ...


An enclave of Rome is the State of the Vatican City, the sovereign territory of the Holy See. It is the smallest nation in the world, and the capital of the only religion to have representation in the United Nations (as a non-member observer state). This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Look up sovereign in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A territory (from the word terra, meaning land) is a defined area (including land and waters), usually considered to be a possession of an animal, person, organization, or institution. ... For other uses, see Nation (disambiguation). ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ...


Rome, Caput mundi ("capital of the world"), la Città Eterna ("the Eternal City"), Limen Apostolorum ("threshold of the Apostles"), la città dei sette colli ("the city of the seven hills") or simply l'Urbe ("the City"),[3] is thoroughly modern and cosmopolitan. As one of the few major European cities that escaped World War II relatively unscathed, central Rome remains essentially Renaissance and Baroque in character. The Historic Centre of Rome is listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.[4] For the film starring Mario Lanza, see Seven Hills of Rome (film). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... For other uses, see Baroque (disambiguation). ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State...

Contents

Rome's History

Main article: History of Rome

For other uses, see History of Rome (disambiguation). ...

From founding to Empire

The ancient Etruscan bronze Capitoline Wolf suckles the infant twins Romulus and Remus, who were not part of the original, but were added in the late 15th century.
The ancient Etruscan bronze Capitoline Wolf suckles the infant twins Romulus and Remus, who were not part of the original, but were added in the late 15th century.

According to legend, the city of Rome was founded by the twins Romulus and Remus on April 21, 753 BC, but archaeological evidence supports the theory that Rome grew from pastoral settlements on the Palatine Hill but in the area of the future Roman Forum, coalescing into a city in the 8th century BC. The city developed into the capital of the Roman Kingdom (ruled by a succession of seven kings, according to tradition), Roman Republic (from 510 BC, governed by the Senate), but finally the Roman Empire (from 27 BC, ruled by an Emperor); this success depended on military conquest, commercial predominance, as well as selective assimilation of neighboring civilizations, most notably the Etruscans and Greeks. Roman dominance expanded over most of Europe and the shores of the Mediterranean sea, while its population surpassed one million inhabitants. For almost a thousand years, Rome was the most politically important, richest and largest city in the Western world, and remained so after the Empire started to decline and was split, even if it ultimately lost its capital status to Milan and then Ravenna, and was surpassed in prestige by the Eastern capital Constantinople. Image File history File links She-wolf_suckles_Romulus_and_Remus. ... Image File history File links She-wolf_suckles_Romulus_and_Remus. ... Extent of Etruscan civilization and the twelve Etruscan League cities. ... This article is about the metal alloy. ... Capitoline Wolf (Italian: Lupa Capitolina) is a 5th century BC Etruscan bronze statue, cast in the lower Tiber valley,[1] located since Antiquity in Rome. ... This page describes the ancient heroes who founded the city of Rome. ... For other uses, see Legend (disambiguation). ... Fraternal twin boys in the tub The term twin most notably refers to two individuals (or one of two individuals) who have shared the same uterus (womb) and usually, but not necessarily, born on the same day. ... This page describes the ancient heroes who founded the city of Rome. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Centuries: 9th century BC - 8th century BC - 7th century BC Decades: 800s BC 790s BC 780s BC 770s BC 760s BC - 750s BC - 740s BC 730s BC 720s BC 710s BC 700s BC Events and Trends 756 BC - Founding of Cyzicus. ... Pastoralism is a form of farming, such as agriculture and horticulture. ... 17th century aviaries on the hill, built by Rainaldi for Odoardo Cardinal Farnese: once wirework cages surmounted them. ... Part of the Roman Forum. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) Ruins of the training grounds at Olympia, Greece. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... The ancient quarters of Rome. ... 7 (seven) is the natural number following 6 and preceding 8. ... Look up king in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article refers to the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For alternate meanings, see Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century). ... The Roman Senate (Latin: Senatus) was the main governing council of both the Roman Republic, which started in 509 BC, and the Roman Empire. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law This article discusses the nature of the imperial dignity, and its dynastic development throughout the history of the Empire. ... The Etruscan civilization existed in Etruria and the Po valley in the northern part of what is now Italy, prior to the formation of the Roman Republic. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Mediterranean redirects here. ... Occident redirects here. ... This article is about the historiography of the decline of the Roman Empire. ... Type Anti-tank Nationality Joint France/Germany Era Cold War, modern Launch platform Individual, Vehicle Target Vehicle, Fortification History Builder MBDA, Bharat Dynamics (under license) Date of design 70s Production period since 1972 Service duration since 1972 Operators 41 countries Variants MILAN 1, MILAN 2, MILAN 2T, MILAN 3, MILAN... Province of Ravenna Ravenna is a city and comune in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Byzantine Empire. ... This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ...


Fall of the Empire and Middle Ages

With the reign of Constantine I, the Bishop of Rome gained political as well as religious importance, eventually becoming known as the Pope and establishing Rome as the centre of the Catholic Church. After the Sack of Rome (410) by Alaric I and the fall of the Western Roman Empire in 476 AD, Rome alternated between Byzantine and plundering by Germanic barbarians. Its population declined to a mere 20,000 during the Early Middle Ages, reducing the sprawling city to groups of inhabited buildings interspersed among large areas of ruins and vegetation. Rome remained nominally part of the Byzantine Empire until 751 AD when the Lombards finally abolished the Exarchate of Ravenna. In 756, Pepin the Short gave the pope temporal jurisdiction over Rome and surrounding areas, thus creating the Papal States. Rome remained the capital of the Papal States until its annexation into the Kingdom of Italy in 1870; the city became a major pilgrimage site during the Middle Ages and the focus of struggles between the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire starting with Charlemagne, who was crowned its first emperor in Rome on Christmas 800 AD by Pope Leo III. Apart from brief periods as an independent city during the Middle Ages, Rome kept its status of Papal capital and "holy city" for centuries, even when the Pope briefly relocated to Avignon (1309–1337). While no longer politically powerful, as tragically shown by the brutal sack of 1527, the city flourished as a hub of cultural and artistic activity during the Renaissance and the Baroque, under the patronage of the Papal court. Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[2] (27 February c. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Pope. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (from Latin... An anachronistic fifteenth-century miniature depicting the sack of 410. ... An 1894 photogravure of Alaric I taken from a painting by Ludwig Thiersch. ... The Roman Empire is not the Holy Roman Empire (843-1806). ... Events August - The usurper Basiliscus is deposed and Zeno is restored as Eastern Roman Emperor. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... For other uses, see Barbarian (disambiguation). ... Justinians wife Theodora and her retinue, in a 6th century mosaic from the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... Events Pippin the Short is elected as king of the Franks by the Frankish nobility, marking the end of the Merovingian and beginning of the Carolingian dynasty. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, whence comes the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Northern Europe that entered the late Roman Empire. ... The Exarchate of Ravenna was a center of Byzantine power in Italy, from the end of the 6th century to 751 A.D., when the last Exarch was put to death by the Emperors enemies in Italy, the Lombards. ... Events Abd-ar-rahman I conquers Iberia and establishes a new Umayyad dynasty. ... Pépin le Bref [1] (714 – September 24, 768), often known as Pepin the Younger or Pepin III, was the King of the Franks from 751 to 768 and is best known for being the father of Charlemagne, or Charles the Great. ... Coat of arms Map of the Papal States; the reddish area was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy in 1860, the rest (grey) in 1870. ... Coat of arms Map of the Papal States; the reddish area was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy in 1860, the rest (grey) in 1870. ... Anthem Marcia Reale dOrdinanza (Royal March of Ordinance)¹ The Kingdom of Italy at the height of its power in 1940. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the religious or spiritual journey. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Charlemagne (left) and Pippin the Hunchback. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... Infobox Pope| English name=Leo III| image= | birth_name=Unknown| term_start=December 27, 795 | term_end=June 12, 816| predecessor=Adrian I| successor=Stephen IV| birth_date=Date of birth unknown| birthplace=Rome, Italy| dead=dead|death_date=June 12, 816| deathplace=Place of death unknown| other=Leo}} Pope Leo III (died June 12... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... City flag City coat of arms Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Région Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Département Vaucluse (préfecture) Arrondissement Avignon Canton Chief town of 4 cantons Intercommunality Communauté dagglomération du Grand Avignon Mayor Marie-Josée Roig... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... For other uses, see Baroque (disambiguation). ... The Roman Curia is the administrative apparatus of the Holy See, coordinating and providing the necessary organisation for the correct functioning of the Roman Catholic Church and the achievement of its goals. ...

Garibaldi attacks Papal Rome in 1849
Garibaldi attacks Papal Rome in 1849

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Garibaldi in 1866. ...

17–19th century

Population rose again and reached 100,000 during the 17th century, but Rome ultimately lagged behind the rest of the European capitals over the subsequent centuries, being largely busy in the Counter-Reformation process. Caught up in the nationalistic turmoils of the 19th century and having twice gained and lost a short-lived independence, Rome became the focus of the hopes for Italian unification, as propelled by the Kingdom of Italy ruled by King Vittorio Emanuele II; after the French protection was lifted in 1870, royal troops stormed the city, and Rome was declared capital of the newly unified Italy in 1871. (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... The Counter-Reformation or the Catholic Reformation was a strong reaffirmation of the doctrine and structure of the Catholic Church, climaxing at the Council of Trent, partly in reaction to the growth of Protestantism. ... Nationalism is an ideology that creates and sustains a nation as a concept of a common identity for groups of humans. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anthem Marcia Reale dOrdinanza (Royal March of Ordinance)¹ The Kingdom of Italy at the height of its power in 1940. ... King Victor Emmanuel II of Italy Victor Emmanuel II (Italian: Vittorio Emanuele II; March 14, 1820—January 9, 1878) was the King of Piedmont, Savoy and Sardinia from 1849–1861, and King of Italy from 1861 until his death in 1878. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


20th century

After a victorious World War I, Rome witnessed the rise to power of Italian fascism guided by Benito Mussolini, who marched on the city in 1922, eventually declared a new Empire and allied Italy with Nazi Germany. This was a period of rapid growth in population, from the 212,000 people at the time of unification to more than 1,000,000, but this trend was halted by World War II, during which Rome was damaged by both Allied forces bombing and Nazi occupation; after the execution of Mussolini and the end of the war, a 1946 referendum abolished the monarchy in favor of the Italian Republic. Rome grew momentously after the war, as one of the driving forces behind the "Italian economic miracle" of post-war reconstruction and modernization. It became a fashionable city in the 1950s and early 1960s, the years of la dolce vita ("the sweet life"), and a new rising trend in population continued till the mid-1980s, when the comune had more than 2,800,000 residents; after that, population started to slowly decline as more residents moved to nearby comuni; this has been attributed to their perceiving a decrease in the quality of life,[citation needed] especially because of the continuously jammed traffic and the worsening pollution it brings about. In recent years the trend has changed again and the population is increasing again, thanks also to the cultural and economic dynamism of the city and immigration from many different countries. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Italian fascism (in Italian, fascismo) was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... Mussolini redirects here. ... For the movie by Dino Risi, see March on Rome (film) The March on Rome was a pseudo-coup détat by which Mussolinis National Fascist Party came to power in Italy. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Italian empire in 1940 The Italian Empire was a 20th century empire, which lasted from 9 May 1936 to September 1943. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the independent states that comprised the Allies. ... The bombing of Rome in World War II took place on several occasions in 1943 and 1944, by both Allied and Axis aircraft, before the city was freed from Axis occupation by the Allies on June 4, 1944. ... Benito Mussolini created a fascist state through the use of propaganda, total control of the media and disassembly of the working democratic government. ... The birth of the Italian Republic (officially on June 2, 1946) is a key event of Italian contemporary history. ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... Modernization (also Modernisation) is a concept in the sphere of social sciences that refers to process in which society goes through industrialization, urbanization and other social changes that completely transforms the lives of individuals. ... A fashion consists of a current (constantly changing) trend, favoured for frivolous rather than practical, logical, or intellectual reasons. ... La Dolce Vita (1960) (translation The Sweet Life) is a film directed by Federico Fellini and usually cited as the film that signals the split between his earlier neo-realist films and his later symbolist period. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Air pollution Pollution is the introduction of pollutants (whether chemical substances, or energy such as noise, heat, or light) into the environment to such a point that its effects become harmful to human health, other living organisms, or the environment. ...


Geography and climate

Panorama of Rome from the Cupolone
Panorama of Rome from the Cupolone
Satellite image of Rome, showing natural and built environment in the city
Satellite image of Rome, showing natural and built environment in the city

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (4378x500, 498 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Rome ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (4378x500, 498 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Rome ... This article is about the famous building in Rome. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 603 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1538 × 1528 pixel, file size: 848 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Roma (fonte: NASA) Credit Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and the U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team - da [1] File historyClick on a date... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 603 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1538 × 1528 pixel, file size: 848 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Roma (fonte: NASA) Credit Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and the U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team - da [1] File historyClick on a date...

Location

Rome is in the Lazio region of central Italy, at the confluence of the Aniene and Tiber (Italian: Tevere) rivers. Although the city center is about 24 kilometers inland from the Tyrrhenian Sea, the city territory extends to the very shore, where the south-western Ostia district is located. The altitude of Rome ranges from 13 meters above sea level (in Piazza del Popolo) to 120 meters above sea level (the peak of Monte Mario).[citation needed] The comune of Rome covers an overall area of about 1,285 square kilometers, including many green areas. For the football club, see S.S. Lazio Lazio (Latium in Latin) is a regione of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzi, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Central Italy, encompasses six of the countrys 20 autonomous regions: Abruzzo Lazio Marche Molise Toscana Umbria Although the regions of Abruzzo and Molise are geographically located in Central Italy, the European office for statistics (Eurostat) lists these two regions within Southern Italy. ... The Aniene River (in Latin: Anio, formerly called the Teverone) is a 98 km river in Lazio, Italy. ... Tiber River in Rome. ... Tyrrhenian Sea. ... The Castle of Julius II in Ostia Antica. ... Altitude is the elevation of an object from a known level or datum. ... For other uses, see 13 (disambiguation). ... The term above mean sea level (AMSL) refers to the elevation (on the ground) or altitude (in the air) of any object, relative to the average sea level. ... The Piazza del Popolo, looking west from the Pincio. ... Monte Mario is the highest (139 m) hill of Rome. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ...


Climate

Rome enjoys a typical Mediterranean climate which characterizes the Mediterranean coasts of Italy. It is at its most comfortable from April through June, and from mid-September to October; in particular, the Roman ottobrate (ottobrata can roughly be translated as "beautiful October day") are famously known as sunny and warm days. By August, the temperature during the heat of the day often exceeds 32 °C (90 °F); traditionally, many businesses would close during August, and Romans would abandon the city for holiday resorts, but this trend is weakening, and the city is increasingly remaining fully functional during the whole summer, in response to growing tourism as well as change in the population's work habits. The average high temperature in December is about 14 °C (57 °F).  Areas with Mediterranean climate A Mediterranean climate is a climate that resembles the climate of the lands in the Mediterranean Basin. ... Mediterranean redirects here. ... For other uses, see Temperature (disambiguation). ...

Weather averages for Rome, Italy
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 55 (12) 56 (13) 59 (15) 63 (17) 71 (21) 77 (25) 83 (28) 83 (28) 79 (26) 71 (21) 62 (16) 57 (13) 68 (20)
Average low °F (°C) 39 (3) 40 (4) 43 (6) 47 (8) 54 (12) 61 (16) 66 (18) 67 (19) 62 (16) 56 (13) 46 (7) 42 (5) 52 (11)
Precipitation inch (cm) 3.2 (8) 2.8 (7) 2.7 (6) 2.0 (6) 2.0 (5) 1.3 (3) 0.6 (1) 1.0 (2) 2.7 (6) 4.5 (11) 4.4 (11) 3.8 (9) 31.6 (80)
Source: Weatherbase[5] 2007

Architecture

Ancient Rome

Main article: Roman architecture

One of the symbols of Rome is the Colosseum (70-80), the largest amphitheatre ever built in the Roman Empire. Originally capable of seating 60,000 spectators, it was used for gladiatorial combat. The list of the very important monuments of ancient Rome includes the Roman Forum, the Domus Aurea, the Pantheon, Trajan's Column, Trajan's Market, the Catacombs of Rome, the Circus Maximus, the Baths of Caracalla, the Arch of Constantine, the Pyramid of Cestius, the Bocca della Verità. ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... The Colosseum by night: exterior view of the best-preserved section. ... The Colosseum in Rome, Italy. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Gladiator (disambiguation). ... “Fights” redirects here. ... Part of the Roman Forum. ... The Domus Aurea (Latin for Golden House) was a large landscaped portico villa, designed to take advantage of artificially created landscapes, rather than a monumental palace,[1] built in the heart of Ancient Rome by the Roman emperor Nero after Great fire of Rome, which devastated Rome in 64 AD... Facade of the Pantheon The Pantheon (Latin Pantheon[1], from Greek Πάνθεον Pantheon, meaning Temple of all the gods) is a building in Rome which was originally built as a temple to the seven deities of the seven planets in the state religion of Ancient Rome. ... Trajans Column is a monument in Rome raised by Apollodorus of Damascus at the order of the Senate. ... Trajans Market, 2006 Trajans Market (Mercatus Traiani) is a large complex of ruins in the city of Rome, located on the Via dei Fori Imperiali, at the opposite end to the Colosseum. ... A procession in the catacomb of Callistus. ... For other uses, see Circus Maximus (disambiguation). ... The Baths of Caracalla, in 2003 The Baths of Caracalla were Roman public baths, or thermae, built in Rome between 212 and 216 AD, during the reign of the Emperor Caracalla. ... The Arch of Constantine seen from the Colosseum The arch seen from Via Triumphalis Detail of the arch (southern side, left) The Arch of Constantine is a triumphal arch in Rome, situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. ... Pyramid of Cestius engraved by Giovanni Battista Piranesi The pyramid was included in the Aurelian Walls, and is close to Porta San Paolo (on the right). ... The Mouth of Truth. ...

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 192 KB) Summary Photographer: WolfgangM Title: Piazza del Popolo, Roma, Italy Taken on: 2005-01-10 Original source: Flickr. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 192 KB) Summary Photographer: WolfgangM Title: Piazza del Popolo, Roma, Italy Taken on: 2005-01-10 Original source: Flickr. ... The Piazza del Popolo, looking west from the Pincio. ...

Renaissance and Baroque

See also: Renaissance architecture
See also: Baroque architecture

Rome was a major world center of the Renaissance, second only to Florence, and was profoundly affected by the movement. The most impressive masterpiece of Renaissance architecture in Rome is the Piazza del Campidoglio by Michelangelo, along with the Palazzo Senatorio, seat of the city government. During this period, the great aristocratic families of Rome used to build opulent dwellings as the Palazzo del Quirinale (now seat of the President of the Republic), the Palazzo Venezia, the Palazzo Farnese, the Palazzo Barberini, the Palazzo Chigi (now seat of the Prime Minister), the Palazzo Spada, the Palazzo della Cancelleria, and the Villa Farnesina. Rome is also famous for her huge and majestic squares, often adorned with obelisks, many of which were built in the XVII century. The principal squares are Piazza Navona, Piazza di Spagna, Campo de' Fiori, Piazza Venezia, Piazza Farnese, and Piazza della Minerva. One of the most emblematic examples of the baroque art is the Fontana di Trevi by Nicola Salvi. Other notable baroque palaces of XVII century are the Palazzo Madama, now seat of the Italian Senate and the Palazzo Montecitorio, now seat of the Chamber of Deputies of Italy. Tempietto di San Pietro in Montorio, Rome, 1502, by Bramante. ... Baroque architecture, starting in the early 17th century in Italy, took the humanist Roman vocabulary of Renaissance architecture and used it in a new rhetorical, theatrical, sculptural fashion, expressing the triumph of absolutist church and state. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... Tempietto di San Pietro in Montorio, Rome, 1502, by Bramante. ... Michelangelos design for Capitoline Hill, now home to the Capitoline Museums. ... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ... The Quirinal Palace once housed popes, and then kings, and now presidents The Quirinal Palace (known in Italian as the Quirinale) is the official residence of the President of the Italian Republic upon the Quirinal Hill, one of the seven hills of Rome. ... The President of the Italian Republic is the head of State of Italy, and represents national unity. ... Palazzo Venezia The Palazzo Venezia is the name for a large palazzo (palace) in central Rome, just north of the Capitoline Hill. ... A mid-18th century engraving of Palazzo Farnese by Giuseppe Vasi Palazzo Farnese, Rome (housing the French Embassy), is the most imposing Italian palace of the sixteenth century (Sir Banister Fletcher) (1). ... In Palazzo Barberini, which still dominates Piazza Barberini, Rione Trevi, Rome, three great architects worked to create a harmonious whole: Carlo Maderno, who began it in 1627, his nephew and assistant Francesco Borromini, working on his first important commission, and a young sculptor, Gian Lorenzo Bernini. ... Palazzo Chigi in a 17th century etching by Giuseppe Vasi The Palazzo Chigi is a palace or noble residence in Rome, overlooking the Piazza Colonna and the Corso. ... In Italy, the President of the Council of Ministers (Italian: Presidente del Consiglio dei Ministri) is the countrys prime minister or head of government, and occupies the fourth-most important state office. ... Bernardino Cardinal Spada (April 21, 1594 – November 10, 1661) was a Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church and a great patron of the arts, whose collection may be seen at Palazzo Spada, Rome. ... The Palazzo della Cancelleria (Italian for Palace of the Chancellery, meaning the Papal Chancellery) is a palace in Rome, situated between the present Corso Vittorio Emanuele II and the Campo de Fiori, in the rione of Parione. ... Villa Farnesina. ... There are eight ancient Egyptian and five ancient Roman obelisks in Rome, together with a number of more modern obelisks; there was also formerly (until 2005) an ancient Ethiopian obelisk in Rome. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700 in the Gregorian calendar. ... Fountain of the four Rivers with Egyptian obelisk, in the middle of Piazza Navona Piazza Navona is a square in Rome. ... The Spanish Steps in Rome The Spanish Steps (Scalinata di Spagna) in Rome ramp a steep slope between the Piazza di Spagna at the base and the church Trinità dei Monti above. ... A view of Campo de Fiori. ... The Piazza Venezia, looking towards the Palazzo di Venezia The Piazza Venezia is a piazza in central Rome. ... A mid-18th century engraving of Palazzo Farnese by Giuseppe Vasi Palazzo Farnese, Rome (housing the French Embassy), is the most imposing Italian palace of the sixteenth century (Sir Banister Fletcher) (1). ... Facade of Santa Maria sopra Minerva. ... The Trevi Fountain (in Italian, Fontana di Trevi) is the largest and most ambitious of the Baroque fountains of Rome. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Baroque architecture, starting in the early 17th century in Italy, took the humanist Roman vocabulary of Renaissance architecture and used it in a new rhetorical, theatrical, sculptural fashion, expressing the triumph of absolutist church and state. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700 in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Palazzo Madama was built, like all of central Rome, atop ruins of ancient Rome, in this case a bath house of Nero. ... Palazzo Madama house of the Senate of the Republic. ... Palazzo Montecitorio The Palazzo Montecitorio is a palace in Rome, which is currently the seat of the Italian Chamber of deputies. ... Chamber of Deputies or Camera dei Deputati, one house of the bicameral parliamentary system, seats 630 members of which 475 are directly elected and 155 by regional proportional representation. ...

ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2016x1338, 1354 KB) Oggetto Rome, Monument to king Vittorio Emanuele II (Vittoriano or Altare della Patria) at sunset. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2016x1338, 1354 KB) Oggetto Rome, Monument to king Vittorio Emanuele II (Vittoriano or Altare della Patria) at sunset. ... The monument of Victor Emmanuel II The Monumento Nazionale a Vittorio Emanuele II (National Monument of Victor Emmanuel II) or Altare della Patria (Altar of the Fatherland) or Il Vittoriano is a monument located in Rome, Italy. ...

Neoclassicism

See also: Neoclassical architecture

In 1870, Rome became capital city of the new Kingdom of Italy. During this time, neoclassicism, a building style influenced by the architecture of Antiquity, became a predominant influence in Roman architecture. In this period many great palaces in neoclassical styles were built to host ministries, embassies and other governing agencies. One of the best-known symbol of Roman neoclassicism is the Monument of Vittorio Emanuele II or "Altar of Fatherland", where the grave of the Unknown Soldier, that represents the 650,000 Italians that fell in World War I, is located. The Cathedral of Vilnius (1783), by Laurynas Gucevičius. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Anthem Marcia Reale dOrdinanza (Royal March of Ordinance)¹ The Kingdom of Italy at the height of its power in 1940. ... The Cathedral of Vilnius (1783), by Laurynas Gucevičius. ... Antiquity means different things: Generally it means ancient history, and may be used of any period before the Middle Ages. ... Late Baroque classicizing: G. P. Pannini assembles the canon of Roman ruins and Roman sculpture into one vast imaginary gallery (1756) Neoclassicism (sometimes rendered as Neo-Classicism or Neo-classicism) is the name given to quite distinct movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that... The monument of Victor Emmanuel II The Monumento Nazionale a Vittorio Emanuele II (National Monument of Victor Emmanuel II) or Altare della Patria (Altar of the Fatherland) or Il Vittoriano is a monument located in Rome, Italy. ... The monument of Victor Emmanuel II The Monumento Nazionale a Vittorio Emanuele II (National Monument of Victor Emmanuel II) or Altare della Patria (Altar of the Fatherland) or Il Vittoriano is a monument to honour Victor Emmanuel, the first king of a unified Italy. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


Fascist architecture

See also: Fascist architecture

The Fascist regime that ruled in Italy between 1922 and 1943 developed an original architectural style, characterized by feast and the research of a link with ancient Rome architecture. The most important fascist style site in Rome is the E.U.R. district, built in 1935. It was originally conceived for the 1942 world exhibition, and was called "E.42" ("Esposizione 42"). However, the world exhibition never took place because Italy entered the Second World War in 1940. The most representative building of the Fascist style at E.U.R. is the Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana (1938-1943), the iconic design of which has been labeled the cubic or Square Colosseum. After World War II, the Roman authorities found that they already had a gem of an off-centre business district that other capitals were still planning (London Docklands and La Defense in Paris). Also the Palazzo della Farnesina, the actual seat of Italian Foreign Ministry, was designed in 1935 in fascist style. A type of Italian architecture from the 1930s used to celebrate the XXth year of the fascist regime in Rome. ... Fascism is an authoritarian political ideology (generally tied to a mass movement) that considers individual and other societal interests inferior to the needs of the state, and seeks to forge a type of national unity, usually based on ethnic, religious, cultural, or racial attributes. ... Palazzo dei Congressi The Esposizione Universale Roma (E.U.R.) is a large complex, built in 1935 by Benito Mussolini as symbol of fascism for the world; he wanted to expand the new Rome in the west, to connect it to the sea. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Exposition advertizing. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... A cube[1] is a three-dimensional solid object bounded by six square faces, facets or sides, with three meeting at each vertex. ... The Colosseum by night: exterior view of the best-preserved section. ... Downtown Honolulu in United States, an example of an urban downtown district Central business district, (CBD used in Australia, New Zealand and sometimes elsewhere), or downtown (used mainly in North America) are terms referring to the commercial heart of a city. ... The 02 and Canary Wharf from the Royal Victoria Dock. ... La Défense, the new skyline of Paris La Défense is a district of high-rise offices, apartment blocks and shopping complexes over part of the communes of Nanterre, Courbevoie and Puteaux (all in the Hauts-de-Seine département), to the west of Paris. ... Palazzo della Farnesina is a building in Rome, Italy, designed in 1935. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ...


Villas and gardens

The center of Rome is surrounded by some large green areas and opulent ancient villas, which are the remains of the crowns of villas which encircled the papal city. Most of them were largely destroyed by real estate speculation at the end of the 19th century. The most important among the surviving ones are: Villa Borghese in Rome, Italy Picture taken by User:Abelson in March 2004. ... Villa Borghese in Rome, Italy Picture taken by User:Abelson in March 2004. ... Villa Borghese: the 19th century Temple of Aesculapius built purely as a landscape feature, influenced by the lake at Stourhead, Wiltshire Villa Borghese is a large landscape garden in the naturalistic English manner in Rome, containing a number of buildings, museums and attractions. ... The Roman Empire contained many kinds of villas. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • Villa Borghese, with a large landscape garden in the naturalistic 19th century English style, containing a number of buildings, museums (see Galleria Borghese) and attractions;
  • Villa Ada, the largest public landscaped park of Rome;
  • Villa Doria Pamphili, the second largest with an area of 1.8 km²;
  • Villa Torlonia, a splendid example of Art Nouveau mansion that was the Roman residence of Benito Mussolini;
  • Villa Albani, commissioned by Alessandro Cardinal Albani to house his collection of antiquities and Roman sculpture, which soon filled the casino that faced the Villa down a series of formal parterres.

Villa Borghese: the 19th century Temple of Aesculapius built purely as a landscape feature, influenced by the lake at Stourhead, Wiltshire Villa Borghese is a large landscape garden in the naturalistic English manner in Rome, containing a number of buildings, museums and attractions. ... The Villa Borghese Pinciana (begun 1605) houses the Galleria Borghese. ... Villa Ada is one of the very largest public parks in Rome, Italy. ... Villa Doria Pamphili, on the Gianicolo, the Roman Janiculum, is the largest (180 hectares) public landscaped park of Rome, bought in 1965–1971 by the City of Rome from the Doria-Pamphilj family—the family favor the orthography of the long i. ... Theater, Villa Torlonia, Rome. ... Vitebsk Railway Station one of the finest examples of Art Nouveau architecture. ... Mussolini redirects here. ... Alessandro Albani (Urbino October 15, 1692–Rome December 11, 1779), of the distinguished family of Urbino that was descended from refugees from Albania when it fell to the Ottoman Turks in the 15th century, was a collector and patron of the arts, who built Villa Albani, 1760, to house his... A mid 18th century view of the Villa Albani by Giuseppe Vasi. ...

Government

Capital status

Rome is the national capital of Italy and is the seat of the President of the Italian Republic, whose official residence is Quirinale Palace. Rome hosts also the Italian Parliament, Italian Prime Minister and all the ministries. The Mayor of Rome is Walter Veltroni of The Union,[6] elected in 2001 and again for a second term in 2006. A political debate in Italy focuses on the opportunity of providing the city with "special powers" of local jurisdiction (the "Roma Capitale" directives),[7] and possibly of turning either the comune or the Province of Rome into a "capital district"[8] separate from the Lazio region, modelled after other European capital cities. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 2020 KB) Roma, Palazzo del Quirinale, facciata su piazza del Quirinale. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 2020 KB) Roma, Palazzo del Quirinale, facciata su piazza del Quirinale. ... The Quirinal Palace once housed popes, then kings, and now presidents. ... The President of the Italian Republic is the head of State of Italy, and represents national unity. ... The President of the Italian Republic is the head of State of Italy, and represents national unity. ... An etching of the Hill, crowned by the mass of the Palazzo del Quirinale, from a series I Sette Colli di Roma antica e moderna published in 1827 by Luigi Rossini (1790 - 1857): his view, from the roof of the palazzo near the Trevi Fountain that now houes the Accademia... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: nonsense that has nothing to do with the rome or mayors If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... Walter Veltroni (Rome, 03 July, 1955) is a Italian politician and lead member of the Democrats of the Left party. ... The Union (Italian: LUnione) is an Italian centre-left political party coalition. ... Debate (North American English) or debating (British English) is a formal method of interactive and position representational argument. ... Rome (It. ... For the football club, see S.S. Lazio Lazio (Latium in Latin) is a regione of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzi, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ...


Subdivisions

Map of Rome's nineteen boroughs.
Map of Rome's nineteen boroughs.

The territory of the commune of Rome is divided into 19 Municipi (area subdivisions).[9] Originally, the city was divided into 20 sub-municipalities, but the XIV, what is now the Comune di Fiumicino, voted some years ago to become a full municipality itself and eventually detached from Rome. A map showing Romes 19 Municipi. ... Image File history File links Municipi_di_Roma. ... Image File history File links Municipi_di_Roma. ... 14 (fourteen) is the natural number following 13 and preceding 15. ... Fiumicino is an Italian town, in which Leornardo Da Vinci airport is located. ...


Other sovereign entities

Rome is unique in its containing two other sovereign entities. One is the Holy See, the political and religious entity that governs the territory of the Vatican City (a de facto enclave since 1870, officially recognised as such in 1929), as well as claiming extraterritorial rights over a few other palaces and churches, mostly in the city centre; indeed, Rome hosts foreign embassies to both Italy and the Holy See. The other entity is the Sovereign Military Order of Malta (SMOM), which took refuge in Rome in 1834 after having lost Malta to Napoleon in 1798, and thus claims no territory (leading to disputes over its actual sovereign status); SMOM too owns extraterritorial palaces in central Rome. “Sovereign” redirects here. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Extraterritoriality is the state of being exempt from the jurisdiction of local law, usually as the result of diplomatic negotiations. ... A diplomatic mission is a group of people from one nation state present in another nation state to represent the sending state in the receiving State. ... Motto Tuitio Fidei et Obsequium Pauperum(Latin) Defence of the faith and assistance to the poor Anthem (Latin) Hail, thou White Cross Capital Palazzo Malta, Rome Official languages Italian Government  -  Grand Master Fra Andrew Bertie Currency Scudo The Sovereign Military Hospitaller Order of Saint John of Jerusalem, of Rhodes and... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Year 1798 (MDCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Knights Hospitaller (the or Knights of Malta or Knights of Rhodes) is a tradition which began as a Benedictine nursing Order founded in the 11th century based in the Holy Land, but soon became a militant Christian Chivalric Order under its own charter, and was charged with the care... Extraterritoriality is the state of being exempt from the jurisdiction of local law, usually as the result of diplomatic negotiations. ...


International involvement

Rome has traditionally been heavily involved in the process of European political integration. In 1957, the city hosted the signing of the treaty of Rome, which established the European Economic Community (predecessor to the European Union), and also played host to the official signing of the proposed European constitution in July 2004. Rome is also the seat of significant international organizations, such as the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, and is the place where the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court was formulated. Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... The Treaty of Rome signing ceremony Signatures in the Treaty The Treaty of Rome, signed by France, West Germany, Italy and Benelux (Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg) on March 25, 1957, established the European Economic Community (EEC). ... The European Community (EC), most important of three European Communities, was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... The Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, commonly referred to as the European Constitution, is an international treaty intended to create a constitution for the European Union. ... The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations that leads international efforts to defeat hunger. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court Opened for signature June 17, 1998[1] at Rome Entered into force July 1, 2002 Conditions for entry into force 60 ratifications Parties 99[2] The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (or Rome Statute) is the treaty which established the International...


Demography

At the time of Emperor Augustus, Rome was the largest city in the world, and probably the largest ever built until the nineteenth century. Estimates of its peak population range from 450,000 to over 3.5 million people with 1 to 2 million being most popular with historians. After the fall of the Roman Empire, the city's population may have been less than 50,000, and continued to stagnate (or shrink) until the Renaissance. When the Kingdom of Italy annexed Rome in 1870, it had a population of about 200,000, which rapidly increased to 600,000 by the end of the 19th century. The fascist regime of Mussolini tried to block an excessive demographic rise of the city, but failed to prevent it from reaching one million people by 1931. For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... The Roman Empire is not the Holy Roman Empire (843-1806). ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... Anthem Marcia Reale dOrdinanza (Royal March of Ordinance)¹ The Kingdom of Italy at the height of its power in 1940. ...


After World War II, Rome continued to expand, with the creation of new quartieri and suburbs in '50s and '60s. Today the official population stands at 2.7 million; the Urban Area of Rome is home to about 4 million in an area of 5,352 km² (2,066 sq mi). 156,833 residents in the comune are of foreign nationality, representing 6.2% of total residents.[10] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A quartiere (plural: quartieri) is a subdivision of certain Italian towns. ... In Italy, the comune, (plural comuni) is the basic administrative unit of both provinces and regions, and may be properly approximated in casual speech by the English word township or municipality. ...


Economy

The ENI palace at EUR neighbour
The ENI palace at EUR neighbour

Modern day Rome has a dynamic and diverse economy with thriving technologies, communications, and service sectors. It produces 6.7% of the national GDP (more than any other city in Italy). Rome grows +4,4% annually and continues to grow at a higher rate in comparison to any other city in the rest of the country. Following World War II Rome's economic growth began to overtake its rivals, Naples and Milan, although a traditional rivalry persists with Milan today. Tourism is inevitably one of Rome's chief industries, with numerous notable museums including the Vatican Museum, the Borghese Gallery, and the Musei Capitolini. Rome is also the hub of the Italian film industry, thanks to the Cinecittà studios. The city is also a center for banking as well as electronics and aerospace industries. Numerous international headquarters, government ministries, conference centres, sports venues and museums are located in Rome's principal business districts: the Esposizione Universale Roma (EUR); the Torrino (further south from the EUR); the Magliana; the Parco de' Medici-Laurentina and the so-called Tiburtina-valley along the ancient Via Tiburtina. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 794 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (918 × 693 pixel, file size: 156 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Palazzo Eni na Eur (Roma) - Foto de Siloé Mascolo - 2005 File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 794 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (918 × 693 pixel, file size: 156 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Palazzo Eni na Eur (Roma) - Foto de Siloé Mascolo - 2005 File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that... Ente nazionale idrocarburi http://fr. ... Technology (Gr. ... For the Bobby Womack album, see Communication (1972 album). ... The tertiary sector of industry, also called the service sector or the service industry, is one of the three main industrial categories of a developed economy, the others being the secondary industry (manufacturing and primary goods production such as agriculture), and primary industry (extraction such as mining and fishing). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ... Type Anti-tank Nationality Joint France/Germany Era Cold War, modern Launch platform Individual, Vehicle Target Vehicle, Fortification History Builder MBDA, Bharat Dynamics (under license) Date of design 70s Production period since 1972 Service duration since 1972 Operators 41 countries Variants MILAN 1, MILAN 2, MILAN 2T, MILAN 3, MILAN... Tourist redirects here. ... Categories: Stub | Vatican City ... The Villa Borghese Pinciana (begun 1605) houses the Galleria Borghese. ... Michelangelos design for Capitoline Hill, now home to the Capitoline Museums. ... The history of Italian cinema began just a few months after the Lumière brothers had discovered the medium, when Pope Leo XIII was filmed for a few seconds in the act of blessing the camera. ... Entrance of the Cinecittà studios Cinecittà (Italian for Cinema City) is a large film studio in Rome, Italy. ... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... This article is about the engineering discipline. ... Look up aerospace in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Palazzo dei Congressi The Esposizione Universale Roma (E.U.R.) is a large complex, built in 1935 by Benito Mussolini as symbol of fascism for the world; he wanted to expand the new Rome in the west, to connect it to the sea. ...


Culture and society

Events in Rome

Main article: Events in Rome

An incomplete list of events in Rome, Italy. ...

Religion

The Religio Romana constituted the major religion of the city in antiquity. However, several other religions and imported mystery cults remained represented within its ever-expanding boundaries, including Judaism, whose presence in the city dates back from the Roman Republic and was sometimes forcibly confined to the Roman Ghetto, as well as Christianity. Despite initial persecutions, by the early 4th century, Christianity had become so widespread that it was legalized in 313 by Emperor Constantine I, and later made official religion of the Roman Empire in 380 by Emperor Theodosius I, allowing it to spread further and eventually wholly replace the declining Religio Romana. Religion in ancient Rome combined several different cult practices and embraced more than a single set of beliefs. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... A mystery religion is any religion with an arcanum, or body of secret wisdom. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article refers to the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For alternate meanings, see Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century). ... The Roman Ghetto was located in the area surrounded by todays Via del Portico dOttavia, Lungotevere dei Cenci, Via del Progresso and Via di Santa Maria del Pianto close to the Tiber and the Theatre of Marcellus, in Rome, Italy. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... February - Wtf is up mah cracka??. Constantine issues the Edict of Milan, ending all persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire. ... An emperorrefers to Nick Herringshaw, a title, empress may only indicate the wife of an emperor (empress consort. ... Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[2] (27 February c. ... A state religion (also called an established church or state church) is a religious body or creed officially endorsed by the state. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... An engraving depicting what Theodosius may have looked like, ca. ...


Rome became the pre-eminent Christian city (vis-a-vis Antioch and Alexandria, and later Constantinople and Jerusalem) based on the tradition that Saint Peter and Saint Paul were martyred in the city during the 1st century, coupled with the city's political importance. The Bishop of Rome, later known as the Pope, claimed primacy over all Bishops and therefore all Christians on the basis that he is the successor of Saint Peter, upon whom Jesus built his Church; his prestige had been enhanced since 313 through donations by Roman emperors and patricians, including the Lateran Palace and patriarchal basilicas, as well as the obviously growing influence of the Church over the failing civil imperial authority. Papal authority has been exercised over the centuries with varying degrees of success, at times triggering divisions among Christians, until the present. For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Antakya. ... This article is about the city in Egypt. ... This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... “St Peter” redirects here. ... Paul of Tarsus (b. ... For other uses, see Martyr (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Pope. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (from Latin... “St Peter” redirects here. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... February - Wtf is up mah cracka??. Constantine issues the Edict of Milan, ending all persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire. ... The Lateran Palace, sometimes more formally known as the Palace of the Lateran, is an ancient palace of the Roman Empire and later a Palace of the Popes. ...

St. Peter's Square in the early morning.
St. Peter's Square in the early morning.

With the increasing chaos and disorder leading to the collapse of the Roman Empire in 476, the popes assumed more and more civil authority first in Rome and in the surrounding territories. Rome became the center of the Catholic Church and the capital city of the Papal States; consequently, a great number of churches, convents and other religious buildings were erected in the city, sometimes above the ruins of older pre-Christian sites of worship. Churches proliferated during the Renaissance, when the Rome's most notable churches were built (this includes St. Peter's basilica on the Vatican Hill (the largest church in the world) and the city cathedral of St. John at the Lateran. The Papacy established its residence first in the Lateran Palace, then in the Quirinal Palace. When Rome was annexed by force to the newly unified Kingdom of Italy In 1870, Pope Pius IX retired to the Vatican, proclaiming himself a prisoner of the Savoy monarchy and leading to decades of conflict between the neonate state and the Catholic Church. This was resolved in 1929, when the Lateran Treaty were signed in Rome, establishing the right for the Holy See to govern the Vatican City as an independent, sovereign state. The patron saints of Rome remain Saint Peter and Saint Paul (or, as they are collectively referred to in this context, "the most holy Saints Peter and Paul"), both celebrated on June 29. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3072x1983, 688 KB) Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Vatican City ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3072x1983, 688 KB) Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Vatican City ... Events August - The usurper Basiliscus is deposed and Zeno is restored as Eastern Roman Emperor. ... The name Catholic Church can mean a visible organization that refers to itself as Catholic, or the invisible Christian Church, viz. ... Coat of arms Map of the Papal States; the reddish area was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy in 1860, the rest (grey) in 1870. ... // The Churches of Rome are more than 900 in numbers. ... This article is about the famous building in Rome. ... St. ... Tapestry featuring Vatican Hill (left), circa 1519 Vatican Hill (in Latin, Vaticanus Mons) is the name given, long before the founding of Christianity, to one of the hills on the side of the Tiber opposite the traditional seven hills of Rome. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... The late Baroque façade of the Basilica of St. ... Late Baroque façade of the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, completed after a competition for the design by Alessandro Galilei in 1735 Lateran and Laterano are the shared names of several architectural projects throughout Rome and Vatican City. ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. ... The Lateran Palace, sometimes more formally known as the Palace of the Lateran, is an ancient palace of the Roman Empire and later a Palace of the Popes. ... The Quirinal Palace once housed popes, then kings, and now presidents. ... Anthem Marcia Reale dOrdinanza (Royal March of Ordinance)¹ The Kingdom of Italy at the height of its power in 1940. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Pope Pius IX (May 13, 1792 – February 7, 1878), born Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti, reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from his election in June 16, 1846, until his death more than 31 years later in 1878. ... The House of Savoy or in Italian, La Casa di Savoia, or simply Casa Savoia, (or Savoie, French) is a dynasty of nobles who traditionally had their domain in Savoy, a region that includes present-day Piemonte, other parts of Northern Italy, and a smaller region in France. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Lateran Treaties of February 11, 1929 provided for the mutual recognition of the then Kingdom of Italy and the Vatican City. ... This article discusses states as sovereign political entities. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... “St Peter” redirects here. ... St. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Central mosque by Paolo Portoghesi, Rome (1974)
Central mosque by Paolo Portoghesi, Rome (1974)

In recent years, the Islamic community has grown significantly, in great part due to immigration from North African and Middle Eastern countries into the city. As a consequence of this trend, the comune promoted the building of the largest mosque in Europe, which was designed by architect Paolo Portoghesi and inaugurated on June 21, 1995. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 222 pixelsFull resolution (2948 × 818 pixel, file size: 531 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Moschea di Roma: panoramica della sala principale File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 222 pixelsFull resolution (2948 × 818 pixel, file size: 531 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Moschea di Roma: panoramica della sala principale File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Paolo Portoghesi (born 2nd November 1931, Rome) is an Italian architect, theorist, historian and professor of architecture at the University La Sapienza in Rome. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... Paolo Portoghesi (born 2nd November 1931, Rome) is an Italian architect, theorist, historian and professor of architecture at the University La Sapienza in Rome. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ...


Language

The original language of Rome was Latin, which evolved during the Middle Ages into Italian. The latter emerged as the confluence of various regional dialects, among which the Tuscan dialect predominated, but the population of Rome also developed its own dialect, the Romanesco. The ancient romanesco, used during the Middle Ages, was a southern Italian dialect, very close to the Neapolitan. The influence of the Florentine culture during the renaissance, and, above all, the immigration to Rome of many Florentines who were among the two Medici Popes' (Leo X and Clement VII) suite, caused a strong change of the dialect, which became much closer to the Tuscan varieties (the immigration of Florentines was mainly due to the Sack of Rome in 1527 and the subsequent demographic decrease). This remained largely confined to Rome until the 19th century, but then expanded other zones of Lazio (Civitavecchia, Latina), from the beginning of the 20th century, thanks to the rising population of Rome and to better transportation systems. As a consequence, Romanesco abandoned its traditional forms to mutate into the dialect spoken within the city, which is more similar to standard Italian, although remaining distinct from other Romanesco-influenced local dialects of Lazio. Dialectal literature in the traditional form Romanesco includes the works of such authors as Giuseppe Gioacchino Belli, Trilussa, and Cesare Pascarella. Contemporary Romanesco is mainly represented by popular actors such as Aldo Fabrizi, Alberto Sordi, Nino Manfredi, Anna Magnani, Gigi Proietti, Enrico Montesano, and Carlo Verdone. For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The Tuscan dialect is a dialect spoken in Tuscany, Italy. ... Romanesco is a group of Romance dialects spoken in Rome and most of the surrounding regions of Lazio, Umbria, central Marche and extreme southern Tuscany in central Italy. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Neapolitan may refer to: Neapolitan, a resident of Naples, Italy Neapolitan language, a language of Naples and environs in southern Italy Neapolitan ice cream, a mixture of chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry ice cream side-by-side in the same container Neapolitan chord, in music, is the first inversion of a... Florence (Italian, Firenze) is a city in the center of Tuscany, in central Italy, on the Arno River, with a population of around 400,000, plus a suburban population in excess of 200,000. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... For the board game, see Medici (board game). ... Pope Leo X Leo X, né Giovanni di Lorenzo de Medici (December 11, 1475 - December 1, 1521), was the only pope who has bestowed his own name upon his age, and one of the few whose original extraction has corresponded in some measure with the splendour of the pontifical dignity. ... For the antipope (1378-1394) see Antipope Clement VII. Pope Clement VII Clement VII, né Giulio di Giuliano de Medici (1478 – September 25, 1534) was pope from 1523 to 1534. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the football club, see S.S. Lazio Lazio (Latium in Latin) is a regione of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzi, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Civitavecchia is a town and comune of the province of Rome in the central Italian region of Lazio, a sea port on the Tyrrhenian sea, 50 miles WNW of Rome, 42°06N 11°47E. According to the 2003 census, its population was 50,100. ... Latina may refer to one of the following: The female gender of the noun Latino in reference to Latin-American immigrants and their descendants. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Romanesco is a group of Romance dialects spoken in Rome and most of the surrounding regions of Lazio, Umbria, central Marche and extreme southern Tuscany in central Italy. ... This article is about mutation in biology, for other meanings see: mutation (disambiguation). ... A dialect (from the Greek word διάλεκτος) is a variant, or variety, of a language spoken in a certain geographical area. ... Romanesco is a group of Romance dialects spoken in Rome and most of the surrounding regions of Lazio, Umbria, central Marche and extreme southern Tuscany in central Italy. ... Giuseppe Gioacchino Belli (March 7, 1791 - December 21, 1863) was an Italian poet, born in Rome. ... Carlo Alberto Salustri (1871-1950, Italian poet, better known by his pen name of Trilussa (an anagram of “Salustri”). He is best known for the poems, some of them sonnets, written in the Italian dialect of Rome. ... Cesare Pascarella (28 April 1858 - 8 May 1940), was an Italian dialect poet and a painter, appointed to the Accademia d’Italia in 1930. ... Romanesco is a group of Romance dialects spoken in Rome and most of the surrounding regions of Lazio, Umbria, central Marche and extreme southern Tuscany in central Italy. ... Aldo Fabrizi ( Rome, november 1, 1905 - Rome, April 2, 1990 ) was a famous Italian actor and Italian director of theatre and film. ... Alberto Sordi, also known as Albertone, (June 15, 1920, Rome - February 25, 2003, Rome) was a beloved Italian actor and a film director. ... Nino Manfredi (March 22, 1921 - June 4, 2004) was an Italian actor. ... Anna Magnani (March 7, 1908 - September 26, 1973) was an Academy Award-winning Italian actress, with stage experience. ... Gigi Proietti (actual name Luigi Proietti, born in Rome 2 November 1940), is a very popular Italian actor, director, dubber and singer. ... Enrico Montesano, born in Rome, Italy on 7 June 1945, is a popular actor for theater and cinema in Italy, as well as a showman. ... Carlo Verdone is an awarded Italian actor, film writer and film director. ...

The statue of Minerva in La Sapienza University

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Head of Minerva by Elihu Vedder, 1896 For other uses, see Minerva (disambiguation). ... University of Rome La Sapienza (Italian Università degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza) is the biggest european university and the most ancient university of Rome, Italy. ...

Universities

Rome is a nation-wide center for higher education. Its first university, La Sapienza (founded in 1303), is the largest in Europe and the second largest in the world, with more than 150,000 students attending.[citation needed] Two new public universities were founded: Tor Vergata in 1982, and Roma Tre in 1992, although the latter has now become larger than the former. Rome also contains a large number of pontifical universities and institutes, including the Pontifical Gregorian University (The oldest Jesuit university in the world, founded in 1551), the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas (Angelicum), and many others. The city also hosts various private universities, such as the LUMSA, the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore (Roman centre), the LUISS, Istituto Europeo di Design,the St. John's University, the John Cabot University, the IUSM, the American University of Rome,the Link Campus of Malta, the S. Pio V University of Rome, and the Università Campus Bio-Medico. Rome is also the location of the John Felice Rome Center, a campus of Loyola University Chicago. The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... University of Rome La Sapienza (Università della Sapienza) is the most ancient university of Rome, Italy. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The University of Rome Tor Vergata (Italian: Università degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata) is a university located in Rome, Italy, and founded in 1982. ... The Third University of Rome (Italian: Università degli Studi Roma Tre) is a university located in Rome, Italy, and founded in 1992. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... A pontifical university is a Roman Catholic university established by and directly under the authority of the Holy See. ... Pontifical Gregorian University (Italian: Pontificia Università Gregoriana) is a pontifical university located in Rome, Italy. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Year 1551 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Facade of the main entrance of the Pontifical University of St. ... The Libera Università Maria SS. Assunta, often simply abbreviated as LUMSA is a private university founded in 1939 in Rome, Italy. ... The Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore (Italian for Catholic University of the Sacred Heart) is a university founded in 1921. ... ... The Istitute Europeo di Design (IED) is a design school that is spread out over six cities, in three countries. ... Saint Johns University can refer to: College of Saint Benedict/Saint Johns University in St. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The University Institute of Motor Sciences (Italian: Istituto Universitario di Scienze Motorie, IUSM) is a university located in Rome, Italy. ... The American University of Rome is the oldest degree-granting American university in Rome. ... Link Campus is the Italian branch of the international-reputed University of Malta. ... The S. Pio V University (Italian: Libera Università degli Studi San Pio V) is a university located in Rome, Italy. ... The Campus Bio-Medico University (Italian: Università Campus Bio-Medico, UNICAMPUS) is a university located in Rome, Italy. ... Loyola University Chicago Rome Center is a campus of Loyola University Chicago in Rome, Italy. ... A garden sign welcomes residents and visitors to Rogers Park as home of Loyola University Chicago. ...


Music

Rome is an important center for music. It hosts the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia (founded in 1585), for which new concert halls were recently built in the new Parco della Musica, one of the largest musical venues in the world. Rome also has an opera house, the Teatro dell'Opera di Roma, as well as several minor musical institutions. The city also played host to the Eurovision Song Contest 1991 and the MTV Europe Music Awards 2004. The Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia in a musical academy and symphonic organization based in Rome, Italy. ... Parco della Musica auditorium in Rome The Parco della Musica is a large multi-function public music complex to the north of Rome--in the area where the 1960 Olympics had been staged. ... New York State Theater, Lincoln Center, home of the New York City Opera Bolshoi Theatre. ... The Teatro dellOpera di Roma (Rome Opera House) is an opera house in Rome, Italy. ... The Eurovision Song Contest 1991 was the 36th Eurovision Song Contest and was held on May 4, 1991 in Rome. ... The MTV Europe Music Awards 2004 were presented in Rome, Italy. ...


Cinema

Set of Gangs of New York in Cinecittà studios, Rome
Set of Gangs of New York in Cinecittà studios, Rome

Rome hosts the Cinecittà Studios, the largest film and television production facility in continental Europe and the center of the Italian cinema, where a large number of today's biggest box office hits are filmed. The 99 acre (40 ha) studio complex is just 5.6 miles (9 km) from the centre of Rome and is part of one of the biggest production communities in the world, second only to Hollywood, with well over 5,000 experienced, multilingual professionals - from period costume makers to visual effects specialists. With more than 3,000 productions which have been made on its lot, from recent features like The Passion of Christ, Gangs of New York, HBO’S Rome, The Life Aquatic and Dino De LaurentiisDecameron, to such cinema classics as Ben Hur, Cleopatra and the films of Federico Fellini, many consider it synonymous with Italian cinema and moviemaking in general. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 895 KB) Summary Set of Martin Scorseses movie Gangs of New York in Cinecittà Studios, Rome, Italy, march 2005, own work Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 895 KB) Summary Set of Martin Scorseses movie Gangs of New York in Cinecittà Studios, Rome, Italy, march 2005, own work Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects... Entrance of the Cinecittà studios Cinecittà (Italian for Cinema City) is a large film studio in Rome, Italy. ... Entrance of the Cinecittà studios Cinecittà (Italian for Cinema City) is a large film studio in Rome, Italy. ... The history of Italian cinema began just a few months after the Lumière brothers had discovered the medium, when Pope Leo XIII was filmed for a few seconds in the act of blessing the camera. ... The Passion of the Christ promotional poster The Passion of the Christ (2004) is an independent film about the last twelve hours of the life of Jesus Christ. ... Gangs of New York is a 2002 film set in the middle 19th century in the Five Points district of New York City. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou is Wes Andersons fourth feature length film and was released in the U.S. on December 25, 2004. ... Agostino De Laurentiis, usually credited as Dino De Laurentiis, (born August 8, 1919) is an Italian movie producer born at Torre Annunziata in the province of Naples. ... The Decameron is a collection of novellas that was finished by Giovanni Boccaccio in 1353. ... Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ is a sword-and-sandal historical fiction epic originally depicted in the 1880 book by American general and author Lew Wallace. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Federico Fellini (January 20, 1920 – October 31, 1993) was one of the most influential and widely revered film-makers of the 20th century. ...


Founded in 1937 by Fascist dictator Benito Mussolini, the studios were bombed by the Western Allies during World War II. In the 1950s, Cinecittà was the filming location for several large American film productions, and subsequently became the studio most closely associated with Federico Fellini. Today Cinecittà is the only studio in the world with pre-production, production and full post-production facilities on one lot, allowing directors and producers to walk in with their script and walk out with a completed film. Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Italian fascism (in Italian, fascismo) was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... Mussolini redirects here. ... The Western Allies were the democracies and their colonial peoples, within the broader coalition of Allies during World War II. The term is generally understood to refer to the countries of the British Commonwealth of Nations and Poland (from 1939), exiled forces from Occupied Europe (from 1940), the United States... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... American cinema has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. ... Federico Fellini (January 20, 1920 – October 31, 1993) was one of the most influential and widely revered film-makers of the 20th century. ...


Media

Newspapers Magazines TVs Radios
  • Audio Review
  • L'Espresso
  • Frequency
  • XL Repubblica
  • Il Venerdì di Repubblica
  • RAI (national centre)
  • Sky Italia (national centre)
  • La7 (national centre)
  • Mediaset Centri di Produzione TV (Rome centre)
  • Mediaset centri produzione Fiction
  • Mediaset TG5 centro Palatino (Rome centre)
  • Radio Capital
  • Radio CNR
  • Radio Deejay (Rome centre)
  • Radio Dimensione Suono
  • Radio Dimensione Suono Roma
  • Radio Globo
  • Radio Italia
  • Radio Rock
  • Radio Radicale
  • Radio Radio
  • Radio Vaticana
  • Radio 24 (Rome centre)

Il Manifesto (Italian for The Manifesto) is an Italian communist newspaper. ... Il Messaggero is an Italian newspaper based in Rome. ... For other newspapers with the same name, see Metro (newspaper). ... Masthead LOsservatore Romano is the Vaticans newspaper. ... La Repubblica (meaning: The Republic) is an Italian daily newspaper. ... Il Tempo is a thoroughbred racehorse, and is probably New Zealands greatest stayer. ... LUnità is an Italian newspaper, published by Democrats of the Left. ... Lespresso is an Italian magazine. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... SKY Italia is an Italian digital satellite television platform owned by News Corporation. ... La7 is an Italian private television channel (usually referred to as the Seventh Channel) and considered as the third major network in Italy. ... DJ redirects here. ... Radio Rock is Finnish rock music radio station, owned by Nelonen Media in SanomaWSOY-conglomerate. ... Radio Radicale is the official radio station of Radicals in Italy. ... Radio Radio was a single by Elvis Costello and The Attractions released in the UK in October 1978. ... Administration building and radio masts at Vatican City Radio Vaticana (Vatican Radio) is the official broadcasting service of the Vatican. ...

Sports

Club Sport Founded League Venue Head Coach
A.S. Roma Football (soccer) 1927 Serie A Stadio Olimpico Luciano Spalletti
S.S. Lazio Football (soccer) 1900 Serie A Stadio Olimpico Delio Rossi
A.S. Cisco Roma Football (soccer) 1972 Serie C2 Stadio Flaminio Fabio Fratena
Pallacanestro Virtus Roma Basketball 1960 Serie A PalaLottomatica Jasmin Repeša
M. Roma Volley Volleyball 2006 A 1 Palazzetto dello Sport Roberto Serniotti
Unione Rugby Capitolina Rugby union 1996 Super 10 Stadio Flaminio Massimo Mascioletti

Rome hosted the 1960 Summer Olympics and is an official candidate to hosting the 2020 Summer Olympics. Football (soccer) is the most popular sport in Rome, as in the rest of the country. The Stadio Olimpico hosted the final game of the 1990 FIFA World Cup; it is also the home stadium for local Serie A clubs A.S. Roma and S.S. Lazio, whose rivalry has become a staple of Roman sports culture. Indeed, famous footballers who play for these teams and are also born in the city tend to become especially popular, as has been the case with players such as Francesco Totti and Giuseppe Giannini (both for A.S. Roma); Paolo Di Canio and Alessandro Nesta (both for Lazio). While far from being as popular as football, rugby union is gaining wider acceptance. The Stadio Flaminio is the home stadium for the Italy national rugby union team, which has been playing in the Six Nations Championship since 2000, albeit with less than satisfactory performances, as they have never won the championship so far. Rome is home to local rugby teams, such as Unione Rugby Capitolina, Rugby Roma, and S.S. Lazio. Every May, Rome hosts the ATP Masters Series tennis tournament on the clay courts of the Foro Italico. Cycling was immensely popular in the post-WWII period, although its popularity has faded in the last decades; Rome has hosted the final portion of the Giro d'Italia twice, in 1989 and 2000. Every spring, the annual Rome marathon is considered to be the most widely attended sports event in Italy. [citation needed] Rome is also home to many other sports teams, including basketball (Pallacanestro Virtus Roma), handball (S.S. Lazio), volleyball (male: M. Roma Volley, female: Virtus Roma and Linea Medica Siram Roma), and waterpolo (A.S. Roma, S.S. Lazio). Associazione Sportiva Roma (ISE: IT0001008876) is a major professional football club both in Italy’s Serie A and in European football. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Italian football league. ... Stadio Olimpico is the major stadium of Rome, Italy. ... Luciano Spalletti (born 7 March 1959 in Certaldo, Florence) is an Italian football coach who currently manages A.S. Roma in Serie A. A former football player for Serie C teams such as Empoli and Spezia, Spallettis early career in management led him to struggling Empoli, where he lead... Società Sportiva Lazio, commonly referred to SS Lazio or simply Lazio, is an Italian professional sports club most noted for its football section, founded in 1900 and based in Rome. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... This article is about the Italian football league. ... Stadio Olimpico is the major stadium of Rome, Italy. ... Delio Rossi (born November 26, 1960 in Rimini) is an Italian football (soccer) manager. ... A.S. Cisco Roma is an Italian football club, based in Rome, Latium. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Serie C is the name of the third and fourth highest football leagues in Italy. ... Home stadium for the Italy national rugby union team. ... Pallacanestro Virtus Roma, also known for sponsorship reasons as Lottomatica Virtus Roma, is a prominent Italian basketball club playing in the Serie A. The club was founded in 1960. ... This article is about the sport. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lega A Basket logo In Italian Basketball, the Serie A is the highest level club competition where play determines the national champion. ... PalaLottomatica, formerly PalaEur, is a stadium in Rome, Italy. ... Jasmin RepeÅ¡a (born June 1, 1961 in ÄŒapljina) is one of the most successful Croatian and European basketball coaches. ... Club Name M. Roma Volley Arena Palazzetto dello Sport Rome, Italy Manager Roberto Serniotti League Italian Volleyball League Team Colors Green & Black Website mromavolley. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Douglas AD-1 (later A-1) Skyraider was a US single-seat attack bomber of the 1950s, 1960s and early 1970s, a propeller-driven anachronism in the Jet Age with a remarkably long and successful career. ... Unione Rugby Capitolina Rome Chairman Claudio Tinari Coach Massimo Mascioletti Captain Alfredo De Angelis Stadium Campo dellUnione Via Flaminia Strip Blue / Dark red Official site http://www. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The Super 10 is the national rugby union competition in Italy. ... Home stadium for the Italy national rugby union team. ... The 1960 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVII Olympiad, were held in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ... The 2020 Summer Olympics The International Olympic Committee has yet to begin the selection process for the host city; the site of the Games of the XXXII Olympiad—as they will be officially known—is expected to be announced in the summer of 2013. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... Stadio Olimpico is the major stadium of Rome, Italy. ... The 1990 FIFA World Cup, the 14th staging of the World Cup, was held in Italy from June 8 to July 8. ... This article is about the Italian football league. ... Associazione Sportiva Roma (ISE: IT0001008876) is a major professional football club both in Italy’s Serie A and in European football. ... Società Sportiva Lazio, commonly referred to SS Lazio or simply Lazio, is an Italian professional sports club most noted for its football section, founded in 1900 and based in Rome. ... Francesco Totti, Cavaliere Ufficiale OMRI,[1][2] (born 27 September 1976 in Rome) is an Italian World Cup-winning footballer. ... Giuseppe Giannini, (born August 20, 1964), is a former Italian international footballer. ... Paolo Di Canio (born July 9, 1968) is an Italian football player who currently plays for Italian Serie C2 club Cisco Roma. ... Alessandro Nesta, Cavaliere Ufficiale OMRI[2][3], (born March 19, 1976 in Rome) is an Italian World Cup-winning footballer. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Home stadium for the Italy national rugby union team. ... First international  Spain 9 - 0 Italy  (20 May 1929) Largest win  Czech Republic 8 - 104 Italy  (18 May 1994) Worst defeat  South Africa 101 - 0 Italy  (19 June 1999) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Two wins, 2003 and 2007 For the rugby sevens side, see Italian... The RBS 6 Nations Championship, (referred to as RBS 6 Nations for sponsorship reasons) known before 2000 as the Five Nations Championship, is an annual international rugby union competition held between six European sides: France, England, Ireland, Italy, Scotland and Wales. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Unione Rugby Capitolina Rome Chairman Claudio Tinari Coach Massimo Mascioletti Captain Alfredo De Angelis Stadium Campo dellUnione Via Flaminia Strip Blue / Dark red Official site http://www. ... Current ATP Masters Series logo The ATP Masters Series is a series of nine tennis tournaments that are part of the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) tour, held annually throughout the year in Europe and North America. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Foro Italico is a vast sports-complex in Rome, Italy. ... Police officer on a bicycle Cycling is a means of transport, a form of recreation, and a sport. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Giro dItalia, also simply known as the Giro, is a long distance road bicycle racing stage race for professional cyclists held over three weeks in May or early June in and around Italy. ... This article is about the sport. ... Pallacanestro Virtus Roma, also known for sponsorship reasons as Lottomatica Virtus Roma, is a prominent Italian basketball club playing in the Serie A. The club was founded in 1960. ... Handball player leaps towards the goal prior to throwing the ball, while the goalkeeper extends himself trying to stop it. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... Club Name M. Roma Volley Arena Palazzetto dello Sport Rome, Italy Manager Roberto Serniotti League Italian Volleyball League Team Colors Green & Black Website mromavolley. ... Water polo is a team water sport, which can be best described as a combination of swimming, football (soccer), basketball, ice hockey, and wrestling. ...


City layout and sites of interest

City centre

Piazza del Campidoglio
Piazza del Campidoglio
Santa Maria Maggiore
Santa Maria Maggiore
Palace of Justice
Palace of Justice
Via della Conciliazione
Via della Conciliazione
Piazza del Popolo
Piazza del Popolo
Vittorio Emanuele's Monument)
Vittorio Emanuele's Monument)
Fontana di Nettuno
Fontana di Nettuno
Piazza della Repubblica
Piazza della Repubblica
Pope's gardens
Pope's gardens
San Paolo fuori le mura
San Paolo fuori le mura
San Giovanni in Laterano
San Giovanni in Laterano
A typical Rome view
A typical Rome view

The historical centre ville is dominated by the traditional "Seven hills of Rome": the Capitoline, Palatine, Viminal, Quirinal, Esquiline, Caelian, and Aventine hills. The Tiber flows south through Rome, with the city centre located where the midstream Tiber Island facilitated crossing. Large parts of the ancient city walls remain. The Servian Wall was built twelve years after Gauls' sack of the city in 390 BC; it contained most of the Esquiline and Caelian hills, as well as the whole of the other five. Rome grew out of the Servian Wall, but no more walls were constructed until 270 AD, when Aurelian began building the Aurelian Walls. These were almost twelve miles (19 km) long, and was still the wall the troops of the Kingdom of Italy had to breach to enter the city in 1870. Download high resolution version (1280x960, 256 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1280x960, 256 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x1369, 1269 KB) Rome, Obelisk behind Santa Maria Maggiore. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x1369, 1269 KB) Rome, Obelisk behind Santa Maria Maggiore. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 522 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 1002 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 522 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 1002 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3264 × 2448 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3264 × 2448 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 161 KB) Summary Photographer: Eugenia & Julian Title: Piazza del popolo, Roma, Italy Taken on: 2005-07-06 Original source: Flickr. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 161 KB) Summary Photographer: Eugenia & Julian Title: Piazza del popolo, Roma, Italy Taken on: 2005-07-06 Original source: Flickr. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 287 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Piazza Venezia mit Monumento a Vittorio Emanuele II.jpg photo by Radomil 28. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 287 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Piazza Venezia mit Monumento a Vittorio Emanuele II.jpg photo by Radomil 28. ... Victor Emmanuel can refer to any of three Italian monarchs and one Crown Prince of the House of Savoy: Victor Emmanuel I of Savoy Victor Emmanuel II of Italy Victor Emmanuel III of Italy Victor Emmanuel, Prince of Naples This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 324 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 324 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2448 × 1632 pixel, file size: 660 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The content of this image was reviewed by Mac9 and afterwards uploaded by FlickrLickr. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2448 × 1632 pixel, file size: 660 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The content of this image was reviewed by Mac9 and afterwards uploaded by FlickrLickr. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 592 pixelsFull resolution (2066 × 1530 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 592 pixelsFull resolution (2066 × 1530 pixel, file size: 2. ... For the film starring Mario Lanza, see Seven Hills of Rome (film). ... The Capitoline Hill (Capitolinus Mons), between the Forum and the Campus Martius, is one of the most famous and smallest of the seven hills of Rome. ... 17th century aviaries on the hill, built by Rainaldi for Odoardo Cardinal Farnese: once wirework cages surmounted them. ... The Viminal Hill (Latin Collis Viminalis, Italian Viminale) is the smallest and least important of the famous seven hills of Rome, and as such always referred to as collis rather than External link Samuel Ball Platner, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome: Viminal Hill Categories: Italy geography stubs | Ancient Rome... An etching of the Hill, crowned by the mass of the Palazzo del Quirinale, from a series I Sette Colli di Roma antica e moderna published in 1827 by Luigi Rossini (1790 - 1857): his view, from the roof of the palazzo near the Trevi Fountain that now houes the Accademia... The Esquiline Hill is one of the famous seven hills of Rome. ... The Caelian Hill (Latin Collis Caelius, Italian Celio) is one of the famous Seven Hills of Rome. ... The Aventine Hill is one of the seven hills on which ancient Rome was built. ... A view from the south on the Tiber Island. ... Large section of the Servian Wall visible next to the railway station of Termini. ... Gallia (in English Gaul) is the Latin name for the region of western Europe occupied by present-day France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... Large section of the Servian Wall visible next to the railway station of Termini. ... Lucius Domitius Aurelianus[1] (September 9, 214–September 275), known in English as Aurelian, Roman Emperor (270–275), was the second of several highly successful soldier-emperors who helped the Roman Empire regain its power during the latter part of the third century and the beginning of the fourth. ... South section of the walls The Aurelian Walls were city walls built between 270 and 273 in Rome during the reign of the Roman Emperor Aurelian. ... Anthem Marcia Reale dOrdinanza (Royal March of Ordinance)¹ The Kingdom of Italy at the height of its power in 1940. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Though relatively small, the old city center contains about 300 hotels and 300 pensioni,[11] over 200 palaces,[12] 900 churches,[13] eight of Rome's major parks, the residence of the President of the Italian Republic, the houses of the Parliament, offices of the city and city government, and many great and well-known monuments. The old city also contains thousands of workshops, offices, bars, and restaurants. Millions of tourists visit Rome annually, making it one of the most visited cities in the world. A pension is a family-owned owned guesthouse. ... The Quirinal Palace once housed popes, then kings, and now presidents. ... The House of Representatives Chamber of the Parliament of Australia in Canberra. ...


Peripheral layout

Via Appia, landscape near Rome

The ancient city within the walls covers about four percent of the modern municipality's 1,507 square kilometres (582 sq mi). The historic city centre is the smallest of Rome's nineteen administrative zones. The city centre is made up of 22 rioni (districts), with one of them, ( Prati), actually lying out of the walled area. Surrounding the centre are 35 quartieri urbani (urban sectors), and within the city limits are six large suburbi (suburbs). The comune of Rome located outside the municipal boundaries about doubles the area of the actual city. Image File history File linksMetadata P_appia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata P_appia. ... Remains of the Appian Way in Rome, Italy The Appian Way (Latin: Via Appia) is a famous road built by the Romans. ... A map of the center of Rome with its rioni The word rione (pl. ... Logo of the rione Prati is the XXII rione of Rome. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ...


The belt highway known as Grande Raccordo Anulare (G.R.A.) describes a huge circle around the capital, about six miles (10 km) out from the city centre; unlike most Italian highways, the G.R.A. is toll-free. The circlular highway ties together the ancient roads that led to Rome in antiquity: the Via Flaminia, Via Aurelia, Via Salaria, Via Tiburtina, Via Casilina and Via Appia. The modern Via Appia connects the city centre to a string of towns known as Castelli Romani. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Autostrada del Grande Raccordo Anulare (GRA) is a toll-free, ring-shaped orbital motorway, 68,2 km (42,6 mi) in circumference that encircles Rome. ... Route of Via Flaminia (in purple). ... Via Aurelia was the Roman road which passed out of ancient Rome through the Porta Aurelia in the Aurelian Walls and ran to the coast a little southeast of modern Palidoro and then followed a coastal route north to Vada Volaterrana. ... Via Salaria, an ancient Roman road in Italy, which eventually ran from Rome (from Porta Salaria of the Aurelian Walls) to Castrum Truentinum (Porto dAscoli) on the Adriatic coast, a distance of 242 km, via Reate (Rieti) and Asculum (Ascoli Piceno). ... Via Tiburtina, an ancient road of Italy, leading east northeast from Rome to Tibur, a distance of about 18 miles. ... The Via Casilina is a road that born from fusion of two ancient Roman roads in Italy Via Latina and Via Labicana. ... Remains of the Appian Way in Rome, Italy The Appian Way (Latin: Via Appia) is a famous road built by the Romans. ... The Castelli Romani (Castles of Rome) is a group of communes in the province of Rome. ...

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 449 pixelsFull resolution (4200 × 2359 pixel, file size: 5. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 449 pixelsFull resolution (4200 × 2359 pixel, file size: 5. ... Saint Peters Square, or Saint Peters Piazza (Piazza San Pietro, in Italian), is located directly in front of St. ...

Vatican City

Main article: Vatican City

The city of Rome surrounds the Vatican City, the enclave of the Holy See, which is a separate sovereign state. It hosts Saint Peter's Square with the Saint Peter's Basilica. The open space before the basilica was redesigned by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, from 1656 to 1667, under the direction of Pope Alexander VII, as an appropriate forecourt, designed "so that the greatest number of people could see the Pope give his blessing, either from the middle of the façade of the church or from a window in the Vatican Palace" (Norwich 1975 p 175). In Vatican City there are also the prestigious Vatican Library, Vatican Museums with the Sistine Chapel, the Raphael Rooms and other important works of Leonardo Da Vinci, Raphael, Giotto, and Botticelli. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Saint Peters Square, or Saint Peters Piazza (Piazza San Pietro, in Italian), is located directly in front of St. ... Interior view, with the nave of the Cattedra in the back St. ... Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini (Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini; December 7, 1598 – November 28, 1680) was a pre-eminent Baroque sculptor and architect of 17th century Rome. ... Alexander VII, né Fabio Chigi (February 13, 1599 – May 22, 1667) was Pope from April 7, 1655 until his death in 1667. ... The Vatican Library (Latin: Bibliotheca Apostolica Vaticana) is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. ... Entrance to the museum Staircase of the Vatican Museum The Vatican Museums (Musei Vaticani) are the public art and sculpture museums in the Vatican City, which display works from the extensive collection of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Sistine Chapel (Italian: ) is a chapel in the Apostolic Palace, the official residence of the Pope, in the Vatican City. ... The Raphael Rooms (also called the Raphael Stanze or, in Italian, Stanze di Raffaello) in the Palace of the Vatican are papal apartments with frescoes painted by the Italian artist Raphael and his workshop. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... This article is about the Renaissance artist. ... There are several things that have been named Giotto: Giotto di Bondone an Italian painter. ... Alessandro di Mariano Filipepi, better known as Sandro Botticelli (Florence March 1, 1445 - May 17, 1510) was an Italian painter of the Florentine school during the Early Renaissance (Quattrocento). ...


Museums and galleries

The list of most important museums and galleries of Rome includes: the National Museum of Rome, the Museum of Roman Civilization, the Villa Giulia National Etruscan Museum, the Capitoline Museums, the Borghese Gallery, the Museum of Castel Sant'Angelo, and the National Gallery of Modern Art. The National Museum of Rome (Museo Nazionale Romano in Italian) is a set of museums in Rome, Italy, split between various branches across the city. ... Museum of Roman Civilization The Museum of the Roman Civilization (Italian Museo della Civiltà Romana) is a museum in Rome (EUR district), devoted to the aspects of the Ancient Roman civilization. ... Sarcofago degli Sposi : the sarcophagus of the married couple The Villa Giulia is a magnificent villa built by Pope Julius II on the edge of the city of Rome, 1550–1555. ... Michelangelos design for Capitoline Hill, now home to the Capitoline Museums. ... The Villa Borghese Pinciana (begun 1605) houses the Galleria Borghese. ... For the town with the same name, see Castel SantAngelo (RI) Castel SantAngelo from the bridge. ... The front of Galleria Nazionale dArte Moderna, on May 1, 2006. ...


Transportation

Airports

Rome is served by three airports, of which the main two are owned by Aeroporti di Roma. The intercontinental Leonardo Da Vinci International Airport is Italy's chief airport; it is more commonly known as "Fiumicino airport", as it is located within the territory of the nearby comune of Fiumicino, south-west of Rome. The older Rome Ciampino Airport is a joint civilian and military airport; it is more commonly referred to as "Ciampino Airport", as it is located within Roman territory near the border with the comune of Ciampino, south-east of Rome. Leonardo da Vinci International Airport (IATA: FCO, ICAO: LIRF), also known as Fiumicino International Airport, is Italys largest airport, with over 30 million passengers in the year 2006. ... Leonardo da Vinci International Airport (IATA: FCO, ICAO: LIRF), also known as Fiumicino International Airport, is Italys largest airport, with over 30 million passengers in the year 2006. ... In Italy, the comune, (plural comuni) is the basic administrative unit of both provinces and regions, and may be properly approximated in casual speech by the English word township or municipality. ... Fiumicino is an Italian town, in which Leornardo Da Vinci airport is located. ... Rome Ciampino Airport (Italian: Aeroporto di Roma-Ciampino or Giovan Battista Pastine Airport) (IATA: CIA, ICAO: LIRA) is a joint civilian, commercial and military airport near Rome in Italy. ... Ciampino is a town in the province of Rome, Lazio, Italy. ...


A third airport, the Aeroporto dell'Urbe, is a small, low-traffic airport located about 6 km north of the city centre, which handles most helicopter and private flights. A fourth airport in the eastern part of the city, the Aeroporto di Centocelle (dedicated to Francesco Baracca), is no longer open to flights; it hosts the Comando di Squadra Aerea (which coordinates the activities of the Aeronautica Militare Italiana) and the Comando Operative di Vertice Interforze[14] (which coordinates all Italian military activities), although large parts of the airport are being redeveloped as a public park. For other uses, see Helicopter (disambiguation). ... Aeroporto of Centocelle was the First Airport in Italy, since 15, April 1909 when Wilbur Whright went here to give a dimostration of his Flyer airplane. ... Count Francesco Baracca, standing by his plane with the famous prancing horse logo, later to become the emblem for the Ferrari car. ... The Aeronautica Militare Italiana is the Italian air force. ...


Railways

Rome is the hub of the Italian railways.


History of Rome railroad

  • The first railroad built in Rome (and the second railway built in Italy) the Rome and Frascati Rail Road, was opened for service on July 14, 1856.
  • On April 16, 1859 the Rome and Civitavecchia Rail Road was opened for service.
  • On January 27, 1862 the Rome and Ceprano Rail Road was opened for service.
  • On April 28, 1864 the Rome and Monterotondo Rail Road was opened for service.
  • On June 12, 1916 the Rome and Fiuggi Rail Road was opened for service.

Stations in the city The Rome and Frascati Rail Road is one of the oldest railroads in Italy It was the first rail road in the Papal State, opening in 1856, at 20 km in length. ... The Rome and Civitavecchia Rail Road is one of the oldest railroads in Italy, in the Papal State, opening in 1859 and consists of 72,6 Km in length. ... The Rome and Fiuggi Rail Road is an old line built on the east part of Rome, capital city of Italy, of 78,13 km in length. ...


Located on the Esquiline Hill, Rome's central station, called Roma Termini, was opened in 1863, then demolished and completely rebuilt between 1939 and 1951; it is operated by Grandi Stazioni and mainly served by Trenitalia. It is the single largest station in Europe[citation needed] and is visited by 600,000 passengers daily;[citation needed] it has twenty-nine railway platforms, and also serves as a shopping centre and art gallery. The second largest station in the city is Roma Tiburtina, which is being redeveloped for high-speed rail service.[15] Other notable stations include Roma Ostiense, Roma Trastevere, Roma Tuscolana, Roma San Pietro, Roma Nomentana and Roma Casilina. The Esquiline Hill is one of the famous seven hills of Rome. ... Roma Termini station, as seen from the air Main concourse of Termini station seen from the side showing the sloping roof Station Roma Termini is the main train station of Rome. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Trenitalia logo. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For the traditional meaning of the word mall, see mall. ... The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. ... Roma Tiburtina is the second-largest railway station in Rome (after Roma Termini). ... French-designed Eurostar and Thalys TGVs side-by-side in the Paris-Gare du Nord. ...


Urban transportation

Underground

Map of Rome Metro.
Map of Rome Metro.

A 2-line subway system operates in Rome, called the "Metropolitana" or Rome Metro. Construction on the first branch started in the 1930s. The line had been planned to quickly connect the main train station (Termini) with the newly planned E42 area in the southern suburbs, where the 1942 World Fair was supposed to be held. The event never took place because of war. The area was later partly redesigned and renamed EUR (Esposizione Universale di Roma: Rome Universal Exhibition) in the 1950s to serve as a modern business district. The line was finally opened in 1955 and it is now part of the B Line. The A line opened in 1980 from Ottaviano to Anagnina stations, later extended in stages (1999 - 2000) to Battistini. In the 1990s, an extension of the B line was opened from Termini to Rebibbia. This underground network is generally reliable (although it may become very congested at peak times and during events, especially the A line) as it is relatively short. As of 2005, its total length is 38 km. The two existing lines, A & B, only intersect at Roma Termini station. Image File history File links Metro_rome. ... Image File history File links Metro_rome. ... A rapid transit, underground, subway, tube, elevated, or metro(politan) system is a railway — usually in an urban area — with a high capacity and frequency of service, and grade separation from other traffic. ... Line A arriving at Termini Line B leaving Circo Massimo A Metropolitana train covered with graffiti The Rome Metro (often simply called Metropolitana by residents) is a underground public transportation system that operates in Rome, Italy. ... Roma Termini station, as seen from the air Main concourse of Termini station seen from the side showing the sloping roof Station Roma Termini is the main train station of Rome. ... Exposition advertizing. ... Palazzo dei Congressi The Esposizione Universale Roma (E.U.R.) is a large complex, built in 1935 by Benito Mussolini as symbol of fascism for the world; he wanted to expand the new Rome in the west, to connect it to the sea. ... Roma Termini station, as seen from the air Main concourse of Termini station seen from the side showing the sloping roof Station Roma Termini is the main train station of Rome. ...


A new branch of the B line (B1) is under construction with an estimated cost of 482.900.000 Euro. It is scheduled to open in 2010. B1 will connect to line B at Piazza Bologna and will have 4 stations over a distance of 3.9 km. 2010 (MMX) will be a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


A third line, line C, is under construction with an estimated cost of 3.000.000.000 Euro and will have 30 stations over a distance of 25.5 km. It will partly replace the existing tram line, Termini-Pantano. It will feature full automated, driverless trains. The first section will open in 2011 and the final sections in 2015. Archaeological findings frequently delay underground construction work. 2011 (MMXI) will be a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the video game developer, see 2015, Inc. ...


A fourth line, line D, is under development. It will have 22 stations over a distance of 20 km. The first section will open in 2015 and the final sections before 2035. For the video game developer, see 2015, Inc. ... 2035 (MMXXXV) will be a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian Calendar. ...


Overground

Roman tram in Largo di Torre Argentina
Roman tram in Largo di Torre Argentina

The Rome Metro is part of an extensive transport network made of a tramway network, suburban and urban lines in and around the city of Rome, plus an "express line" to Fiumicino Airport. Whereas most FS-Regionale lines (Regional State Railways) do provide mostly a suburban service with more than 20 stations scattered throughout the city, the Roma-Lido (starting at Ostiense station), the Roma-Pantano (starting nearby Termini) and the Roma-Nord (starting at Flaminio station) lines offer a metro-like service. There is also an overground rail system with seven lines which link the hinterland of the Roman Area. One of this leads to the second Airport of the city, Ciampino. Rome also has a comprehensive bus and light rail system. The English web site of the ATAC public transportation company allows a route to be calculated using the buses, light rail and subways. [1] The Metrebus integrated fare system allows holders of tickets and integrated passes to travel on all companies vehicles, within the validity time of the ticket purchased. [2] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3456x2304, 3060 KB) Roman Tram in Via Torre Argentina taken by me on 7-7-06 --Grahamec 10:41, 24 October 2006 (UTC) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3456x2304, 3060 KB) Roman Tram in Via Torre Argentina taken by me on 7-7-06 --Grahamec 10:41, 24 October 2006 (UTC) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are... Line A arriving at Termini Line B leaving Circo Massimo A Metropolitana train covered with graffiti The Rome Metro (often simply called Metropolitana by residents) is a underground public transportation system that operates in Rome, Italy. ... Trenitalia logo. ... Ciampino is a town in the province of Rome, Lazio, Italy. ... Autobus redirects here. ...

Map of Rome Tramway
Map of Rome Tramway

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 553 pixelsFull resolution (1100 × 760 pixel, file size: 34 KB, MIME type: image/png) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Rome ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 553 pixelsFull resolution (1100 × 760 pixel, file size: 34 KB, MIME type: image/png) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Rome ...

Motor Traffic Limited Zone (ZTL)

Chronic congestion caused by cars during the 1970s and 1980s led to the banning of unauthorized traffic from the central part of city during workdays from 6 a.m. to 6 pm. This area is officially called (Italian) Zona a Traffico Limitato (ZTL). Heavy traffic due to night-life crowds during weekends led in recent years to the creation of other ZTLs in the Trastevere and S. Lorenzo districts during the night, and to experimentation with a new night ZTL also in the city center (plans to create a night ZTL in the Testaccio district as well are underway). In recent years, parking spaces along the streets in wide areas of the city have been converted to pay parking, as new underground parking spread throughout the city. In spite of all these measures, Rome's traffic remains an unsolved problem.


International relations

Historic Centre of Rome, the Properties of the Holy See in that City Enjoying Extraterritorial Rights and San Paolo Fuori le Mura*
UNESCO World Heritage Site

Rome - Castel Sant'Angelo
Rome - Castel Sant'Angelo
State Party Flag of Italy Italy and Holy See
Type Cultural
Criteria i, ii, iii, iv, vi
Reference 91
Region Europe and North America
Inscription History
Inscription 1980  (4th Session)
Extensions 1990
* Name as inscribed on World Heritage List.
Region as classified by UNESCO.

Rome has one sister city and a number of partner cities: Properties of the Holy See, as agreed in the 1929 Lateran Treaty. ... Basilica di San Paolo fuori le Mura — known in English as the Basilica of St Paul Outside the Walls or St Paul-without-the-Walls — is one of five churches considered to be the great ancient basilicas of Rome. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1491x945, 332 KB) Description: Castel Sant Angelo, Roma. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1491x945, 332 KB) Description: Castel Sant Angelo, Roma. ... As of 2006, there are a total of 830 World Heritage Sites located in 138 State Parties. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Vatican_City. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... This is a list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Europe. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ...


Twin city:

  • Flag of France Paris, France is Rome's only sister city[16](Seule Paris est digne de Rome; seule Rome est digne de Paris / Solo Parigi è degna di Roma; solo Roma è degna di Parigi / Only Paris is worthy of Rome; only Rome is worthy of Paris).

Partner cities: Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the capital of France. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Bolivia. ... Achacachi is a town on the Altiplano plateau in the South American Andes in Bolivia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Algeria. ... This article is about the capital of Algeria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Peking redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Serbia. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Republika Srpska. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Brazil. ... Nickname: Location of Brasília Coordinates: , Region State Founded 21 April 1960 Government  - Governor Jose Roberto Arruda Area  - Total 5,802 km² (2,240. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Egypt. ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Cincinnati, Ohio viewed from the SW, across the Ohio River from Kentucky. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - Total 365. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bulgaria. ... Plovdiv (Bulgarian: ) is the second-largest city in Bulgaria after Sofia, with a population of 343,662. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Short name Statistics Location map Map of location of Seoul. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... Tongeren is a municipality located in the Belgian province of Limburg near Hasselt. ...

See also

Rome is a historic center is an intricate network of small streets and piazzas, with many specialty shops catering largely to tourists. ... The Large Cities Climate Leadership Group is a group of cities committed to the reduction of urban carbon emissions and adapting to climate change. ... Based in Rome, Italy, the Glocal Forum aims to balance the global with the local by strengthening inter-city relations and harnessing global opportunities for the economic, social and cultural interests of the local community. ... // The Churches of Rome are more than 900 in numbers. ...

Notes

  1. ^ http://demo.istat.it/bilmens2006/index.html- ISTAT demographics
  2. ^ http://demo.istat.it December 2006
  3. ^ s.v. "Urbe", De Mauro Paravia.
  4. ^ http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/91 - Entry about Rome on the official website of the UNESCO World Heritage Centre
  5. ^ Weatherbase: Historical Weather for Rome, Italy (English). Weatherbase (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-07.
  6. ^ Personal profile on the official website of the Comune di Roma.
  7. ^ http://www.infrastrutturetrasporti.it/page/standard/site.php?p=cm&o=vh&id=146 - Roma Capitale on the official website of the Italian Ministry for Infrastructures and Transportation
  8. ^ http://www.camera.it/_dati/leg14/lavori/stampati/sk4000/articola/3885.htm - Proposal of Constitutional Law on the official website of the Camera dei Deputati
  9. ^ http://www.comune.roma.it/was/wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/7_0_21L?menuPage=/Area_di_navigazione/Sezioni_del_portale/Municipi/ - List of Municipi and definition of their territories on the official website of the Comune di Roma
  10. ^ populationhttp://demo.istat.it/strasa2006/index.html
  11. ^ Italian in Florence - Links - Information on Rome.
  12. ^ Italian in Florence - Links - Information on Rome.
  13. ^ Italian in Florence - Links - Information on Rome.
  14. ^ http://www.difesa.it/SMD/COI/La+sede.htm - Entry about the Centocelle Airport in the official website of the Italian Ministero della Difesa
  15. ^ http://eurostar-av.trenitalia.com/it/progetto/stazioni_rinnovate/roma_tiburtina.html - Entry on Roma Tiburtina station on the official website of the Italian high-speed rail service (in Italian)
  16. ^ www.v1.paris.fr/EN/city_government/international/special_partners.asp.
  17. ^ http://www.liberazione.it/giornale/051129/LB12D6D0.asp - Short newspaper article on the Rome / Achacachi twinning

Istituto Nazionale di Statistica (ISTAT) is the Italian national statistical institute, roughly corresponding to the United States Census Bureau. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... The Italian Chamber of Deputies (Italian: Camera dei Deputati) is the lower house of the Parliament of Italy. ... Ministero della Difesa (MDD) is the Italian Ministry of Defence. ...

References

Further references and bibliography can be found in the more detailed articles linked to in this article.
  • Lucentini, Mario (2002). La Grande Guida di Roma. Rome: Newton & Compton Editori. ISBN 88-8289-053-8. (Italian)
  • Spoto, Salvatore (1999). Roma Esoterica. Rome: Newton & Compton Editori. ISBN 88-8289-265-4. (Italian)
  • Richard Brilliant (2006). Roman Art. An American's View. Rome: Di Renzo Editore. ISBN 88-8323-085-X. 

Documentaries

  • The Holy Cities: Rome produced by Danae Film Production, distributed by HDH Communications; 2006.

External links

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Coordinates: 41°54′N, 12°30′E Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Taj Mahal Big Ben Saint Basils Cathedral Azadi Square in Tehran For other senses of this word, see landmark (disambiguation). ... The Basilica of San Clemente is a complex of buildings in Rome centered around a 12th century Roman Catholic church dedicated to Pope Clement I. The site is notable as being an archeological record of Roman architectural, political and religious history from the early Christian era to the Middle Ages. ... The Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore is the largest church in Rome dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary. ... Basilica di San Paolo fuori le Mura — known in English as the Basilica of St Paul Outside the Walls or St Paul-without-the-Walls — is one of five churches considered to be the great ancient basilicas of Rome. ... The late Baroque façade of the Basilica of St. ... The Roman Ghetto was located in the area surrounded by todays Via del Portico dOttavia, Lungotevere dei Cenci, Via del Progresso and Via di Santa Maria del Pianto close to the Tiber and the Theatre of Marcellus, in Rome, Italy. ... This article is about the famous building in Rome. ... The Sistine Chapel (Italian: ) is a chapel in the Apostolic Palace, the official residence of the Pope, in the Vatican City. ... Santa Maria in Trastevere is one of the oldest churches in Rome. ... The monument of Victor Emmanuel II The Monumento Nazionale a Vittorio Emanuele II (National Monument of Victor Emmanuel II) or Altare della Patria (Altar of the Fatherland) or Il Vittoriano is a monument to honour Victor Emmanuel, the first king of a unified Italy. ... In Palazzo Barberini, which still dominates Piazza Barberini, Rione Trevi, Rome, three great architects worked to create a harmonious whole: Carlo Maderno, who began it in 1627, his nephew and assistant Francesco Borromini, working on his first important commission, and a young sculptor, Gian Lorenzo Bernini. ... A view from the south on the Tiber Island. ... Villa Borghese: the 19th century Temple of Aesculapius built purely as a landscape feature, influenced by the lake at Stourhead, Wiltshire, England. ... Ara Pacis:Detail of the processional frieze showing members of the Julio-Claudian family (north face) The Ara Pacis Augustae (Latin, Altar of Majestic Peace; commonly shortened to Ara Pacis) is an altar to Peace, envisioned as a Roman goddess. ... For the town with the same name, see Castel SantAngelo (RI) Castel SantAngelo from the bridge. ... For other uses, see Circus Maximus (disambiguation). ... The Colosseum by night: exterior view of the best-preserved section. ... Facade of the Pantheon The Pantheon (Latin Pantheon[1], from Greek Πάνθεον Pantheon, meaning Temple of all the gods) is a building in Rome which was originally built as a temple to the seven deities of the seven planets in the state religion of Ancient Rome. ... Part of the Roman Forum. ... In Roman mythology, Portunes (alternatively spelled Portumnes or Portunus) was a god of keys and doors and livestock. ... Largo di Torre Argentina, Temple A (to Juturna), with part of Temple B on the left. ... There are eight ancient Egyptian and five ancient Roman obelisks in Rome, together with a number of more modern obelisks; there was also formerly (until 2005) an ancient Ethiopian obelisk in Rome. ... Temple of Jupiter on Capitoline Hill, 6th–1st century BC See Temple of Jupiter for temples to him in other places. ... The Temple of Hercules Victor, in the Forum Boarium The Temple of Hercules Victor or Hercules Olivarius, located in the Forum Boarium in Rome, is a round temple of Greek peripteros (enclosed chamber) design. ... The Trevi Fountain Trevi Fountain at night. ... The Baths of Caracalla, in 2003 The Baths of Caracalla were Roman public baths, or thermae, built in Rome between 212 and 216 AD, during the reign of the Emperor Caracalla. ... South section of the walls The Aurelian Walls were city walls built between 270 and 273 in Rome during the reign of the Roman Emperor Aurelian. ... The Spanish Steps, seen from Piazza di Spagna. ... Large section of the Servian Wall visible next to the railway station of Termini. ... A mid-18th century engraving of Palazzo Farnese by Giuseppe Vasi Palazzo Farnese, Rome (housing the French Embassy), is the most imposing Italian palace of the sixteenth century (Sir Banister Fletcher) (1). ... Fountain of the four Rivers with Egyptian obelisk, in the middle of Piazza Navona Piazza Navona is a square in Rome. ... The Apollo Belvedere, also called the Pythian Apollo, is a celebrated marble sculpture from Classical Antiquity. ... The Mouth of Truth La Bocca della Verità (Italian, the Mouth of Truth) is a river god that used to be a drain cover, but since the Middle ages, has served as a lie detector. ... The statue of Laocoön and His Sons, also called the Laocoön Group, is a monumental marble sculpture, now in the Vatican Museums, Rome. ... The Aventine Hill is one of the seven hills on which ancient Rome was built. ... The Caelian Hill (Latin Collis Caelius, Italian Celio) is one of the famous Seven Hills of Rome. ... The Capitoline Hill (Capitolinus Mons), between the Forum and the Campus Martius, is one of the most famous and smallest of the seven hills of Rome. ... The Esquiline Hill is one of the famous seven hills of Rome. ... 17th century aviaries on the hill, built by Rainaldi for Odoardo Cardinal Farnese: once wirework cages surmounted them. ... An etching of the Hill, crowned by the mass of the Palazzo del Quirinale, from a series I Sette Colli di Roma antica e moderna published in 1827 by Luigi Rossini (1790 - 1857): his view, from the roof of the palazzo near the Trevi Fountain that now houes the Accademia... The Viminal Hill (Latin Collis Viminalis, Italian Viminale) is the smallest and least important of the famous seven hills of Rome, and as such always referred to as collis rather than External link Samuel Ball Platner, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome: Viminal Hill Categories: Italy geography stubs | Ancient Rome... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...




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