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Encyclopedia > Romanus I
Contemporary coin of Romanus I.
Contemporary coin of Romanus I.

Romanus I Lecapenus (Romanos I Lakapenos, 870 - 948), who shared the throne of the Byzantine Empire with Constantine VII and exercised all the real power from 919 to 944, was admiral of the Byzantine fleet on the Danube River when, hearing of the defeat of the army at the Battle of Anchialus (917), he resolved to sail for Constantinople. Image File history File links Romanus I Follis 920-944 Named link: Rasiels Roman Imperial Type Set File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Romanus I Follis 920-944 Named link: Rasiels Roman Imperial Type Set File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Events February 28 - End of the Fourth Council of Constantinople. ... Events Otto I the Great founds missionary dioceses of Brandenburg, Havelburg, Ribe, Aarhus, and Schleswig Births Deaths Categories: 948 ... Byzantine Empire (Greek: Βασιλεία Ῥωμαίων) is the term conventionally used since the 19th century to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... Constantine and his mother Zoë. Constantine VII Porphyrogenitos (the Purple-born) (Constantinople, 905 – Constantinople, November 9, 959) was the son of Byzantine emperor Leo VI and his fourth wife Zoe Karvounopsina. ... Events King Edward I of England conquers Bedford. ... Events City of Algiers (re)founded by the Zirid king Buluggin ibn Ziri Abu Yazid launches a rebellion against the Fatimids in the Aures mountains. ... Length 2,888 km Elevation of the source 1,078 m Average discharge 30 km before Passau: 580 m³/s Vienna: 1,900 m³/s Budapest: 2,350 m³/s just before Delta: 6,500 m³/s Area watershed 817,000 km² Origin Black Forest (Schwarzwald-Baar, Baden- Württemberg, Germany... The Battle of Anchialus refers to three battles between Bulgaria and the Byzantine Empire. ... Events August 20 - Battle of Anchialus: Tsar Simeon I of Bulgaria invades Thrace and drives the Byzantines out. ...


After the marriage of his daughter Helena to Constantine he was first proclaimed basileopator ("father of the emperor") in 919 and soon after, crowned colleague of his son-in-law. His reign was uneventful, except for an attempt to check the accumulation of landed property. It was terminated by two of his own sons, Stephen and Constantine Lecapenus, who in 944 carried him off to the Prince's Islands and compelled him to become a monk. Stephen and Constantine Lecapenus were exiled and Constantine became emperor . Romanus died in 948. The Byzantine Empire had a complex system of aristocracy and bureaucracy. ... The Princes Islands are a chain of nine islands off the coast of Istanbul, Turkey, in the Sea of Marmara. ... A Roman Catholic monk A monk is a person who practices monasticism, adopting a strict religious and ascetic lifestyle, usually in community with others following the same path. ... Events Otto I the Great founds missionary dioceses of Brandenburg, Havelburg, Ribe, Aarhus, and Schleswig Births Deaths Categories: 948 ...


Bibliography

  • Runciman, Steven. The Emperor Romanus Lecapenus and his Reign. Cambridge: University Press, 1990. (Originally published 1929.) ISBN 0-521-35722-5

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Romanus I
Preceded by:
Constantine VII
Byzantine Emperor
with Constantine VII
Succeeded by:
Constantine VII

This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, a publication in the public domain. Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Constantine and his mother Zoë. Constantine VII Porphyrogenitos (the Purple-born) (Constantinople, 905 – Constantinople, November 9, 959) was the son of Byzantine emperor Leo VI and his fourth wife Zoe Karvounopsina. ... This is a list of the Emperors of the late Roman Empire, called Byzantine. ... Constantine and his mother Zoë. Constantine VII Porphyrogenitos (the Purple-born) (Constantinople, 905 – Constantinople, November 9, 959) was the son of Byzantine emperor Leo VI and his fourth wife Zoe Karvounopsina. ... Constantine and his mother Zoë. Constantine VII Porphyrogenitos (the Purple-born) (Constantinople, 905 – Constantinople, November 9, 959) was the son of Byzantine emperor Leo VI and his fourth wife Zoe Karvounopsina. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The 11th edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Romanus III - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (227 words)
Romanus III (November 15, 1028 - April 11, 1034) was a Byzantine emperor.
Romanus was an undistinguished Byzantine patrician, who was compelled by the dying emperor Constantine VIII to marry his daughter Zoë and become his successor.
In 1030 he resolved to retaliate upon the incursions of the Muslims on the eastern frontier by leading a large army in person against Aleppo, but by allowing himself to be surprised on the march sustained a serious defeat at Azaz near Antioch.
St. Romanus of Caesarea -- Deacon and Martyr (2482 words)
Romanus was a native of Palestine, a deacon and exorcist in the parish of Caesarea.
Romanus was brought before the prefect, Asclepiades, who rebuked him as a disturber of the city, as one who swayed the minds of others, and as one who urged the ignorant rabble to despise the laws of Rome.
Romanus, sighing deeply, gave a long-drawn groan Of sad complaint and thus began in ringing voice: 'A tongue has never failed the man who speaks of Christ, Nor need you ask what organ is the source of words, When He is praised who gave us the gift of speech.'...
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