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Encyclopedia > Romans

Roman or Romans has several meanings, primarily related to the Roman citizens, but also applicable to typography, math, and a commune.

Contents

Roman

The noun Roman means a citizen of For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). The Roman Colosseum Rome (Italian and Latin Roma) is the capital city of Italy, and of its Lazio region. It is located on the lower Tiber river, near the Mediterranean Sea, at 41°50N, 12°15E. The Vatican City State, a sovereign... Rome. The adjective Roman means pertaining or related to Rome. The name Romans in historical texts often refers to the three main epochs of History - Ancient history - Ancient Rome This is a List of Ancient Rome-related topics, that aims to include aspects of both the Ancient Roman Republic and Roman Empire. An index of important figures in Ancient Rome can be found in List of ancient Romans. The topics in this list cover... ancient Rome:

  • Topics in Roman mythology Important Gods: Jupiter Mars Quirinus Vesta Juno Diana Fortuna Minerva Mercury Vulcan Ceres Venus Lares Legendary History: Aeneas Romulus Numa Early Kings Roman religion The Flamens Greek/Roman myth compared There were seven traditional Kings of Rome before the establishment of the Roman Republic. They were... Roman Kingdom Centuries: 9th century BC - 8th century BC - 7th century BC Decades: 800s BC 790s BC 780s BC 770s BC 760s BC - 750s BC - 740s BC 730s BC 720s BC 710s BC 700s BC Events and Trends 756 BC - Founding of Cyzicus. 755 BC - Ashur-nirari V succeeds Ashur-Dan III... 753 BC to Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC Events and Trends 509 BC - Foundation of the Roman Republic 508 BC - Office of pontifex maximus created... 509 BC — there were seven traditional Kings of Rome before the establishment of the Roman Republic.
  • See also Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century). The Roman Republic (Latin: Res Publica Romanorum) was the representative government of Rome and its territories from 510 BC until the establishment of the Roman Empire, sometimes placed at 44 BC (the year of Caesars appointment as perpetual... Roman Republic Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC Events and Trends 509 BC - Foundation of the Roman Republic 508 BC - Office of pontifex maximus created... 509 BC to Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC - 40s BC - 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC 0s Years: 49 BC 48 BC 47 BC 46 BC 45 BC 44 BC 43 BC 42 BC 41 BC... 44 BC — traditionally lasted as a representative government of Rome and its territories from 509 BC until the establishment of the Roman Empire, typically placed at 44 BC or 27 BC
  • The Roman Empire is not the Holy Roman Empire (843-1806). Roman Empire between AD 60 and 400 with major cities. During this time only Dacia and Mesopotamia were added to the Empire but were lost before 300. The Roman Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman... Roman Empire Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC - 40s BC - 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC 0s Years: 49 BC 48 BC 47 BC 46 BC 45 BC 44 BC 43 BC 42 BC 41 BC... 44 BC to Years: 472 473 474 475 - 476 - 477 478 479 480 Decades: 440s 450s 460s - 470s - 480s 490s 500s Centuries: 4th century - 5th century - 6th century Events August - The usurper Basiliscus is deposed and Zeno is restored as Eastern Roman Emperor. September 4 - Romulus Augustus, the last Emperor of the Western... AD 476 — conventionally used to describe the Roman state in the centuries following its reorganization under the leadership of Caesar Augustus
  • The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the The Roman Empire is not the Holy Roman Empire (843-1806). Roman Empire between AD 60 and 400 with major cities. During this time only Dacia and Mesopotamia were added to the Empire but were lost before 300. The... Byzantine Empire — Eastern Roman Empire Years: 326 327 328 329 - 330 - 331 332 333 334 Decades: 300s 310s 320s - 330s - 340s 350s 360s Centuries: 3rd century - 4th century - 5th century Events May 11 - Constantine I refounds Byzantium, renames it New Rome, and moves the capital of the Roman Empire there from Rome. It is later... 330 to Years: 1450 1451 1452 - 1453 - 1454 1455 1456 Decades: 1420s 1430s 1440s - 1450s - 1460s 1470s 1480s Centuries: 14th century - 15th century - 16th century Events May 29 - Fall of Constantinople to Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II the Conqueror, marking the end of the Byzantine Empire (Eastern Roman Empire). July 17 - Battle of... 1453 — the eastern section of the Roman Empire, with its capital at Constantinople (modern Istanbul), which remained in existence after the fall of Rome in the 5th century.
  • History of Germany series Franks Holy Roman Empire German Confederation German Empire Weimar Republic Nazi Germany Nazi Germany (WWII) Germany since 1945 The history of Germany is, in places, extremely complicated and depends much on how one defines Germany. As a nation-state, Germany did not exist until 1871. Before... Holy Roman Empire — c. For other uses, see number 900. Years: 896 897 898 899 - 900 - 901 902 903 904 Decades: 870s 880s 890s - 900s - 910s 920s 930s Centuries: 8th century - 9th century - 10th century Events Gyeonhwon formally establishes the kingdom of Hubaekje in southwestern Korea. Merchants from southwest Asia and India settle on... 900 to Years: 1803 1804 1805 - 1806 - 1807 1808 1809 Decades: 1770s 1780s 1790s - 1800s - 1810s 1820s 1830s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1806 in art 1806 in literature 1806 in music 1806 in science 1806 in sports List of state leaders in 1806 List of religious leaders in 1806... 1806 — political conglomeration of lands in western and central Europe in the Middle Ages.
  • New Testament Matthew Mark Luke John Acts Romans 1 Corinthians 2 Corinthians Galatians Ephesians Philippians Colossians 1 Thessalonians 2 Thessalonians 1 Timothy 2 Timothy Titus Philemon Hebrews James 1 Peter 2 Peter 1 John 2 John 3 John Jude Revelation edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title... Epistle to the Romans — Book of the A Bible handwritten in Latin, on display in Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. This Bible was transcribed in Belgium in 1407 AD, for reading aloud in a monastery. The Bible (From Greek (Ελληνικά) Spoken in: Greece, Cyprus, Albania and surrounding countries Region: The Balkans... Bible New Testament Matthew Mark Luke John Acts Romans 1 Corinthians 2 Corinthians Galatians Ephesians Philippians Colossians 1 Thessalonians 2 Thessalonians 1 Timothy 2 Timothy Titus Philemon Hebrews James 1 Peter 2 Peter 1 John 2 John 3 John Jude Revelation edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title... New Testament — one of the epistles, or letters, included in the New Testament canon.

See also

Society

  • For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). The Roman Colosseum Rome (Italian and Latin Roma) is the capital city of Italy, and of its Lazio region. It is located on the lower Tiber river, near the Mediterranean Sea, at 41°50N, 12°15E. The Vatican City State, a sovereign... Rome — is the capital city of Italy. It is located on the Tiber river, in the central part of the country near the Mediterranean Sea, at 41°50′ N 12°15′ E (http://kvaleberg.com/extensions/mapsources/index.php?params=41_50_N_12_15_E_). The Vatican City, located in an enclave within Rome, is the seat of the Pope of the Roman Catholic Church (see also under Roman Catholicism). Rome was the seat of the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic, and the Roman Empire.
    • Roman Emperor is the title historians use to refer to the ruler of the Roman Empire. It was not actually used, and there was never actually any single office corresponding to it. Rather, the title Roman Emperor is a convenient shorthand for a complicated collection of offices and powers. In... Roman Emperors — list of Roman Emperors with the dates they controlled the Roman Empire.
    • The Seven Hills of Rome east of the Tiber form the heart of Rome. They figure prominently into Roman mythology, religion, and politics; the original city was held by tradition to have been founded by Romulus on the Palatine Hill (Collis Palatinus). The other six of the Seven Hills of... Roman hills — Seven hills of ancient Rome — east of the Tiber form the heart of Rome.
    • Roman law is the This article is about law in A society is a group of people living or working together. There are various different uses of the term society. The casual meaning of society simply refers to a group of people living together in an ordered community.1 The... Roman law — the legal system of both the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire, from its earliest days to the time of the Eastern Roman Empire, even to the time of the Emperor Justinian I after the fall of Rome itself.

Mythology

  • Topics in Roman mythology Important Gods: Jupiter Mars Quirinus Vesta Juno Diana Fortuna Minerva Mercury Vulcan Ceres Venus Lares Legendary History: Aeneas Romulus Numa Early Kings Roman religion The Flamens Greek/Roman myth compared Roman mythology can be considered as two parts. One part, largely later and literary, consists of... Roman mythology — Rooted in Greek mythology. Roman poets borrowed from Greek models in the later part of the Republic, the Romans had no stories about their gods equivalent to the Titanomachy or the seduction of Zeus by Hera.

Military

  • See also Legion software and Legion forummer. The Roman legion (from the Latin legio, meaning levy) was the basic military unit of ancient Rome. It consisted of about 5,000 to 6,000 (later 8,000) infantry soldiers and several hundred cavalrymen. Legions were named and numbered; about 50 have... Roman legion — the basic military unit of ancient Rome. It consisted of about 5,000 to 6,000 (later 8000) infantry soldiers and several hundred cavalrymen.
  • A Roman Triumph was a civil ceremony and religious rite of ancient Rome, held to publicly honour the military commander (dux) of a notably successful foreign war or campaign and to display the glories of Roman victory. Only men of senatorial or consular rank could perform a triumph and be... Roman Triumph — ceremony of the ancient Rome to publicly honor the military commander (Dux) of a notably successful foreign war or campaigns. Only men of senatorial or consular rank could perform a triumph and be a triumphator.

Language and numbers

  • For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. It gained great importance as the formal language of the Roman Empire. All Romance languages are descended from Latin, and many words based on Latin are found in other modern languages... Latin language — language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium.
    • The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world. Contents // 1 Letters of the alphabet 1.1 Majuscules: Capital (upper-case) letters 1.2 Minuscules: lower-case letters 1.3 Other letters 2 Evolution 3 Spread of the Latin alphabet... Roman alphabet (Latin alphabet) — the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world, the standard script of the English language and most of the languages of western and central Europe, and of those areas settled by Europeans.
    • edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Template:Numeral_systems&action=edit) Numeral systems Arabic Armenian Attic (Greek) Babylonian Chinese Egyptian Etruscan Greek Hebrew Indian Ionian (Greek) Japanese Khmer Mayan Roman Cyrillic Thai Binary (2) Octal (8) Decimal (10) Hexadecimal (16) The system of Roman numerals is... Roman numerals — numeral system originating in ancient Rome. It is based on certain letters which are given value.
    • The Roman calendar changed its form several times in the time between the foundation of Rome and the fall of the Roman Empire. This article generally discusses the early Roman or pre-Julian calendars. The calendar used after 46 BC is discussed under the Julian calendar. Contents // 1 History of... Roman calendar — changed its form several times in the time between the foundation of Rome and the fall of the Roman Empire.

Architecture

  • The Romans adopted the external language of classical Greek architecture for their own purposes, which were so different from Greek buildings as to create a new architectural style. The two styles are often considered one body of classical architecture. Sometimes that approach is productive, and sometimes it hinders understanding by... Roman architecture — adopted external language of classical Greek architecture for Rome's own purposes, which were so different from Greek buildings as to create a new architectural style. The two styles are often considered one body of classical architecture.
    • A Roman road in Pompeii The Romans, as a military, commercial and political expedient, became adept at constructing roads; many long sections of them are ruler-straight, but it should not be thought that all of them were. The Roman roads were essential for the growth of their empire, by... Roman road — as a military, commercial, and political expedient, became adept at constructing long straight roads and were essential for the growth of their empire.
    • The Colosseum in Rome, Italy The Colosseum, originally known as the Flavian Amphitheater (lat. Amphitheatrum Flavium), also referred to as the Coliseum, is an amphitheater in Rome, capable of seating 50,000 spectators, which was once used for gladiatorial combat. Its construction began under the Emperor Vespasian in 72 AD... Roman Colosseum — originally known as the Flavian Amphitheater, is an amphitheater in Rome, capable of seating 45,000 spectators, which was once used for gladiatorial combat.
    • The Roman Empire contained many villas which were rather like country houses, though suburban villas on the edge of cities were known, such as the Middle and Late Republican villas that encroached on the Campus Martius, then on the edge of Rome. The late Republic witnessed an explosion of villa... Roman villa — country houses, though suburban villas on the edge of cities were known), such as the late Republican villas that encroached on the Campus Martius then on the edge of Rome.

Britain

  • Roman invasion of Britain: Britain was the target of invasion by forces of the Roman Republic and Roman Empire several times during its history. In common with other regions on the edge of the empire, Britain had long enjoyed trading links with the Romans and their economic and cultural influence... Roman invasion of Britain — Britain was the target of invasion by forces of the Roman Republic and Roman Empire several times during its history.
    • History of Britain Chronological Prehistoric Britain Roman Britain Mediæval Britain Early Modern Britain Modern Britain Geographic History of England History of Ireland History of Scotland History of Wales Topical Economic history British Empire Military history Social history Constitutional history edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/wiki.phtml?title... Roman Britain — term applied to the historical period when Britain was under Roman rule, usually considered AD 44 to 410.
    • The term Romano-British describes the Romanised culture of Britain under the rule of the Roman Empire, when Roman and Christian culture had extensively entered into the life of the native Brythonic, Pictish and perhaps Gaelic -speaking peoples of Britain. One vector of Roman influence into British life was the... Romano-British — Romanised culture of Britain under the rule of the Roman Empire, when Roman and For other uses of the term Christian, see This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. If an article link referred you here, you might want to go back and fix it to point directly to the intended... Christian culture had extensively entered into the life of the native Celtic-speaking peoples of Britain.
    • Roman sites in the United Kingdom is a link page for any Roman site open to the public. It should be noted that there are many sites that do not require special access. These include roman roads, and sites that have not been uncovered. England Ambleside Roman Fort, Cumbria Arbeia... Roman sites in the United Kingdom — any Roman site open to the public.
    • A partial list of Roman place names in Britain and the British Isles (including Ireland). This list includes only names documented from Roman times. For later Latin names, see List of British places with Latin names. Contents // 1 Region/state names 2 Island names 3 City names 4 See also... List of Roman place names in Britain — also includes Ireland, Faeroe Islands and Iceland.

Geometry

  • The Roman surface (so called because Jakob Steiner was in Rome when he thought of it) is a self-intersecting immersion of the real projective plane into three-dimensional space, with an unusually high degree of symmetry. The simplest construction is as the image of a sphere centered at the... Roman surface — self-intersecting immersion of the real projective plane into three-dimensional space, with an unusually high degree of symmetry.

Typography

Roman is a family of Typography (from the Greek words typos = form and grapho = write) is the art and technique of selecting and arranging type styles, point sizes, line lengths, line leading, character spacing, and word spacing for typeset applications. These applications can be physical or digital. The two primary functions of typography are the... typographic In typography, a typeface is a co-ordinated set of character designs, which usually comprises an alphabet of letters, a set of numerals and a set of punctuation marks. There are also typefaces of Ideograms and symbols (e.g. mathematical or map making) In its widest sense a typeface could... fonts, the most famous and common of which is Times New Roman is a serif typeface, developed for The Times newspaper in the early 1930s, designed by Starling Burgess, Victor Lardent and Stanley Morison and produced by the Monotype Corporation. Though no longer used by The Times, it is still widely used for typesetting books. A version of Times... Times New Roman.


Christianity

  • Romans is often short for the New Testament Matthew Mark Luke John Acts Romans 1 Corinthians 2 Corinthians Galatians Ephesians Philippians Colossians 1 Thessalonians 2 Thessalonians 1 Timothy 2 Timothy Titus Philemon Hebrews James 1 Peter 2 Peter 1 John 2 John 3 John Jude Revelation edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title... Epistle to the Romans, one of the books of the New Testament Matthew Mark Luke John Acts Romans 1 Corinthians 2 Corinthians Galatians Ephesians Philippians Colossians 1 Thessalonians 2 Thessalonians 1 Timothy 2 Timothy Titus Philemon Hebrews James 1 Peter 2 Peter 1 John 2 John 3 John Jude Revelation edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title... New Testament of the Christian A Bible handwritten in Latin, on display in Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. This Bible was transcribed in Belgium in 1407 AD, for reading aloud in a monastery. The Bible (From Greek (Ελληνικά) Spoken in: Greece, Cyprus, Albania and surrounding countries Region: The Balkans... Bible.
  • The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. Members generally prefer the term Catholic Church, but this term has multiple meanings (see Catholicism); the term Roman Catholic Church is used in this article to avoid... Roman Catholic Church — largest of the Christian churches that profess the Catholic faith.
    • The Roman Missal is the liturgical book that contains the texts and rubrics for the celebration of the Roman rite of Mass. Before the high Middle Ages, several books were used at Mass: a Sacramentary with the prayers, one or more books for the Scriptural readings, and one or more... Roman Missal — book containing all the fixed and changeable prayers and readings for the conduct of Roman Catholic Masses.

Geography

  • Roman (population: 69,483) is a city in Moldavia, Romania, located 46 Km East of Piatra Neamt, in the Neamt county at the confluence of Siret and Moldova rivers. It is thought that the name was taken from the voivod Roman I Musat, believed to be its founder. History The... Roman is a city in the Administrative map of Romania with Neamţ county highlighted Neamţ is a Romanian county (Judeţ) in the Moldavia region, with the capital city at Piatra Neamţ (population: 125,050). Its common abbreviation is NT. Demographics In 2002, it had a population of 557,000 and the population... Neamţ county, Romania (formerly spelled Rumania or Roumania; Romanian: România) is a country in southeastern This article is about the continent. For alternative meanings, see: Europe (disambiguation) World map showing location of Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is Geology (from Greek γη- (ge-, the earth) and... Romania
  • Roman or Romans is the name or part of the name of several communes in The French Republic or France ( French (Français) Spoken in: The French Republic or France ( French (Fran ais) Spoken in: France and 53 other countries Region: Europe Total speakers: 128 million Ranking: 11 Genetic classification: Indo-European  Italic   Romance    Italo-Western   ... France:
    • Roman, in the Eure Coat of arms of the French department of Eure. Copied from the French Wikipedia article. Licensed under GFDL. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. Click on date to download the file or see the image... Eure This article is part of the series: This article is part of the series: Administrative divisions of France Regional level This article is part of the series: This article is part of the series: Administrative divisions of France Regional level Régions Régions doutre-mer Departmental level Départements... département
    • Romans, in the Ain is also a figure from mythology; see In Irish mythology, Ain and her sister wrote the Brehon Laws which protected the rights of women. Categories: Mythology stubs | Irish mythology ... Ain (mythology). Ain Missing image Blason_france_Ain_petit.jpg Coat of Arms of Ain Details Information This article is part of the... Ain département
    • Romans, in the Deux-Sèvres Missing image Blason_france_Deux-Sèvres_petit.jpg Coat of Arms dev Details Information This article is part of the series: This article is part of the series: Administrative divisions of France Regional level This article is part of the series: This article is part of the... Deux-Sèvres département
    • Romans-sur-Isère, in the Drôme Missing image Blason_france_Drôme_petit.jpg Coat of Arms de la Drôme Details Information This article is part of the series: This article is part of the series: Administrative divisions of France Regional level This article is part of the series: This article is part... Drôme département

  Results from FactBites:
 
Roman Numerals (507 words)
The Romans were active in trade and commerce, and from the time of learning to write they needed a way to indicate numbers.
The big differences between Roman and Arabic numerals (the ones we use today) are that Romans didn't have a symbol for zero, and that numeral placement within a number can sometimes indicate subtraction rather than addition.
So the Romans moved on to the symbol for 5 - V. Placing I in front of the V — or placing any smaller number in front of any larger number — indicates subtraction.
Roman Mythology (4901 words)
ROMAN MYTHOLOGY, various beliefs, rituals, and other observances concerning the supernatural held or practiced by the ancient Romans from the legendary period until Christianity finally completely supplanted the native religions of the Roman Empire at the start of the Middle Ages.
The indigetes were the original gods of the Roman state, and their names and nature are indicated by the titles of the earliest priests and by the fixed festivals of the calendar; 30 such gods were honored with special festivals.
Early Roman cult was not so much a polytheism as a polydemonism the worshipers' concepts of the invoked beings consisted of little more than their names and functions, and the being's numen, or power, manifested itself in highly specialized ways.
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