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Encyclopedia > Roman rite

Latin Rite, in the singular and accompanied, in English, by the definite article, refers to the sui juris particular Church of the Roman Catholic Church that developed in the area of western Europe and northern Africa where Latin was for many centuries the language of education and culture. This sense, synonymous with "the Latin Church", is that in which the term is most often used in Church documents, including the opening canon of the Code of Canon Law. Sui iuris is a Latin phrase that literally means “of one’s own right”. It is usually spelled sui juris in civil law, which uses the phrase to indicate legal competence, the capacity to manage one’s own affairs (Blacks Law Dictionary, Oxford English Dictionary). ... A Particular Church , in Roman Catholic theology and canon law, is any of the individual constituent ecclesial communities in full communion with the Church of Rome and thus make up the Catholic Communion. ... The Roman Catholic Church is the largest Christian body in the world. ...


The term is also used, in singular or plural, to refer to one or more of the forms of sacred liturgy traditional in different parts of this Latin Church. Of these Latin rites, there survive today the widely used Roman rite, the Ambrosian rite of Milan, Italy and neighbouring areas, and the Mozarabic rite, in very limited use at Toledo, Spain. Other Latin liturgical rites have fallen into into disuse, such as the Gallican rite that was associated with France, and the rites that some religious orders practiced until after the Second Vatican Council. From the Greek word λειτουργια, which can be transliterated as leitourgia, meaning the work of the people, a liturgy comprises a prescribed religious ceremony, according to the traditions of a particular religion; it may refer to, or include, an elaborate formal ritual (such as the Catholic Mass), a daily activity such... Ambrosian Rite (also sometimes called the Milanese rite) named after Saint Ambrose, bishop of Milan in the fourth century, is a Catholic rite practised by approximately five million inhabitants in north-western Lombardy, Italy (with the only exclusion of the city of Monza) and part of Canton Ticino, Switzerland, and... This is about the Italian city of Milan. ... The Mozarabic rite is a form of Catholic worship within the Latin Rite of the Catholic Church. ... This article is about the city in Spain named Toledo. ... The Second Vatican Council, or Vatican II, was an Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church opened under Pope John XXIII in 1962 and closed under Pope Paul VI in 1965. ...


Sometimes, the term "Roman Catholic" is treated as synonymous with "Latin-Rite", though never by the Roman Catholic Church itself.


Characteristic of the Latin Rite (in the first-mentioned sense) are obligatory celibacy of priests, confirmation after the age of reason (but not necessarily as late as pre-adolescence), direct appointment of bishops by the Pope, honorary titles of patriarch and primate, and, of course, the Latin-rite liturgies. The Eastern Rite Churches, to varying extents, differ in these respects. For instance, ordination to priesthood (but not to the order of bishop) may be conferred on married men, and Eastern patriarchal and major archiepiscopal Churches elect bishops for their own territory (though not outside it). An oath of clerical celibacy is the promise of a religious or clerical official to remain unmarried, or not to remarry. ... Roman Catholic priest A priest or priestess is a holy man or woman who takes an officiating role in worship of any religion, with the distinguishing characteristic of offering sacrifices. ... Confirmation can refer to: Confirmation (sacrament) Confirmation (epistemology) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see Bishop (disambiguation). ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Catholic Church. ... Originally a patriarch was a man who exercised autocratic authority as a pater familias over an extended family. ... A primate in the Western Church is an archbishop or bishop who has authority not just over the bishops of his own province, as a Metropolitan does, but over a number of provinces, such as a national church. ... Then-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger (now Pope Benedict XVI) presiding at the 2005 Easter Vigil Mass in place of the dying Pope John Paul II. Mass is the term used of the celebration of the Eucharist in the Latin rites of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The term Eastern Rites may refer to the liturgical rites used by many ancient Christian Churches of Eastern Europe and the Middle East that, while being part of the Roman Catholic Church, are distinct from the Latin Rite or Western Church. ...


Canon law for the Latin-Rite Church has, since 1917, been codified in the Code of Canon Law[1]. A completely new edition was promulgated by Pope John Paul II in 1983. 1917 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), born Karol Józef Wojtyła (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005), reigned as pope of the Catholic Church for almost 27 years, from 16 October 1978 until his death, making his the third-longest reign in the history of the Papacy according to the... 1983 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On the Latin liturgical rites see, for instance, with regard to the Roman liturgical rite, Mass (liturgy), Novus Ordo Missae, Tridentine Mass, but also Mozarabic Rite, Ambrosian Rite and other articles referenced in these. Then-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger (now Pope Benedict XVI) presiding at the 2005 Easter Vigil Mass in place of the dying Pope John Paul II. Mass is the term used of the celebration of the Eucharist in the Latin rites of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Then-Cardinal Ratzinger (now Pope Benedict XVI) presiding over the 2005 Easter Vigil Mass at St. ... A pre-Vatican II altar with reredosThe altar is preceded by three steps, as was most common for a churchs main altar, though some main altars, such as that in Saint Peters in the Vatican, had (and have) much more than three. ... The Mozarabic rite is a form of Catholic worship within the Latin Rite of the Catholic Church. ... Ambrosian Rite (also sometimes called the Milanese rite) named after Saint Ambrose, bishop of Milan in the fourth century, is a Catholic rite practised by approximately five million inhabitants in north-western Lombardy, Italy (with the only exclusion of the city of Monza) and part of Canton Ticino, Switzerland, and...


See also

From the Greek word λειτουργια, which can be transliterated as leitourgia, meaning the work of the people, a liturgy comprises a prescribed religious ceremony, according to the traditions of a particular religion; it may refer to, or include, an elaborate formal ritual (such as the Catholic Mass), a daily activity such... The Roman Catholic Church is the largest Christian body in the world. ... This article considers Catholicism in the broadest ecclesiastical sense. ... A Particular Church , in Roman Catholic theology and canon law, is any of the individual constituent ecclesial communities in full communion with the Church of Rome and thus make up the Catholic Communion. ... Full communion is a kind of relationship between two or more organizations of Christians. ... // Partial list of Christian liturgies (past and present) Roman Catholic church (churches in communion with the Holy See of the Bishop of Rome) Latin Rite Novus Ordo Missae Tridentine Mass Anglican Use Mozarabic Rite Ambrosian Rite Gallican Rite Eastern Rite, e. ... A pre-Vatican II altar with reredosThe altar is preceded by three steps, as was most common for a churchs main altar, though some main altars, such as that in Saint Peters in the Vatican, had (and have) much more than three. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Roman Catholic Church. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05 (2272 words)
Besides the Roman rite, to which the vast majority belong, there are among Catholics five Eastern rites, used by a number of communities (Eastern Catholics or Uniates; see patriarch).
Apart from the rites and foreign missions, the organization of the church is by diocese, the territory of a bishop.
The doctrine of apostolic succession is one of the keystones of the Catholic faith; it holds that the pope (the vicar of Christ) and the bishops have in varying degrees the spiritual authority Jesus assigned to his apostles.
Roman Rite - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1085 words)
The liturgical rite of the Church of Rome is called the Roman Rite.
The quite distinct term Latin Rite, usually refers not to a liturgical rite but to the particular Church within the Roman Catholic Church that was sometimes referred to also as the Patriarchate of the West, within which liturgical rites other than the now almost universally adopted Roman Rite have been and still are in use.
Again, while in all the other ancient rites the liturgy is chanted throughout, in the Tridentine form of the Roman Rite and for some centuries before, the priest normally merely spoke the words of the Mass, to a large extent silently.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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