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Encyclopedia > Roman festivals

Roman holidays generally were celebrated to worship and celebrate a certain god or mythological occurrence, and consisted of religious observances, various festival traditions and usually a large feast. The most important festivals were the Saturnalia, the Consualia, the Lupercalia and the rites of the Bona Dea. Among the most useful sources for Ancient Roman holidays is Ovid's Fasti, a poem that documents in detail the festivals of January to June at the time of Augustus. A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... For other uses, see Saturnalia (disambiguation). ... The Consuales Ludi or Consualia is a festival which honors Consus, the god of counsel, and the one who protects the harvest which is now in storage at this time. ... The Lupercalia was a very ancient, possibly pre-Roman pastoral festival, observed on February 13 through February 15 to avert evil spirits and purify the city, releasing health and fertility. ... In Roman mythology, Bona Dea (the good goddess) was a goddess of fertility, healing, virginity and women. ... For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation) Publius Ovidius Naso (March 20, 43 BC – 17 AD) was a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid who wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... Ovids Fasti is a long, unfinished Latin poem by the Roman poet Ovid. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ...


The list below is organized by date. Some of these festivals were instituted in different eras. When possible, the initial date is stated.

Contents

Ianuarius

is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Agonalia, in ancient Rome, were festivals celebrated on January 9, March 17, May 21, and December 11 in each year in honor of various divinities (Ovid, Fasti, i. ... Roman bust of Janus, Vatican. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Carmentalia is the feast day of the Roman goddess Carmenta, an ancient oracle who was defied later on by the Romans. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Februarius

is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Parentalia. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Lupercalia was a very ancient, possibly pre-Roman pastoral festival, observed on February 13 through February 15 to avert evil spirits and purify the city, releasing health and fertility. ... Marble sculpture of Pan copulating with a goat, recovered from Herculaneum Pan (Greek Παν, genitive Πανος) is the Greek god who watches over shepherds and their flocks. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... In Roman mythology, Quirinus was a mysterious god. ... In Roman mythology, Quirinus was an early god of the Roman state. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Feralia was a Roman feast honoring the infernal powers. It typically fell on February 22 and was the last day of the Parentalia, a week-long festival that honored the dead. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... In Roman mythology, Terminus was the god of boundaries. ... Terminus can refer to: Terminal station, a bus or rail station acting as an end destination Terminus (mythology), a Roman god Jupiter (god) (also known by this name) Atlanta, Georgia, which was originally called Terminus Terminus (planet), the home planet of the Foundation in Isaac Asimovs Foundation series Terminus...

Martius

is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Matronalia (or Matronales Feriae) was a festival celebrating the goddess of childbirth (Juno who brings children into the light). Prior to the reform of the Roman calendar by Julius Caesar, this was the first day of the new year. ... IVNO REGINA (Queen Juno) on a coin celebrating Julia Soaemias. ... Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and either Jupiter or a magical flower. ... Vesta was the virgin goddess of the hearth, home, and family in Roman mythology. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Equirria (Festival of Mars - held on February 27, First Equirria and March 14, Second Equirria) were holy days with religious and military significance at either end of the new year celebrations for Mars. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bacchanalia were wild and mystic festivals of the Roman god Bacchus. ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Agonalia, in ancient Rome, were festivals celebrated on January 9, March 17, May 21, and December 11 in each year in honor of various divinities (Ovid, Fasti, i. ... Adjectives: Martian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In Ancient Roman religious tradition, the Quinquatria or Quinquatrus was a festival sacred to Minerva, celebrated on the 19th of March. ... This article is about the Roman goddess. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Adjectives: Martian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In Greek mythology, Hygieia (Roman equivalent: Salus) was a daughter of Asclepius. ...

Aprilis

is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Veneralia (April 1) was the festival of Venus Verticordia, the goddess of love and beauty. ... Marble Venus of the Capitoline Venus type, Roman (British Museum) Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A fountain in Madrid depicting Cybele in her chariot drawn by lions, in the Plaza de Cibeles Originally a Phrygian goddess, Cybele (Greek: Κυβέλη) was a deification of the Earth Mother who was worshipped in Anatolia from Neolithic times. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Cerealia was a 7-day holiday celebrated in ancient Rome in honor of the goddess Ceres. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 3rd century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC - 200s BC - 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC Years: 207 BC 206 BC 205 BC 204 BC 203 BC - 202 BC - 201 BC 200 BC 199 BC 198 BC 197 BC Events October... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Roman festival for the god Tellus held April 15th where a pregnant cow was sacrified, the calf fetus burned, and the ashes saved for the Parilia fesival. ... Terra Mater or Tellus Mater was a goddess personifying the Earth in Roman mythology. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Parilia was a festival described in detail by Ovid in Fasti. ... In Roman mythology, Pales was the goddess of shepherds, flocks and livestock. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In Roman mythology, Robiga (meaning green or life) along with her brother, Robigus, were the fertility gods of the Romans. ... In Roman mythology, Robigus (wheat rust or mildew) was a fertility god who protected crops against diseases. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Floralia, also known as the Florifertum, was an ancient Roman festival dedicated to the goddess Flora. ... In Roman mythology, Flora was a goddess of flowers and the season of spring. ...

Maius

is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In Roman mythology, Bona Dea (the good goddess) was a goddess of fertility, healing, virginity and women. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Larvae are the plural of larva, juvenile form of animals with indirect development. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Mercuralia is a Roman celebration known also as the Festival of Mercury. Mercury was thought to be the god of merchants and commerce. ... A sculpture of the Roman god Mercury by 17th-century Flemish artist Artus Quellinus. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In Roman mythology Veiovis, or Vediovis, was an old Italian or Etruscan deity. ... Agonalia, in ancient Rome, were festivals celebrated on January 9, March 17, May 21, and December 11 in each year in honor of various divinities (Ovid, Fasti, i. ...

Iunius

is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In Greek mythology, Enyo (horror) was an ancient goddess known by the epithet Waster of Cities and frequently depicted as being covered in blood and carrying weapons of war. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Vesta was the virgin goddess of the hearth, home, and family in Roman mythology, analogous to Hestia in Greek mythology. ... Vesta was the virgin goddess of the hearth, home, and family in Roman mythology. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In Ancient Roman religious tradition, the Quinquatria or Quinquatrus was a festival sacred to Minerva, celebrated on the 19th of March. ... This article is about the Roman goddess. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In Roman mythology, Summanus was the god of nocturnal thunder, as opposed to Jupiter, the god of diurnal (daylight) thunder. ...

Iulius

is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the planet see Jupiter. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC - 200s BC - 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC Years: 213 BC 212 BC 211 BC 210 BC 209 BC - 208 BC - 207 BC 206 BC... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IVNO REGINA (Queen Juno) on a coin celebrating Julia Soaemias. ... In Roman mythology, the god Consus oversaw the storing of grain underneath the ground. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Caprotinia, or feasts of Juno Caprotina, were ancient Roman festivals which were celebrated on July 9, in favour of the female slaves. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC - 390s BC - 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC 395 BC 394 BC 393 BC 392 BC 391 BC - 390 BC - 389 BC 388 BC 387... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Lucaria was an ancient Roman feast, solemnized in the woods, where the Romans, defeated and pursued by the Gauls, retired and concealed themselves; it was held, on July 19, in a wood, between the Tyber and the road called Via Salaria. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Neptunalia was an obscure archaic two-day festival in honour of Neptune as god of waters, celebrated at Rome in the heat and drought of summer, probably July 23 (Varro, De lingua latina vi. ... Genoese admiral Andrea Doria as Neptune, by Agnolo Bronzino. ...

Augustus

is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Opiconsivia On August 25, the Opiconsivia (or Opeconsiva or Opalia) festival was held in honor of Ops. ... For other uses, see OPS. Ops, more properly Opis, (Latin: Plenty) was a fertility deity and earth-goddess in Roman mythology of Sabine origin. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Vertumnus and Pomona by Luca Giordano (1682–1683), private collection In Roman mythology, Vertumnus (Vortumnus, Vertimnus) was the god of seasons, change[1] and plant growth, as well as gardens and fruit trees. ... In Roman mythology, Vertumnus (Vortumnus, Vertimnus) was the god of seasons, change and plant growth, as well as gardens and fruit trees. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The festival of Nemoralia (aka Festival of Torches) was celebrated by the ancient Romans either on the 13-15th of August or on the August Full Moon, in honor of the goddess Diana. ... Diana may refer to: In mythology: Diana (mythology), ancient Roman goddess of the moon, of love, and affection People bearing the name: Diana, Princess of Wales, the first wife of HRH The Prince of Wales Diana (given name), people with the given name Diana In music: Diana (Bryan Adams song... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In Roman mythology, Portunes (alternatively spelled Portumnes or Portunus) was a god of keys and doors and livestock. ... In Roman mythology, Portunes (alternatively spelled Portumnes or Portunus) was a god of keys and doors and livestock. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Vinalia were Roman festivals in honour of Jupiter and Venus. ... Marble Venus of the Capitoline Venus type, Roman (British Museum) Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. ... The Esquiline Hill is one of the famous seven hills of Rome. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 298 BC 297 BC 296 BC 295 BC 294 BC 293 BC 292 BC 291 BC 290... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Consuales Ludi or Consualia is a festival which honors Consus, the god of counsel, and the one who protects the harvest which is now in storage at this time. ... In Roman mythology, the god Consus oversaw the storing of grain underneath the ground. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Forge of Vulcan by Diego Velasquez, (1630). ... The Forge of Vulcan by Diego Velasquez, (1630). ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The lapis manalis (Latin: stone of the Manes) was a name given to two sacred stones used in the Roman religion. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Opiconsivia On August 25, the Opiconsivia (or Opeconsiva or Opalia) festival was held in honor of Ops. ... For other uses, see OPS. Ops, more properly Opis, (Latin: Plenty) was a fertility deity and earth-goddess in Roman mythology of Sabine origin. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Volturnalia was the Roman festival on August 27 dedicated to Volturnus, god of the waters, god of fountains. ... In Roman mythology, Volturnus was a god of the waters, probably derived from a local Samnite cult. ...

September

The Septmontium was a Roman festival of the seven mountains of Rome, which was celebrated in September, near the seven mountains, within the walls of the city; they sacrificed seven times in seven different places; and on that day the emperors were very liberal to the people. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ludi Romani was a religious festival in ancient Rome to the honour of Jupiter, whose temple was dedicated on 13 September 509 BC. It was held annually since 366 BC, normally from 12 to 14 September, but extended to 5 to 19 September, and eventually started at 4 September in... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... For the planet see Jupiter. ... Aedile (Latin Aedilis, from aedes, aedis temple, building) was an office of the Roman Republic. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC - 360s BC - 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 371 BC 370 BC 369 BC 368 BC 367 BC - 366 BC - 365 BC 364 BC 363...

October

is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In Roman mythology, Ceres was the goddess of growing plants (particularly cereals) and of motherly love. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC 200s BC - 190s BC - 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC 140s BC Years: 196 BC 195 BC 194 BC 193 BC 192 BC - 191 BC - 190 BC 189 BC... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Cimbri and Teutones Roman Republic Commanders Kings Boiorix and Teutobod Quintus Servilius Caepio and Gnaeus Mallius Maximus† Strength about 200,000 80,000 troops in 10-12 legions with up to 40,000 auxiliaries and camp followers Casualties Unknown, perhaps several thousand An estimated 112,000 The Battle of... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC - 100s BC - 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC Years: 110 BC 109 BC 108 BC 107 BC 106 BC - 105 BC - 104 BC 103 BC... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Meditrinalia was a festival in honor of Meditrina (also spelled Mediterina) and was celebrated on October 11. ... In Roman mythology, Meditrina (healer) was the goddess of health, longevity and wine. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In Roman mythology, Fontus was the son of Juturna and Janus. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Equirria (Festival of Mars - held on February 27, First Equirria and March 14, Second Equirria) were holy days with religious and military significance at either end of the new year celebrations for Mars. ... Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and either Jupiter or a magical flower. ... Model of the ancient Campus Martius around 300 AD The Pantheon, a landmark of the Campus Martius since ancient Rome. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Armilustrium was a festival in honor of Mars, the god of war, celebrated on October 19. ... Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and either Jupiter or a magical flower. ...

November

is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Pomona, Nicolas Fouché, c. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Aedile (Latin Aedilis, from aedes, aedis temple, building) was an office of the Roman Republic. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC - 210s BC - 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC Years: 221 BC 220 BC 219 BC 218 BC 217 BC - 216 BC - 215 BC 214 BC... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In Roman festivals, the Epulum Jovis was a sumptuous feast offered to Jupiter on November 13. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Feronia was a rural goddess in Roman mythology, to whom woods and fountains were sacred. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In Roman festivals, the Brumalia was a feast of Bacchus, celebrated among the Romans during the space of thirty days, commencing on November 24. ...

December

is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In Roman mythology, Bona Dea (the good goddess) was a goddess of fertility, healing, virginity and women. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Marble sculpture of Pan copulating with a goat, recovered from Herculaneum Pan (Greek Παν, genitive Πανος) is the Greek god who watches over shepherds and their flocks. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Agonalia, in ancient Rome, were festivals celebrated on January 9, March 17, May 21, and December 11 in each year in honor of various divinities (Ovid, Fasti, i. ... This article is about Greek mythology. ... The Septmontium was a Roman festival of the seven mountains of Rome, which was celebrated in September, near the seven mountains, within the walls of the city; they sacrificed seven times in seven different places; and on that day the emperors were very liberal to the people. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Consuales Ludi or Consualia is a festival which honors Consus, the god of counsel, and the one who protects the harvest which is now in storage at this time. ... In Roman mythology, the god Consus oversaw the storing of grain underneath the ground. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Saturnalia (disambiguation). ... Saturnus, Caravaggio, 16th c. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses of Epona, see Epona (disambiguation) Image:Epona link. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Opiconsivia On August 25, the Opiconsivia (or Opeconsiva or Opalia) festival was held in honor of Ops. ... For other uses, see OPS. Ops, more properly Opis, (Latin: Plenty) was a fertility deity and earth-goddess in Roman mythology of Sabine origin. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Divalia was a Roman festival held on December 21, in honour of the goddess Angerona, whence it is also called Angeronalia. ... In Roman mythology, Angerona or Angeronia was an old Roman goddess, whose name and functions are variously explained. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Roman festival of Larentalia was held on December 23, but was ordered to be observed twice a year by Augustus; by some supposed to be in honour of the Lares, a kind of domestic genii, or divinities, worshipped in houses, and esteemed the guardians and protectors of families, supposed... In Roman mythology, Dea Tacita (the silent goddess) was a goddess of the dead. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Coin of Emperor Probus, circa 280, with Sol Invictus riding a quadriga, with legend SOLI INVICTO, to the Unconquered Sun. Note how the Emperor (on the left) wears a radiated solar crown, worn also by the god (to the right). ...

References

  1. ^ Holidays and Festivals - Roman Festivals

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

Further reading

  • Fowler, W. Warde (1899). The Roman Festivals of the Period of the Republic: An Introduction to the Study of the Religion of the Romans. London: Macmillan and Co.. Retrieved on 2007-03-24. 
  • Scullard, H. H. (1981). Festivals and Ceremonies of the Roman Republic. London: Thames and Hudson. ISBN 0-500-40041-5. 
Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Howard Hayes Scullard (1903-1983) was a British historian specializing in ancient history, notable for editing the Oxford Classical Dictionary and for his many books. ... Religion in ancient Rome combined several different cult practices and embraced more than a single set of beliefs. ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... The Augur was a priest or official in ancient Rome. ... Bust of a flamen, 3rd century, Louvre A flamen was a name given to a priest assigned to a state supported god or goddess in Roman religion. ... The bronze sheeps liver of Piacenza, with Etruscan inscriptions In Roman practice inherited from the Etruscans, a haruspex (plural haruspices) was a man trained to practice a form of divination called haruspicy, hepatoscopy or hepatomancy. ... Alternate meanings: see Pontifex (disambiguation) In Ancient Rome, the Pontifex Maximus was the high priest of the collegium of the Pontifices, the most august position in Roman religion, open only to a patrician, until 254 BC, when a plebeian first occupied this post. ... The rex Nemorensis, (Latin: the king of Nemi or the king of the grove) was a sort of sacred king who served as priest of the goddess Diana at Aricia in Italy, by the shores of lake Nemi. ... A sacred king, according to the systematic interpretation of mythology developed by Sir James George Frazer in his influential book The Golden Bough, was a king who represented a solar deity in a periodically re-enacted fertility rite. ... Image of a Roman Vestal Virgin In Ancient Rome, the Vestal Virgins (sacerdos Vestalis), were the virgin holy priestesses of Vesta, the goddess of the hearth. ... Roman Funerals and Burial Introduction In ancient Rome, important people had elaborate funerals. ... The Imperial cult in Ancient Rome was the worship of the Roman Emperor as a god. ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... Many adherents of Roman religion have been persecuted, mainly by Christians. ... The Sibylline Books or Sibyllae were a collection of oracular utterances, set out in Greek hexameters, purchased from a sibyl by the semi-legendary last king of Rome, Tarquinius Superbus, and consulted at momentous crises through the history of the Republic and the Empire. ... The Temple of Hercules Victor, near the Teatro di Marcello in Rome (a Greek-style Roman temple) // Pagan history and architecture Originally in Roman paganism, a templum was not (necessarily) a cultic building but any ritually marked observation site for natural phenomena believed to allow predictions, such as the flight... This is a list of Roman deities with brief descriptions. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... In Roman mythology, Ceres was the goddess of growing plants (particularly cereals) and of motherly love. ... The Diana of Versailles In Roman mythology, Diana was the goddess of the hunt, in literature the equivalent of the Greek goddess Artemis, though in cult she was Italic in origin. ... IVNO REGINA (Queen Juno) on a coin celebrating Julia Soaemias. ... For the planet see Jupiter. ... Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and either Jupiter or a magical flower. ... A sculpture of the Roman god Mercury by 17th-century Flemish artist Artus Quellinus. ... This article is about the Roman goddess. ... Genoese admiral Andrea Doria as Neptune, by Agnolo Bronzino. ... Marble Venus of the Capitoline Venus type, Roman (British Museum) Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. ... The Forge of Vulcan by Diego Velasquez, (1630). ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... Fortuna governs the circle of the four stages of life, the Wheel of Fortune, in a manuscript of Carmina Burana In Roman mythology, Fortuna (equivalent to the Greek goddess Tyche) goddess of fortune, was the personification of luck, hopefully of good luck, but she could be represented veiled and blind... Lares (pl. ... For other uses, see Pluto (disambiguation). ... In Roman mythology, Quirinus was an early god of the Roman state. ... Coin of Emperor Probus, circa 280, with Sol Invictus riding a quadriga, with legend SOLI INVICTO, to the Unconquered Sun. Note how the Emperor (on the left) wears a radiated solar crown, worn also by the god (to the right). ... Vesta was the virgin goddess of the hearth, home, and family in Roman mythology. ... Adranus or Adranos (Greek: ) was a fire god worshipped by the Sicels, the original inhabitants of the island of Sicily. ... The Averrunci, in antiquity, were an order of deities among the Romans, whose office was to avert dangers and evils. ... Averruncus is a minor god in Roman mythology. ... Bromius is the Roman god of wine. ... Caelus was the Latin name that the Romans used for the Greek sky god Uranus. ... In Roman mythology, Clitunno was a river god, an Oceanid. ... This article is about the Roman god. ... Dis Pater, or Dispater, was a Roman and Celtic god of the underworld, later subsumed by Pluto or Jupiter. ... Marble sculpture of Pan copulating with a goat, recovered from Herculaneum Pan (Greek Παν, genitive Πανος) is the Greek god who watches over shepherds and their flocks. ... Late second-century statue of Glycon. ... In Roman mythology, the god Inuus protected livestock. ... In Roman mythology, Lupercus was a name for the Greek god Pan. ... In Roman mythology, Orcus was a god of the underworld, punisher of broken oaths, more equivalent to Pluto than to the Greek Hades, and later identified with Dis Pater. ... Saturnus, Caravaggio, 16th c. ... Aius Locutius is a Roman legend. ... In Roman mythology, Angerona or Angeronia was an old Roman goddess, whose name and functions are variously explained. ... In Roman mythology, Concordia was the goddess of agreement, understanding, and marital harmony. ... copia may refer to: The ancient city also called Thurii Copia (latin) COPIA: The American Center for Wine, Food and the Arts Copia (album) by the artist Eluvium (musician) Category: ... Fortuna governs the circle of the four stages of life, the Wheel of Fortune, in a manuscript of Carmina Burana In Roman mythology, Fortuna (equivalent to the Greek goddess Tyche) goddess of fortune, was the personification of luck, hopefully of good luck, but she could be represented veiled and blind... In Roman mythology, Spes was the goddess of hope. ... This is a list of topics related to ancient Rome that aims to include aspects of both the ancient Roman Republic and Roman Empire. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... For other uses, see History of Rome (disambiguation). ... This is a Timeline of events concerning ancient Rome, from the city foundation until the last attempt of the Roman Empire of the East to conquer Rome. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The ancient quarters of Rome. ... This article is about the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For the state which existed in the 18th century, see Roman Republic (18th century). ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... The Principate is, according to its etymological derivation from the Latin word princeps, meaning chief or first, the political regime dominated by such a political leader, whether or not he is formally head of state and/or head of government. ... The Dominate was the despotic last of the two phases of government in the ancient Roman Empire between its establishment in 27 BC and the formal date of the collapse of the Western Empire in AD 476. ... This article is about the historiography of the decline of the Roman Empire. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus The Western Roman Empire in 395. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... The Roman Senate (Latin: Senatus) was the main governing council of both the Roman Republic, which started in 509 BC, and the Roman Empire. ... A Curia in early Roman times was a subdivision of the people, i. ... The Forum of Jerash, in Jordan. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law The cursus honorum (Latin: course of honours) was the sequential order of public offices held by aspiring politicians in both the Roman Republic and the early Empire. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honours Emperor Institutions and Law Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Roman assemblies were the Comitia Calata, the Comitia Curiata, the Comitia Centuriata, and the Comitia Tributa. ... Collegiality is the relationship between colleagues. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law This article discusses the nature of the imperial dignity, and its dynastic development throughout the history of the Empire. ... A legatus (often anglicized as legate) was equivalent to a modern general officer in the Roman army. ... The Misspeling of Ducks ... Officium (plural officia) is a Latin word with various meanings, including service, (sense of) duty, courtesy, ceremony and the likes. ... A prefect (from the Latin praefectus, perfect participle of praeficere: make in front, i. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Vigintisexviri (sing. ... The lictor, derived from the Latin ligare (to bind), was a member of a special class of Roman civil servant, with special tasks of attending magistrates of the Roman Republic and Empire who held imperium. ... Magister militum (Latin for Master of the Soldiers) was a top-level command used in the later Roman Empire, dating from the reign of Constantine. ... The Latin word imperator was a title originally roughly equivalent to commander during the period of the Roman Republic. ... The princeps senatus (plural principes senatus) was the leader of the Roman senate. ... Alternate meanings: see Pontifex (disambiguation) In Ancient Rome, the Pontifex Maximus was the high priest of the collegium of the Pontifices, the most august position in Roman religion, open only to a patrician, until 254 BC, when a plebeian first occupied this post. ... Augustus (plural augusti) is Latin for majestic, the increaser, or venerable. The feminine form is Augusta. ... Caesar (plural Caesars), Latin: Cæsar (plural Cæsares), is a title of imperial character. ... The Tetrarchs, a porphyry sculpture sacked from a Byzantine palace in 1204, Treasury of St. ... Magistratus ordinarii (ordinary magistrates) and Magistratus extraordinarii (extraordinary magistrates) were two categories of officials who held political, military, and, in some cases, religious power in the Roman Republic. ... Magistratus ordinarii (ordinary magistrates) and Magistratus extraordinarii (extraordinary magistrates) were two categories of officials who held political, military, and, in some cases, religious power in the Roman Republic. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law Tribune (from the Latin: tribunus; Greek form tribounos) was a title shared by 2-3 elected magistracies and other governmental and/or (para)military offices of the Roman Republic and Empire. ... Quaestores were elected officials of the Roman Republic who supervised the treasury and financial affairs of the state, its armies and its officers. ... Aedile (Latin Aedilis, from aedes, aedis temple, building) was an office of the Roman Republic. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law Praetor was a title granted by the government of Ancient Rome to men acting in one of two official capacities: the commander of an army, either before it was mustered or more typically in the field, or an elected... This article is about the highest office of the Roman Republic. ... Censor was the title of two magistrates of high rank in the Roman Republic. ... See Roman Governor for the duties of a promagistrate as a governor of a province A promagistrate is a person who acts in and with the authority and capacity of a magistrate, but without holding a magisterial office. ... A Roman governor was an official either elected or appointed to be the chief adminstator of Roman law throughout one or more of Ancient Romes many provinces. ... Magistratus ordinarii (ordinary magistrates) and Magistratus extraordinarii (extraordinary magistrates) were two categories of officials who held political, military, and, in some cases, religious power in the Roman Republic. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law Dictator was a political office of the Roman Republic. ... The Master of the Horse was (and in some cases, is) a historical position of varying importance in several European nations. ... Decemviri (singular decemvir) is a Latin term meaning Ten Men which designates any such commission in the Roman Republic (cf. ... Military tribunes elected with consular power during the Conflict of the Orders in the Roman Republic on and off starting in 444 BCE and then continuiously from 408 BCE - 394 BCE and from 391 BCE - 367 BCE The practice of electing consular tribunes ended in 366 BCE when the Lex... The term triumvirate (Latin for rule by three men) or troika in Russian, is commonly used to describe an alliance between three equally powerful political or military leaders. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law The King of Rome (Latin: rex, regis) was the chief magistrate of the Roman Kingdom. ... Using the term Roman law in a broader sense, one may say that Roman law is not only the legal system of ancient Rome but the law that was applied throughout most of Europe until the end of the 18th century. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law The Law of the Twelve Tables (Lex Duodecim Tabularum, more informally simply Duodecim Tabulae) was the ancient legislation that stood at the foundation of Roman law. ... The toga was the characteristic garment of the Roman citizen. ... Auctoritas is the Latin origin of English authority. According to Benveniste [citation?], auctor (which also gives us English author) is derived from Latin augeó (to augment): The auctor is is qui auget, the one who augments the act or the juridical situation of another. ... Imperium can, in a broad sense, be translated as power. ... The system for Roman litigation passed through three stages over the years: until around 150 BC, the Legis Actiones system; from around 150 BC until around 342 AD, the formulary system; and from 342 AD onwards, the cognito procedure. ... Map of all the territories once occupied by the Roman Empire. ... Main article: Military history of ancient Rome As the Roman kingdom successfully overcame opposition from the Italic hill tribes and became a larger state, the age of tyranny in the eastern Mediterranean began to pass away. ... The branches of the Roman military at the highest level were the Roman army and the Roman navy. ... The history of ancient Rome - originally a city-state of Italy, and later an empire covering much of Eurasia and North Africa from the ninth century BC to the fifth century AD - was often closely entwined with its military history. ... The technology history of the Roman military covers the development of and application of technologies for use in the armies and navies of Rome from the Roman Republic to the fall of the Western Roman Empire. ... Root directory at Military history of ancient Rome Romes military was always tightly keyed to its political system. ... Map of all the territories once occupied by the Roman Empire, along with locations of limes Roman military borders and fortifications were part of a grand strategy of territorial defense in the Roman Empire. ... Basic ideal plan of a Roman castrum. ... The strategy of the Roman Military encompasses its grand strategy (the arrangements made by the state to implement its political goals through a selection of military goals, a process of diplomacy backed by threat of military action, and a dedication to the military of part of its production and resources... Roman military engineering is a type of Roman engineering carried out by the Roman Army - almost exclusively by the Roman legions for the furthering of military objectives. ... The Roman army was a set of land-based military forces employed by the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic and later Roman Empire as part of the Roman military. ... Legion redirects here. ... Roman infantry tactics refers to the theoretical and historical deployment, formation and maneuvers of the Roman infantry from the start of the Roman Republic to the fall of the Western Roman Empire. ... Roman military personal equipment was produced in large numbers to established patterns and used in an established way. ... Roman siege engines were, for the most part, adapted from Hellenistic siege technology. ... Roman trireme, a warship, 31 BC. Note the bank of oars (two on the hidden side), the square-rigged sails, the steering oars, the tower on deck, the ram at the prow, the ballistae and the Greek fire. ... Roman trireme, a warship, 31 BC. Note the bank of oars (two on the hidden side), the square-rigged sails, the steering oars, the tower on deck, the ram at the prow, the ballistae and the Greek fire. ... Auxiliaries (from Latin: auxilia = supports) formed the standing non-citizen corps of the Roman army of the Principate (30 BC - 284 AD), alongside the citizen legions. ... As with most other military forces the Roman military adopted a carrot and stick approach to military, with an extensive list of decorations for military gallantry and likewise a range of punishments for the punishment of military transgressions. ... Julius Caesar, from the bust in the British Museum, in Cassells History of England (1902). ... This article is about theatrical performances in ancient Rome. ... The toga was the distinctive garb of Romen men, while women wore stolas. ... Still life with fruit basket and vases (Pompeii, ca. ... Latin literature, the body of written works in the Latin language, remains an enduring legacy of the culture of ancient Rome. ... Fresco from the Villa of the Mysteries. ... We know less about the music of ancient Rome than we do about the music of ancient Greece. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... Roman Funerals and Burial Introduction In ancient Rome, important people had elaborate funerals. ... Within the wider stream of influences that contributed to the Christianization of the Roman Empire, followers of the Ancient Roman religion were persecuted by Christians during the period after the death of Constantine and the reign of Julian, only to enjoy a respite for a number of years before the... The Imperial cult in Ancient Rome was the worship of the Roman Emperor as a god. ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... The Forum of Jerash, in Jordan. ... For the series of murder mystery novels, see SPQR series. ... The Pont du Gard in France is a Roman aqueduct built in ca. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For centuries the monetary affairs of the Roman Republic had rested in the hands of the Senate, which was steady and fiscally conservative. ... Roman commerce was the engine that drove the growth of the Roman Empire. ... The Roman calendar changed its form several times in the time between the foundation of Rome and the fall of the Roman Empire. ... Clothing in Ancient Rome consisted generally of the toga, the stola, brooches for them, and breeches. ... Found all over the Roman Empire, a circus is a building for public entertainment, including chariot racing. ... The institution of slavery in ancient Rome made many people non-persons before their legal system. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Hypothetical distribution of languages in Iron Age Italy during the sixth century BC. The Italic subfamily is a member of the Centum branch of the Indo-European language family. ... For the Old Latin Bible used before the Vulgate, see Vetus Latina. ... Classical Latin is the language used by the principal exponents of that language in what is usually regarded as classical Latin literature. ... Medieval Latin was the form of Latin used in the Middle Ages, primarily as a medium of scholarly exchange and as the liturgical language of the medieval Roman Catholic Church, but also as a language of science, literature, law, and administration. ... Renaissance Latin is a name given to the distinctive form of Latin style developed during the European Renaissance of the fourteenth to sixteenth centuries, particularly by the humanist movement. ... New Latin (or Neo-Latin) is a post-medieval version of Latin, now used primarily in International Scientific Vocabulary cladistics and systematics. ... Recent Latin is the form of Latin used from the late ninteenth century down to the present. ... The Duenos inscription, from the 6th century BC, is the second-earliest known Latin text. ... Latin literature, the body of written works in the Latin language, remains an enduring legacy of the culture of ancient Rome. ... Vulgar Latin, as in this political graffito at Pompeii, was the speech of ordinary people of the Roman Empire — different from the classical Latin used by the Roman elite. ... The term Ecclesiastical Latin (sometimes called Church Latin) refers to the Latin language as used in documents of the Roman Catholic Church and in its Latin liturgies. ... The Romance languages (sometimes referred to as Romanic languages) are a branch of the Indo-European language family that comprises all the languages that descend from Latin, the language of the Roman Empire. ... The following is a List of Roman wars fought by the ancient Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic and Roman Empire, organized by date. ... The following is a List of Roman battles (fought by the Roman Kingdom, the Roman Republic, and the Roman Empire), organized by date. ... // Manius Acilius Glabrio -- Manius Acilius Glabrio (consul 191 BC) -- Manius Acilius Glabrio (consul 91) -- Titus Aebutius Helva -- Aegidius -- Lucius Aemilius Barbula -- Marcus Aemilius Lepidus (triumvir) -- Lucius Aemilius Paulus Macedonicus -- Marcus Aemilius Scaurus (praetor 56 BC) -- Flavius Aëtius -- Lucius Afranius (consul) -- Sextus Calpurnius Agricola -- Gnaeus Julius Agricola -- Flavius Antoninus -- Marcus... This is a list of Roman legions, including key facts about each legion. ... This is a list of the Roman Emperors with the dates they ruled the Roman Empire. ... List of ancient Roman triumphal arches (By modern country) // France Orange Reims: Porte de Mars Saint Rémy de Provence: Roman site of Glanum Saintes: Arch of Germanicus Greece Arch of Galerius, Thessaloniki Hadrians Arch, Athens Italy It has been suggested that List of Roman arches in Rome be... This is a tentative list of topics regarding political institutions of Ancient Rome. ... This is an attempted alphabetical List of Roman laws. ... Abbreviations: Imp. ...

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Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Roman mythology (2052 words)
Roman mythology is the set of beliefs, rituals, and other observances concerning the supernatural held or practiced by the ancient Romans from early periods until Christianity finally completely supplanted the native religions of the Roman Empire.
The original religion of the early Romans was so modified by the addition of numerous and conflicting beliefs in later times, and by the assimilation of a vast amount of Greek mythology, that it cannot be reconstructed precisely.
The festival was celebrated on February 15 at the cave of the Lupercal on the Palatine Hill, where the legendary founders of Rome, the twins Romulus and Remus, were supposed to have been nursed by a wolf.
Roman Mythology - MSN Encarta (1270 words)
Roman Mythology, body of religious and historical beliefs, and attendant rituals and other observances, held or practised by the ancient Romans from the legendary foundation of Rome in the 8th century bc (see Kings of Rome) until Christianity finally supplanted the native religions of the Roman Empire in the 4th century ad.
The indigetes were the original gods of the Roman state, and their names and nature are indicated by the titles of the earliest priests and by the fixed festivals of the calendar; 30 such gods were honoured with special festivals.
Early Roman cult was not so much polytheism as polydemonism: the worshippers’ concepts of the invoked beings consisted of little more than their names and functions, and the being’s numen, or power, manifested itself in highly specialized ways.
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