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Encyclopedia > Roman Catholic Church in Scotland
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Religion in Scotland

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Church of Scotland
Roman Catholic Church
Associated Presbyterian Churches
Free Church of Scotland
Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland
Scottish Episcopal Church
Action of Churches Together in Scotland
History of the Jews in Scotland The Church of Scotland (CofS, known informally as The Kirk) is the national church of Scotland. ... The Associated Presbyterian Churches (APC), a small Scottish denomination (with some representation in Canada and New Zealand), were formed in 1989 from part of the community of the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland. ... This article concerns the Free Church of Scotland 1843-1900, for the Free Church of Scotland existing from 1900 to the present day see Free Church of Scotland (post 1900). ... St. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... Action of Churches Together in Scotland (ACTS) is an ecumenical grouping of churches and associated organisations founded in 1990. ... The earliest date at which Jews arrived in Scotland is not known. ...

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The Roman Catholic Church in Scotland describes the organisation of the worldwide Roman Catholic Church in the geographic area of Scotland, distinct from the Catholic Church in England & Wales and the Catholic Church in Ireland. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Catholicism. ... Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... The Catholic Bishops Conference of England and Wales is the Episcopal Conference of the Catholic Church in England and Wales. ... The Catholic Church in Ireland is part of the worldwide Catholic Church, under the spiritual leadership of the Pope and curia in Rome. ...


In the 2001 census about 16% of the population of Scotland described themselves as being Roman Catholic, compared with 42% as being Church of Scotland.[1] Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... The Church of Scotland (CofS, known informally as The Kirk) is the national church of Scotland. ...


One of the issues it has had to face is sectarianism, though this is now largely restricted to education and football in parts of the Central Belt, especially in the west, or to spillovers from Northern Ireland. Sectarianism refers (usually pejoratively) to a rigid adherence to a particular sect or party or denomination. ... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Dieu et mon droit (motto) (French for God and my right)2 Northern Irelands location within the UK Main language English Other recognised languages Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Peter Hain MP Area  - Total Ranked 4th...

Contents


History

Christianity probably came to Scotland around the second century, and was firmly established by the sixth and seventh centuries. However, until the eleventh century, the relationship between the Church in Scotland and the Papacy is ambigious. The Scottish 'Celtic' Church had marked liturgical and ecclesiological differences from the rest of Western Christendom. Some of these were resolved end of the seventh century following the Synod of Whitby and St Columba's withdrawal to Iona, however, it was not until the ecclessiastical reforms of the eleventh century that the Scottish Church became an integral part of the Roman communion. Christianity is a monotheistic religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus as recounted in the New Testament. ... The Synod of Whitby was an important synod which eventually led to the unification of the church in Britain. ... A separate article is titled Columba (constellation). ... Iona village viewed from a short distance offshore. ...


That remained the picture until the Reformation in the early sixteen century, when the Church in Scotland broke with the papacy, and adopted a Calvinist confession. At that point the celebration of the Roman Mass was outlawed. When Mary Queen of Scots returned from France to rule, she found herself as a Roman Catholic in a largely Protestant state and Protestant court. However, some few thousand indigenous Scottish Roman Catholics remained mainly in a small strip from the north-east coast to the Western Isles. Significant strongholds included Moidart, Morar and Barra. The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ... In an unadorned church, the 17th century congregation stands to hear the sermon. ... Mary I of Scotland (Mary Stuart) (December 8, 1542 – February 8, 1587), better known as Mary, Queen of Scots, was Queen of Scots, monarch of the Kingdom of Scotland from December 14, 1542 to July 24, 1567, and Queen Consort of France from July 10, 1559 to December 5, 1560. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... A state is an organized political community, occupying a territory, and possessing internal and external sovereignty, that enforces a monopoly on the use of force. ... A royal or noble court, as an instrument of government broader than a court of justice, comprises an extended household centered on a patron whose rule may govern law or be governed by it. ... The Western Isles are an archipelago in Scotland. ... Moidart is a district in Lochaber, Highland, Scotland to the west of Fort William; the area is very remote and Loch Shiel cuts off the south-west boundary of the district. ... Morar is a small village in the Scottish Highlands, with a population of 257 [1]. It lies on both the West Highland Main Line and the A830 Road to the Isles, between Fort William and Mallaig. ... Castlebay, Barra This article is about the island of Barra in Scotland. ...


The Jacobite risings in 1715 and 1745 further damaged the Roman Catholic cause in Scotland and it was not until the start of Catholic Emancipation in 1793 that Roman Catholicism regained a civil respectability. Each Jacobite Rising formed part of a series of military campaigns by Jacobites attempting to restore the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland (and after 1707, Great Britain) after James VII of Scotland and II of England was deposed in 1688 and the thrones usurped by his... Catholic Emancipation was a process in Great Britain and Ireland in the late 18th century and early 19th century which involved reducing and removing many of the restrictions on Roman Catholics which had been introduced by the Act of Uniformity, the Test Acts and the Penal Laws. ...


During the nineteenth century, Irish immigration substantially boosted the number of Scottish Roman Catholics (especially in the west), and by 1900 it was estimated that 90-95% were of full or partial Irish descent. The Irish diaspora consists of Irish emigrants and their descendants in countries such as the United States, the United Kingdom, Bermuda, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, South Africa and states of the Caribbean and continental Europe. ... The Irish are a northwestern European ethnic group who originated in Ireland. ...


A Roman Catholic hierarchy was (re-)introduced in the mid 19th century.


Organisation

There are two archbishops and six bishops in Scotland: In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ...

The Archbishop of Saint Andrews and Edinburgh is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Saint Andrews and Edinburgh. ... The Bishop of Aberdeen is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Aberdeen in the Province of Saint Andrews and Edinburgh. ... The Bishop of Argyll and the Isles is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Argyll and the Isles in the Province of Saint Andrews and Edinburgh. ... The Bishop of Dunkeld is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Dunkeld in the Province of Saint Andrews and Edinburgh. ... The Bishop of Galloway is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Galloway in the Province of Saint Andrews and Edinburgh. ... The Archbishop of Glasgow is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Metropolitan Archdiocese of Glasgow. ... The Bishop of Motherwell is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Motherwell in the Province of Glasgow. ... The Bishop of Paisley is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Paisley in the Province of Glasgow. ...

See also

The Catholic Church in Great Britain is part of the worldwide Catholic Church, sometimes known as the Roman Catholic Church, under the spiritual government and teaching of the Pope and Catholic Bishops throughout the world. ...

External links


 
 

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