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Encyclopedia > Rollins College

Rollins College is an institution of higher learning located in Winter Park, Florida. Its current president is Lewis Duncan. Rollins College is situated on the south side of downtown Winter Park, along the shores of Lake Virginia. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Carver County is a county located in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ...


Founded in 1885 by New England Congregationalists who sought to bring their style of liberal arts education to what was then the Florida frontier, Rollins is the among the oldest recognized colleges in the state of Florida. Today it has more than 1,700 undergraduate students. Its seventy acre campus contains a range of amenities including a theater for performing arts, the Cornell Campus Center, and the Alfond Sports Center. 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... // United States In the United States, the frontier was the term applied to the zone of unsettled land outside the region of existing settlements of Americans. ... A college (Latin collegium) can be the name of any group of colleagues; originally it meant a group of people living together under a common set of rules (con-, together + leg-, law). As a consequence members of colleges were originally styled fellow and still are in some places. ...


U.S. News & World Report has recognized its Crummer Graduate School of Business among the top twenty-five part-time professional MBA programs nationwide. Crummer is consistently ranked by Forbes magazine among the best business schools for return on investment. The Hamilton Holt School evening studies division offers undergraduate and graduate courses. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A business school is a university-level institution that confers degrees in Business Administration. ... In finance, the return on investment (ROI) or just return is a calculation used to determine whether a proposed investment is wise, and how well it will repay the investor. ...


Rollins is a member of the Associated Colleges of the South. Overview The Associated Colleges of the South (ACS) is a consortium of 16 private liberal arts colleges Members Birmingham-Southern College 900 Arkadelphia Rd. ...

Contents

Schools and Degree Programs

Rollins has three schools that offer a variety of programs: the College of Arts and Sciences, the Hamilton Holt School, and the Crummer Graduate School of Business.


College of Arts and Sciences[1]

The College of Arts and Sciences has approximately 1,710 students and a student to faculty ratio of 12 to 1. Ninety-two percent of the faculty possess a Ph.D. or the highest degree in their field. The College offers twenty-eight undergraduate majors and a variety of interdisciplinary programs that allow students to design their own courses of study. Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ...


Like many liberal arts programs, the College of Arts & Sciences operates on the philosophy that students should receive a well-rounded education regardless of their chosen specialty. As such, completion of a Bachelor of Arts degree requires the 140 credits required for graduation to be approximately evenly derived from general education courses, major/minor courses, and elective courses.


Classes in the College of Arts and Sciences are typically worth 4 credits, in contrast to the traditional 3 credits per class structure of many American Universities. The college also requires 140 credit hours to graduate instead of the traditional 120. A credit is a unit that gives weighting to the value, level or time requirements of an academic course. ...


Hamilton Holt School[2]

The Hamilton Holt School offers Bachelor of Arts degrees in a variety of majors as well as several graduate degrees. Like the College of Arts & Sciences, the undergraduate program at the Hamilton Holt School requires a combination of general education courses, major/minor courses, and electives. Unlike its residential counterpart, however, the Hamilton Holt School targets adults seeking professional advancement and therefore schedules most courses in the evenings and on weekends. Students enrolled in the Hamilton Holt program pay tuition per credit hour and are not eligible for on-campus housing.


Graduate programs offered through the Hamilton Holt School include:

  • Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling
  • Master of Arts in Teaching Elementary Education (for new uncertified graduates)
  • Master of Education in Elementary Education (for established certified teachers)
  • Master of Human Resources
  • Master of Liberal Studies

Crummer Graduate School of Business[3]

The Crummer Graduate School of Business offers a Master's Degree in Business Administration (MBA) in four different programs: Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ...

  • The Early Advantage MBA Program is a 21-month full-time program designed for recent college graduates with little to no work experience.
  • The Corporate MBA Program (formerly Executive MBA program) is a 19-month program designed for current or potential senior executives with classes meeting on alternating Fridays and Saturdays.
  • The Professional MBA Program is a 32-month evening program designed for working professionals who wish to advance their careers to a management and/or executive level.
  • The Saturday MBA Program is a 19-month program designed for current managers, entrepreneurs, or executives with several years of work experience. Classes meet all day on Saturdays only.

The Crummer school also offers a Management and Executive Education program. This program targets organizations that wish to provide training and development to their current or future managers and executives. While courses in this program do not generally lead to a degree, they are tailored to the specific requests of the client organizations. Courses may be single-day training workshops or a long-term program of study, and the may be conducted on the college campus or another site selected by the client.


Special Programs

Honors Degree Program[4]

The Honors Degree Program allows the top students in each entering class of the College of Arts and Sciences to complete a series of special interdisciplinary seminars, which replace approximately two-thirds of the school's general education requirements. To earn an honors degree, students must also complete a thesis in their major field during their junior and senior years.


Accelerated Management Program (AMP)[5]

The Accelerated Management Program allows selected students to earn both a BA from the College of Arts and Sciences and an MBA from the Crummer Graduate School of Business in a total of five years. Students enrolled in this program must complete all general education and major/minor requirements prior to the conclusion of their third year. In their fourth year, students take courses from the Early Advantage MBA program, from which credits are applied to both their undergraduate and graduate transcripts. Upon completion of the fourth year, AMP students graduate from the College of Arts and Sciences and walk with their class at commencement. In the fifth year, students complete the MBA degree and graduate a second time.


Rollins College Conference (RCC)[6]

The Rollins College Conference, taken in the first semester of a student's freshman year, is required of all non-transfer students in the College of Arts and Sciences. The course serves as both an orientation course and a topic course in a student's area of interest. The professor for this course will serve as the enrolled students' academic advisor until they select a major and choose a new advisor from the corresponding department. One or two peer mentors (upperclassmen with special training) join the course and offer counseling and support to the new students. The conference also contains a fourth hour time block each week where students participate in bonding and socialization activities.


International Programs[7]

All three schools at Rollins offer international courses to destinations such as London, Sydney, Australia, and Madrid, Spain among others. Some programs are offered directly through Rollins, while others are offered through partnerships with other colleges and universities. Students may study abroad for a week or an entire semester. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This is about the city of Sydney in Australia. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... A college (Latin collegium) can be the name of any group of colleagues; originally it meant a group of people living together under a common set of rules (con-, together + leg-, law). As a consequence members of colleges were originally styled fellow and still are in some places. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ...


Athletics

The school's sports teams are called the Tars. They participate in the Sunshine State Conference of the NCAA's Division II. The Sunshine State Conference was formed in 1975 as a Division II basketball conference. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division II (or DII) is an intermediate-level division of competition in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ...


Sports sanctioned by the NCAA include basketball, baseball (men), softball (women), cross country, field hockey (women), bowling (women), golf, fencing (coeducational), lacrosse, soccer, rowing, volleyball, ice hockey, water polo, rifle (coeducational), tennis, skiing (coeducational), track & field, swimming, diving, and wrestling (men's). Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Memorial Stadium, St. ... Softball is an activity descended from baseball, in which a ball, eleven to twelve inches (or rarely, 16 inches) (28 to 30. ... The Minnesota State High school Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world; it is the second most popular team sport after football (soccer)[]. Its official name and the one by which it is usually known is hockey [1][2... Bowling ball and two pins Ten-pin bowling lane Automatic Scorer by Brunswick Specialized computers replaced hand scoring beginning 1970s. ... The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews, generally regarded as the worlds Home of Golf. Golf is a sport in which individual players or teams hit a ball into a hole using various clubs, and also is one of the few ball games that does not use... Fencing advertisement for the 1900 Summer Olympic Games This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... Volleyball is an Olympic sport in which two teams separated by a high net use their hands, arms or (rarely) other parts of their bodies to hit a ball back and forth over the net. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Water polo is a team water sport, which can be best described as a combination of swimming, football, basketball, rugby and wrestling. ... The shooting sports include those competitive sports involving tests of proficiency (accuracy and speed) using various types of guns such as firearms and airguns (see Archery for more information on shooting sports that make use of bows and arrows). ... A tennis net Tennis is a game played between either two players (singles) or two teams of two players (doubles). Players use a stringed racquet to strike a hollow rubber ball covered with felt over a net into the opponents court. ... Alpine skier carving a turn on piste Alpine skiing (or downhill skiing) is a recreational activity and sport involving sliding down snow-covered hills with long, thin skis attached to each foot. ... A womens 400m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ... This article concentrates on human swimming. ... Diving refers to the sport of acrobatically jumping or falling into water. ... FILA Greatest Wrestler of 20th Century (Greco-Roman) Alexander Karelin throws Olympian Jeff Blatnick with his Karelin Lift Andrell Durden (top) and Edward Harris grapple for position during the All-Marine Wrestle Offs. ...


Alumnae/i

Famous Rollins alumnae/i include:

F. Duane Ackerman is the chairman and chief executive officer of Atlanta-based BellSouth Corporation. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Pauline May Betz Addie (August 6, 1919) was an American female tennis player. ... Helen Newington Wills Roark (October 6, 1905 – January 1, 1998), also known as Helen Wills Moody, was an American tennis player who is generally considered to have been one of the greatest female tennis players of all time. ... Prince Lorenzo Borghese (June 9, 1973 - ) is a descendant of Italian royalty, a cosmetics entrepreneur and stars on the 9th season of ABC’s The Bachelor. ... Jim Bowden (born in Boston, Massachusetts) is the general manager of the Washington Nationals. ... Larry Burkett was born in Winter Park, Florida on March 3rd, 1939, the fifth of eight children. ... Ellie Cornell (born 15 December 1963) is an American actress and movie producer, known primarily for her roles in horror films. ... Miss America 1993 Leanza Cornett (born June 10, 1971 in Big Stone Gap, Virginia; raised in Jacksonville, Florida) was crowned Miss Florida 1992 and Miss America 1993. ... Miss America contestants visit Andrews Air Force Base in 2003 The Miss America pageant (different from the Miss USA pageant) is a long-standing competition which awards scholarships to young women from the fifty states plus two territories of the United States of America. ... Entertainment Tonight is a daily television entertainment news show that is syndicated by CBS Paramount Domestic Television throughout the United States, Canada, on the Nine Network in Australia and on UBC Inside in Thailand. ... Donald James Cram (April 22, 1919 - June 17, 2001) was an American chemist who shared the 1987 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for “synthesizing three-dimensional molecules that could mimic the functioning of natural molecules. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Buddy Ebsen as Jed Clampett Buddy Ebsen (April 2, 1908 – July 6, 2003) was an American actor and dancer, who is best-remembered for his role as Jed Clampett in the popular television series The Beverly Hillbillies. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the 1993 film, see The Beverly Hillbillies (film) The Beverly Hillbillies was an American television program about a hillbilly family living in Southern California. ... Rahul Gandhi (born June 19, 1970) is a rising Indian politician and member of the Parliament of India from the Indian National Congress. ... Glenda Hood is a U.S. politician, currently serving as secretary of state in Florida. ... Nickname: The City Beautiful, O-Town, 407 Location in Orange County and the state of Florida. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... Hoover Company logo, originally designed by Henry Dreyfuss The Hoover Company is an American floor care manufacturer based in North Canton, Ohio. ... Dana Ivey (born August 14, 1942) is an American actress. ... The Color Purple is the ninth film directed by Steven Spielberg, and was released 1985. ... Christopher Alan Kirkpatrick (born October 17, 1971 in Oil City, Pennsylvania)[1] is the oldest member of N Sync, and has a countertenor voice as well as the groups de facto leader, who managed to give them creative control. ... N Sync (often stylised *NSYNC) was a five-part American pop boy band, formed in Orlando, Florida. ... Jack Kramer as an amateur in 1947 John Albert Kramer (b. ... J. Roderick MacArthur (1920-1984) was a U.S. businessman and philanthropist. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Flashdance is a musical and romance film released in April 1983. ... Anthony Perkins Anthony Perkins (April 4, 1932–September 12, 1992) was an American actor best known for his role as the serial killer Norman Bates in Alfred Hitchcocks Psycho. ... Norman Bates is a fictional character created by writer Robert Bloch as the central character in his novel Psycho. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock, KBE (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) was a highly influential film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Psycho is a 1960 suspense/horror film directed by auteur Alfred Hitchcock from the screenplay by Joseph Stefano. ... Scott Reiniger is an American actor, one of the stars of the 1978 film, Dawn of the Dead. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Fred Rogers on the set of Mister Rogers Neighborhood The Reverend Frederick McFeely Rogers (March 20, 1928 – February 27, 2003) was the host of the internationally acclaimed childrens television show Mister Rogers Neighborhood, in production from 1968 to 2001. ... Mister Rogers Neighborhood or MisteRogers is an American childrens television series that was created and hosted by Fred Rogers. ... Christopher M. Russo (born October 18, 1959), known as the Mad Dog, is an American sports radio personality. ... WFAN (660 kHz), often referred to as Sportsradio 66 or The FAN, is a radio station in New York City. ...

Students and student life

Rollins College offers a variety of programs for students, including Fox Day, more than seventy student organizations, the Arts at Rollins College (ARC).


Peace memorial

In 2000, a New York Times editorial took notice of Rollins College's Peace Memorial[2] 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Erected in 1938 and dedicated on Armistice Day, by college president Hamilton Holt, it consists of a German artillery shell, surrendered by Germany at the end of the First World War, mounted on a pedestal, bearing this inscription:[3]

Pause, passerby and hang your head in shame
This Engine of Destruction, Torture and Death Symbolizes:
The Prostitution of the Inventor
The Avarice of the Manufacturer
The Blood-guilt of the statesman
The Savagery of the Soldier
The Perverted Patriotism of the Citizen
The Debasement of the Human Race
That it can be Employed as an Instrument of Defense of Liberty, Justice and Right in Nowise Invalidates the Truth of the Words Here Graven.
—Hamilton Holt

The top half of the monument was stolen by vandals during World War II, but the bottom half survives and is in the stairwell leading to the second floor of the Mills Memorial building.[4] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Notes

  1.  ; "A Question of Leadership," William H. Honanalso, The New York Times, January 26, 2000, p. 8; also online
  2.   Image: Holt's Peace Memorial (as originally erected)
  3.   Personal communication , Rollins College library

January 26 is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  1. ^ Rollins College: College of Arts and Sciences. Retrieved on 2007-02-03.
  2. ^ Rollins College: Hamilton Holt School. Retrieved on 2007-02-03.
  3. ^ Rollins College: Crummer Graduate School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-02-03.
  4. ^ Rollins College: Admission: Honors Degree Program. Retrieved on 2007-02-03.
  5. ^ Rollins College: Admission: Pre-Professional Programs. Retrieved on 2007-02-03.
  6. ^ Rollins College: Admission: Rollins College Conference. Retrieved on 2007-02-03.
  7. ^ Rollins College: Admission: International Learning. Retrieved on 2007-02-03.

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ...

External links

  • Rollins College Web site
  • Rollins Tars Athletics
  • international programs director, Donna O'Connor

  Results from FactBites:
 
College Profiles - Rollins College (1173 words)
Rollins is noted for its faculty's focus on teaching and its small classes.
Rollins' curriculum is based on a liberal arts pattern: students complete general education requirements in three areas (skills, cognitive courses, affective courses) and preparation in a major.
Rollins seeks to help qualified students attend college regardless of their ability to meet the expenses.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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