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Encyclopedia > Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone's 40th Anniversary Issue
Type Music magazine
Format

Owner Jann Wenner
Publisher Wenner Publishing
Editor Jann Wenner
Will Dana
Founded 1967
Language English
Headquarters New York City, NY
Circulation 1.4 million [1][2]

Website: www.rollingstone.com

Rolling Stone is an American based magazine devoted to music, liberal politics and popular culture that is published biweekly. Rolling Stones may refer to: The Rolling Stones, a rock band Rolling Stone, a magazine dedicated to pop culture Rollin Stone, a song by Robert Wilkins, covered by Muddy Waters Like a Rolling Stone, a song by Bob Dylan The Rolling Stones (novel), a 1952 novel by Robert A. Heinlein... Image File history File links RollingStone-Logo. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Jann S. Wenner (born 7 January 1946 in New York City) is the owner of Wenner Media and the publisher of several magazines, most prominently the pop music biweekly Rolling Stone. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Liberalism is a political current embracing several historical and present-day ideologies that claim defense of individual liberty as the purpose of government. ... Popular culture, sometimes abbreviated to pop culture, consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ... Look up biweekly in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Contents

Beginnings in San Francisco

John Lennon - RS 1 (November 9, 1967) How I Won the War Film Still
John Lennon - RS 1 (November 9, 1967) How I Won the War Film Still

Rolling Stone was founded in San Francisco in 1967 by Jann Wenner (who is still editor and publisher) and music critic Ralph J. Gleason. To get the magazine off the ground, Wenner borrowed $7500 from his family members and from the family of his soon-to-be wife, Jane Wenner.[3] Image File history File links 22456_lg. ... Image File history File links 22456_lg. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Jann S. Wenner (born 7 January 1946 in New York City) is the owner of Wenner Media and the publisher of several magazines, most prominently the pop music biweekly Rolling Stone. ... Ralph J. Gleason (1917-1975) was an influential American jazz and pop music critic. ...


Rolling Stone was initially identified with and reported on the hippie counterculture of the era. However, the magazine distanced itself from the underground newspapers of the time, such as Berkeley Barb, embracing more traditional journalistic standards and avoiding the radical politics of the underground press. In the very first edition of the magazine, Wenner wrote that Rolling Stone "is not just about the music, but about the things and attitudes that music embraces." This has become the de facto motto of the magazine. Singer of a modern Hippie movement in Russia The hippie subculture was a youth movement that began in the United States during the mid-1960s and spread around the world. ... In sociology, counterculture is a term used to describe the values and norms of behavior of a cultural group, or subculture, that run counter to those of the social mainstream of the day, the cultural equivalent of political opposition. ... The phrase underground press, especially underground newspapers (or simply underground papers) is, these days, most often used in reference to the alternative print media, independently published and distributed, associated with the countercultural movements of the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... The Berkeley Barb was an underground newspaper which was published in Berkeley, California, in the 1960s and 1970s. ...


In the 1970s, Rolling Stone began to make a mark for its political coverage, with the likes of gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson writing for the magazine's political section. Thompson would first publish his most famous work Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas within the pages of Rolling Stone, where he remained as a contributing editor until his death. In the 1970s, the magazine also helped launch the careers of many prominent writers, such as the writer-director Cameron Crowe, Joe Klein, Joe Eszterhas and Kurt Loder, who now works for MTV. It was at this point that the magazine ran some of its most famous stories, including that of the Patty Hearst abduction odyssey. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Gonzo journalism. ... Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005) was an American journalist and author. ... The hard cover version of the book. ... Cameron Bruce Crowe (born July 13, 1957) is an Academy Award winning American writer and film director. ... Joe Klein (born September 7, 1946) is a longtime Washington, D.C. and New York journalist and columnist, perhaps best known for his novel Primary Colors, an anonymously-written roman à clef portraying Bill Clintons first presidential campaign. ... Josef Eszterhas (born November 23, 1944) is a controversial Hungarian-American writer, best known for his screenplays for the films Basic Instinct and Showgirls. ... Promotional photo of Kurt Loder Kurt Loder (born May 5, 1945) is a film critic, author, and television personality. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... Patricia Campbell Hearst (born February 20, 1954), now known as Patricia Hearst Shaw, is an American newspaper heiress and occasional actress. ...


The magazine was so influential in shaping pop culture in the 1970s that a song dedicated to it, "Cover of the Rolling Stone" by Dr. Hook & The Medicine Show (written by Shel Silverstein), became a hit single. Dr. Hook & The Medicine Show eventually did end up fulfilling their wish and ended up on the cover of Rolling Stone. Gerry Gerstens illustration of Dr. Hook & the Medicine Show on the cover of Rolling Stone #131 (March 29, 1973) Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show was a pop-country rock band formed around Union City, New Jersey in 1968. ... Sheldon Alan Shel Silverstein (September 25, 1930 – May 10, 1999) was an American poet, songwriter, musician, composer, cartoonist, screenwriter and author of childrens books. ...


Today

In the early 2000s, facing competition from lad mags such as Maxim and FHM, Rolling Stone reinvented itself, hiring former FHM editor Ed Needham. The magazine started targeting younger readers and offering more sex-oriented content, which often focused on sexy young television or film actors as well as pop music. At the time, some long-time readers denounced the magazine, claiming it had declined from astute musical and countercultural observer to a sleek, superficial tabloid, emphasizing style over substance.[4] Since then, however, the magazine has resumed its traditional mix of content, including in-depth political stories, and has seen circulation (currently at 1.4 million) and revenue rise. In 2007, the magazine won a National Magazine Award for general excellence and was a finalist in reporting for Janet Reitman's article "Inside Scientology."[5] Lad mag is a condescending term for a magazine for men that features pictures of scantily clad actresses and models, accompanied by brief articles about the women, consumer stories about tools and toys, and guy tales of sex -- mostly how to get more. ... Maxim is an international English language lad mag (mens magazine) based in the United Kingdom and known for its revealing pictorials featuring popular actresses, singers, and female models, of which none are nudes. ... FHM or For Him Magazine is an international monthly lads mag. ... FHM or For Him Magazine is an international monthly lads mag. ... The National Magazine Award is a prestigious American award that honors excellence in the magazine industry. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy Scientology is a body of beliefs and related practices created by American pulp fiction author L. Ron Hubbard in 1952 as an outgrowth of his earlier self-help system, Dianetics. ...

The 1000th issue of Rolling Stone, which featured over 150 celebrities and fictional characters on its cover.

Leading up to what it called the "50th Anniversary of Rock" in 2004, Rolling Stone published a series of all-time greatest lists to recognize historic achievements in the field. "The 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time" and "The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time" appeared in 2003, followed by "50 Moments That Changed the History of Rock & Roll" and "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time" in 2004. It also published "The Rolling Stone Immortals", a list of the 100 greatest artists of our time. Image File history File links RS1000. ... Image File history File links RS1000. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time was the cover story of a special issue of Rolling Stone magazine published in November 2004. ...


On May 7, 2006, Rolling Stone published its 1000th issue.[6] The cover, which was influenced by the cover art of The Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, featured some of the most influential celebrities whom RS had covered. is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... For other uses, see Sgt. ...


Rolling Stone has evolved over the years, but certain features regarded as the hallmark of the magazine, such as "National Affairs" which has been around since the likes of Hunter S. Thompson and Joe Klein, and "Rock and Roll" are still published in the magazine today. In a bid to react to the advent of the internet, these two features have been made available in the forms of blogs.[7][8] Rolling Stone also publishes "Random Notes," a section which mixes photos with tabloid like headlines. Another regular feature printed next to "Random Notes" is the "Smoking Section" which is written by Austin Scaggs. Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005) was an American journalist and author. ... Joe Klein (born September 7, 1946) is a longtime Washington, D.C. and New York journalist and columnist, perhaps best known for his novel Primary Colors, an anonymously-written roman à clef portraying Bill Clintons first presidential campaign. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Today, four decades since its founding, the Rolling Stone record reviews section is regarded by many sources as still one of the most influential around.[9]


Political commentary

While Rolling Stone is an entertainment magazine, throughout its four decade run it has consistently interjected political and social commentary of various kinds. Loyal to its hippie roots, the magazine has traditionally taken a leftist editorial perspective[10]. For example, it was often very critical of the Richard Nixon administration.[11] The famed Hunter S. Thompson was the main political correspondent for Rolling Stone, writing the National Affairs section. William Greider and Matt Taibbi have also contributed extensively to the National Affairs section. The magazine has been extremely critical of the George W. Bush administration. Singer of a modern Hippie movement in Russia The hippie subculture was a youth movement that began in the United States during the mid-1960s and spread around the world. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... Nixon redirects here. ... Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005) was an American journalist and author. ... William Greider is an American author who writes primarily about economics. ... Matthew C. Taibbi (born February 3, 1970), an American journalist and political writer. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...

  • In the May 4, 2006 issue of the magazine, RS printed an article by Princeton University historian Sean Wilentz which said George W. Bush was possibly the "worst president in history," citing a "combination of incompetence, laziness and ineptitude for the job."[12] The issue's cover was a cartoon depiction of President Bush wearing a dunce cap while sitting in a corner.
  • Rolling Stone printed an issue with a John Kerry cover interview prior to the 2004 U.S. presidential election, with an article attempting to persuade readers to vote for him. In the past, then-President Bill Clinton and then-Vice President Al Gore (while he was running for the Presidency) have graced the covers of the magazine. Gore still regularly appears in the pages of Rolling Stone due in part to his environmental advocacy and his film An Inconvenient Truth.
  • Rolling Stone published an article by Robert Kennedy, Jr. discussing claims that George W. Bush "stole" the election of 2004.[13] The article was heavily influential and cited by former President Clinton who called it "compelling."[14]
  • In the November 2, 2006 issue of the magazine, Rolling Stone printed an article condemning the United States Congress with a cover article titled "Time to Go! Incompetent, lazy, corrupt: Inside the Worst Congress EVER." The article lists the "10 Worst Congressmen" by name — nine of whom were Republicans and the 10th was Louisiana Democrat William J. Jefferson.

is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Sean Wilentz (b. ... For the topological space, see dunce hat (topology). ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... An Inconvenient Truth is an American Academy Award-winning documentary film about climate change, specifically global warming, presented by former United States Vice President Al Gore and directed by Davis Guggenheim. ... Robert Francis Kennedy Jr. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... William Jennings Jefferson (born March 14, 1947) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Louisiana. ...

Criticism

One major criticism of Rolling Stone involves its apparent generational bias toward the 1960s and early 1970s. One critic referred to the Rolling Stone list of the 100 Greatest Songs as an example of "unrepentant rockist fogeyism." [15] In further response to this issue, rock critic Jim DeRogatis, a former Rolling Stone editor, published a thorough critique of the magazine's lists in a book called Kill Your Idols: A New Generation of Rock Writers Reconsiders the Classics (ISBN 1-56980-276-9), which featured differing opinions from many younger critics. [16] Rockism is an ideology of popular music criticism, originating in the British music press in the late 1970s or early 1980s. ... Jim DeRogatis (born 1964 in Jersey City, New Jersey) is a U.S. music critic. ...


In more recent years, Rolling Stone has been criticized for reconsidering many classic albums that it had previously dismissed. Examples of artists for whom this is the case include, among others, Led Zeppelin and Nirvana. The former band was largely written off by Rolling Stone critics during the band's most active years in the 1970s.[17] [18] However by 2006, a cover story on Led Zeppelin honored them as "the Heaviest Band of All Time." In a similar manner, Nirvana's album Nevermind was awarded only three stars out of five by Rolling Stone upon its release, with the reviewer claiming that "Nirvana isn't onto anything altogether new." [19] Years later, the magazine ranked the album number 17 out of its top 500 greatest albums of all time, surpassing hundreds of 4-star and even 5-star albums. On the other hand, the 3-star review for the album was the opinion of one reviewer, while the Top 500 list was the result of a survey of over 250 musicians and critics. For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... This article is about the American grunge band. ... For other uses, see Nevermind (disambiguation). ...


Another criticism of Rolling Stone is that it failed to acknowledge both the newly emerging hard rock movement in the 1970s, as well as early hip hop. One critic writes, "Some argue that Rolling Stone had began to lose touch with rock's vital pulse as early as 1971, when the magazine put its weight behind folk rock singer-songwriters such as Carly Simon, Jackson Browne, and Joni Mitchell and largely ignored the heavy rock acts then filling arenas across America." [20] Rolling Stone has reconsidered many of its reviews of early hip hop and rap albums, most of which had previously been dismissed. The magazine has since upgraded its original reviews of classic albums by artists such as Jay-Z, the Wu-Tang Clan and De La Soul. [17] A critic for Slate magazine described a conference at which the 1984 Rolling Stone Record Guide was scrutinized. As he described it, "The guide virtually ignored hip-hop and ruthlessly panned heavy metal, the two genres that within a few years would dominate the pop charts. In an auditorium packed with music journalists, you could detect more than a few anxious titters: How many of us will want our record reviews read back to us 20 years hence?" [15] Hard Rock redirects here. ... Hip hop is a cultural movement that began amongst urban African American youth in New York and has since spread around the world. ... Carly Elisabeth Simon (born June 25, 1945 in New York City) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe and two-time Grammy Award winning American musician who emerged as one of the leading lights of the early 1970s singer-songwriter movement. ... Clyde Jackson Browne (born October 9, 1948) is an American rock music singer, songwriter, guitarist, and pianist, whose introspective lyrics made him the poster boy of the Southern California confessional singer-songwriter movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Joni Mitchell, CC (born Roberta Joan Anderson on November 7, 1943) is a Canadian musician, songwriter, and painter. ... Hip hop is a cultural movement that began amongst urban African American youth in New York and has since spread around the world. ... RAP may mean: the IATA airport code for Rapid City Regional Airport Rassemblement pour lalternative progressiste, a Québecois political party. ... Jay-Z (aka the Jigga, HOV and Hova, born Shawn Carter on December 4, 1970 in Brooklyn, New York) is an African American rapper/hip hop artist and record label executive; one of the most popular and successful rappers of the late 1990s and early 2000s. ... Wu-Tang redirects here. ... De La Soul is a Grammy-award winning hip hop group from Long Island, New York. ... For other uses, see Slate (disambiguation). ... The Rolling Stone Album Guide, previously known as the Rolling Stone Record Guide, is a book that along with its sister publication, the magazine Rolling Stone, is one of the best places to find definitive reviews of popular music (apart from wikipedia!). // First Edition Title: The Rolling Stone Record Guide...


Like MTV, Rolling Stone has been criticized for "selling out" in order to succeed financially. Longtime readers have complained that the magazine has strayed from its traditional focus on music toward a new focus on film stars.[21] The hire of former FHM editor Ed Needham further isolated critics who alleged that Rolling Stone had lost its credibility.[22] This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... FHM or For Him Magazine is an international monthly lads mag. ...


Website

Rolling Stone has maintained a website for many years, with selected current articles, reviews, blogs, MP3s, and other features such as searchable and free encyclopedic articles about artists, with images and sometimes sound clips of their work. There are also selected archival political and cultural articles and entries. The site also at one time had an extensive message board forum.


By the late 1990s, the message board forum at the site had developed into a thriving community with a large number of regular members and contributors worldwide. Unfortunately, the site was also plagued with numerous Internet trolls and malicious code-hackers who vandalized the forum substantially[23]. Rolling Stone abruptly and without notice deleted the forum in May 2004 after IFTB failed to reappear and was blamed for spoofing a former poster's name: Mary B. An Internet troll, or simply troll in Internet slang, is someone who intentionally posts controversial or contrary messages in an on-line community such as an on-line discussion forum with the intention of baiting users into an argumentative response. ...


Rolling Stone began a new, much more limited message board community at their site in late 2005, only to remove it again in 2006. Rolling Stone now permits users to make follow-up comments to posted articles in a blog format. It also maintains a page at MySpace.


Famous staff

Michael Azerrad is an American author, journalist and musician. ... Lester Bangs during an interview Leslie Conway Bangs (December 14, 1948 – April 30, 1982) was an American music journalist, author and musician. ... Robert Christgau (born April 18, 1942), is an American essayist, music journalist, and the self-declared Dean of American Rock Critics.[1] In print, his name is sometimes abbreviated as Xgau. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Cameron Bruce Crowe (born July 13, 1957) is an Academy Award winning American writer and film director. ... from the University of Pennsylvania website: Anthony DeCurtis is executive editor at Tracks, a new magazine for music fans who are over thirty. ... Jancee Dunn is a journalist and former VJ. Dunn has written for Rolling Stone magazine since 1989. ... Josef Eszterhas (born November 23, 1944) is a controversial Hungarian-American writer, best known for his screenplays for the films Basic Instinct and Showgirls. ... Timothy Ferris (born August 29, 1944) is the best-selling author of twelve books, including Coming of Age in the Milky Way, for which he was awarded the American Institute of Physics Prize, and a nomination for the Pulitzer Prize. ... Ben Fong-Torres (方振豪; pinyin: Fāng Zhènháo; born January 7, 1945, in Alameda, California) is a rock journalist, author, and broadcaster best known for his association with Rolling Stone magazine (through 1981) and the San Francisco Chronicle (from around 1982). ... David Fricke is a senior editor at Rolling Stone magazine, where he writes predominantly on rock music. ... Look up Nobody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Joe Klein (born September 7, 1946) is a longtime Washington, D.C. and New York journalist and columnist, perhaps best known for his novel Primary Colors, an anonymously-written roman à clef portraying Bill Clintons first presidential campaign. ... Cover of David LaChapelle book, David LaChapelle (born March 11, 1969[1] Fairfield, Connecticut, United States) is a photographer and director who works in the fields of fashion, advertising, and fine art photography, and is noted for his surreal, unique and often humorous style. ... This article is about the American photographer. ... Steven Levy Steven Levy (born 1951) is an American journalist who has written several books on computers, technology, cryptography, the Internet, cybersecurity, and privacy. ... Promotional photo of Kurt Loder Kurt Loder (born May 5, 1945) is a film critic, author, and television personality. ... Greil Marcus (2006) Greil Marcus (born 1945) is an American author, music journalist and cultural critic. ... Patrick Jake ORourke (born November 14, 1947) is an American political satirist, journalist, and writer. ... Rob Sheffield Rob Sheffield is a contributing editor at Rolling Stone magazine. ... Ralph Steadman (born Wallasey, May 15, 1936) is a British cartoonist and caricaturist. ... Neil Strauss is a Los Angeles-based author and journalist who writes for The New York Times and Rolling Stone, where he is a contributing editor. ... Matthew C. Taibbi (born February 3, 1970), an American journalist and political writer. ... Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005) was an American journalist and author. ... Touré. For other persons named Touré, see Touré (disambiguation). ... Peter Travers is the film critic for Rolling Stone magazine. ... Jann S. Wenner (born 7 January 1946 in New York City) is the owner of Wenner Media and the publisher of several magazines, most prominently the pop music biweekly Rolling Stone. ...

In popular culture

Janet Jackson on the September 1993 cover of Rolling Stone
Janet Jackson on the September 1993 cover of Rolling Stone
Britney Spears on the April 1999 cover of Rolling Stone
Britney Spears on the April 1999 cover of Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone is largely regarded as the predominant music promotional force in American culture, alongside the likes of MTV. It has been frequently referenced in other forms of media, such as in Cameron Crowe's semi-autobiographical film Almost Famous where Crowe's character worked as a teenage reporter for the magazine and the cult classic music-oriented movie High Fidelity where becoming a Rolling Stone journalist is cited as the lead character's ambition. In the 1985 movie Perfect, John Travolta made an appearance as a Rolling Stone journalist. Wenner had cameo roles in both Almost Famous and Perfect. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (557x768, 106 KB) Summary Britney Spears on the cover of April 1999 Rolling Stone. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (557x768, 106 KB) Summary Britney Spears on the cover of April 1999 Rolling Stone. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... Cameron Bruce Crowe (born July 13, 1957) is an Academy Award winning American writer and film director. ... Almost Famous is a 2000 American film written and directed by Cameron Crowe. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... High Fidelity is a 2000 film directed by Stephen Frears, starring John Cusack, Iben Hjejle, Jack Black, Todd Louiso, Tim Robbins, Lisa Bonet, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Joan Cusack, Joelle Carter, and Lili Taylor. ... John Joseph Travolta (born February 18, 1954) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor, dancer, and singer, best known for his leading roles in films such as Saturday Night Fever, Grease and Pulp Fiction. ...


In Stephen King's 1980 novel Firestarter, the young heroine takes her story (of her very demonstrable psychic powers) to Rolling Stone. Because she is fleeing the government, or rogue elements of it, the choice of Rolling Stone is a clever way of choosing a national venue respected by the growing younger demographic that is also unlikely to cooperate with government censorship or suppression of her story. For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... FireStarter (Japanese ファイスタ Fai Suta) is the second episode of the anime FLCL. Spoiler warning: Summary The Episode starts out with Mamimi playing some handheld videogame about burning stuff to please a dark god Cantide. ...


The magazine also had made some of the most controversial covers in pop culture; eyebrows were raised when a then-17 year-old Britney Spears was featured on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine in a sexually suggestive Lolita-themed photo shoot which triggered widespread speculation (denied by her representatives) that the singer had opted to have breast implants. Another controversial cover and, perhaps one of the Magazine's most famous, is of Janet Jackson who was photographed topless with her then husband's hand covering her breasts. Britney Jean Spears (born December 2, 1981) is a Grammy Award-winning[1] American pop singer, dancer, actress, author and songwriter. ... Janet Damita Jo Jackson (born May 16, 1966) is an American singer, actress, songwriter, record producer, dancer, activist, pop icon, and younger sister of the King of Pop, Michael Jackson. ...


The Rick Griffin logo for Rolling Stone and magazine cover were used as the basis for promotional images for the film School of Rock. Richard Alden Griffin (June 18, 1944 - August 18, 1991) was an American artist and one of the leading designers of psychedelic posters in the 1960s. ... For other uses, see Logo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see School of Rock (disambiguation). ...


At the end of The Wedding Singer, Drew Barrymore is reading a copy of Rolling Stone (Issue 440, January 31, 1985) with Billy Idol on the cover, while going to Las Vegas with Glen on the plane. The movie is set in 1985. The Wedding Singer is a 1998 romantic comedy film written by Tim Herlihy and directed by Frank Coraci that stars Adam Sandler as Robbie Hart, a wedding singer, and Drew Barrymore as Julia Sullivan, the object of his affections. ... Drew Blyth Barrymore (born February 22, 1975) is an American actress and film producer, the youngest member of the Barrymore family of American actors. ... Billy Idol (born William Michael Albert Broad) is an British musician and singer. ... This article is about the year. ...


In the movie, Tenacious D and the Pick of Destiny, copies of Rolling Stone are seen in a scene where Jack Black and Kyle Gass are contemplating what they need to be great musicians, and Black sees that several great guitarists wield the same pick. This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ...


In the movie Music and Lyrics, fictional Rolling Stone magazine reviews from various eras play a major role. Music and Lyrics is a romantic comedy film released by Warner Bros. ...


In the pilot episode of the CW series "Gossip Girl," a fictional Rolling Stone cover story on "forgotten bands of the '90s" is a repeatedly referenced plot point. This article is about the book series. ...

Shania Twain on the cover of November 1999 issue of Rolling Stone

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Celebrities who have appeared on the cover

Appearing on the cover of Rolling Stone has become something of a milestone in the career of many famous artists, and remains the aspiration of many up-and-coming musicians {source}. Some artists have graced the cover many times, some of these pictures going on to become iconic. The Beatles, for example, have appeared on the cover over thirty times, either individually or as a band.[24] The first ten who have appeared on the cover are: The list of celebrities who have appeared on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine is long and storied. ...

John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Tina Turner (born Anna Mae Bullock) November 26, 1939) is an 11 time Grammy Award-winning (sharing three), American Singer, Dancer, Record Producer, Executive Producer, Film Producer, Actress, Writer, Performer, Songwriter, Author and occasional Painter whose career has spanned from 1956 to present. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... Otis Ray Redding, Jr. ... For other uses, see Donovan (disambiguation). ... For other persons named James or Jim Morrison, see James Morrison. ... Janis Lyn Joplin (19 January 1943 – 4 October 1970) was an American singer, songwriter, and music arranger, from Port Arthur, Texas. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an Academy Award-winning English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... Eric Patrick Clapton CBE (born 30 March 1945), nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter and composer. ...

Lists

Rolling Stone often publishes lists which include:

The 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time was a cover story of the 18 September 2003 issue of Rolling Stone magazine published in August 2003. ... The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time was the cover story of a special issue of Rolling Stone magazine published in November 2004. ... The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time is the cover story of a special issue of Rolling Stone magazine published in November 2003. ...

Reference works

  • Rolling Stone Album Guide. Four editions with varying titles, c. 1979, 1983, 1992, 2004.
  • The Rolling Stone Illustrated History of Rock & Roll. Random House, 1980. ISBN 0-394-73938-8
  • Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide. 1985.
  • Rolling Stone Cover-to-Cover: The First 40 Years. Bondi Digital Publishing, 2007. ISBN 978-0979526107

The Rolling Stone Album Guide, previously known as The Rolling Stone Record Guide, is a book that, along with its sister publication Rolling Stone magazine, contains professional reviews of popular music. ...

International editions

  • Australia: A Rolling Stone supplement commenced in 1969 in Go-Set magazine. It became a full title in 1972 and is now published by Next Media Pty Ltd, Sydney.
  • Germany: Published in Germany since 1994 by AS Young Mediahouse.
  • Argentina: Rolling Stone is published by Publirevistas S.A. since April 1998.
  • Chile: Rolling Stone was published by Edu Comunicaciones since May 2003. Is actually published by El Mercurio, since January 2006.
  • Colombia: Edited in Bogotá for Colombia,Perú, Panama and Venezuela
  • Spain: Rolling Stone is published by PROGRESA in Madrid, since 1999.
  • Italy: Published in Italy since November 2003, first by IXO Publishing and now by Editrice Quadratum. As in China, the Italian version of Rolling Stone has local content and translated articles.
  • Russia:Rolling Stone is published by Izdatelskiy Dom SPN since 2004.
  • Indonesia: Published in Indonesia since June 2005 by JHP Media.
  • Turkey: Published in Turkish since June 2006 by GD Gazete Dergi.
  • Brazil: Published in Brazil since October 2006 by Spring Comunicações.
  • China: Rolling Stone in mainland China is licensed to One Media Group of Hong Kong and published in partnership with China Record Corporation. The magazine is in Chinese with translated articles and local content. Its cooperation launched in March 2006 as "Rolling Stone" in English and under the Chinese name "音像世界" ("Audio Visual World").[citation needed] While the launch of this cooperation generated a great deal of speculation in the foreign press about the regulator's attitudes to the magazine, many of the reports published were misleading in reporting that the magazine had ceased publishing, etc. Ultimately, in April 2007 publication ceased for financial reasons.
  • Japan: Launched in March of 2007. Like other international editions, its content consists of translated material from the American publication as well as native music coverage.
  • France: Launched 2002. This edition ceased in 2007.

Go-Set was a legendary Australian rock music magazine published from 1966-1974. ... Next Media is an Australian media company founded in 1987 by current CEO and publisher, Phil Keir. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... El Mercurio is a conservative Chilean newspaper with editions in Valparaíso and Santiago. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... - Peru (Spanish: República del Perú) is a country in western South America, bordering Ecuador and Colombia to the north, Brazil to the east, Bolivia to the east, south-east and south, Chile to the south, and the Pacific Ocean to the west. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

The Rolling Stone Interview is a feature article in the American magazine Rolling Stone that sheds light on notable figures from the worlds of music, popular culture, or politics. ...

Notes

  1. ^ http://www.mediabistro.com/articles/cache/a2867.asp
  2. ^ http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4179/is_20060504/ai_n16483523
  3. ^ http://www.salon.com/people/bc/1999/04/20/wenner/
  4. ^ Literary 'Rolling Stone' sells out to male titillation
  5. ^ "National Magazine Awards Database". Retrieved on 2007-11-06. 
  6. ^ Rolling Stone: Our 1000th Issue
  7. ^ "National Affairs" Daily blog
  8. ^ "Rock and Roll" Daily blog
  9. ^ New York Times article
  10. ^ http://www.salon.com/media/1998/06/09media.html
  11. ^ 'He was a crook'
  12. ^ The Worst President in History
  13. ^ Was the 2004 Election Stolen?
  14. ^ Rochester City News
  15. ^ a b May 9, 2006. Does hating rock make you a music critic? Jody Rosen. Slate. Article charging "RS" with "fogeyism."
  16. ^ July 4, 2004. Idle worship, or revisiting the classics. Jim DeRogatis. Chicago Sun-Times.Article discussing intention of book
  17. ^ a b Documentation of attempt to change reviews
  18. ^ Note: Although album reviews from this time are available, www.rollingstone.com does not show its original reviews of Led Zeppelin albums
  19. ^ Note to Editor: I encourage you to review the quote from Rolling Stone, it actually says, "If Nirvana isn't onto anything altogether new, Nevermind does possess the songs, character and confident spirit to be much more than a reformulation of college radio's high-octane hit." This is means something completely different as you can see. "Original "Rolling Stone" Review of "Nevermind." utm_source=Rhapsody&utm_medium=CDreview
  20. ^ Simon Reynolds. Soft Rock. Encyclopedia Britannica. Critique
  21. ^ http://www.huffingtonpost.com/michael-simmons/an-open-letter-to-jann-we_b_32016.html
  22. ^ http://salon.com/ent/feature/2002/06/28/rollingstone/index.html
  23. ^ http://rsjunior.proboards18.com/index.cgi?board=tribunal&action=display&thread=1085021884&page=19
  24. ^ Wenner, Jann (2006). "Our 1000th Issue - Jann Wenner looks back on 39 years of Rolling Stone" RollingStone.com (accessed September 21, 2006)

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Rolling Stone

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The revitalization of the Rolling Stones was demonstrated in the early summer of 1968 with "Jumping Jack Flash", a single that rivaled the best of their previous output.
The Rolling Stones' soporific slide into the 70s mainstream probably began during 1973 when their jet-setting was threatening to upstage their musical endeavors.
One of the Rolling Stones" cleverest devices throughout the 80s was their ability to compensate for average work by occasional flashes of excellence.
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The Rolling Stones, unlike the bands of the Mersey beat, were also good musicians: an expressive and versatile vocalist, a razor-sharp rhythmic guitar and a natural talent like Jones as the inspiration, the coordinator, the arranger and saboteur.
By now The Rolling Stones were eccentric multi-millionaires surrounded by a team of managers (to handle their millions), of lawyers (to run from the laws they continuously broke), of technicians (to prepare their concerts), of doctors (to avoid the risk that someone could wind up like Jones).
I Rolling Stones compirono un'operazione tre volte rivoluzionaria: recuperarono il rhythm and blues cosi` com'era, assimilarono tutto cio` che era "male" di quella musica (ritmo trascinante, canto sguaiato, atteggiamento spavaldo, liriche oscene) e lo sposarono alla frustrazione dei giovani della loro generazione, due minuti prima che quella frustrazione esplodesse nei disordini studenteschi del '64.
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