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Encyclopedia > Rogers Hornsby
Rogers Hornsby
Second Baseman
Born: April 27, 1896(1896-04-27)
Winters, Texas
Died: January 5, 1963 (aged 66)
Chicago, Illinois
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 10, 1915
for the St. Louis Cardinals
Final game
July 10, 1937
for the St. Louis Browns
Career statistics
AVG     .358
Hits     2930
Home runs     301
Teams

As Player Image File history File links Rogers_Hornsby. ... The position of the second baseman Second base redirects here. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Winters is a city located in Runnels County, Texas. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1915 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations National League (1892–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 6, 9, 14, 17, 20, 42, 42, 45, 85 Name St. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1937 throughout the world. ... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In Major League Baseball history, Ty Cobb had a record 4,191 hits (later revised to 4,189) by 1928; Pete Rose would surpass it 57 years later, and finish with 4,256 career hits. ... Homerun redirects here. ...

As Manager Major league affiliations National League (1892–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 6, 9, 14, 17, 20, 42, 42, 45, 85 Name St. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1915 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1926 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1933 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–85) Other nicknames The Jints, The Gigantes, The G... April 12 - President Calvin Coolidge throws out the first ball in Washington D.C. as the Washington Senators lost to the Boston Red Sox 6-2. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... The following are the baseball events of the year 1928 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1871, 1874-1889) (a. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1929 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1932 throughout the world. ... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1933 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1937 throughout the world. ...

Career highlights and awards
  • Holds the NL record for career batting average at .358.
  • Hit better than .300 15 times and better than .400 three times.
  • Won seven batting titles, two HR titles and four RBI crowns.
  • Won triple crowns in 1922 and 1925.
  • Rogers is the only right-handed hitter in the 20th century to hit .400 in three seasons.
  • In 1922, Hornsby became the first National Leaguer ever to hit 40 home runs in a season.
  • In only his second season as the player/manager, Rogers led the Cardinals to defeat the New York Yankees four games to three in the 1926 World Series.
  • Rogers’ career .358 batting average is the highest by a right-handed hitter in the history of Major League Baseball.
  • Hornsby is the only player in history to average a .400 batting average over a 5 year span (1921-25).
  • Rogers’ .424 batting average in 1924 is the highest mark in the National League in the 20th century.
Member of the National
Baseball Hall of Fame
Elected     1942
Vote     78.1% (first ballot)

Rogers Hornsby (April 27, 1896 in Winters, Texas - January 5, 1963 in Chicago, Illinois), nicknamed "The Rajah", was a Major League Baseball second baseman and manager. Hornsby's first name, Rogers, was his mother's maiden name. He spent most of his career with the St. Louis Browns and the St. Louis Cardinals. In addition, he had short stints for the Chicago Cubs, the Boston Braves, and the New York Giants. Major league affiliations National League (1892–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 6, 9, 14, 17, 20, 42, 42, 45, 85 Name St. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1925 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1926 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–85) Other nicknames The Jints, The Gigantes, The G... April 12 - President Calvin Coolidge throws out the first ball in Washington D.C. as the Washington Senators lost to the Boston Red Sox 6-2. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... The following are the baseball events of the year 1928 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1871, 1874-1889) (a. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1930 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1932 throughout the world. ... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1933 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1937 throughout the world. ... The following are the events of the year 1952 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames The Redlegs, The Big Red Machine... The following are the events of the year 1952 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... The following are the events of the year 1953 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... National league can refer to: National Basketball League, in the United States and Canada, which merged with the rival Basketball Association of America to form the National Basketball Association National Football League, the major American football league in the United States National Hockey League, the major ice hockey league in... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... Homerun redirects here. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... National league can refer to: National Basketball League, in the United States and Canada, which merged with the rival Basketball Association of America to form the National Basketball Association National Football League, the major American football league in the United States National Hockey League, the major ice hockey league in... Homerun redirects here. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1942 throughout the world. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Winters is a city located in Runnels County, Texas. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... The position of the second baseman Second base redirects here. ... New York Yankees manager Joe Torre returning to the dugout (September 2005) In baseball, the head coach of a team is called the manager (or more formally, the field manager); this individual controls matters of team batting order to more closely communicate with baserunners, but most managers delegate this responsibility... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ... Major league affiliations National League (1892–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 6, 9, 14, 17, 20, 42, 42, 45, 85 Name St. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1871, 1874-1889) (a. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–85) Other nicknames The Jints, The Gigantes, The G...


Hornsby ranks second on the list for highest career batting average. His career average of .358 is the highest for any right-handed hitter or National League player and 9 points behind Ty Cobb's career average of .367. The Baseball Hall of Fame elected Hornsby in 1942. He has also been given a star on the St. Louis Walk of Fame. Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... National league can refer to: National Basketball League, in the United States and Canada, which merged with the rival Basketball Association of America to form the National Basketball Association National Football League, the major American football league in the United States National Hockey League, the major ice hockey league in... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... See previous election: 1939 and next election: 1944 The 1942 election to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame was the first to be conducted in three years, and the only regular election in the years 1940 to 1944; in 1939 the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) had... The St. ...

Contents

Baseball career

Hornsby holds the modern record for highest batting average in a season, .424 in 1924, and he won the Triple Crown in 1922 and again in 1925. He won the NL's MVP Award twice, in 1925 and 1929. At his peak, from 1920 to 1925, Hornsby led his league in batting average all six years, in RBIs four years, and in home runs twice. Over five seasons (1921 through 1925), Hornsby averaged an astonishing .402, a feat unlikely to be equalled. Besides his major league record of 6 consecutive batting titles (based on current research), he won a 7th batting title for the Boston Braves in 1928 (.387). He hit 301 home runs, not all of them as a second baseman. He is among the top four in home runs by a second baseman, as of the start of the 2005 season. The following are the baseball events of the year 1924 throughout the world. ... In baseball, the Triple Crown refers to: A batter who (at seasons end) leads the league in three major categories -- home runs, runs batted in, and batting average. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1922 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1925 throughout the world. ... In the game of baseball, both amateur and professional, it is tradition to annually recognize the one player in the league who has contributed the most to the success of the players team. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “RBI” redirects here. ... In baseball, a home run is a base hit in which the batter is able to circle all the bases, ending at home plate and scoring a run, with no errors on the play that result in the batter achieving extra bases. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Hornsby was a remarkably consistent hitter who hit equally well when playing at home or on the road. His lifetime home batting average was .359, and his lifetime away batting average was .358. He had five seasons where he averaged over .400 at home, and four seasons where he averaged over .400 on the road. Hornsby began his career with the St. Louis Cardinals at the tail end of the 1915 season. He was a full-time player from 1916 through 1931, except for 1930 when he was sidelined most of the season due to an ankle fracture. At the end of his career as a full-time player Hornsby's lifetime batting average was .361. After 1931 Hornsby primarily focused his career on managing, however he would make occasional pinch-hitting and other appearances. His last appearance as a player was in 1937 while managing the St. Louis Browns.


During Hornsby's 15 seasons as a full-time player he finished in the top 4 in batting average 12 times, winning seven batting crowns, while finishing as runner-up three times. Hornsby led the league in slugging average 9 times, and was runner-up twice. He also led the league in on-base percentage 10 times. Baseball sabermetricians have developed a statistic to measure a player's overall production as a hitter. This statistic, called OPS+ (slugging average plus on base percentage adjusted for home park and normalized to league average), is considered by many to be the most elegant measure of a hitter's batting prowess. It has been found that in Hornsby's 15 seasons as a full-time player, he had the highest OPS+ in the league in 12 of those seasons, and on one other occasion he had the second highest OPS+ in the league. During that period Hornsby led the National league in various offensive categories 69 times. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Hornsby holds a major league record of 13 consecutive games with two or more base hits, accomplished July 5th through July 18th 1923.


Among the highlights of Hornsby's career was the 1922 season, when he became the only player in baseball history to hit over 40 home runs and bat over .400 in the same season. Hornsby won the first of his triple crowns in 1922, and led the league in almost every batting category including batting average (.401), home runs (42), runs batted in (152), slugging average (.722), on base percentage (.459), doubles (46), base hits (250), runs scored (141), total bases (450). His 42 home runs was a National league record (broken 7 years later by Chuck Klein). His 250 base hits was also a National League record (broken 8 years later by Bill Terry). His 450 total bases was the highest single season total of any National league player during the 20th century. Hornsby also produced in the field, leading the league in putouts, double plays, and fielding percentage.


Hornsby's record .424 batting average in 1924 was 143 points higher than the batting average of the rest of the league. Hornsby's on base percentage in 1924 was .507, which was the highest on base percentage achieved by any National League player during the 20th century, a record which was only seriously challenged by Hornsby himself in 1928 when he recorded a .498 on base percentage which was the second highest mark of the century in the NL. In 1925 Hornsby again won the triple crown, coming within one home run of duplicating his unparalleled feat of hitting 40 home runs and batting .400 in the same season. The .756 slugging percentage that Hornsby compiled in 1925 is the highest single season slugging average of any National League player during the 20th century. The 156 runs scored by Hornsby in 1929 were the most runs scored in a single season by a right-handed batter in the National League during the 20th century. Hornsby hit more home runs and drove in more runs than any other National League player during the 1920's. Hornsby also had the highest batting average of any National League player during that decade, which makes him the only player in baseball history (based on current research) to in effect win the triple crown for an entire decade.


Ted Williams in his autobiography, "My Turn at Bat" (at page 118), stated that Hornsby was the greatest hitter for average and power in the history of baseball. One of the more remarkable aspects of Hornsby as a hitter is the fact that he accomplished his batting feats as a right- handed hitter. Throughout baseball history approximately 70% of the pitchers have been right- handed, thereby placing a right-handed hitter at a statistical disadvantage approximately 70% of the time. Most of Hornsby's serious rivals for the laurel of greatest hitter ever have been left-handed hitters (e.g., Ruth, Cobb, Bonds, Williams, Gehrig, Musial). Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. ...


In 1916 Hornsby played primarily at third base and shortstop. In 1917 he played shortstop full time and led the league in double plays. In 1918, a reporter for the Washington Post described Hornsby as the outstanding fielding shortstop in the western circuit of the National League and perhaps the finest fielding shortstop in the entire league. 1920 was Hornsby's first full season as a second baseman, and he led the league in putouts, assists, and double plays. In an August 26, 1925 article in the Los Angeles Times, Hall of Fame manager Hughie Jennings described Hornsby as one of the best-fielding second basemen in the game. Hornsby's average of 3.31 assists per game is the 7th highest of any second baseman in baseball history. Hughie Jennings on a 1909-1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card (White Borders (T206)). Hugh Ambrose Jennings (April 2, 1869 - February 1, 1928) was an American baseball player and manager in Major League Baseball. ...


Hornsby was also renowned for his speed. In a January 8, 1963 article in the Chicago American, Hall of Fame player and manager, Al Lopez, said of Hornsby that, "he was one of the speediest men we ever had in baseball." His speed was often later compared to that of the young Mickey Mantle. Hall of Famer Pie Traynor who saw both Hornsby and Mickey Mantle play insisted that Hornsby would have beaten Mantle to first base from the right hand batter's box. Christy Mathewson once stated that he believed that Hornsby was faster than Maurice Archdeacon, a player who in the 1920's was believed to have been the fastest player to have played major league baseball. During the 1922 season, Hornsby won a 100-yard dash against Pro Football Hall of Fame running back Bo McMillin at Sportsman's Park in St. Louis. Hornsby did not try to steal very often, however he used his great speed to take extra bases. Between 1916 and 1927 Hornsby had 30 inside-the-park home runs, and led the league with 17 triples in 1917 and 18 triples in 1921; he had 20 triples in 1920. Harold Joseph Pie Traynor (November 11, 1899 - March 16, 1972) was a Major League Baseball third baseman who played his entire career with the Pittsburgh Pirates (1920-37). ... Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995) was an American baseball player who was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974. ... Christopher Christy Mathewson (August 12, 1880 - October 7, 1925), nicknamed Big Six, The Christian Gentleman, or Matty, was a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... Alvin Bo McMillin (January 12, 1895 - March 31, 1952) was a Hall-of-Fame college football player, and later successful head coach, who served at both the collegiate and professional levels but who achieved his greatest success at the college level. ... Sportsmans Park was the name of a former Major League Baseball ballpark in St. ...


During Hornsby's first nine years as a player in the National League, the Most Valuable Player Award was not yet in existence, so he had no opportunity to be declared MVP for some of his greatest seasons. In 1924 the Most Valuable Player award was given in the National League for the first time. Hornsby ended up finishing second in the balloting to pitcher Dazzy Vance when a sportwriter who worked for a newspaper in a rival National League city, completely omitted Hornsby's name from his ballot. A public outcry ensued, and many prominent persons throughout the league, including Branch Rickey and John McGraw, publicly stated their opinion that Hornsby had been the MVP, and should have received the award. Hornsby himself was more charitable telling the newspapers, "More power to Vance. He's a great pitcher." As a result of the public outcry, the sportwriter who had omitted Hornsby's name altogether from his ballot was removed as a voter for future MVP awards. The following season, 1925, Hornsby was voted the Most Valuable Player by an overwhelming margin. Hornsby repeated as winner of the National League MVP award in 1929. Clarence Arthur Dazzy Vance (March 4, 1891 - February 16, 1961) was a star Major League Baseball pitcher during the 1920s. ... Wesley Branch Rickey (December 20, 1881 – December 9, 1965) was an innovative Major League Baseball executive best known for two things: breaking baseballs color barrier by signing the African-American player Jackie Robinson, and later drafting the first Hispanic superstar, Roberto Clemente; and creating the framework to the modern... John Joseph McGraw (April 7, 1873–February 25, 1934), nicknamed Little Napoleon and Muggsy, was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ...

Rogers Hornsby was honored alongside the retired numbers of the St. Louis Cardinals in 1937.
Rogers Hornsby was honored alongside the retired numbers of the St. Louis Cardinals in 1937.

In addition to his success on the field, he was one of baseball's more successful player-managers, guiding his Cardinals to a World Series victory over Babe Ruth's New York Yankees in 1926. He himself tagged out Ruth trying to steal, thus ending that Series. Image File history File links CardsRetiredSTL.PNG‎ [edit] Summary [edit] Summary Source: I, the Silent Wind of Doom made this picture on MSPaint to serve as a retired number on the St. ... Image File history File links CardsRetiredSTL.PNG‎ [edit] Summary [edit] Summary Source: I, the Silent Wind of Doom made this picture on MSPaint to serve as a retired number on the St. ... Major league affiliations National League (1892–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 6, 9, 14, 17, 20, 42, 42, 45, 85 Name St. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... This article is about the baseball player. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... In the 1926 World Series, the St. ...


Hornsby was one of the more controversial characters in baseball history. Although he did not drink or smoke, he was a compulsive gambler. As with Ty Cobb, his photogenic smile belied a dark side. One writer characterized him as "a liturgy of hatred," and according to legendary baseball writer Fred Lieb, Hornsby confessed to being a member of the Ku Klux Klan. His chief interest was in winning, and he could be as sarcastic and uncompromising with club owners as he was with his teammates. When Hornsby was traded from the St. Louis Cardinals to the New York Giants after the 1926 season, the deal was held up because Hornsby, as part of his contract as the manager of the Cardinals (he was a player-manager at the time), owned several shares of stock in the Cardinals. Cardinals owner Sam Breadon offered Hornsby a sum for the stock considerably lower than what Hornsby demanded for it, and neither would budge. Eventually, the other owners of the National League made up the difference, and the trade went through. Compulsive gambling is an urge or addiction to gamble despite harmful negative consequences or a desire to stop. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ... Sam Breadon (July 26, 1876, New York, New York – May 8, 1949, St. ...


Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis, who had banned the Black Sox for life, was not sympathetic to the notion of ballplayers gambling at horse races anymore than at the ballpark. He called Hornsby into his office to reproach him for playing the horses--which was Hornsby's only real recreation outside of baseball (even after he retired). Landis did not intimidate Rogers; Hornsby recriminated Landis by pointing out that the commissioner was playing the stock market with funds from his office and this would cause a scandal if Hornsby exposed it. Naturally, Landis relented about Hornsby's horseplaying. (Source: The Great Baseball Mystery by Victor Luhrs) Kenesaw Mountain Landis Kenesaw Mountain Landis (November 20, 1866 – November 25, 1944) was an American jurist who served as a federal judge from 1905 to 1922, and subsequently as the first commissioner of Major League Baseball. ... ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... A stock market is a market for the trading of company stock, and derivatives of same; both of these are securities listed on a stock exchange as well as those only traded privately. ...


As with some other star athletes, as a manager he had trouble relating to players who shared neither his talent nor his zeal for winning. As his playing skills waned, he tended to be shuffled from team to team, wearing out his welcome quickly among his charges. Having won the World Series as a player-manager with the Cardinals, he was traded to the Giants for the 1927 season, then to the Boston Braves for 1928, and finally moved on to the Chicago Cubs in 1929, where he became their player-manager (and remained for three seasons thereafter), thus playing for four different teams in four years.


As Bill Veeck related in his autobiography, Veeck as in Wreck, his father Bill Sr., who was President and General Manager of the Chicago Cubs, had hired Hornsby, and soon disposed of him when the usual problems surfaced. Some years later, when the junior Veeck hired Hornsby to manage his St. Louis Browns for a time, his widowed mother wrote him a letter asking, "What makes you think you're any smarter than your Daddy was?" After a near-mutiny by the players, Veeck let Hornsby go, and his mother wrote back, "Told ya so!" Veeck, alert as ever to an opportunity for publicity, arranged a stunt in which he was awarded a trophy by the players for freeing them from Hornsby's control. William Louis Veeck Jr. ...


In his later years, Hornsby's disdain for younger players only increased. According to the book Can't Anybody Here Play This Game?, Hornsby was hired by the fledgling New York Mets to scout all the major league players. His report was not especially useful, as the best compliment he could come up with for anyone was "Looks like a major league ballplayer"—his assessment of Mickey Mantle. In another anecdote, Hornsby was reviewing a group of major league players with his customary none-too-complimentary remarks. Among the group were Chicago Cubs' third baseman Ron Santo and outfielder Billy Williams. Hornsby had just gotten through dismissing one player with the comment, "You'd better go back to shining shoes because you can't hit," when Santo whispered to Williams, "If he says that to me, I'm going to cry." When Hornsby came to Santo, he said, "You can hit in the big leagues right now," then turned to Williams and said, "So can you." Another version of this anecdote has Hornsby declaring that Williams and Santo will "make it" after observing them in a Cubs rookie camp in 1959, when both players were 20-year-old minor leaguers. Both Santo and Williams would go on to become star players for several years. Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42, Shea Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964-present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995) was an American baseball player who was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974. ... Ronald Edward Santo (born February 25, 1940 in Seattle, Washington) is a former third baseman in Major League Baseball who played almost his entire career with the Chicago Cubs. ... Billy Leo Williams (born June 15, 1938) is an American former outfielder in Major League Baseball. ...


In another quote attibuted to him while coaching for the 1962 Mets, Hornsby was asked how well he thought he could hit the current crop of pitchers if he were playing today, to which he replied "I guess I'd hit about .280 or .290". When asked why he'd hit for such a low average, Hornsby replied "Well, I'm 66 years old, what do you expect."


In contrast with his usual contempt for young players, he could be generous to those who had the "right stuff". When Hornsby was managing the Cincinnati Reds, players recalled him giving impromptu batting tips to the opposition, unable to help himself. Biographers of Ted Williams cite the story that the young Williams spoke with the aging Hornsby about hitting. Hornsby's secret was simply this: "Wait for a good pitch to hit." That became Williams' creed and the creed of many who followed. Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames The Redlegs, The Big Red Machine... For other uses, see Creed (disambiguation). ...


During one at bat, a rookie pitcher became flustered when the umpire called three consecutive balls that he argued were strikes. The umpire responded, "Son, when you throw a strike, Mr. Hornsby will let you know." As Pete Rose said to a reporter in 1978 while he was pursuing a 44-game hitting streak and had just tied Hornsby's personal best at 33, "Ol' Rogers was quite a hitter, wasn't he?" Peter Edward Pete Rose, Sr. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... In baseball, a hitting streak refers to the consecutive number of official games in which a player gets at least one base hit. ...


Hornsby was the great-grandson of early Texas pioneer Reuben Hornsby and a distant relative of musician Bruce Hornsby, who sometimes performs with a bust of Rogers on his piano. Reuben Hornsby was an early Texas pioneer and surveyor for Stephen F. Austin. ... Bruce Randall Hornsby (born November 23, 1954 in Williamsburg, Virginia) is an American singer, pianist, accordion player, and songwriter. ... A short grand piano, with the lid up. ...


Hornsby is mentioned in the poem "Lineup for Yesterday" by Ogden Nash: Frederic Ogden Nash (August 19, 1902 – May 19, 1971) was an American poet best known for writing pithy and funny light verse. ...

Lineup for Yesterday
H is for Hornsby;
When pitching to Rog,
The pitcher would pitch,
Then the pitcher would dodge.
Ogden Nash, Sport magazine (January 1949)[1]

Hornsby died in 1963 of a heart attack after cataract surgery. He was buried in the Hornsby Bend cemetery east of Austin, Texas. Frederic Ogden Nash (August 19, 1902 – May 19, 1971) was an American poet best known for writing pithy and funny light verse. ... The inaugural issue of SPORT magazine, September, 1946, depicting New York Yankees centrefielder Joe DiMaggio together with his son Joe Jr. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... Heart attack redirects here. ... Human eye cross-sectional view, showing position of human lens. ... Austin is the capital of the U.S. state of Texas and the seat of Travis County. ...


In 1999, he ranked number 9 on The Sporting News list of Baseball's Greatest Players, the highest-ranking second baseman. Later that year, he was elected to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... In 1998, The Sporting News compiled a list of Baseballs Greatest Players. ... In 1999, MasterCard sponsored the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. ...


Career statistics

See:Career Statistics for a complete explanation. Statistics are very important to baseball, perhaps as much as they are for cricket, and more than almost any other sport. ...

G AB H 2B 3B HR R RBI BB SO AVG OBP SLG
2,259 8,173 2,930 541 169 301 1,579 1,584 1,038 679 .358 .434 .577

Trivia

  • In addition to not drinking or smoking, Hornsby refused to watch movies or read, in an effort to retain his batting eye.[2]

In the Movie, A League of their Own, starring Tom Hanks, Hanks’ character Jimmy Duggan refers to Hornsby during his famous “There’s no crying in baseball” tirade. He goes on to say, while berating the player for making an error and crying, “Rogers Hornsby was my manager, and he called me a talking pile of pig shit, and that was when my parents drove all the way down from Michigan to see me play the game, and did I cry? No! No, and you know why? Because there’s no crying in baseball, there's no crying in baseball, no crying.” For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of...


See also

In the sport of baseball, a home run is the act of hitting the ball in such a manner, whether out of the park or in (see inside the park home run), that allows the batter to safely reach home and score in one play. ... // † – Biggio has announced his retirement, effective at the end of the 2007 season. ... Players denoted in boldface are still actively contributing to the record noted. ... Below is the list of Major League Baseball players who have reached the 2,000 hit milestone. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of Major League Baseball all-time leaders in doubles. ... Below is the list of 158 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 100 triple milestone. ... Below is the list of 295 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 1,000 Runs milestone. ... Below is the list of 252 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 1,000 RBI milestone. ... In baseball, the Triple Crown refers to: A batter who (at seasons end) leads the league in three major categories -- home runs, runs batted in, and batting average. ... Major League Baseball recognizes runs batted in champions in the American League and National League each season. ... The batting championship is awarded to the Major League Baseball player in each the American League and National League who has the highest batting average in a particular season. ... Major League Baseball recognizes home run champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Major League Baseball recognizes runs scored champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Major League Baseball recognizes doubles champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Listed below are the occurrences of Major League Baseball players who have hit three home runs in a single game. ... At the end of each Major League Baseball season, the league leaders of various statistical categories are announced. ...

References

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Rogers Hornsby
  1. ^ Baseball Almanac. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
  2. ^ Suerhsdorf, A. D.. The Ballplayers - Rogers Hornsby. BaseballLibrary.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-25.
  • Baseball America, Donald Honig.
  • Ted Williams: An American Hero, Leigh Montville
  • Hitter: Life and Turmoils of Ted Williams, Ed Linn
  • Baseball As I Have Known It, Fred Lieb. Tempo, 1970.

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Rogers Hornsby - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1027 words)
Rogers’ career.358 batting average is the highest by a right-handed hitter in the history of Major League Baseball.
Hornsby is considered by many followers of baseball's history to be one of the game's greatest hitters (and perhaps its greatest right-handed hitter of all time), on a level with Ted Williams, Ty Cobb, Babe Ruth and Stan Musial.
Hornsby was the great-grandson of early Texas pioneer Reuben Hornsby and is a distant relative of musician Bruce Hornsby, who sometimes performs with a bust of Rogers on his piano.
Rogers Hornsby (238 words)
Hornsby hit.401 in 1922,.403 in 1925, and in 1924 set the 20th century single season batting average record with an incredible.424 batting average.
In 1926, Hornsby led his Cardinals to a World Series victory as a player/manager, then was immediately traded in the offseason to the New York Giants for Frankie Frisch.
Hornsby finished his career in 1937 and made a lasting impression in baseball history with a lifetime average of.358 (second all-time to Ty Cobb's.367 lifetime average).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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