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Encyclopedia > Rogers' Rangers
Rogers' Rangers

Rogers' Rangers Toward Ticonderoga 1759
Depicted by artist John Buxton
Active 17551763
Country Great Britain
Allegiance British Crown
Branch Provincial Irregulars
Type Special Operations Light Infantry
Role Conducting unconventional or special Light Infantry operations
Size Nine companies
Garrison/HQ Fort William Henry
Battles/wars Battle of Great Meadows
Battle of Fort William Henry
Battle on Snowshoes
Raid on Saint-François
Devil's Hole Massacre
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Major Robert Rogers
Lieutenant John Stark

Rogers' Rangers was an independent company of rangers attached to the British Army during the French and Indian War. The unit was informally trained by Major Robert Rogers as a rapidly deployable light infantry force tasked with reconnaissance and conducting special operations against distant targets. Their military tactics were so bold and effective that the unit became the chief scouting unit of British Crown forces in the late 1750s. Later, several members of Rogers' Rangers became influential leaders in the American Revolutionary War and a large number of ex-rangers were present as patriot militiamen at the Battle of Concord Bridge. Image File history File links Rogersrangers. ... 1755 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen_in_Parliament) legislative power. ... Provincial has several meanings and may refer to: Provincial examinations: Bi-annual province-wide examinations for students between the grades of 10 to 12 in the province of British Columbia Anything related to a province, a formal geographical division; Anything related to the provinces, the parts of a country outside... Irregular Soldiers, 19th Century Irregulars are soldiers or warriors that are not part of a regular army organization. ... Special forces or special operations forces is a term used to describe relatively small military units raised and trained for reconnaissance, unconventional warfare and special operations. ... Traditionally light infantry (or skirmishers) were soldiers whose job was to provide a skirmishing screen ahead of the main body of infantry, harassing and delaying the enemy advance. ... The British Fort William Henry on the shores of Lake George, New York (NY), was built during the French and Indian War (1754-1763) by Sir William Johnson as a staging ground for attacks against the French Fort Carillon (later renamed Fort Ticonderoga). ... The Battle of the Great Meadows, also known as the Battle of Fort Necessity was a battle of the French and Indian War fought on July 3, 1754 in present-day Fayette County, Pennsylvania. ... Combatants France Britain Commanders Louis-Joseph de Montcalm Lieutenant-Colonel George Monro Strength 1,600 natives 6,000 regulars and militia 2,500 regulars and militia Casualties Unknown 297 dead or wounded 2,308 captured The Battle of Fort William Henry in August 1757 resulted in Britains loss of... The Battle on Snowshoes refers to two separate military engagements during the French and Indian War. ... Saint-François-du-Lac, Quebec is an community in Nicolet-Yamaska Regional County Municipality, Quebec, Canada, located at the confluence of the Saint Lawrence and Saint-François rivers, at the edge of Lac Saint-Pierre (Hence its name, Saint-François of the lake). This is the same... Combatants Seneca Great Britain Commanders Cornplanter Honayewus John Stedman Strength 300-500 134 Casualties Unknown 80 (although reports are as high as 103) The Battle of Devils Hole Road, also known as the Devils Hole Massacre, was fought on September 14, 1763 between a detachment of the British... This does not cite any references or sources. ... General John Stark John Stark (August 28, 1728 – May 8, 1822) was a general who served in the American Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. ... Standard NATO code for a friendly infantry company. ... The 75th Ranger Regiment—also known as the United States Army Rangers—is an elite light infantry special operations force of the United States Army Special Operations Command (USASOC); with headquarters in Fort Benning, Georgia. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Combatants France First Nations allies: * Algonquin * Lenape * Wyandot * Ojibwa * Ottawa * Shawnee Great Britain Iroquois Confederacy American Colonies Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) The French and Indian War was the nine-year North American chapter of the Seven Years... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Traditionally light infantry (or skirmishers) were soldiers whose job was to provide a skirmishing screen ahead of the main body of infantry, harassing and delaying the enemy advance. ... Mixed reconnaissance patrol of the Polish Home Army and the Soviet Red Army during Operation Tempest, 1944 Reconnaissance is the military term for the active gathering of information about an enemy, or other conditions, by physical observation. ... Special forces or special operations forces is a term used to describe relatively small military units raised and trained for reconnaissance, unconventional warfare and special operations. ... Combatants United States France Spanish Empire Dutch Republic Oneida Tuscarora Polish volunteers Quebec volunteers Prussian volunteers Great Britain Iroquois Confederacy Hessian mercenaries Loyalists Commanders George Washington Nathanael Greene Gilbert de La Fayette Comte de Rochambeau Bernardo de Gálvez Tadeusz Kościuszko Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben King George III Sir... Go to american revolution at wiki to get the same information provided below! This article concerns Patriots in the Revolutionary War. ... Combatants Militia of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, (Minutemen) British Army, Royal Marines Commanders John Parker, James Barrett, William Heath Francis Smith, John Pitcairn, Walter Laurie, Lord Hugh Percy Strength 75 at Lexington Green (Parker). ...

Contents

History

Rogers' Rangers was a group of colonial militia that fought for the British during the French and Indian War. Commanded by Robert Rogers they operated primarily in the Lake George and Lake Champlain regions of New York. The group was formed during the winter of 1755 by forces entrenched at Fort William Henry. The Rangers employed some of the earlier forms of guerrilla warfare used by European armies, used frequently during winter raids against French towns and emplacements, travelling on snowshoes and on frozen rivers. Lebanese Kataeb militia A Militia is an organization of citizens to provide defense, emergency or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ... Combatants France First Nations allies: * Algonquin * Lenape * Wyandot * Ojibwa * Ottawa * Shawnee Great Britain Iroquois Confederacy American Colonies Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) The French and Indian War was the nine-year North American chapter of the Seven Years... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Lake George, also known as the Queen of American Lakes, is a long narrow lake at the southeast base of the Adirondack Mountains, northern New York, USA. The lake extends about 32. ... Landsat photo Lake Champlain (French: lac Champlain) is a large lake in North America, mostly within the borders of the United States (states of Vermont and New York) but partially situated across the US-Canada border in the province of Quebec. ... NY redirects here. ... The British Fort William Henry on the shores of Lake George, New York (NY), was built during the French and Indian War (1754-1763) by Sir William Johnson as a staging ground for attacks against the French Fort Carillon (later renamed Fort Ticonderoga). ... Guerrilla warfare (also guerilla) is the unconventional warfare and combat with which small group combatants (usually civilians) use mobile tactics (ambushes, raids, etc) to combat a larger, less mobile formal army. ...


Never fully respected by the regular British forces, they were one of the only non-Indian force able to operate in the region due to the harsh winter conditions, and the difficulties of moving regular forces though the region's mountainous terrain.


After the British forces surrendered Fort William Henry, the Rangers were stationed on Rogers Island near Fort Edward. This allowed the Rangers to train and operate with more freedom than the regular forces. Combatants France Britain Commanders Louis-Joseph de Montcalm Lieutenant-Colonel George Monro Strength 1,600 natives 6,000 regulars and militia 2,500 regulars and militia Casualties Unknown 297 dead or wounded 2,308 captured The Battle of Fort William Henry in August 1757 resulted in Britains loss of... Rogers Island is an island on the Hudson River, in Washington County, New York, that once formed part of the third largest city in colonial North America, and is considered the spiritual home of the United States Special Forces, particularly the United States Rangers[1]. // Rogers Island is located in... Fort Edward can refer to at least two places: Fort Edward (village), New York Fort Edward (town), New York a temporary fort in South Africa, ca. ...


In March 1758 at The Battle of the Snowshoes Rogers' Rangers ambushed a French-Indian force and were in turn ambushed by French-Indian Forces. The Rangers had 52 survivors/8 wounded and 125 lost. Rogers estimated 100 killed and nearly 100 wounded of the French-Indian forces; however the French listed casualites as total of 10 Indians killed/17 wounded and 3 Canadians wounded[1]. The Battle on Snowshoes refers to two separate military engagements during the French and Indian War. ...


During 1759 the Rangers were involved in one of their most famous operations: the Rangers were ordered to destroy the Indian settlement of Saint-Francis in Quebec from which attacks on British villages were frequently being launched. Rogers led a force of 200 Rangers from Crown Point, New York, deep into French territory. Following the successful destruction of the village, the force ran out of food during their retreat back through northern Vermont. Once the Rangers reached a safe location along the Connecticut River at Fort Wentworth, Rogers left them encamped, and returned a few days later with food, and relief forces from Fort at Number 4 now Charlestown, New Hampshire the nearest English town. In the Raid on St.Francis, Rogers thought 200 were killed, leaving 20 women and children to be taken prisoners, of whom he took 5 children prisoners; however, the French record that only 30 were killed {including 20 women and children}[2] Saint-François-du-Lac, Quebec is an community in Nicolet-Yamaska Regional County Municipality, Quebec, Canada, located at the confluence of the Saint Lawrence and Saint-François rivers, at the edge of Lac Saint-Pierre (Hence its name, Saint-François of the lake). This is the same... , Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Official languages French Government - Lieutenant-Governor Pierre Duchesne - Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 75 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area  Ranked 2nd - Total 1,542,056 km² (595... Crown Point is the name of several towns or cities, and geographic features: Crown Point, Alaska Crown Point, Indiana Crown Point, New York Crown Point, Oregon. ... NY redirects here. ... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... The Connecticut River as seen from the French King Bridge in western Massachusetts. ... Fort Wentworth was built by order of Benning Wentworth in 1755. ... The Fort at Number 4 was the northern most English settelment along the Connecticut River in New Hampshire untill after the French and Indian War more than 30 miles (50 km) from the nearest English settlement at Fort Dummer. ... Location in Sullivan County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Sullivan County Incorporated 1783 Board of Selectmen Brenda Ferland, Chair Jon B LeClair Steven A Neill Area    - City 98. ...


At the end of the war the Rangers were given the task of taking command of Detroit from the French forces on behalf of the British crown. Nickname: Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (Latin for, We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes) Location in Wayne County, Michigan Coordinates: , Country United States State Michigan County Wayne County Founded 1701 Incorporation 1806 Government  - Type Strong Mayor-Council  - Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick (D) Area  - City  143. ...


After the war most of the Rangers returned to civilian life. In 1763 a unit of the Rogers' Rangers who were formed into the British 80th Regiment of Light Armed Foot {1758-1764} were ambushed at the Devil's Hole Massacre during Pontiac's Rebellion. At the outbreak of the American Revolution at Lexington and Concord, former Rangers were among the Minutemen firing at the British. After these events, Robert Rogers offered his help to the commander of the Colonial Army, George Washington. Washington refused, fearing that Rogers was a spy because Rogers had just returned from a long stay in England. Rogers was infuriated by this and did indeed join the British--forming the Queen's Rangers {1776} and later the King's Rangers. Combatants Seneca Great Britain Commanders Cornplanter Honayewus John Stedman Strength 300-500 134 Casualties Unknown 80 (although reports are as high as 103) The Battle of Devils Hole Road, also known as the Devils Hole Massacre, was fought on September 14, 1763 between a detachment of the British... Combatants British Empire American Indians Commanders Jeffrey Amherst, Henry Bouquet Pontiac, Guyasuta Strength ~3,000 soldiers[1] ~3,500 warriors[2] Casualties 450 soldiers killed, 2,000 civilians killed or captured, 4,000 civilians displaced ~200 warriors killed, possible additional war-related deaths from disease Pontiacs Rebellion was a... The Battle of Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775 was the first battle of the American Revolutionary War and was described as the shot heard round the world in Emersons Concord Hymn. ... Lexington Minuteman representing John Parker Minutemen is a name given to members of the militia of the American Colonies, who would be ready for battle in a minutes notice. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... SPY may refer to: SPY (spiders), ticker symbol for Standard & Poors Depository Receipts SPY (magazine), a satirical monthly, trademarked all-caps SPY (Ivory Coast), airport code for San Pédro, Côte dIvoire SPY (Ship Planning Yard), a U.S. Navy acronym SPY, short for MOWAG SPY, a... The Royal Canadian Armoured Corps (RCAC) is the armoured branch of service of the Canadian Forces Land Force Command (Canadian Army), including regular force and militia regiments. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...


The Queen's York Rangers (1st American Regiment) of the Canadian Army claim to be descended from Rogers' Rangers. Also claiming descent from Rogers' Rangers is the 1st Battalion 119th Field Artillery of Michigan and the U.S. Army Rangers. The 1st American Regiment was originally raised during the Seven Years War by Robert Rogers and were better known as Rogers Rangers. ... The 1-119th Field Artillery is part of the Michigan Army National Guard. ... Official force name 75th Ranger Regiment Rangers Other names Airborne Rangers Army Rangers U.S. Army Rangers Branch U.S. Army Chain of Command USASOC Description Special Operations Force, rapidly deployable light infantry force. ...


The historical novel Northwest Passage (1937), an American classic, gave great verisimilitude to the events of Rogers' Rangers' raid on the Abenaki town of St. Francis. The first half of the novel was later adapted to film called Northwest Passage (1940). Northwest Passage is a well-researched historical novel by Kenneth Roberts, published in 1937. ... For other uses, see Verisimilitude (disambiguation). ... The Abenakis a confederation of Algonquin tribes, comprising the Penobscots, Passamaquoddies, Norridgewocks, and others, formerly occupying what is now Maine, and southern New Brunswick. ... Northwest Passage is a 1940 movie, starring Spencer Tracy, Robert Young, Walter Brennan, Ruth Hussey, and others. ...


During the Second World War, the U.S. Army was interested in the tactics of the British Commando units, which by then had a couple of years of experience, and wanted similar special operations forces of their own. Recalling this colonial unit, they took the name "Rangers" as the official title; these units consider Rogers their founding father and distribute copies of Rogers' Rangers Standing Orders to all aspiring Ranger students. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Official force name 75th Ranger Regiment Rangers Other names Airborne Rangers Army Rangers U.S. Army Rangers Branch U.S. Army Chain of Command USASOC Description Special Operations Force, rapidly deployable light infantry force. ... There are two versions of the Rangers Standing Orders of Major Robert Rogers. ...


A more recent book, White Devil - A True Story of War, Savagery, and Vengeance in Colonial America, by Steven Brumwell (ISBN 0-306-81389-0, Da Capo Books, 2005), contains an historical analysis of the St. François raid and ensuing controversy.


In 2002, Mind Lab Films produced a Documentary about Robert Rogers and his Rangers entitled "The Battle On Snowshoes." The Film is available through Heritage Books.


Notable members

This does not cite any references or sources. ... General John Stark John Stark (August 28, 1728 – May 8, 1822) was a general who served in the American Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. ... General Jonathan Moulton was to play an important role in the early history of New Hampshire and many tales of his adventures would become the stuff of legend. ... Joseph Cilley (1734-1799) was a New Hampshire state senator and general. ... Maj. ... Moses Hazen (1733-1802) was born in Haverhill, Massachusetts. ... William Stark (1724-1776) was the older brother of Gen. ...

Footnotes

See also

Jeffrey Amherst by Joshua Reynolds Jeffrey Amherst, 1st Baron Amherst (sometimes spelled Geoffrey, he himself spelled his name as Jeffery) (January 29, 1717 - August 3, 1797) served as an officer in the British army Born in Sevenoaks, England, he became a soldier aged about 14. ... The New Hampshire Provincial Regiment was a composit regiment made up of units of the New Hampshire Militia during the French and Indian War for service with the British Army in North America. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Roy Roger's Rangers - Mounted Shooting Club - Points System (401 words)
The Roy Rogers Rangers have blazed a few new trails and have established a little twist to what is known as a point system.
This is how the Roy Rogers Rangers Point System works: As you know SASS has 5 divisions for mounted shooting, so, we figure that if a division #1 bests a master #5…well, that ought to count for something.
The Roy Rogers Rangers Point System has proven to be a lot of fun, levels out the playing field and fosters friendly competition.
Rogers' Rangers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (867 words)
Rogers' Rangers was a group of colonial militia that fought for the British during the French and Indian War.
During 1759 the Rangers were involved in one of their most famous operations: the Rangers were ordered to destroy the Indian settlement of Saint-François in Quebec from which attacks on British villages were frequently being launched.
Rogers was infuriated by this and did indeed join the British--forming the Queen's Rangers and later the King's Rangers.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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