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Encyclopedia > Roger Sherman
Sherman's marble statue in the National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol.
Sherman's marble statue in the National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol.

Roger Sherman (April 19 (O.S.), April 30 (N.S.), 1721July 23, 1793) was an early American lawyer and politician. He served as the first mayor of New Haven, Connecticut, and served on the Committee of Five that drafted the Declaration of Independence, and was also a representative and senator in the new republic. Image File history File links RogerSherman. ... Image File history File links RogerSherman. ... Part of the National Statuary Hall Collection The National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol is comprised of statues donated by individual states to honor persons notable in their history. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1721 (MDCCXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... New Haven redirects here. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... The Committee of Five was the group delegated by the Second Continental Congress on June 11, 1776 to draft the United States Declaration of Independence. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to...


He was the only person to sign all four great state papers of the U.S.: the Articles of Association, the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution.[1] Thomas Jefferson once said of him: "That is Mr. Sherman of Connecticut, a man who has never said a foolish thing in his life." The Articles of Association was a petition of grievances against Great Britain by the American colonies, and a compact among them to collectively impose economic sanctions to pressure a resolution. ... The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, commonly known as the Articles of Confederation, was the first governing document, or constitution, of the United States of America. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ...


Sherman is also the patriarch of one of the most powerful and prolific U.S. political families, the Baldwin, Hoar & Sherman family. The Baldwin, Evarts, Hoar & Sherman family is an exceedingly large political family of the United States spanning the countrys history. ...

Contents

Early life

Sherman was born in Newton, Massachusetts. When he was three years old, his family moved to Canton, Massachusetts, a town located seventeen miles south of Boston. Sherman's education did not extend beyond grammar school and his early career was spent as a shoe designer but he was blessed with the ability of learning, and access to a good library owned by his father as well as a Harvard educated parish minister, Rev. Samuel Dunbar, who took him under his wing. Nickname: Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1688 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor David B. Cohen (Dem) Area  - City  18. ... Canton is a town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ...


In 1743, after his father's death, he moved (on foot) with his mother and siblings to New Milford, Connecticut, where in partnership with his brother, he opened the town's first store. He very quickly introduced himself in civil and religious affairs, rapidly becoming one of the town's leading citizens and eventually town clerk of New Milford. Due to his mathematical skill he became county surveyor of [New Haven County] in 1745, and began providing astronomical calculations for almanacs in 1748. New Milford (Incorporated 1712) is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States 14 miles (23 km) north of Danbury, on the Housatonic River. ...


Painter Ralph Earl's depiction of Sherman was described by Bernard Bailyn as "one of the most striking portraits of the age." [1] ]] Ralph Earl (May 11, 1751 - August 16, 1801) was a famous American painter. ... It has been suggested that The Peopling of British North America be merged into this article or section. ...


Sherman was urged to read for the bar exam by a local lawyer and was admitted to the Bar of Litchfield, Connecticut in 1754, and chosen to represent New Milford in the Connecticut General Assembly from 1755 to 1758 and from 1760 to 1761. In 1766 he was elected to the Upper House of the Connecticut General Assembly, where he served until 1785. Litchfield is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut and is known as a affluent summer resort. ... The Connecticut General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ...


He was appointed justice of the peace in 1762, judge of the court of common pleas in 1765, and justice of the Superior Court of Connecticut from 1766 to 1789, when he left to become a member of the United States Congress. He was also appointed treasurer of Yale College, and awarded an honorary Master of Arts degree. He was a professor of religion for many years, and engaged in lengthy correspondences with some of the greatest theologians of the time. Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Yale redirects here. ...


In 1783 he and Richard Law were appointed to massively revise the confused and archaic Connecticut statutes, which they accomplished with great success. In 1784 he was elected Mayor of New Haven, which office he held until his death. He is especially notable for being the only person to sign all four great state of papers of the United States: the United States Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Association, the Articles of Confederation, and the United States Constitution. Only one other person, Robert Morris, signed 3 of these documents (not the Articles of Association). Richard Law (March 7, 1733– January 26, 1806) was an American lawyer, jurist and statesman from New London, Connecticut. ... This is a list of the Mayors of New Haven, Connecticut. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to... The Articles of Association was a petition of grievances against Great Britain by the American colonies, and a compact among them to collectively impose economic sanctions to pressure a resolution. ... The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, commonly known as the Articles of Confederation, was the first governing document, or constitution, of the United States of America. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... Robert Morris Robert Morris, Jr. ... The Articles of Association was a petition of grievances against Great Britain by the American colonies, and a compact among them to collectively impose economic sanctions to pressure a resolution. ...

In John Trumbull's famous painting, Sherman is literally front and center -- of those standing up near the desk, he is the second person from the left. The painting depicts the Committee of Five presenting its work to the Congress.
In John Trumbull's famous painting, Sherman is literally front and center -- of those standing up near the desk, he is the second person from the left. The painting depicts the Committee of Five presenting its work to the Congress.

Image File history File links Declaration_independence. ... Image File history File links Declaration_independence. ... This article is about the American painter. ... The Committee of Five was the group delegated by the Second Continental Congress on June 11, 1776 to draft the United States Declaration of Independence. ...

Continental Congress

At the start of the Revolutionary War in 1775 Sherman was appointed to the Connecticut Governor's Council of Safety and also commissary to the Connecticut Troops. He was elected to the Continental Congress in 1774 and served very actively throughout the War, earning high esteem in the eyes of his fellow delegates and serving on the Committee of Five that drafted the Declaration of Independence. The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... The Continental Congress was the first national government of the United States. ... The Committee of Five was the group delegated by the Second Continental Congress on June 11, 1776 to draft the United States Declaration of Independence. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to...


Constitutional Convention

During the Constitutional Convention of 1787, summoned into existence to amend the Articles of Confederation, Sherman offered what came to be called the Great Compromise. In this plan, the people would be represented in the house by proportional representation in one branch of the legislature, called the House of Representatives. The states would be represented in another house called the Senate. Each state had a representative for every 30,000 people. In the upper house, on the other hand, each state was guaranteed two senators, no matter their size. Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy. ... The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, commonly known as the Articles of Confederation, was the first governing document, or constitution, of the United States of America. ... The Connecticut Compromise, also known as the Great Compromise, was an essential agreement between large and small states reached during the Philadelphia Convention of 1787 that in part defined the legislative structure and representation that each state would have under the United States Constitution. ...


Sherman is also memorable for his stance against paper money and his authoring of Article I Section 10 of the United States Constitution. Paper Money is the second album by the band Montrose. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ...

Mr. Willy & Mrs. Willy moved to insert after the words "coin money" the words "nor emit bills of credit, nor make any thing but gold & silver coin a tender in payment of debts" making these prohibitions absolute, instead of making the measures allowable (as in the XIII art:) with the consent of the Legislature of the U.S. ... Mr. Sherman thought this a favorable crisis for crushing paper money. If the consent of the Legislature could authorize emissions of it, the friends of paper money would make every exertion to get into the Legislature in order to license it." [2]

Mr. Sherman and other Founding Fathers feared that without prohibiting the States from making "any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts" that congress could simply print an endless supply of papery currency and force it upon its citizenry. This was a major issue predating the Constitution as English common law forced one colony to accept the inflated currency of another at face value. The result was that one could actually make money by redeeming notes of one colony for gold or silver coin in another.[3] This, and other "evils" of paper money are well documented by Roger Sherman in his highly influential book A Caveat Against Injustice or An Inquiry into the Evils of a Fluctuating Medium of Exchange. Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy. ...

This statue of Roger Sherman is at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, PA.
This statue of Roger Sherman is at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, PA.

Image File history File linksMetadata Roger_Sherman_statue. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Roger_Sherman_statue. ... Exterior of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania The National Constitution Center is a 160,000 square foot museum that opened on July 4, 2003 in the historic district of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and designed by American architect Henry N. Cobb. ... This article refers to the largest city of Pennsylvania. ...

Family

He was a first cousin twice removed of Eli Whitney, inventor of the cotton gin. Sherman's mother Mehitable Wellington and Whitney's great-grandmother Elizabeth Wellington were siblings. It has been suggested that both of them were descended from Edward I of England. Eli Whitney Eli Whitney (b. ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver or the English Justinian because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and tried to do the same to Scotland. ...


Watergate-era proscecutor Archibald Cox, famous for his firing during the Saturday Night Massacre was a direct descendant of Roger Sherman. Archibald Cox, Jr. ... The Saturday night massacre (October 20, 1973) was the term given by political commentators to U.S. President Richard Nixons executive dismissal of independent special prosecutor Archibald Cox, and the forced resignations of Attorney General Elliot Richardson and Deputy Attorney General William Ruckelshaus during the controversial and drawn-out...


His grandson, William Maxwell Evarts was an American lawyer and statesman who served as US Secretary of State, US Attorney General and US Senator from New York. William Maxwell Evarts (February 6, 1818–February 28, 1901) was an American lawyer and statesman. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... This article is about the state. ...


The town of Sherman, Connecticut is named in honor of Roger Sherman. Sherman is the northernmost town of Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. ...


Sherman Avenue in central Madison, Wisconsin is named in honor of Roger Sherman. Most of the main streets in Downtown Madison are named after signers of the United States Constitution. Naturally, there is also a Sherman Avenue in New Haven, which extends into neighboring Hamden. For other uses, see Madison (disambiguation). ...


He is buried in the Grove Street Cemetery in New Haven, and his grave is the center of the city's 4th of July celebrations. Grove Street Cemetery or Grove Street Burial Ground in New Haven, Connecticut is located in the center of the Yale University campus. ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ...


The official name of the policy debate team at Western Connecticut State University is the "Roger Sherman Debate Society". This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


See also

  • Dictionary of American Biography
  • Boardman, Roger Sherman, Roger Sherman, Signer and Statesman, 1938. Reprint. New York: Da Capo Press, 1971.
  • Boutell, Lewis Henry, The Life of Roger Sherman, Chicago: A.C. McClurg & Co., 1896.
  • Boyd, Julian P., “Roger Sherman: Portrait of a Cordwainer Statesman.” New England Quarterly 5 (1932): 221-36.
  • Collier, Christopher; Roger Sherman’s Connecticut: Yankee Politics and the American Revolution, Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1971.
  • Gerbr, Scott D., "Roger Sherman and the Bill of Rights." Polity 28 (Summer 1996): 521-540.
  • Hoar, George Frisbie, The Connecticut Compromise. Roger Sherman, the Author of the Plan of Equal Representation of the States in the Senate, and Representation of the People in Proportion to Numbers in the House, Worcester, MA: Press of C. Hamilton, 1903.
  • Rommel, John G., Connecticut’s Yankee Patriot: Roger Sherman, Hartford: American Revolution Bicentennial Commission of Connecticut, 1980.

George Frisbie Hoar (29 August 1826–30 September 1904) was a prominent United States politician. ...

References

  1. ^ Roger Sherman Architect of the Capitol. Retrieved February 14, 2007.
  2. ^ Farrand, Max, ed. The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787.
  3. ^ A Caveat Against Injustice or an Inquiry into the Evils of a Fluctuating Medium of Exchange., New York, Roger Sherman, 1752.

External links

Preceded by
none
Mayors of New Haven, Connecticut
1784–1793
Succeeded by
Elizur Goodrich
Preceded by
William S. Johnson
United States Senator (Class 3) from Connecticut
1791–1793
Served alongside: Oliver Ellsworth
Succeeded by
Stephen M. Mitchell
The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... Find A Grave is an online database of seventeen million cemeteries and burial records. ... This is a list of the Mayors of New Haven, Connecticut. ... Elizur Goodrich (March 24, 1761-November 1, 1849) was an American lawyer and politician from Connecticut. ... For other persons named William Johnson, see William Johnson (disambiguation). ... Connecticut ratified the Constitution on January 9, 1788. ... Oliver Ellsworth (April 29, 1745 – November 26, 1807), an American lawyer and politician, was a revolutionary against British rule, a drafter of the United States Constitution, and third Chief Justice of the United States. ... Stephen Mix Mitchell (December 9, 1743– September 30, 1835) was an American lawyer, jurist, and statesman from Weathersfield, Connecticut. ... Connecticut ratified the Constitution on January 9, 1788. ... Oliver Ellsworth (April 29, 1745 – November 26, 1807), an American lawyer and politician, was a revolutionary against British rule, a drafter of the United States Constitution, and third Chief Justice of the United States. ... James Hillhouse (October 20, 1754 - December 29, 1832), of New Haven, Connecticut, was a real estate developer responsible for much of the current look of New Haven, a politician, and a treasurer of Yale University. ... Samuel Wittlesey Dana (February 13, 1760–July 21, 1830) was an American lawyer and politician from Middletown, Connecticut. ... Elijah Boardman in 1789 by Ralph Earle Elijah Boardman (March 7, 1760 - August 18, 1823) was a United States Senator from Connecticut. ... Henry Waggaman Edwards (October, 1779–July 22, 1847) was a governor of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... For other people named Samuel Foote, see Samuel Foote (disambiguation). ... Nathan Smith (January 8, 1770 - December 6, 1835) was a United States Senator from Connecticut, and was the brother of Nathaniel Smith and uncle of Truman Smith. ... John Milton Niles (1787 - 1856) was a U.S. editor and political figure from Connecticut, a member of the Democratic Party. ... Thaddeus Betts (b. ... Jabez W. Huntington (November 8, 1788 - November 1, 1847) was a United States Representative and Senator from Connecticut. ... Roger Sherman Baldwin (January 4, 1793–February 19, 1863) was an American lawyer involved in the Amistad case, who later became governor of Connecticut and United States Senator. ... Isaac Toucey (November 15, 1792–July 30, 1869) was an American statesman who served as a U.S. Senator, Secretary of the Navy, Attorney General of the United States and Governor of Connecticut. ... James Dixon (August 5, 1814 - March 27, 1873) was a United States Representative and Senator from Connecticut. ... William Alfred Buckingham (May 28, 1804 - February 5, 1875) was a Republican U.S. Senator from Connecticut. ... For other people named William Eaton, see William Eaton (disambiguation) William Wallace Eaton (October 11, 1816 - September 21, 1898) was a United States Representative and United States Senator from Connecticut. ... Joseph Roswell Hawley ( October 31, 1826 - March 17, 1905), American political leader, was born at Stewartsville, Richmond county, North Carolina, where his father, a native of Connecticut, was pastor of a Baptist church. ... Morgan Bulkeley. ... George Payne McLean (October 7, 1857 - June 6, 1932) was a United States Senator from Connecticut. ... Frederic Collin Walcott (February 19, 1869 - April 27, 1949) was a United States Senator from Connecticut. ... Francis Thomas Maloney (1894-1945) was a U.S. Representative from Connecticut from 1933 to 1935 and a U.S. Senator from Connecticut from 1935 to 1945. ... 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Andrew Adams (January 7, 1736– November 26, 1797) was an American lawyer, jurist, and political leader in Litchfield, Connecticut during the Revolutionary War. ... For other uses, see Samuel Adams (disambiguation). ... Thomas Adams (1730 - August, 1788) was a politician and businessman from Virginia. ... For other people with the same name, see John Banister (disambiguation). ... Josiah Bartlett (November 21, 1729–May 19, 1795), was an American physician and statesman who, as a delegate to the Continental Congress for New Hampshire, signed the Declaration of Independence. ... Daniel Carroll Daniel Carroll (July 22, 1730–July 5, 1796) was a politician and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. ... William Clingan (c. ... John Collins (June 8, 1717 – March 4, 1795) was an American statesman from Newport, Rhode Island. ... 63. ... John Dickinson (November 2, 1732 – February 14, 1808) was an American lawyer, artist and politician from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Wilmington, Delaware. ... Other notable men have similar names, see: William Drayton (disambiguation). ... James Duane (February 6, 1733–February 1, 1797) was a lawyer, jurist, and revolutionary leader from New York. ... For other men with this name, see the disambiguation page: William Duer. ... William Ellery William Ellery (December 22, 1727–February 15, 1820), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of Rhode Island. ... Elbridge Thomas Gerry (pronounced ) (July 17, 1744 – November 23, 1814) was an American statesman and diplomat. ... For other persons named John Hancock, see John Hancock (disambiguation). ... For other persons named John Hanson, see John Hanson (disambiguation). ... Cornelius Harnett (April 20, 1723–April 28, 1781) was a American merchant, farmer, and statesman from Wilmington, North Carolina. ... John Harvie (1742-1807) was an American lawyer and builder from Virginia. ... Thomas Heyward, Jr. ... Samuel Holten (June 9, 1738 – January 2, 1816) was an American physician and statesman from Danvers, Massachusetts. ... Titus Hosmer (1736– August 4, 1780) was an American lawyer from Middletown, Connecticut. ... Samuel Huntington, 1731-1796, drawn from the life by Du Simitier in Philadelphia; engraved by B.L. Prevost at Paris. ... Richard Hutson (July 9, 1748 – April 12, 1795) was an American lawyer, judge, and politician from Charleston, South Carolina. ... Edward Langworthy (1738–1802) was an American teacher who was a delegate to the Continental Congress from Georgia. ... Henry Laurens Henry Laurens (1724–1792) was an American merchant and rice planter from South Carolina who became a political leader during the Revolutionary War. ... Francis Lightfoot Lee (October 14, 1734–January 11, 1797), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of Virginia. ... Richard Henry Lee (January 20, 1732–June 19, 1794) was an American who served as the sixth President of the United States in Congress assembled under the Articles of Confederation, holding office from November 30, 1784 to November 22, 1785. ... Francis Lewis Francis Lewis (March 21, 1713 – December 30, 1803), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of New York. ... James Lovell (October 31, 1737– July 14, 1789) was an American educator and statesman from Boston, Massachusetts. ... Henry Marchant (April 9, 1741– August 30, 1796) was an American lawyer from Newport, Rhode Island. ... John Mathews (1744–November 17, 1802) was an American lawyer from Charleston, South Carolina. ... Thomas McKean Thomas McKean (March 19, 1734–June 24, 1817) was the second President of the United States in Congress assembled, from July 10, 1781, until November 4, 1781. ... Gouverneur Morris Gouverneur Morris (January 31, 1752 – November 6, 1816) was an American statesman who represented Pennsylvania in the Constitutional Convention of 1787 and was an author of large sections of the Constitution of the United States. ... For other persons named Robert Morris, see Robert Morris (disambiguation). ... John Penn (May 17, 1741–September 14, 1788), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of North Carolina. ... Joseph Reed (August 27, 1741– March 5, 1785) was an American lawyer and jurist from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Daniel Roberdeau (1727–January 5, 1795) was an American merchant in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Nathaniel Scudder (May 10, 1733–October 17, 1781) was an American physician and patriot leader during the Revolutionary War. ... Jonathan Bayard Smith (February 21, 1742–June 16, 1812) was an American merchant from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Edward Telfair (1735– September 17, 1807) was governor of the state of Georgia in 1786 and 1790-1793. ... Nicholas Van Dyke, Sr. ... John Walton (1738 - 1783) was a Georgia delegate to the Continental Congress. ... John Wentworth, Jr. ... John Williams (March 14, 1731 - October 10, 1799) was a signer of the United States Articles of Confederation. ... John Witherspoon Dr. John Witherspoon (February 5, 1723 – November 15, 1794), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of New Jersey. ... Oliver Wolcott (December 1, 1726–December 1, 1797), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of Connecticut. ... Download high resolution version (486x784, 59 KB) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... Abraham Baldwin Abraham Baldwin (November 23, 1754—March 4, 1807) was an American politician, Patriot, and Founding Father from the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Richard Bassett (April 2, 1745 – August 15, 1815) was an American lawyer and politician from Dover, in Kent County, Delaware. ... This article is about the delegate to the U.S. Constitutional Convention, for other persons with the same name, see Gunning Bedford (disambiguation). ... John Blair (1732–August 31, 1800) was an American politician, Founding Father, and Patriot. ... Italic text:For the English scholar see William Blount, 4th Baron Mountjoy. ... David Brearley David Brearley (often misspelled Brearly) (June 11, 1745–August 16, 1790) was a delegate to the U.S. Constitutional Convention and signed the U.S. Constitution on behalf of New Jersey. ... This article is about the Delaware politician. ... Pierce Butler (July 11, 1744 - February 15, 1822) was a soldier, planter, and statesman, recognized as one of United States Founding Fathers. ... Daniel Carroll Daniel Carroll (July 22, 1730–July 5, 1796) was a politician and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. ... George Clymer (March 16, 1739–January 23, 1813) was an American politician and Founding Father. ... Daniel of St. ... Jonathan Dayton (October 16, 1760–October 9, 1824) was an American politician from the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... John Dickinson (November 2, 1732 – February 14, 1808) was an American lawyer, artist and politician from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Wilmington, Delaware. ... This article is about the Founding Father of the United States. ... Thomas Fitzsimons (1741-1811) was an American merchant and statesman of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ... Nicholas Gilman Nicholas Gilman, Jr. ... Nathaniel Gorham (May 27, 1738–June 11, 1796) was the eighth President of the United States in Congress assembled, under the Articles of Confederation. ... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 - July 12, 1804) was an Army officer, lawyer, Founding Father, American politician, leading statesman, financier and political theorist. ... Jared Ingersoll Jared Ingersoll (October 24, 1749 – October 31, 1822) was an early American lawyer and statesman from Philadelphia. ... For other persons named William Johnson, see William Johnson (disambiguation). ... Rufus King (March 24, 1755 – April 29, 1827) was an American lawyer, politician, and diplomat. ... John Langdon (June 26, 1741—September 18, 1819) was a politician from New Hampshire and one of the first two United States Senators from that state. ... William Livingston William Livingston (November 30, 1723 – July 25, 1790) served as the Governor of New Jersey (1776–1790) during the American Revolution and was a signer of the United States Constitution. ... For other persons named James Madison, see James Madison (disambiguation). ... James McHenry (November 16, 1753 – May 3, 1816) was an early American statesman. ... Thomas Mifflin , John Singleton Copley, 1773. ... Gouverneur Morris Gouverneur Morris (January 31, 1752 – November 6, 1816) was an American statesman who represented Pennsylvania in the Constitutional Convention of 1787 and was an author of large sections of the Constitution of the United States. ... For other persons named Robert Morris, see Robert Morris (disambiguation). ... William Paterson William Paterson (December 24, 1745–September 9, 1806) was a New Jersey statesman, a signer of the United States Constitution, and an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. ... Charles Cotesworth (C.C.) Pinckney (February 5, 1746 – August 16, 1825), was an early American statesman and a signer of the U.S. Constitution. ... Charles Pinckney Charles Pinckney (October 26, 1757–October 29, 1824) was an American politician who was a signer of the United States Constitution, Governor of South Carolina, a Senator and a member of the House of Representatives. ... George Read (September 18, 1733 – September 21, 1798) was an American lawyer and politician from New Castle, in New Castle County, Delaware. ... This article is about the Governor and Chief Justice of the United States. ... Gov. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Hugh Williamson Hugh Williamson (December 5, 1735–May 22, 1819) was an American politician. ... For other persons named James Wilson, see James Wilson (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 495 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (3629 × 4392 pixel, file size: 1. ...

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Roger Sherman Inn - History - inn, lodging, bed and breakfast, New Canaan, CT (92 words)
Roger Sherman Inn - History - inn, lodging, bed and breakfast, New Canaan, CT The Inn is named for Roger Sherman whose niece, Martha Sherman, lived in the house from its building in 1783 until 1806.
Her father, the Reverend Josiah Sherman was a chaplain during the Revolutionary War.
Roger Sherman (see his portrait at upper left), a lawyer and delegate from Connecticut to the Continental Congress, had the distinction of being the only person to sign all four of these historical American documents:
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