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Encyclopedia > Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March

Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March (25 April 128729 November 1330) an English nobleman of the fourteenth century, was for three years de facto ruler of England, after leading a successful rebellion against Edward II. He was himself overthrown by Edward's son, Edward III. Mortimer was also the lover of Edward II's wife, Isabella of France, who assisted him in the deposition of her husband. is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Construction of the Uppsala Cathedral began in 1287. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events The Bulgars under Michael III are beaten by the Serbs at Velbuzhd, and large parts of Bulgaria fall to Serbia. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Edward II, (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327), of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until deposed in January, 1327. ... This article is about the King of England. ... Isabella returns to England with her son, Edward III. Jean Fouquet, 1455x1460. ...

Contents

Early life and family history

Mortimer, grandson of Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Wigmore, was born at Wigmore Castle, Herefordshire, England, the firstborn of Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Wigmore and his wife, Margaret de Fiennes. Edmund Mortimer had been a second son, intended for clerical work, but on the sudden death of his elder brother, Edmund was recalled from Oxford University and installed as heir. As a boy, Roger was probably sent to be fostered in the household of his formidable uncle, Roger Mortimer of Chirk. It was this uncle who had carried the head of Llywelyn the Last to King Edward I in 1282. Roger Mortimer (1231-1282), 1st Baron Wigmore, was the son of Ralph de Mortimer and his wife, Gwladus Ddu - daughter of Llywelyn the Great. ... Part of the ruins of Wigmore Castle Wigmore Castle (O.S. Map 137, 407693) is a ruined castle which is barely visible from the village of Wigmore in the northwest region of Herefordshire, England. ... Herefordshire is a historic and ceremonial county and unitary district (known as County of Herefordshire) in the West Midlands region of England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Wigmore (1251-July 17, 1304) was the second son and eventual heir of Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Wigmore. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Arms used by Llywelyn ap Gruffydd Llywelyn ap Gruffydd or Llywelyn Ein Llyw Olaf (c. ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver or the English Justinian because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and tried to do the same to Scotland. ...


Like many noble children of his time, Roger was married young, to Joan de Geneville, the daughter of a neighbouring lordship. They were married in 1301, and immediately began a family. Through his marriage with Joan de Geneville, Roger not only acquired increased possessions on the Welsh marches, including the important Ludlow Castle, which became the chief stronghold of the Mortimers, but also extensive estates and influence in Ireland. However, Joan de Geneville was not an "heiress" at marriage. Her grandfather, Geoffrey de Geneville conveyed most, but not all, of his Irish lordships at age 80 in 1308, to Roger Mortimer, and then retired, notably alive - he finally died in 1314. Geoffrey also conveyed much of his legacy, such as Kenlys, during his lifetime, to his younger son (the older son Piers having died in 1292), Simon de Geneville, who had meanwhile become Baron of Culmullin, through marriage to Joanna FitzLeon. Roger Mortimer therefore succeeded to the Lordship of Trim (which later reverted to the Crown). He did not succeed however to the Lordship of Fingal, which descended firstly to Simon de Geneville (whose son Laurence predeceased him), and thence through his heiress daughter Elizabeth to her husband William de Loundres, and next through their heiress daughter, also Elizabeth, to Sir Christopher Preston, and finally to the Viscounts Gormanston. This article is about the country. ... Ludlow Castles gatehouse Ludlow Castle is a large, now ruined castle which dominates the town of Ludlow in Shropshire, England. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Swords Code: D (FL proposed) Area: 448. ... Gormanston is a town in Tasmania on the slopes of Mount Owen, above the town of Queenstown in Tasmanias West Coast. ...


Roger Mortimer's childhood came to an abrupt end when Lord Wigmore was mortally wounded in a skirmish near Builth in July 1304. Since Roger was underage at the death of his father, he was placed by King Edward I under the guardianship of Piers Gaveston, and was knighted by Edward in 1306. In that year also Roger was endowed as Baron Wigmore, and came into his full inheritance. His adult life began in earnest. Builth Wells (Welsh: Llanfair ym Muallt) is a town in Powys, traditional county of Brecknockshire, mid Wales, lying on the River Wye. ... Piers Gaveston, 1st Earl of Cornwall (c. ...


Military adventures in Ireland, Wales

In 1308 he went to Ireland in person, to enforce his authority. This brought him into conflict with the de Lacys, who turned for support to Edward Bruce, brother of Robert Bruce, king of Scotland. Mortimer was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland by Edward II. In 1316, at the head of a large army, he drove Bruce to Carrickfergus and the de Lacys into Connaught, wreaking vengeance on their adherents whenever they were to be found. crest of de Lacy Lacy´s purple lion De Lacy (Lascy, Lacie) is an old Norman noble family originating from Lassy (Calvados). ... // Edward Bruce (Edubard a Briuis as he was known in medieval Gaelic), (c. ... Robert I, King of Scots (Mediaeval Gaelic:Roibert a Briuis; modern Scottish Gaelic: Raibeart Bruis; Norman French: Robert de Brus or Robert de Bruys; 11 July 1274 – 7 June 1329), usually known in modern English as Robert the Bruce, was King of Scotland from 1306 until his death in 1329. ... Edward II, (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327), of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until deposed in January, 1327. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Carrickfergus Borough UK Parliament: East Antrim European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling Code: 028, +44 28 Post Town: Carrickfergus Postal District(s): BT38 Population (2005) 32,668 Carrickfergus (from the Irish: Carraig Fhearghais meaning Rock of Fergus) is a large town in... Statistics Area: 17,713. ...


He was then occupied for some years with baronial disputes on the Welsh border until about 1318.


Opposition to Edward II

In 1318, Mortimer joined the growing opposition to Edward II and the Despensers, and he supported Humphrey de Bohun, 4th earl of Hereford, in refusing to obey the king’s summons to appear before him in 1321. The execution of Hugh, the younger Despenser, from a manuscript of Froissart. ... Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford (1276 – March 16, 1322) was a member of an important Norman family of the Welsh Marches. ...


Forced to surrender to the king at Shrewsbury in January 1322, Mortimer was consigned to the Tower of London, but escaped to France in August 1324. In the following year Queen Isabella, wife of Edward II, anxious to escape from her husband, obtained his consent to her going to France to use her influence with her brother, King Charles IV, in favour of peace. At the French court the queen found Roger Mortimer; she became his mistress soon afterwards, and at his instigation refused to return to England so long as the Despensers retained power as the king’s favourites. This article is about the town of Shrewsbury in England. ... For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is an historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ... Isabella returns to England with her son, Edward III. Jean Fouquet, 1455x1460. ... Charles IV of France, also Charles I of Navarre, called the Fair (French: le Bel) (11 December 1294 – 1 February 1328), was the King of France and Navarre and Count of Champagne from 1322 to his death: the last French king of the senior Capetian lineage. ...


Invasion of England and defeat of Edward II

The scandal of Isabella’s relations with Mortimer compelled them both to withdraw from the French court to Flanders, where they obtained assistance for an invasion of England. Landing in England in September 1326, they were joined by Henry, Earl of Lancaster; London rose in support of the queen, and Edward took flight to the west, pursued by Mortimer and Isabella. For other uses, see Flanders (disambiguation). ... Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


After wandering helplessly for some weeks in Wales, the king was taken prisoner on 16 November, and was compelled to abdicate in favour of his son. Though the latter was crowned as Edward III on January 25, 1327, the country was ruled by Mortimer and Isabella, who were widely believed to have arranged the murder of Edward II in the following September at Berkeley Castle. A asses is a ceremony marking the investment of a monarch with regal power through, amongst other symbolic acts, the placement of a crown upon his or her head. ... This article is about the King of England. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 25 - Edward III becomes King of England. ... Edward II, (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327), of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until deposed in January, 1327. ... Berkeley Castle in 1712. ...


Powers won and lost

Rich estates and offices of profit and power were now heaped on Mortimer. He was made constable of Wallingford Castle, and in September 1328 he was created Earl of March. However, although in military terms he was far more competent than the Despensers, his ambition was troubling to all. His own son, Geoffrey, mocked him as "the king of folly." During his short time as ruler of England he took over lordship of Denbigh, Oswestry, and Clun (all of which previously belonged to the Earl of Arundel). He was also granted the marcher lordship over Montgomery by the Queen. Wallingford Castle 1913. ... The title Earl of March has been created several times in the Peerage of Scotland and the Peerage of England. ...

The "Tyburn Tree"

The jealousy and anger of many nobles was aroused by Mortimer's use of power but no action was taken. Then, in March of 1330, Mortimer ordered the execution of Edmund, Earl of Kent, the half-brother of Edward II. After this execution Henry Lancaster prevailed upon the young king, Edward III, to assert his independence. In October 1330, a Parliament was called in Nottingham (just days before Edward's 18th birthday) and Mortimer and Queen Isabella were seized by Edward and his companions from inside Nottingham Castle. In spite of Isabella’s entreaty to her son, "Fair son, have pity on the gentle Mortimer," Mortimer was conveyed to the Tower. Image File history File links The Tyburn Tree File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links The Tyburn Tree File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Edmund Plantagenet, or Edmund of Woodstock (August 5, 1301 – March 19, 1330) was Earl of Kent from July 28, 1321 (1st creation). ...


Accused of assuming royal power and of various other high misdemeanours, he was condemned without trial and hanged at Tyburn on 29 November 1330, his vast estates being forfeited to the crown. Mortimer's widow, Joan, received a pardon in 1336 and survived till 1356. She was buried beside Mortimer at Wigmore, but the site was later destroyed. Misdemeanors are lesser criminal acts which are generally punished less severely than felonies; but more so than infractions. ... Hanging is the suspension of a person by a ligature, usually a cord wrapped around the neck, causing death. ... Tyburn was a former village in the county of Middlesex close to the current location of Marble Arch. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events The Bulgars under Michael III are beaten by the Serbs at Velbuzhd, and large parts of Bulgaria fall to Serbia. ...


Children of Roger and Joan

  • Edmund Mortimer (13021331), married Elizabeth de Badlesmore, they had Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March, who was restored to his grandfather’s title.
  • Margaret Mortimer (13041337), married Thomas de Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley
  • Maud Mortimer (1307 – aft. 1345), married John de Charlton, Lord of Powys
  • Geoffrey Mortimer (1309 – 1372/6)
  • John Mortimer (13101328)
  • Joan Mortimer (c. 1312 – 1337/51), married James Audley, 2nd Baron Audley
  • Isabella Mortimer (c. 1313 – aft. 1327)
  • Catherine Mortimer (c. 13141369), married Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick
  • Agnes Mortimer (c. 13171368), married Laurence Hastings, 1st Earl of Pembroke
  • Beatrice Mortimer (c. 13191383), married (1) Edward, 2nd Earl of Norfolk; (2) Thomas de Braose, 1st Baron Braose
  • Blanche Mortimer (c. 13211347), married Peter de Grandison, 2nd Baron Grandison

Events July 11 - Battle of the Golden Spurs (Guldensporenslag in Dutch), major victory of Flanders over the French occupier. ... Events September 8 - Stefan Dusan declares himself king of Serbia Start of the reign of Emperor Kogon of Japan, first of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders Births Coluccio Salutati, Florentine political leader (died 1406) Deaths January 14 - Odoric, Italian explorer October 27 - Abulfeda, Arab historian and geographer (born 1273) Categories: 1331... Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March (1328 - February 26, 1360) was an English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years War. ... Events 20 July - Fall of Stirling Castle: Edward I of England takes the last rebel stronghold in the Wars of Scottish Independence. ... // March 16 - Edward, the Black Prince is created Duke of Cornwall. ... January 18 - German king Albrecht I makes his son Rudolf king of Bohemia. ... Events Miracle of the Host Births October 31 - King Fernando I of Portugal (died 1383) Agnès of Valois, daughter of John II of France (died 1349) Eleanor Maltravers, English noblewoman (died 1405) Deaths April 14 - Richard Aungerville, English writer and bishop (born 1287) September 16 - John IV, Duke of... Events August 15 - The city of Rhodes surrenders to the forces of the Knights of St. ... [edit] Events May 11 - In France, 64 members of the Knights Templar are burned at the stake for heresy Abulfeda becomes governor of Hama. ... Events Augustiner brew Munich May 1 - Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton - England recognises Scotland as an independent nation after the Wars of Scottish Independence May 12 - Nicholas V is consecrated at St Peters Basilica in Rome by the bishop of Venice. ... Events June 15 : Battle near Rozgoni Battle near Thebes Siege of Rostock begins Births November 13 - King Edward III of England Deaths June 19 - Piers Gaveston, favourite of Edward II of England September 7 - King Ferdinand IV of Castile Categories: 1312 ... Events Siege of Rostock ends Foundation year of the Order of the Rose Cross (Rosicrucian Order), according to the Rosicrucian Fellowship. ... Events January 25 - Edward III becomes King of England. ... Events June 24 - Battle of Bannockburn. ... Events King Charles V of France renounces the treaty of Brétigny and war is declared between France and England. ... Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick KG (14 February 1313 – November 13, 1369) was an English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years War. ... Events The Great Famine of 1315-1317. ... Events Timur ascends throne of Samarkand. ... Laurence de Hastings, 1st Earl of Pembroke (20 March 1319 – 20 August 1348) was a Norman English nobleman and held the titles 1st Earl of Pembroke (3rd creation), Baron Abergavenny and Baron Hastings. ... Events Magnus VII ascends the throne of Norway and unites the country with Sweden. ... Year 1383 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Events Births September 29 - John of Artois, Count of Eu, French soldier (d. ... Illustration of the Black Death from the Toggenburg Bible (1411). ...

Sources

  • Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 By Frederick Lewis Weis; Lines: 10-31, 29-32, 29-33, 39-31, 47B-33, 71-33, 71A-32, 120-33, 176B-32, 263-31
  • The Greatest Traitor, by Ian Mortimer, 2003.
  • Calendar of the Gormanston Register (ed. Mills/McEnery), Dublin, 1916.
  • Preston Genealogy, by Sir Thomas Wentworth, May 1636 (MS 10,208, National Library, Dublin)

External links

  • Wigmore Castle
Peerage of England
Preceded by
New Creation
Earl of March
1328–1330
Succeeded by
Forfeit
(restored in 1348
for Roger Mortimer)
Preceded by
Edmund Mortimer
Baron Wigmore
1304–1330

  Results from FactBites:
 
Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1050 words)
Roger was the eldest son and first child born to Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Wigmore, by his wife, Margaret de Fiennes.
As a boy, Roger was probably sent to be fostered in the household of his formidable uncle, Roger Mortimer of Chirk.
Since Roger was underage at the death of his father, Edmund Mortimer, he was placed by Edward I under the guardianship of Piers Gaveston, and was knighted by Edward in 1306.
Roger Mortimer (342 words)
Roger Mortimer (or Roger de Mortimer) was the name of several Marcher lords, a powerful Norman family living on the borders of England and Wales in the 13th and 14th centuries.
Roger Mortimer (~1256-1326), son of the above, was Justice of Wales under King Edward II of England.
Roger Mortimer (1374-1398), 4th Earl of March, was descended through his mother from King Edward III, and for this reason was named by the childless King Richard II of England as his heir.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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