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Encyclopedia > Roger McGuinn

James Roger McGuinn (known professionally as Roger McGuinn and born James Joseph McGuinn III on July 13, 1942) is a popular rock American singer-songwriter and guitarist of the 1960s and 1970s. He is best known for being the lead singer and lead guitarist on many of The Byrds' hit records, the pioneering folk-rock band of the 1960s, contributing much to the band's unique sound. is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1964) were an American rock band. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Early life/music career

Roger McGuinn was born and raised in Chicago, Illinois. His parents, James and Dorothy, were involved in journalism and public relations, and during his childhood penned a bestseller titled Parents Can't Win. He attended The Latin School of Chicago. He became interested in music after hearing Elvis Presley's "Heartbreak Hotel," and asked his parents to buy him a guitar. In the early 1980s, he paid tribute to the song that encouraged him to pick up the guitar that he credited "Heartbreak Hotel" to his autobiographical show. Around the same time, he was also influenced by country artists and/or groups such as, Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins, Gene Vincent and The Everly Brothers. Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Latin School of Chicago is a private elementary, middle and high school in the Gold Coast neighborhood in Chicago. ... Elvis Aron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), often known simply as Elvis and also called The King of Rock n Roll or simply The King, was an American singer, musician and actor. ... For the Whitney Houston song, see Heartbreak Hotel (Whitney Houston song). ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... It has been suggested that Johnny Cash family be merged into this article or section. ... Carl Lee Perkins (April 9, 1932 – January 19, 1998) was an American pioneer of rockabilly music, a mix of rhythm and blues and country music that was recorded most notably at Sun Records in Memphis beginning in 1954. ... Gene Vincent, real name Vincent Eugene Craddock, (February 11, 1935 – October 12, 1971) was an American rockabilly pioneer musician, best known for his hit Be-Bop-A-Lula. // His parents, Ezekiah Jackson and Mary Louise Craddock, were shop owners in Norfolk, Virginia. ... Phil (left) and Don in 1962 The Everly Brothers, (Don Everly, born Isaac Donald Everly February 1, 1937, Brownie, Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, Phil Everly, born Phillip Everly, January 19, 1939, Chicago, Illinois) are male siblings who were top-selling country-influenced rock and roll performers, best known for their steel...


In 1957, he enrolled as a student at Chicago's Old Town School of Folk Music, where he mastered the five-string banjo and continued to hone his guitar skills. After graduation, McGuinn performed solo at various coffeehouses on the folk music circuit where he was discovered and hired as a sideman by folk groups like the Limeliters, the Chad Mitchell Trio, and Judy Collins. He also played guitar and sang backup harmonies for Bobby Darin. Soon after, he moved to the West Coast, winding up in Los Angeles, where he eventually met the future members of The Byrds. Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... The Old Town School of Folk Music is a Chicago teaching and performing institution that launched the careers of many notable folk music artists. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument of African American origin adapted from several African instruments. ... Coffeehouse in Damascus // A coffeehouse, coffee shop, or cafe (also spelled as café from the French, Spanish, and Portuguese or caffè from the Italian) shares some of the characteristics of a bar, and some of the characteristics of a restaurant. ... Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the... A sideman is a professional musician who is hired to perform or record with a group of which he is not formally a member. ... The Limeliters are a folk music group formed in July 1959 by Lou Gottlieb (bass), Alex Hassilev (baritone), and Glenn Yarbrough (tenor). ... The Chad Mitchell Trio was a popular folk music group during the 1960s. ... Judy Collins Judith Marjorie Collins (born May 1, 1939 in Seattle, Washington) is an American folk and standards singer. ... Bobby Darin (May 14, 1936 – December 20, 1973) (born Walden Robert Cassotto) was one of the most popular American big band performers and rock and roll teen idols of the late 1950s. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1964) were an American rock band. ...


In 1962, after he left the Chad Mitchell Trio, Bobby Darin hired him to be a backup guitarist and harmony singer. Around that time, he wanted to add some folk to his roots thinking it was a burgeoning musical field. About a year and a half after he began to play guitar and sing with Darin, Darin lost his voice and retired from singing. Bobby opened T.M. Music in New York City's Brill Building, hiring McGuinn as a song writer for $35 a week. In 1963, just one year before he cofounded the Byrds, he was a studio musician in New York City, recording with Judy Collins and Simon and Garfunkel. At the same time, he was hearing of The Beatles, and wondered whether Beatlemania might affect folk music. When Doug Weston gave McGuinn a job in Los Angeles, at the Troubadour, McGuinn had seasoned his act with most of the Beatles songs, therefore, he would turn his attention to another folkie who was also a Beatle fan, Gene Clark, to join forces with McGuinn in The Byrds, in July of 1964. Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chad Mitchell Trio was a popular folk music group during the 1960s. ... Bobby Darin (May 14, 1936 – December 20, 1973) (born Walden Robert Cassotto) was one of the most popular American big band performers and rock and roll teen idols of the late 1950s. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Brill Building (1930- ) in the United States is located at 1619 Broadway, in New York City, New York, just north of Times Square. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Judy Collins Judith Marjorie Collins (born May 1, 1939 in Seattle, Washington) is an American folk and standards singer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... The Beatles arrival at Americas JFK Airport in 1964 has proved a particularly enduring image of Beatlemania. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... For other uses, see Gene Clark (disambiguation). ... The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1964) were an American rock band. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ...


During his time with the Byrds, McGuinn developed two innovative and highly influential styles of electric guitar playing: "jingle-jangle" -- generating ringing arpeggios based on banjo finger picking styles he learned while at the Old Town School -- and, secondly, a merging of saxophonist John Coltrane's free-jazz atonalities which hinted at the droning of the sitar, a style of playing first heard on the Byrds' 1966 single "Eight Miles High". Various arpeggios as seen on a staff Notation of a chord in arpeggio In music, an arpeggio is a broken chord where the notes are played or sung in succession rather than simultaneously. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument of African American origin adapted from several African instruments. ... “Coltrane” redirects here. ... Diagram of some sitar parts. ... Eight Miles High is a song by Gene Clark, Jim McGuinn, and David Crosby, first appearing as a single from 1966 by the rock band The Byrds. ...


While tracking the Byrds' first single, "Mr. Tambourine Man," at Columbia studios, McGuinn discovered a key ingredient of his signature sound. "The 'Rick' by itself is kind of thuddy," he notes. "It doesn't ring. But if you add a compressor, you get that long sustain. To be honest, I found this by accident. The engineer, Ray Gerhardt, would run compressors on everything to protect his precious equipment from loud rock and roll . He compressed the heck out of my 12-string, and it sounded so great we decided to use two tube compressors [likely Teletronix LA-2As] in series, and then go directly into the board. That's how I got my 'jingle-jangle' tone. It's really squashed down, but it jumps out from the radio. With compression, I found I could hold a note for three or four seconds, and sound more like a wind instrument. Later, this led me to emulate John Coltrane's saxophone on 'Eight Miles High.' Without compression, I couldn't have sustained the riff's first note." Mr. ... Mod revivalist band The Jams Bruce Foxton (left) on a Rickenbacker bass and Paul Weller on a Rickenbacker guitar Rickenbacker International Corporation, also known as Rickenbacker (IPA pronunciation: ) [1]), is an electric guitar manufacturer, notable for having invented the first electric guitar during the 1930s. ... Audio level compression, also called dynamic range compression, volume compression, compression, limiting, or DRC (often seen in DVD player settings) is a process that manipulates the dynamic range of an audio signal. ... Sustain is a parameter of musical sound in time. ... Audio engineering is a part of audio science dealing with the recording and reproduction of sound through mechanical and electronic means. ... Structure of a vacuum tube diode Structure of a vacuum tube triode In electronics, a vacuum tube, electron tube, or (outside North America) thermionic valve or just valve, is a device used to amplify, switch or modify a signal by controlling the movement of electrons in an evacuated space. ... BBC Local Radio Mark III radio mixing desk In professional audio, a mixing console, digital mixing console, mixing desk (Brit. ... A wind instrument is a musical instrument that contains some type of resonator (usually a tube), in which a column of air is set into vibration by the player blowing into (or over) a mouthpiece set at the end of the resonator. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored instrument of the woodwind family. ... Eight Miles High is a song by Gene Clark, Jim McGuinn, and David Crosby, first appearing as a single from 1966 by the rock band The Byrds. ...


"I practiced eight hours a day on that 'Rick'," he continues, "I really worked it. In those days, acoustic 12s had wide necks and thick strings that were spaced pretty far apart, so they were hard to play. But the Rick's slim neck and low action let me explore jazz and blues scales up and down the fretboard, and incorporate more hammer-ons and pull-offs into my solos. I also translated some of my banjo picking techniques to the 12-string. By combining a flat pick with metal finger picks on my middle and ring fingers, I discovered I could instantly switch from fast single-note runs to banjo rolls and get the best of both worlds." (Redirected from 12 string guitar) The twelve string guitar is an acoustic or electric guitar with twelve strings, which produces a richer, more ringing tone than a standard six string guitar. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Blues is a vocal and instrumental musical form which evolved from African American spirituals, shouts, work songs and chants and has its earliest stylistic roots in West Africa. ... Fretted guitar fingerboard Fretless violin fingerboard The fingerboard, (also known as a fretboard on fretted instruments), is a part of most stringed instruments. ... Hammer-on is a stringed instrument playing technique performed (especially on guitar) by sharply bringing a fretting-hand finger down on the fingerboard behind a fret, causing a note to sound. ... A pull-off is a stringed-instrument playing technique performed (usually on an electric guitar) by pulling a fretting finger off the fingerboard. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument of African American origin adapted from several African instruments. ... Various guitar picks A plectrum is a small flat tool used to pluck or strum a stringed instrument. ... A fingerpick is a type of plectrum used most commonly for playing bluegrass style banjo music. ...


Another sound that McGuinn developed is made by playing a seven string guitar, featuring a doubled G-string (with the second string tuned an octave higher). The C. F. Martin guitar company has even released a special edition called the HD7 Roger McGuinn Signature Edition, that claims to capture McGuinn's signature "jingle-jangle" tone which he created with 12 string guitars, while maintaining the ease of playing a 6-string. The Martin logo. ...


In 1968 he helped create the groundbreaking Byrds album Sweetheart of the Rodeo, to which many attribute the rise in popularity of country rock. After the break-up of the Byrds, McGuinn released several solo albums, and later toured with Bob Dylan during his 1975 and 1976 "Rolling Thunder Revue" and opened for Dylan and Tom Petty in 1987. Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sweetheart of the Rodeo is an album by American country rock band The Byrds, released on July 29, 1968 (see 1968 in music). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Eric Anderson in October 1975 The Rolling Thunder Revue was a tour headed by Bob Dylan in the fall of 1975 and the spring of 1976. ... Thomas Earl Tom Petty (born October 20, 1950) is a singer and guitarist. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ...


In 1978, McGuinn joined fellow ex-Byrds Gene Clark and Chris Hillman to form "McGuinn, Clark and Hillman", and the band released its debut album with Capitol Records in 1979. The media loved the band and they performed on many TV rock shows, including repeated performances on The Midnight Special, where they played both new material and Byrds hits. "Don't You Write Her Off" reached #33 in April 1979. While some feel that the slick production and disco rhythms didn't flatter the group, and the album had mixed reviews both critically and commercially, it sold enough to generate a follow up. McGuinn, Clark and Hillman's second release was to have been a full group effort entitled "City", but a combination of Clark's unreliabilty and his dissatisfaction with their musical direction (mostly regarding Ron and Howard Albert's production) resulted in the billing change on their next LP "City" to "Roger McGuinn and Chris Hillman, featuring Gene Clark". By 1981 Clark had left and the group briefly continued as "McGuinn/Hillman."[1] For other uses, see Gene Clark (disambiguation). ... Chris Hillman on the cover of his album The Other Side (2005) Chris Hillman (born Christopher Hillman December 4, 1944, in Los Angeles, California), was one of the original members of The Byrds (1965) with Roger McGuinn, Gene Clark, David Crosby, and Michael Clarke. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the...


McGuinn currently tours as a solo artist.


Roger McGuinn has used the World Wide Web to continue the folk tradition since November 1995 by recording a different folk song each month on his Folk Den site. The songs are made available from his web site and a selection (with guest vocalists) was released on CD as Treasures from the Folk Den. In November 2005 McGuinn released a four-CD box set containing one hundred of his favorite songs from the Folk Den. WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents accessed via the Internet. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... A compact disc or CD is an optical disc used to store digital data, originally developed for storing digital audio. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On July 11, 2000, McGuinn testified before in a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on downloading music from the Internet that artists do not always receive the royalties that (non-Internet based) record companies state in contracts, and that to date, The Byrds had not received any royalties for their biggest hits, "Mr. Tambourine Man" and "Turn, Turn, Turn"—they only received advances, which were split five ways and amounted to just "a few thousand dollars" per bandmember. He also stated that he was receiving 50 percent royalties from MP3.com.[2] is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... MP3. ...


Religious faith and name changes

In 1965, McGuinn joined the Subud spiritual association and practiced the latihan, an exercise in which he opened himself up to receiving spiritual guidance through the quieting of his mind. McGuinn changed his name in 1967 after Subud's founder Bapak told him it would better "vibrate with the universe." Bapak sent Jim the letter "R" and asked him to send back ten names starting with that letter. Owing to a fascination with airplanes, gadgets and science fiction, he sent names like "Rocket," "Retro," "Ramjet," and "Roger," the latter a term used in signalling protocol over two-way radios, military and civil aviation. Roger was the only "real" name in the bunch and Bapak picked it. While using the name Roger professionally from that time on, McGuinn only officially changed his middle name from Joseph to Roger. Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Subud (pronounced IPA: ) is an international spiritual association of people of all religions as well as people with no religious affiliation. ... The Latihan (from Bahasa Indonesian latihan kejiwaan, meaning spiritual exercise) is the main practice of Subud. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Subud (pronounced IPA: ) is an international spiritual association of people of all religions as well as people with no religious affiliation. ... Muhammad Subuh Sumohadiwidjojo (1901-1987), known as Bapak or Pak Subuh to his followers, was a Javanese Muslim who founded the spiritual movement Subud in the period 1924 to 1933. ... Muhammad Subuh Sumohadiwidjojo (1901-1987), known as Bapak or Pak Subuh to his followers, was a Javanese Muslim who founded the spiritual movement Subud in the period 1924 to 1933. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Voice procedure includes various techniques used to clarify, simplify and standardize spoken communications over two-way radios, in use by the military, in civil aviation, police and fire dispatching systems, citizens band radio (CB), etc. ... Civil airliner - Air India Boeing 747-400 Civil aviation is one of two major categories of flying, representing all non-Military aviation, both private and commercial. ... Muhammad Subuh Sumohadiwidjojo (1901-1987), known as Bapak or Pak Subuh to his followers, was a Javanese Muslim who founded the spiritual movement Subud in the period 1924 to 1933. ...


In 1977 McGuinn became a born-again Christian. Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Born again is a term used originally and mainly in Christianity, where it is associated with salvation, conversion and spiritual rebirth. ...


Discography

  • Roger McGuinn (1973)
  • Peace on You (1974)
  • Roger McGuinn and Band (1975)
  • Cardiff Rose (1976)
  • Thunderbyrd (1977)
  • Back from Rio (1990)
  • Born to Rock & Roll (1992)
  • Live from Mars (1996)
  • McGuinn's Folk Den (4 volumes) (2000)
  • Treasures from the Folk Den (2001)
  • Back to New York (2002)
  • Live from Electric Lady Land (2002)
  • Limited Edition (2004)
  • The Folk Den Project (2005)
  • Live From Spain (2007)

Roger McGuinn was Roger McGuinns first full-length solo album, released in 1973. ... Peace on You was Roger McGuinns second full-length solo album, released in 1974. ... Roger McGuinn and Band was Roger McGuinns third full-length solo album, released in 1975. ... James Roger McGuinn (known professionally as Roger McGuinn and born James Joseph McGuinn III on July 13, 1942) is a popular rock American singer-songwriter and guitarist of the 1960s and 1970s. ...

Cardiff Rose, 1976

Cardiff Rose (1976)[1], produced by Mick Ronson, was done on the heels of Bob Dylan's "Rolling Thunder Review" tour in 1975 which McGuinn had participated in. The album includes a pirate tale "Jolly Roger", a song about King Arthur's "Round Table", and a classic version of Joni Mitchell's "Dreamland". This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Joni Mitchell, CC (born Roberta Joan Anderson on November 7, 1943) is a Canadian musician, songwriter, and painter. ...

  1. Take Me Away
  2. Jolly Roger
  3. Rock and Roll Time
  4. Friend
  5. Partners in Crime
  6. Up to Me
  7. Round Table
  8. Pretty Polly
  9. Dreamland
  10. Soul Love (demo recording)
  11. Dreamland (live)

Thunderbyrd, 1977

  1. All Night Long
  2. It's Gone
  3. Dixie Highway
  4. American Girl
  5. We Can Do It All Over Again
  6. Why Baby Why
  7. I'm Not Lonely Anymore
  8. Golden Loom
  9. Russian Hill

Back from Rio, 1990

  1. Someone To Love
  2. Car Phone
  3. You Bowed Down
  4. Suddenly Blue
  5. The Trees Are All Gone
  6. King Of The Hill
  7. Without Your Love
  8. The Time Has Come
  9. Your Love Is A Gold Mine (Back From Rio) - feat. David Crosby
  10. If We Never Meet Again

Born to Rock & Roll, 1992

  1. I'm So Restless
  2. My New Woman
  3. Draggin'
  4. The Water Is Wide
  5. Same Old Sound
  6. Bag Full Of Money
  7. Gate of Horn
  8. Peace On You
  9. Lover Of The Bayou
  10. Stone (The Lord Loves A Rolling Stone)
  11. Lisa
  12. Take Me Away
  13. Jolly Roger
  14. Friend
  15. Dreamland
  16. Dixie Highway
  17. American Girl
  18. Up To Me
  19. Russian Hill
  20. Born To Rock And Roll

References

  1. ^ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gene_Clark
  2. ^ http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0007/11/se.01.html

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Roger McGuinn (778 words)
McGuinn, a Chicago native, studied at the Old Town School of Folk Music and was active on Chicago's folk scene, where he was strongly influenced as a teenager by Bob Gibson.
Roger McGuinn disbanded the Byrds in 1973 to pursue his dream of a solo career.
McGuinn Clark and Hillman and Crosby McGuinn and Hillman photos by Henry Diltz from the Under the Covers CD-ROM (used by permission).
Roger McGuinn - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (279 words)
James Roger McGuinn (born July 13, 1942) is an American singer-songwriter, who was born as James Joseph McGuinn III in Chicago, Illinois.
McGuinn is best known for being the frontman of The Byrds, the pioneering folk-rock band of the 1960's, in which he played a Rickenbacker 360-12 electric 12 string guitar, contributing much to the band's unique sound.
McGuinn toured with Bob Dylan during his 1975 and 1976 Rolling Thunder Revue and opened for Dylan and Tom Petty in 1987.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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