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Encyclopedia > Roger Ebert
Roger Ebert

Russ Meyer (left) and Roger Ebert (right) (1970)
Born June 18, 1942 (1942-06-18) (age 65)
Urbana, Illinois, U.S.
Occupation Film critic
Nationality American
Subjects Film
Website RogerEbert.com

Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. Download high resolution version (1057x1311, 267 KB)Russ Meyer and Roger Ebert File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For the baseball player, see Russ Meyer (baseball player). ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A snowy day in Carle Park west of the Urbana High School. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article is about work. ... Film criticism is the analysis and evaluation of films, individually and collectively. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Film criticism is the analysis and evaluation of films, individually and collectively. ...


He is known for his weekly review column (appearing in the Chicago Sun-Times since 1967, and later online)[1] and for the television program Siskel & Ebert at the Movies, which he co-hosted for 23 years with Gene Siskel. After Siskel's death in 1999, he auditioned several potential replacements but ultimately chose Richard Roeper to fill the open chair and the program was retitled Ebert & Roeper and the Movies in 2000. The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ... A television program (US), television programme (UK) or simply television show is a segment of programming in television broadcasting. ... Eugene Gene Kal Siskel (January 26, 1946 – February 20, 1999) was one of the worlds most successful film critics. ... Richard Roeper (born October 17, 1959)[1] is a columnist/film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times and, since September of 2000, has co-hosted the television series At the Movies with Ebert & Roeper with fellow film critic Roger Ebert. ... At the Movies with Ebert & Roeper is a movie review television program featuring film critic Roger Ebert and columnist Richard Roeper, both of the Chicago Sun-Times. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ...


Ebert's movie reviews are syndicated to more than 200 newspapers in the United States and abroad. He has written more than 15 books, including his annual movie yearbook. In 1975, Ebert became the first film critic to win a Pulitzer Prize for Criticism. His television programs have also been widely syndicated, and have been nominated for Emmy awards. In February 1995, a section of Chicago's Erie Street near the CBS Studios was given the honorary name Siskel & Ebert Way. Ebert was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in June 2005, the first professional film critic to receive one. Roger Ebert was named as the most influential pundit in America by Forbes Magazine, beating the likes of Bill Maher, Lou Dobbs, and Bill O'Reilly.[2] He has honorary degrees from the University of Colorado, the American Film Institute, and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Print Syndication is a form of syndication in which news articles, columns, or comic strips are made available to newspapers and magazines. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Criticism has been presented since 1970 to a newspaper writer who has demonstrated distinguished criticism. Recipients of the award are chosen by an independent board and officially administered by Columbia University. ... An Emmy Award. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City 234. ... CBS (formerly an acronym for Columbia Broadcasting System) is a major television network and radio broadcaster in the United States. ... Buskers perform on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... An honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum, not to be confused with an honors degree) is an academic degree awarded to an individual as a decoration, rather than as the result of matriculating and studying for several years. ... The University of Colorado at Boulder (CU-Boulder, UCB officially[3]; Colorado and CU colloquially) is the flagship university of the University of Colorado System in Boulder, Colorado. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The School of the Art Institute of Chicago is a fine arts college located in Chicago, Illinois. ...


Since 1994 he has written a Great Movies series of individual reviews of what he deems to be the most important films of all time. Since 1999 he has hosted the annual Roger Ebert's Overlooked Film Festival in Champaign, Illinois. Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... The year 1999 in film involved some significant events. ... Roger Eberts Overlooked Film Festival, commonly referred to as Ebertfest, is a film festival held each April in Champaign, Illinois organized by the College of Communications at the University of Illinois. ... Champaign is a city in Champaign County, Illinois, in the United States. ...

Contents

Early life

Ebert was born in Urbana, Illinois to Annabel (Stumm) and Walter H. Ebert.[3] His paternal grandparents were German immigrants.[4] His interest in journalism began as a student at Urbana High School, where he was a sports writer for The News-Gazette in Champaign, Illinois. However, he began his writing career with letters of comment to the science fiction fanzines of the era.[1] In his senior year he was co-editor of his high school newspaper, The Echo. A snowy day in Carle Park west of the Urbana High School. ... Champaign is a city in Champaign County, Illinois, in the United States. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... A fanzine (also called a zine) is an amateur publication created by fans of a particular cultural phenomena (such as a literary genre or type of music) to address or correspond with others who share their interest. ...


In 1958, Ebert won the Illinois High School Association state speech championship in Radio Speaking, an event that simulates radio newscasts.[5] The Illinois High School Association (IHSA) is one of 521 state high school associations in the United States, designed to regulate competition in interscholastic events at the high school level. ... Individual events is a type of speech competition characterized by individuals competing in a variety of different events. ...


Ebert received his undergraduate degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he was editor of The Daily Illini and member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity. One of the first movie reviews he ever wrote was a review of La dolce vita, published in The Daily Illini in October 1961.[6] A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ... The Daily Illini is the independent student-run daily newspaper of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... La Dolce Vita (1960) (translation The Sweet Life) is a film directed by Federico Fellini and usually cited as the film that signals the split between his earlier neo-realist films and his later symbolist period. ...


Ebert did his graduate study in English at the University of Cape Town under a Rotary International Fellowship. He was a doctoral candidate in English at the University of Chicago when the film critic's position was offered to him by the Sun-Times. UCT redirects here. ... Rotary International is an organization of service clubs known as Rotary Clubs located all over the world. ... For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ...


Career

Ebert began his professional critic career in 1967, writing for the Chicago Sun-Times. In 1969, his review of Night of the Living Dead[7] was published in Reader's Digest. The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ... This article is about the 1968 film directed by George A. Romero. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In 1976 Ebert and Gene Siskel of the Chicago Tribune began co-hosting a weekly film review television show, Sneak Previews, which was locally produced by the Chicago public broadcasting station WTTW. The show was picked up by PBS in 1978 for national distribution. In 1982, the critics moved to a syndicated commercial television show named At the Movies, and later, Siskel & Ebert at The Movies, where they were known for their "thumbs up/thumbs down" review summaries. When Siskel died in 1999, the producers retitled the show Roger Ebert & the Movies with rotating co-hosts. In September 2000, fellow Chicago Sun-Times columnist Richard Roeper became the permanent co-host and the show was renamed Ebert & Roeper and the Movies. Eugene Gene Kal Siskel (January 26, 1946 – February 20, 1999) was one of the worlds most successful film critics. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Sneak Previews was a film review show that first aired aired on WTTW, a PBS television station in Chicago, Illinois, and found national airing as other PBS affiliates added the program to their schedules. ... Public broadcasting is a form of public service broadcasting (PSB) intended to serve the diverse needs of the viewing or listening public. ... WTTW (Channel 11) is one of three PBS member stations serving the Chicago, Illinois market; the others are WYCC and WYIN. WTTW began broadcasting on March 5, 1955 and is owned and operated by Window to the World Communications Inc. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... In broadcasting, syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast radio shows and television shows to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... A columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and the Internet. ... Richard Roeper (born October 17, 1959)[1] is a columnist/film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times and, since September of 2000, has co-hosted the television series At the Movies with Ebert & Roeper with fellow film critic Roger Ebert. ... At the Movies with Ebert & Roeper is a movie review television program featuring film critic Roger Ebert and columnist Richard Roeper, both of the Chicago Sun-Times. ...


Ebert has also done DVD audio commentaries for several films including Citizen Kane, Casablanca, Dark City, Floating Weeds, Crumb, and Beyond the Valley of the Dolls (for which Ebert also wrote the screenplay, based on a story that he co-wrote with Russ Meyer). Citizen Kane is a 1941 mystery/drama film released by RKO Pictures and directed by Orson Welles, his first feature film. ... This article is about the 1942 film. ... Dark City is a 1998 science fiction film written by Alex Proyas, Lem Dobbs and David S. Goyer, and directed by Proyas. ... A 1959 film directed by Yasujiro Ozu and shot (in colour) by Kazuo Miyagawa, one of Japans greatest cinematographers. ... Crumb is a 1994 documentary film about the noted underground comic artist R. Crumb and his family. ... Beyond the Valley of the Dolls is a 1970 film starring Dolly Read, Cynthia Myers, Erica Gavin, Edy Williams, Marcia McBroom, John LaZar, and Michael Blodgett. ... For the baseball player, see Russ Meyer (baseball player). ...


On the day of the Academy Awards, Ebert and Roeper typically appear on the live pre-awards show, An Evening at the Academy Awards: The Arrivals. This airs prior to the awards ceremony show, which also features red carpet interviews and fashion commentary. They also appear on the post-awards show entitled An Evening at the Academy Awards: the Winners. Both shows are produced and aired by the American Broadcasting Company owned station in Los Angeles station KABC-TV. This show also airs on WLS-TV as well as the network's other owned stations along with being syndicated to several ABC affiliates and other broadcasters outside the country. Ebert did not appear on the 2007 show for medical reasons. Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The red carpet at the 2007 Tribeca Film Festival; to the left is Rachael Harris A red carpet is a strip of carpet in the colour red, which is laid out to welcome VIPs such as dignitaries and celebrities at formal events. ... This article is about the American broadcast network. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... KABC-TV (Channel 7, branded as ABC7) is the American Broadcasting Company owned television station (through The Walt Disney Company) in the Greater Los Angeles area market, and is the most-watched television station in Southern California. ... WLS-TV abc Disney 7 is an American television station in Chicago, Illinois and thats owned and operated by the abc-TV Network & The Walt Disney Company. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Other career highlights

As a teenager, Ebert was involved in science fiction fandom,[8] writing articles for fanzines, including Richard A. Lupoff's Xero. Science fiction fandom or SF fandom is the community of people actively interested in science fiction and fantasy literature, and in contact with one another based upon that interest. ... A fanzine (also called a zine) is an amateur publication created by fans of a particular cultural phenomena (such as a literary genre or type of music) to address or correspond with others who share their interest. ... A 1957 photo of Dick Lupoff in what he has described as full Army regalia. ... Xero was the title of a science fiction fanzine published from 1960 to 1963 by Dick and Pat Lupoff. ...


Ebert co-wrote the screenplay for the 1970 cult film Beyond the Valley of the Dolls, directed by Russ Meyer, and likes to joke about being responsible for the poorly received film. Ebert and Meyer also made Beneath the Valley of the Ultra-Vixens and were involved in the ill-fated Sex Pistols movie Who Killed Bambi? Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A cult film is a film that has acquired a highly devoted but relatively small group of fans. ... Beyond the Valley of the Dolls is a 1970 film starring Dolly Read, Cynthia Myers, Erica Gavin, Edy Williams, Marcia McBroom, John LaZar, and Michael Blodgett. ... For the baseball player, see Russ Meyer (baseball player). ... Beneath the Valley of the Ultra-Vixens is a satirical sexploitation film starring Uschi Digart and Kitten Natividad written and directed by breast fetishist Russ Meyer. ... Sex Pistols are an iconic and highly influential English punk rock band, formed in London in 1975. ... Who Killed Bambi? was to be the first film featuring The Sex Pistols which was due to be released in 1978. ...


Other appearances

In 2003 Ebert had a cameo appearance in the film Abby Singer in which he recited the white parasol monologue from Citizen Kane. Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Abby Singer is a 2003 film that also had a different version released in 2006. ... Citizen Kane is a 1941 mystery/drama film released by RKO Pictures and directed by Orson Welles, his first feature film. ...


Ebert, along with colleague Gene Siskel, guest stared on an episode of the animated TV series The Critic. In the episode, Siskel and Ebert split and each wants Jay as his new partner. The episode is a parody of the film Sleepless in Seattle.[9] For the play by Sheridan, see The Critic (play). ... Sleepless in Seattle is a 1993 American comedy-drama film written and directed by Nora Ephron. ...


Style of critique and personal tastes

Ebert has described his critical approach to films as "relative, not absolute"; he reviews a film for what he feels will be its prospective audience, yet always with at least some consideration as to its value as a whole. He awards four stars to films of the highest quality, and no stars to those of the lowest.

When you ask a friend if Hellboy is any good, you're not asking if it's any good compared to Mystic River, you're asking if it's any good compared to The Punisher. And my answer would be, on a scale of one to four, if Superman is four, then Hellboy is three and The Punisher is two. In the same way, if American Beauty gets four stars, then (The United States of) Leland clocks in at about two.[10] Hellboy (also known as Super Sapiens in Malaysia) is an American supernatural thriller, directed by Mexican director Guillermo del Toro. ... For other uses, see Mystic River (disambiguation). ... For the 1989 movie starring Dolph Lundgren, see The Punisher (1989 film). ... For the franchise, see Superman film series. ... American Beauty is a 1999 drama film that explores themes of love, freedom, self-liberation, the search for happiness, and family against the backdrop of modern American suburbia. ... The United States of Leland is a 2004 dramatic movie by director Matthew Ryan Hoge about a meek teenaged boy named Leland P. Fitzgerald who has inexplicably committed a shocking murder. ...

Ebert has emphasized that his star ratings have little meaning if not considered in the context of the review itself. Occasionally (as in his review of Basic Instinct 2), Ebert's star rating may seem at odds with his written opinion. Ebert has acknowledged such cases, stating "I cannot recommend the movie, but ... why the hell can't I? Just because it's God-awful? What kind of reason is that for staying away from a movie? God-awful and boring, that would be a reason."[11] In his review of The Manson Family, he gave the film three stars for achieving what it set out to do, but admitted that didn't count as a recommendation per se. He similarly gave the Adam Sandler-starring remake of The Longest Yard a positive rating of three stars, but in his review, which he wrote soon after attending the Cannes Film Festival, he recommended readers not see the film because they had access to more satisfying cinematic experiences.[12] Basic Instinct 2, also known as Basic Instinct 2: Risk Addiction is a 2006 film, being the long awaited sequel to 1992s Basic Instinct. ... A low budget B film about the Manson family. ... This article is about the 1974 film. ... The Cannes Film Festival (French: le Festival de Cannes), founded in 1939, is one of the worlds oldest, most influential and prestigious film festivals. ...


Ebert has reprinted his starred reviews in movie guides. During his appearances on Howard Stern's radio show, he was frequently challenged to defend his ratings. Ebert stood by his opinions with one notable exception: when Stern pointed out that he'd given The Godfather Part II a three-star rating, but had given The Godfather Part III three and a half stars. This article is a biography of Howard Stern as an individual; for information regarding his radio show see The Howard Stern Show. ... The Godfather Part II is a 1974 motion picture directed by Francis Ford Coppola from a script he co-wrote with Mario Puzo. ... The Godfather Part III (1990) is the third and final film in the Godfather trilogy written by Mario Puzo and Francis Ford Coppola, and directed by Coppola. ...


Ebert has occasionally accused some films of having an unwholesome political agenda, and the word "fascist" accompanied more than one of Ebert's reviews of the law-and-order films of the 1970s such as Dirty Harry. He is also suspicious of films that are passed off as art, but which he sees as merely lurid and sensational. Ebert has leveled this charge against such films as The Night Porter[13] and Blue Velvet.[14] Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... For other uses, see Dirty Harry (disambiguation). ... Categories: 1974 films | Controversial films | Movie stubs ... Blue Velvet is an influential 1986 neo-noir mystery and thriller film written and directed by David Lynch. ...


Ebert's reviews can clash with the overall reception of movies, as evidenced by his negative review of the 1988 Bruce Willis action film Die Hard and his positive review of 1997's Speed 2: Cruise Control. Ebert often makes heavy use of mocking sarcasm, especially when reviewing movies he considers bad. At other times he is direct, famously in his review of the 1994 Rob Reiner comedy North, which he concluded by writing that: Walter Bruce Willis (born March 19, 1955 in Idar-Oberstein, Germany) is an American actor and singer. ... This article is about the 1988 action film. ... Speed 2: Cruise Control is an 1997 action movie produced by Twentieth Century Fox, directed by Jan de Bont. ... Sarcasm[1] Mockery, sarcasm is sneering, jesting, or mocking a person, situation or thing. ... Robert Rob Reiner (born March 6, 1945) is an American actor, director, producer, writer, childrens advocate and political activist. ... North is a 1994 motion picture directed by Rob Reiner, and starring Elijah Wood. ...

I hated this movie. Hated hated hated hated hated this movie. Hated it. Hated every simpering stupid vacant audience-insulting moment of it. Hated the sensibility that thought anyone would like it. Hated the implied insult to the audience by its belief that anyone would be entertained by it.[15]

Ebert's reviews are also often characterized by dry wit. In January 2005, when Rob Schneider insulted a Los Angeles Times movie critic Patrick Goldstein, who panned his movie Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo by commenting that the critic was unqualified because he had never won the Pulitzer Prize, Ebert intervened by stating that, as a Pulitzer winner, he was qualified to review the film, and bluntly told Schneider, "Your movie sucks."[16] This article is about the American actor/comedian. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... Patrick Goldstein writes about movies for the Los Angeles Times where he writes The Big Picture. ...


Ebert also shows a marked distaste for films that feature violence in support of authority. For movies that feature religion, he has been known to comment on them using his own Roman Catholic faith and his own interpretation of Christianity. He often includes personal anecdotes in his reviews when he considers them relevant. He has occasionally written reviews in the forms of stories, poems, songs, scripts, or imagined conversations. He has written many essays and articles exploring the field of film criticism in depth.


Ebert has been accused of bourgeois elitism in his dismissal of what he calls "Dead Teenager Movies". Ebert has clarified that he does not disparage horror movies as a whole, but that he draws a distinction between films like Nosferatu and The Silence of the Lambs, which he regards as "masterpieces", and films which he feels consist of nothing more than groups of teenagers being killed off with the exception of one survivor to populate a sequel.[17] DVD cover showing horror characters as depicted by Universal Studios. ... This article is about the 1922 silent film. ... The Silence of the Lambs is a 1991 film directed by Jonathan Demme and starring Jodie Foster and Anthony Hopkins. ...


Ebert's favorite film is Citizen Kane.[18] His favorite actor is Robert Mitchum and his favorite actress is Ingrid Bergman.[19] Citizen Kane is a 1941 mystery/drama film released by RKO Pictures and directed by Orson Welles, his first feature film. ... Robert Charles Durman Mitchum (August 6, 1917 – July 1, 1997) was an Academy award nominated American film actor and singer. ...   (pronounced in Swedish, but usually in English, IPA notation) (August 29, 1915 – August 29, 1982) was a three-time Academy Award-winning and two-time Emmy Award-winning Swedish actress. ...


Views on the film industry

Ebert is an outspoken opponent of the Motion Picture Association of America rating system (he often uses the negative epithet "flywheels" to describe their arbitrary nature). He has repeatedly criticized their decisions regarding which movies are "suitable for children." For example, Whale Rider[20] and School of Rock[21] were both rated PG-13 (unsuitable for children under the age of thirteen), while he thought both were inoffensive enough for schoolchildren and contained positive messages for that age group. In his review of The Exorcist, Ebert said it was "stupefying" that the film received a rating of "R" from the MPAA instead of an "X" (suitable only for adults). He has frequently argued that the MPAA is more likely to give an "R" rating for mild sexual content than for highly violent content. In his review of The Passion of The Christ (to which he awarded a perfect four stars), he was quoted as saying: 'I said the film is the most violent I have ever seen. The MPAA's R rating is definitive proof that the organization either will never give the NC-17 rating for violence alone, or was intimidated by the subject matter. If it had been anyone other than Jesus up on that cross, I have a feeling that NC-17 would have been automatic.[22] MPAA redirects here. ... Whale Rider is a 2002 movie based on the 1987 novel by New Zealand Māori author Witi Tame Ihimaera. ... For other uses, see School of Rock (disambiguation). ... The Exorcist is an Academy Award-winning 1973 American horror and thriller film, adapted from the 1971 novel of the same name by William Peter Blatty, dealing with the demonic possession of a young girl, and her mother’s desperate attempts to win back her daughter through an exorcism conducted... This article is about the film. ...


He also frequently laments that cinemas outside major cities are "booked by computer from Hollywood with no regard for local tastes", making high-quality independent and foreign films virtually unavailable to most American moviegoers.[23]


Ebert is a strong advocate for Maxivision 48, in which the movie projector runs at 48 frames per second, as compared to the usual 24 frames per second. He is opposed to the practice whereby theatres lower the intensity of their projector bulbs in order to extend the life of the bulb, arguing that this has no effect other than to make the film harder to see.[24] Maxivision 24 and Maxivision 48 are 35 mm motion picture film formats, created by Dean Goodhill in 1999. ...


Personal life

Roger Ebert, Peter O'Toole, and Jason Patric at the 2004 Savannah Film Festival
Roger Ebert, Peter O'Toole, and Jason Patric at the 2004 Savannah Film Festival

Since the 1970s, Ebert has worked for the University of Chicago as a guest lecturer, teaching a night class on film. His fall 2005 class was on the works of the German director Rainer Werner Fassbinder. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3072x2048, 383 KB)Roger Ebert, Peter OToole, Jason Patrik at 2004 Savannah Film Festival This work is copyrighted. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3072x2048, 383 KB)Roger Ebert, Peter OToole, Jason Patrik at 2004 Savannah Film Festival This work is copyrighted. ... Peter Seamus OToole (born August 2, 1932, uncertain but presumed correct date[1]) is an eight-time Academy Award-nominated Irish actor. ... Roger Ebert, Peter OToole, and Jason Patric at the 2004 Savannah Film Festival. ... Rainer Werner Fassbinder (May 31, 1945 – June 10, 1982) was a German movie director, screenwriter and actor. ...


Ebert married trial attorney Chaz Hammelsmith on July 18, 1992 and has a stepdaughter, a stepson, and four stepgrandchildren. He has been friends with, and at one time dated, Oprah Winfrey, who credits him with encouraging her to go into syndication.[25] He is also good friends with film historian and critic Leonard Maltin, and considers the book Leonard Maltin's Movie and Video Guide to be the standard of film guide books. is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Oprah Winfrey, (born January 29, 1954) is a multiple-Emmy Award winning host of The Oprah Winfrey Show, the highest rated talk show in television history. ... Leonard Maltin (born December 18, 1950 in New York City) is a widely known and respected American film critic. ...


A supporter of the Democratic Party,[26] Ebert publicly urged left-wing activist and filmmaker Michael Moore to give a politically-charged acceptance speech at the Academy Awards: "I'd like to see Michael Moore get up there and let 'em have it with both barrels and really let loose and give them a real rabble-rousing speech."[27] Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Michael Francis Moore (born April 23, 1954) is an American political-activist, a film director, author, social commentator, and political humorist. ...


Raised Catholic and educated in parochial schools, Ebert has been critical of films he believes are grossly ignorant or insulting of Catholicism, such as Stigmata[28] and Priest, though he has given favorable reviews of controversial films with themes or references to Jesus and Catholicism, including The Passion of the Christ,[22] Martin Scorsese's controversial The Last Temptation of Christ (which many Catholics denounced), and to Kevin Smith's religious satire Dogma.[29] However, Ebert identifies himself as an agnostic.[30] Stigmata is a controversial movie directed by Rupert Wainwright that premiered on September 10, 1999. ... Priest is a British film, made in Liverpool, which was shown in 1994 at the Toronto International Film Festival. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... This article is about the film. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, writer and producer and founder of the World Cinema Foundation. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other persons named Kevin Smith, see Kevin Smith (disambiguation). ... Dogma is a 1999 comedy film, written and directed by Kevin Smith, who stars in the film along with Ben Affleck, Matt Damon, Linda Fiorentino, Alan Rickman, Bud Cort, Salma Hayek, Chris Rock, Jason Lee, Jason Mewes, George Carlin, Janeane Garofalo, and Alanis Morissette. ... The term agnosticism and the related agnostic were coined by Thomas Henry Huxley in 1869. ...


Battle with thyroid cancer

In early 2002, Ebert was diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancer. Fortunately, in February of that year, surgeons at Northwestern Memorial Hospital were able to successfully remove the cancer with clean margins. He later underwent surgery in 2003 for cancer in his salivary gland and in December of 2003, he underwent a four-week course of radiation treatment as a followup to the surgery on his salivary gland, which altered his voice slightly. As he battled the illness, Ebert continued to be a dedicated critic to film, not missing a single opening while undergoing treatment. Thyroid cancer is malignant growth of the thyroid gland. ... Northwestern Memorial Hospital is a hospital under Northwestern University, Illinois. ... A clean margin is a medical term referring to the attempt in surgical oncology to resect a tumor with no part of the tumor on pathology extending past a set margin known as the clean point. This is an important issue in areas that are functionally important (ie. ...


He underwent further surgery Friday, June 16, 2006, just two days before his 64th birthday, to remove cancer near his right jaw and a section of jaw bone.[31] is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On July 1, that same year, Ebert was hospitalized in serious condition after his carotid artery burst near the surgery site and he "came within a breath of death".[32] He later learned that the burst was likely a side effect of his treatment, which involved neutron beam radiation. He was subsequently kept bed-ridden to prevent further damage to the scarred vessels in his neck while he slowly recovered from multiple surgeries and the rigorous treatment regimen. At one point, his status was so precarious that Ebert had a tracheostomy placed in his neck to reduce his work of breathing while he recovered.[31] is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Neutron radiation consists of free neutrons. ... Tracheotomy is a surgical procedure used to cut a hole in the trachea through which a small tube is inserted. ...


Ebert filmed enough TV programs with his co-host Richard Roeper to keep him on the air for several weeks. However, his extended convalescence has necessitated a series of "guest critics" to co-host with Roeper, including Jay Leno (a good friend to both Ebert and Roeper), Kevin Smith, John Ridley, Toni Senecal, Michael Phillips, Aisha Tyler, Fred Willard, Anne Thompson, A. O. Scott, Mario Van Peebles, George Pennacchio, and John Mellencamp. Richard Roeper (born October 17, 1959)[1] is a columnist/film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times and, since September of 2000, has co-hosted the television series At the Movies with Ebert & Roeper with fellow film critic Roger Ebert. ... Jay Leno (April 28, 1950) is an Emmy-winning American comedian and writer who is best known as the host of NBC televisions long-running variety and talk program The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. ... For other persons named Kevin Smith, see Kevin Smith (disambiguation). ... John Ridley John Ridley is an American film director, actor, inventor and writer. ... Toni Senecal is an entertainment reporter for WNYW-TV Fox 5 News at 10. ... Michael Phillips is a film critic for the Chicago Tribune newspaper. ... Aisha Tyler (born September 18, 1970 in San Francisco, California) is an American actress, stand-up comedian and occasional writer. ... Fred Willard (born September 18, 1939) is an American comedian and character actor, known for his improvisational comedy skills. ... As Deputy Film Editor of The Hollywood Reporter, Anne Thompson writes the weekly Risky Business column and the daily Riskybizblog. ... Anthony O. Tony Scott (born July 10, 1966) is a Jewish (1) film critic for The New York Times newspaper. ... Mario Van Peebles (b. ... John Mellencamp, also known as John Cougar and John Cougar Mellencamp, (born October 7, 1951) is best known for being an American rock singer-songwriter. ...


An update from Ebert on October 11, 2006 confirmed his bleeding problems had resolved. He was undergoing rehabilitation at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago due to lost muscle mass, and later underwent further rehabilitation at the Pritikin Center in Florida."[33] is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rehabilitation Hospital located in Chicago, Illinois, United States. ...


After a three-month absence, the first movie he reviewed was The Queen. As of August 2007, there was no estimate as to when he will return to Ebert & Roeper. Ebert followed through with his promise and made his first public appearance since the summer of 2006 at Ebertfest on April 25, 2007. He was unable to speak but communicated through his wife, Chaz, through the use of written notes. This article is about the film. ... August 2007 is the eighth month of that year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


His opening words to the crowd of devout fans at the festival were a reference to the film he co-wrote with Russ Meyer, Beyond the Valley of the Dolls: "It's my happening and it freaks me out." Most fans and journalists believed the remark to be a reference to the dramatic rise in popularity of Ebertfest over the past few years. Others believed the line to be a subtle reference to how, instead of acting as a critic, he had actually become the protagonist, to the degree where it 'freaked' him out — a sardonic and endearing reference typical of Ebert's writing style and spoken commentary.[34]


In an interview with WLS-TV in Chicago, he said, "I was told photos of me in this condition would attract the gossip papers — so what?" When asked by the Sun-Times in an April 23 article about his decision to return to the limelight, Ebert remarked, "We spend too much time hiding illness."[35] WLS (Worlds Largest Store) is the callsign two broadcast stations in Chicago: radio station WLS AM 890 TV station WLS-TV 7 (DTV 52) WLS (Weight Loss Surgery) see Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery   This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Fans at his website have remarked his public appearances have been inspirational to cancer victims and survivors around the country.[36] He will need reconstructive surgery on his jaw, a relatively dangerous procedure in light of the damage to the vessels already seen when his artery burst during earlier treatment.[34]


On the road to recovery

The current condition of Ebert's voice is unknown. However, on May 18, 2007, three of his reviews (including Shrek the Third) were published by the Chicago Sun-Times as well as Ebert's website, a role that his editor had shouldered during the critic's illness.[37] Since then, he has slowly worked back up to his previous output of 5-6 reviews a week plus a "Great Movies" review. He has also resumed his "Answer Man" column. In a July 21, 2007 commentary on a rebuttal to Clive Barker, he revealed that he had lost the ability to speak, but not to write.[38] He recently posted reviews of the 2006 film Casino Royale and the 2007 films Zodiac and Ratatouille with a note that he was in the process of going back and reviewing some of the movies that were released during his absence.[39] He recently disclosed that he will be in attendance at the 2007 Toronto International Film Festival and is awaiting surgery that will hopefully restore his voice.[40] Currently, he talks using a computerized voice system. He has chosen to use a voice with a British accent, to which he has given the name "Lawrence".[41] is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the film. ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the South African football (soccer) coach, see Clive Barker (soccer). ... Casino Royale (2006) is the 21st film in the James Bond series and the first to star Daniel Craig as MI6 agent James Bond. ... Zodiac, a Paramount Pictures and Warner Bros. ... For other uses, see Ratatouille (disambiguation). ... The 2007 Toronto International Film Festival will run from Sep 6 to Sep 15, 2007. ...


Bibliography

Each year, Ebert publishes Roger Ebert's Movie Yearbook, a book containing all his movie reviews from the last three years, as well as essays and other writings. He has also written the following books:

  • Awake in the Dark: The Best of Roger Ebert (ISBN-10 0-226-18200-2) — a collection of essays from his forty years as a film critic, featuring interviews, profiles, essays, his initial reviews upon a film's release, as well as critical exchanges between the film critics Richard Corliss and Andrew Sarris
  • Ebert's "Bigger" Little Movie Glossary (ISBN 0-8362-8289-2) — a book of movie clichés
  • The Great Movies (ISBN 0-7679-1038-9) and The Great Movies II (ISBN 0-7679-1950-5) — two books of essays about great films
  • I Hated, Hated, Hated This Movie (ISBN 0-7407-0672-1) — a collection of reviews of films that received two stars or fewer.
  • Roger Ebert's Book of Film (ISBN 0-393-04000-3) — a Norton Anthology of a century of writing about the movies
  • Questions For The Movie Answer Man (ISBN 0-8362-2894-4) — his responses to questions sent from his readers
  • Behind the Phantom's Mask (ISBN 0-8362-8021-0) — his first attempt at fiction.
  • An Illini Century (ASIN B0006OW26K) — the history of the first 100 years of the University of Illinois
  • The Perfect London Walk (ISBN 0-8362-7929-8) — a tour of Ebert's favorite foreign city
  • Your Movie Sucks (ISBN 0-7407-6366-0) — a new collection of less-than-two-star reviews.

Richard Corliss is a writer for Time magazine who focuses on movies, with the occasional article on music or sports, and has distinguished himself for his clever way with words. ... Andrew Sarris is a film critic and a leading proponent of the Auteur theory of criticism. ... The Norton Anthology of English Literature is a well-known English Literary studies supplement for many tertiary level students. ...

See also

The Boulder Pledge Under no circumstances will I ever purchase anything offered to me as the result of an unsolicited e-mail message. ... E-mail spam, also known as bulk e-mail or junk e-mail is a subset of spam that involves sending nearly identical messages to numerous recipients by e-mail. ... The Brown Bunny is an independent film by actor/director Vincent Gallo about a motorcycle racer on a cross-country drive who is haunted by the memories of his former lover. ... The Brown Bunny is an independent film by actor/director Vincent Gallo about a motorcycle racer on a cross-country drive who is haunted by the memories of his former lover. ... Vincent Gallo (born in Buffalo, New York on April 11, 1961[1] is an American movie actor and director starring in a number of independent movies. ...

References

  1. ^ a b RogerEbert.com
  2. ^ Maureen O'Donnell (September 25, 2007). He's No. 1!. suntimes.com.
  3. ^ FilmReference.com biography of Roger Ebert
  4. ^ Ebert's review of Maryam (April 12, 2002)
  5. ^ Roger Ebert in the IHSA list of state speech champions
  6. ^ Ebert's review of La Dolce Vita (October 4, 1961)
  7. ^ Ebert’s review of Night of the Living Dead January 5, 1967)
  8. ^ See his autobiographical essay in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, "Thought Experiments: How Propeller-Heads, BNFs, Sercon Geeks, Newbies, Recovering GAFIAtors, and Kids in the Basements Invented the World Wide Web, All Except for the Delivery System."
  9. ^ TV.com Episode summary: The Critic - "Siskel & Ebert & Jay & Alice"
  10. ^ Ebert's review of Shaolin Soccer (April 23, 2004)
  11. ^ Ebert's review of Basic Instinct 2 (March 21, 2006)
  12. ^ Ebert's review of The Longest Yard (2005 version) at rogerebert.com; May 27, 2005
  13. ^ Ebert's review of The Night Porter at rogerebert.com; February 10, 1975
  14. ^ Ebert's Review of Blue Velvet at rogerebert.com; September 19, 1986
  15. ^ Ebert's review of North (July 22, 1994)
  16. ^ Ebert's review of Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo
  17. ^ Gurnow, Michael; "Roger Ebert’s Bloody Ax: An Examination of the Film Critic’s Elitist Dismissal of the Horror Film"
  18. ^ Online chat with Ebert at bventertainment.go.com; August 2, 2007.
  19. ^ Biography page for Ebert at tv.com
  20. ^ Ebert's "Movie Answer Man column", November 16, 2003
  21. ^ Ebert's review of School of Rock (October 3, 2003)
  22. ^ a b Ebert's review of The Passion of the Christ; February 24, 2004
  23. ^ Ebert, Roger, "They got it right," Chicago Sun Times (29 Jan. 2004)
  24. ^ Ebert's "Movie Answer Man column", February 19, 2006
  25. ^ “How I gave Oprah her start”, Ebert, Roger; Chicago Sun-Times, November 16, 2005
  26. ^ Ebert's political donations
  27. ^ Interview with Matthew Rothschild, The Progressive, August 2003
  28. ^ Ebert's review of Stigmata (January 1, 1999)
  29. ^ Ebert's review of Dogma (November 12, 1999)
  30. ^ A Life In The Movies, Carol Felsenthal, Chicago Magazine December 2005
  31. ^ a b Email from Roger, August 17, 2006, posted on his website
  32. ^ Ebert's words in his review of Sicko, June 29, 2007
  33. ^ "Ebert: Despite setbacks, I am feeling better every day", Chicago Sun-Times, April 3 2007
  34. ^ a b Ebertfest 2007 in pictures (2007-05-03).
  35. ^ Ebert, Roger; "It wouldn't be Ebertfest without Roger" April 23, 2007
  36. ^ Article and Video report with Full Interview from WLS, Chicago, April 25
  37. ^ Roger Ebert. RogerEbert.com Front Page. Retrieved on 2007-05-22.
  38. ^ Roger Ebert. RogerEbert.com Commentary. Retrieved on 2007-07-23.
  39. ^ Ebert's review of Zodiac (August 24, 2007)
  40. ^ "Ebert weighs in on TIFF", TheStar.com, 2007-09-05
  41. ^ http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?section=local&id=5756213

is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Asimovs Science Fiction is a science fiction magazine, first published in 1977 as Isaac Asimovs Science Fiction Magazine or IASFM for short. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see Sicko (disambiguation). ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... WLS (Worlds Largest Store) is the callsign two broadcast stations in Chicago: radio station WLS AM 890 TV station WLS-TV 7 (DTV 52) WLS (Weight Loss Surgery) see Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery   This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Roger Ebert
  • Roger Ebert official website
  • Ebert & Roeper official website
  • Roger Ebert's Overlooked Film Festival
  • Roger Ebert at the Internet Movie Database
  • Roger Ebert at TV.com
  • Roger Ebert RSS Feed
  • Political donations made by Ebert
  • Sight and Sound poll on his top ten movies
  • Progressive Magazine Transcript of Interview with Roger Ebert
  • Front Page Magazine Article Critical of Ebert's Politics
Persondata
NAME Ebert, Roger Joseph
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION American film critic
DATE OF BIRTH 18 June 1942
PLACE OF BIRTH Urbana, Illinois
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Roger Ebert (758 words)
Ebert, now 62 and living with his wife, attorney Chaz Hammelsmith Ebert, in Chicago, had earlier conquered thyroid cancer, and when a salivary gland tumor he had been dealing with for years was found to be cancerous, he faced the future head on.
Ebert grew up in Urbana, Illinois, where he began his journalism career in a way that today seems the stuff of movies: he started at 15 as a sports writer for his hometown newspaper, The News-Gazette, then worked his way up as an apprentice on the city desk.
Ebert's personal life is, of course, also rich—thanks in part to early detection and treatment of oral cancer.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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