FACTOID # 15: A mere 0.8% of West Virginians were born in a foreign country.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Roger B. Taney
Roger Brooke Taney

5th Chief Justice of the United States
In office
March 28, 1836 – October 12, 1864
Preceded by John Marshall
Succeeded by Salmon P. Chase
Born March 17, 1777
Calvert County, Maryland
Died October 12, 1864
Washington, DC

Roger Brooke Taney (March 17, 1777October 12, 1864) was the fifth Chief Justice of the United States, from 1836 until his death in 1864, and the first Roman Catholic to hold that office. RogerTaney (19th century photograp) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... March 28 is the 87th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (88th in leap years). ... Charles Darwin 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... John Marshall (September 24, 1755–July 6, 1835) was an American statesman and jurist who more than anyone shaped American constitutional law and made the Supreme Court a center of power. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in Leap years). ... 1777 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Calvert County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maryland. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,417 sq mi (32,160 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37°53N to 39°43N  - Longitude 75°4W to 79°33... October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in Leap years). ... 1777 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ...


Taney died during the final months of the American Civil War, on the same day that his home state of Maryland abolished slavery. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert Edward Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties Killed in action: 110,000 Total dead: 360,000 Wounded: 275,200 Killed in action: 93,000 Total dead: 258... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,417 sq mi (32,160 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37°53N to 39°43N  - Longitude 75°4W to 79°33...

Contents


Chief Justice

Unlike Marshall, who had supported a broad role for the federal government in the area of economic regulation, Taney and the other justices appointed by Jackson more often favored the power of the states. The Taney Court, among other things, overturned the Marshall Court's decision in the Dartmouth College Case (1819) that had limited the power of the states to regulate corporations and reversed the Marshall Court's previous holding that states could not charter banks. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Taney and his colleagues did, however, depart from their support for state sovereignty in one area: state laws restricting the rights of slaveholders. In Prigg v. Pennsylvania (1842), the Court held that the Constitutional prohibition against state laws that would emancipate any "person held to service or labor in [another] state" barred Pennsylvania from punishing a Maryland man who had seized a former slave and her child, then taken them back to Maryland without seeking an order from the Pennsylvania courts permitting the abduction. The Taney Court extended this rule ten years later in Moore v. Illinois (1852) to hold that "any state law or regulation which interrupts, impedes, limits, embarrasses, delays or postpones the right of the owner to the immediate possession of the slave, and the immediate command of his service, is void." Five years later Taney wrote the decision for the Court in the Dred Scott case that declared any restrictions imposed by Congress on the spread of slavery into the territories, such as those found in the Missouri Compromise, to be unconstitutional. Prigg v. ... Holding Blacks, whether slaves or free, could not become United States citizens and the plaintiff therefore lacked the capacity to file a lawsuit. ... The United States in 1820. ...


The Dred Scott decision was widely condemned at the time by opponents of slavery as an illegitimate use of judicial power. Abraham Lincoln and the Republican Party accused the Taney Court of carrying out the orders of the "slave power" and of conspiring with President James Buchanan to undo the Kansas-Nebraska Act. Current scholarship supports that second charge, as it appears that Buchanan put significant political pressure behind the scenes on Justice Robert Grier to obtain at least one vote from a justice from outside the South to support the Court's sweeping decision. Dred Scott Dred Scott (ca. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was an American politician who served as the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... James Buchanan (April 23, 1791 – June 1, 1868) was the 15th president of the United States (1857–1861). ... The Kansas–Nebraska Act was a United States federal law passed on May 30, 1854, organizing a territorial government for the lands that later became the states of Kansas and Nebraska. ... Robert Cooper Grier (March 5, 1794-September 25, 1870), was an American jurist. ...


Taney's intemperate language only added to the fury of those who opposed the decision. As he explained the Court's ruling, African-Americans, free or slave, could not be citizens of any state, because the drafters of the Constitution had viewed them as "beings of an inferior order, and altogether unfit to associate with the white race, either in social or political relations, and so far inferior that they had no rights which the white man was bound to respect."


Taney's own attitudes toward slavery were more complex. Taney not only emancipated his own slaves, but gave pensions to those who were too old to work. In 1819, he defended a Methodist minister who had been indicted for inciting slave insurrections by denouncing slavery in a camp meeting. In his opening argument in that case Taney condemned slavery as "a blot on our national character."


Taney's attitudes toward slavery, however, hardened over time. By the time he wrote his opinion in Dred Scott he labeled the opposition to slavery as "northern aggression," a popular phrase among Southern supporters of slavery. He evidently hoped that a Supreme Court decision declaring federal restrictions on slavery in the territories unconstitutional would put the issue beyond the realm of political debate. As it turned out, he was wrong, as his decision only served to galvanize Northern opposition to slavery while splitting the Democratic Party on sectional lines.


Many abolitionists--and some supporters of slavery--believed that Taney was prepared to rule that the states likewise had no power to bar slaveholders from bringing their property into free states and that state laws providing for the emancipation of slaves brought into their territory were likewise unconstitutional. A case, Lemmon v. New York, that presented that issue was slowly making its way to the Supreme Court in the years after the Dred Scott decision. The outbreak of the American Civil War denied Taney that opportunity, as the Commonwealth of Virginia seceded and no longer recognized the Court's authority. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert Edward Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties Killed in action: 110,000 Total dead: 360,000 Wounded: 275,200 Killed in action: 93,000 Total dead: 258... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Taney continued to trouble Lincoln during the three years he remained Chief Justice after the beginning of the war. After President Lincoln declared martial law in parts of the State of Maryland and suspended the writ of habeas corpus, Taney ruled as Circuit Judge in Ex parte Merryman (1861) that only Congress had the power to take this action. Some scholars argue that Lincoln made an aborted attempt to arrest Taney himself in response to his habeas corpus decision, though the evidence is sparse, (see the Taney Arrest Warrant controversy). Lincoln ignored the court's order and continued to arrest prisoners without the privilege of the writ, though Merryman was eventually released without charges. Some Radical Republicans in Congress even considered initiating impeachment charges against Taney. Martial law is the system of rules that takes effect (usually after a formal declaration) when a military authority takes control of the normal administration of justice. ... For other uses, see Habeas corpus (disambiguation). ... Ex parte Merryman, (1861), is a well-known U.S. federal court case which arose out of the American Civil War. ... The Taney Arrest Warrant theory is a controversial story of recent discovery in Abraham Lincoln scholarship. ... The Radical Republicans were an influential faction of American politicians in the Republican party during the American Civil War and Reconstruction eras, 1860-1876. ...


Taney also served as the Secretary of Treasury under president Andrew Jackson. He helped president Jackson transfer funds from the National bank to state banks when Jackson vetoed the banks recharter.

Engraved portrait of Chief Justice Taney
Enlarge
Engraved portrait of Chief Justice Taney

File links The following pages link to this file: Roger B. Taney Categories: U.S. history images ... File links The following pages link to this file: Roger B. Taney Categories: U.S. history images ...

Legacy

Taney remained a controversial figure — even when merely a statuary figure — after his death. In 1865 Congress rejected the proposal to commission a bust of Taney to be displayed with those of the four Chief Justices who preceded him. As Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts said: Charles Sumner Charles Sumner (January 6, 1811–March 11, 1874) was an American politician and statesman from the U.S. state of Massachusetts. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ...

I speak what cannot be denied when I declare that the opinion of the Chief Justice in the case of Dred Scott was more thoroughly abominable than anything of the kind in the history of courts. Judicial baseness reached its lowest point on that occasion. You have not forgotten that terrible decision where a most unrighteous judgment was sustained by a falsification of history. Of course, the Constitution of the United States and every principle of Liberty was falsified, but historical truth was falsified also. . . .

Sumner had long exhibited an extreme and bitter dislike of the late Chief Justice. Upon hearing the news of Taney's passing the previous year, he wrote Abraham Lincoln in celebration declaring that "Providence has given us a victory" in Taney's death. Even though Congress refused, in 1865, to commission a bust of Taney for display, it eventually did so when Taney's successor, Chief Justice Salmon Chase, died. In 1873, Congress apportioned funds for busts of both Taney and Chase to be displayed in the Capitol alongside the other chief justices. Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was an American politician who served as the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808–May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Chief Justice of the United States and previously as U.S. Treasury Secretary under Abraham Lincoln. ...


Justice Benjamin Robbins Curtis, author of a dissent in Dred Scott, held his former colleague in high esteem despite their differences in that case. Writing in his own memoirs, Curtis described Taney: Benjamin Robbins Curtis (4 November 1809 _ 15 September 1874) was an American attorney and United States Supreme Court Justice. ...

He was indeed a great magistrate, and a man of singular purity of life and character. That there should have been one mistake in a judicial career so long, so exalted, and so useful is only proof of the imperfection of our nature. The reputation of Chief Justice Taney can afford to have anything known that he ever did and still leave a great fund of honor and praise to illustrate his name. If he had never done anything else that was high, heroic, and important, his noble vindication of the writ of habeas corpus, and of the dignity and authority of his office, against a rash minister of state, who, in the pride of a fancied executive power, came near to the commission of a great crime, will command the admiration and gratitude of every lover of constitutional liberty, so long as our institutions shall endure.

Modern legal scholars have tended to concur with Justice Curtis that, notwithstanding the Dred Scott decision and the furor surrounding it which will forever be attached to his name, Taney was both an outstanding jurist and a competent judicial administrator.


Taney County, Missouri is named in his honor. There is a statue of Justice Taney [1] prominently displayed on the grounds of the Maryland state house. Taney County is a county located in the state of Missouri. ... The Maryland State House, located in Annapolis, Maryland, is the meeting place of the Maryland General Assembly, the states legislature. ...


The US Coast Guard Cutter Taney, a famous World War II ship, is named after Roger B. Taney. The USCGC Taney is a United States Coast Guard High Endurance Cutter, notable as the last ship floating that fought in the attack on Pearl Harbor. ... This article is becoming very long. ...


See also

This is a chronological list of notable cases decided by the United States Supreme Court during the tenures of Chief Justices John Jay, John Rutledge, Oliver Ellsworth, John Marshall, Roger Taney, Salmon P. Chase, Morrison Waite, Melville Fuller, Edward Douglass White, and William Howard Taft (October 19, 1789 through February...

External links

Preceded by:
Thomas Kell
Attorney General of Maryland
1827—1831
Succeeded by:
Josiah Bayly
Preceded by:
John M. Berrien
Attorney General of the United States
1831–1833
Succeeded by:
Benjamin F. Butler
Preceded by:
William J. Duane
United States Secretary of the Treasury
1833–1834
Succeeded by:
Levi Woodbury
Preceded by:
John Marshall
Chief Justice of the United States
March 28, 1836October 12, 1864
Succeeded by:
Salmon P. Chase
United States Attorneys General Seal of the United States Department of Justice
Randolph • Bradford • LeeLincolnR Smith • Breckinridge • RodneyPinkneyRushWirtBerrienTaneyButlerGrundy • Gilpin • CrittendenLegaréNelsonMasonCliffordTouceyJohnsonCrittendenCushingBlackStantonBatesSpeed • Stanberry • EvartsHoarAkermanWilliamsPierrepontTaftDevensMacVeaghBrewsterGarlandMillerOlneyHarmonMcKennaGriggsKnoxMoodyBonaparteWickershamMcReynoldsGregoryPalmer • Welch • DaughertyStoneSargentW Mitchell • Cummings • MurphyJacksonBiddleT ClarkMcGrathMcGranery • Brownell • RogersKennedyKatzenbachR ClarkJ MitchellKleindienstRichardsonSaxbeLeviBellCivilettiW SmithMeeseThornburghBarrRenoAshcroftGonzales
This box: viewtalkedit
United States Secretaries of the Treasury Seal of the United States Department of the Treasury
HamiltonWolcottDexterGallatinCampbellDallasCrawfordRushInghamMcLaneDuaneTaneyWoodburyEwingForwardSpencerBibbWalkerMeredithCorwinGuthrieCobbThomasDixChaseFessendenMcCullochBoutwellRichardsonBristowMorrillShermanWindomFolgerGreshamMcCullochManningFairchildWindomFosterCarlisleGageShawCortelyouMacVeaghMcAdooGlassHoustonMellonMillsWoodin • Morgenthau • VinsonSnyderHumphreyAndersonDillon • Fowler • BarrKennedyConnallyShultzSimonBlumenthalMillerReganBakerBradyBentsenRubinSummersO'NeillSnowPaulson
Chief Justices of the United States of America Seal of the United States Supreme Court
JayRutledgeEllsworthMarshallTaneyChaseWaiteFullerWhite
TaftHughesStoneVinsonWarrenBurgerRehnquistRoberts
The Taney Court Seal of the U.S. Supreme Court
1836–1837: J. Story | S. Thompson | J. McLean | H. Baldwin | J.M. Wayne | P.P. Barbour
1837–1838: J. Story | S. Thompson | J. McLean | H. Baldwin | J.M. Wayne | P.P. Barbour | J. Catron
1838–1841: J. Story | S. Thompson | J. McLean | H. Baldwin | J.M. Wayne | P.P. Barbour | J. Catron | J. McKinley
1842–1843: J. Story | S. Thompson | J. McLean | H. Baldwin | J.M. Wayne | J. Catron | J. McKinley | P.V. Daniel
1843–1844: J. Story | J. McLean | H. Baldwin | J.M. Wayne | J. Catron | J. McKinley | P.V. Daniel
1845–1846: J. McLean | J.M. Wayne | J. Catron | J. McKinley | P.V. Daniel | S. Nelson | L. Woodbury
1846–1851: J. McLean | J.M. Wayne | J. Catron | J. McKinley | P.V. Daniel | S. Nelson | L. Woodbury | R.C. Grier
1851–1852: J. McLean | J.M. Wayne | J. Catron | J. McKinley | P.V. Daniel | S. Nelson | R.C. Grier | B.R. Curtis
1853–1857: J. McLean | J.M. Wayne | J. Catron | P.V. Daniel | S. Nelson | R.C. Grier | B.R. Curtis | J.A. Campbell
1858–1860: J. McLean | J.M. Wayne | J. Catron | P.V. Daniel | S. Nelson | R.C. Grier | J.A. Campbell | N. Clifford
1860–1861: J. McLean | J.M. Wayne | J. Catron | S. Nelson | R.C. Grier | J.A. Campbell | N. Clifford
1862–1863: J.M. Wayne | J. Catron | S. Nelson | R.C. Grier | N. Clifford | N.H. Swayne | S.F. Miller | D. Davis
1863–1864: J.M. Wayne | J. Catron | S. Nelson | R.C. Grier | N. Clifford | N.H. Swayne | S.F. Miller | D. Davis | S.J. Field

[[Category:Maryland in the Civil War}Taney, Roger]] Attorney General J. Joseph Curran. ... John MacPherson Berrien (August 23, 1781–January 1, 1856) of Georgia was a United States Senator and Andrew Jacksons Attorney General. ... Alberto Gonzales, current Attorney General of the United States The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Benjamin Franklin Butler (December 17, 1795–November 8, 1858) was a lawyer, legislator and Attorney General of the United States. ... William John Duane (May 9, 1780 - September 27, 1865) was a U.S. (Irish-born) lawyer. ... John W. Snow, the current Secretary of the Treasury. ... Levi Woodbury (December 22, 1789–September 4, 1851) was the first justice of the Supreme Court of the United States to have attended law school. ... John Marshall (September 24, 1755–July 6, 1835) was an American statesman and jurist who more than anyone shaped American constitutional law and made the Supreme Court a center of power. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... March 28 is the 87th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (88th in leap years). ... Charles Darwin 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... Alberto Gonzales, current Attorney General of the United States The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Image File history File links Doj. ... Edmund Jennings Randolph (August 10, 1753 – September 12, 1813) was an American attorney, Governor of Virginia, Secretary of State, and the first United States Attorney General. ... William Bradford (September 14, 1755–August 23, 1795) was a lawyer and judge from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and the second United States Attorney General in 1794-1795. ... Charles Lee (1758– June 24, 1815) was an American lawyer from Virginia. ... Levi Lincoln, Sr. ... Robert Smith (November 3, 1757–November 26, 1842) was the second United States Secretary of the Navy from 1801 to 1809 and the sixth United States Secretary of State from 1809 to 1811. ... John Breckinridge served many positions in government throughout his life. ... Caesar Augustus Rodney (January 4, 1772 _ June 10, 1824) was the United States Attorney General from 1807 to 1811, a U.S. Senator from Delaware from 1822 to 1823, and the U.S. Minister to Argentina from 1823 until his death in Buenos Aires in 1824. ... William Pinkney William Pinkney (March 17, 1764–February 25, 1822) was an American statesman and diplomat, and the seventh U.S. Attorney General. ... Wikipedia also has an entry for Richard Rush (director) Richard Rush Richard Rush (August 29, 1780–July 30, 1859) was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... William Wirt (November 8, 1772 – February 18, 1834) was an American author and statesman who is credited with turning the position of United States Attorney General into one of influence. ... John MacPherson Berrien (August 23, 1781–January 1, 1856) of Georgia was a United States Senator and Andrew Jacksons Attorney General. ... Benjamin Franklin Butler (December 17, 1795–November 8, 1858) was a lawyer, legislator and Attorney General of the United States. ... Felix Grundy (September 11, 1777–December 19, 1840) was a U.S. Congressman and U.S. Senator from Tennessee who also served as the 13th Attorney General of the United States. ... Henry Dilworth Gilpin (April 14, 1801–January 29, 1860) was an American lawyer and statesman of American Quaker extraction who served as Attorney General of the United States. ... John Jordan Crittenden (September 10, 1786–July 26, 1863) was an American statesman. ... Hugh Swinton Legaré (January 2, 1797–June 20, 1843) was an American lawyer and politician. ... John Nelson (1794 - 1860) was a U.S. lawyer. ... John Young Mason (April 18, 1799–October 3, 1859) was an American politician and diplomat. ... Nathan Clifford (August 18, 1803–July 25, 1881) was an American statesman, diplomat and jurist. ... Isaac Toucey (November 15, 1792–July 30, 1869) was an American statesman who served as a U.S. Senator, Secretary of the Navy, Attorney General of the United States and Governor of Connecticut. ... Reverdy Johnson (May 21, 1796–February 10, 1876) was an American statesman and jurist. ... John Jordan Crittenden (September 10, 1786–July 26, 1863) was an American statesman. ... Caleb Cushing (January 17, 1800–January 2, 1879) was an American statesman and diplomat who served as a U.S. Congressman from Massachusetts and Attorney General under President Franklin Pierce. ... Jeremiah Sullivan Black (January 10, 1810–August 19, 1883) was an American statesman and lawyer. ... Edwin McMasters Stanton (December 19, 1814 – December 24, 1869), was an American lawyer, politician, United States Attorney General in 1860-61 and Secretary of War through most of the American Civil War and Reconstruction era. ... Note: This article is about the American lawyer. ... James Speed (March 11, 1812–June 25, 1887) was a American lawyer, politician and professor. ... Henry Stanberry (February 20, 1803–June 26, 1881) was an American lawyer and Presidential Cabinet member. ... Photograph of U.S. Secretary of State William M. Evarts William Maxwell Evarts (February 6, 1818–February 28, 1901) was an American lawyer and statesman. ... Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar (February 21, 1816–January 31, 1895) was an American politician. ... Amos Tappan Akerman (February 23, 1821 - December 21, 1880) served as United States Attorney General under President Ulysses S. Grant from 1870-1872. ... George Henry Williams (March 23, 1823–April 4, 1910) was an American judge and statesman. ... Edwards Pierrepont (March 4, 1817–March 6, 1892) was an American statesman, jurist and lawyer. ... Alphonso Taft Alphonso Taft (November 5, 1810 – May 21, 1891) was the Attorney General and Secretary of War under President Ulysses S. Grant and the founder of an American political dynasty. ... Charles Devens (April 4, 1820–January 7, 1891) was an American lawyer, jurist and statesman. ... Isaac Wayne MacVeagh (April 19, 1833–January 11, 1917) was an American politician and diplomat. ... Benjamin Harris Brewster (October 13, 1816–April 4, 1888) was an American attorney and Cabinet secretary. ... Augustus Hill Garland (June 11, 1832 - January 26, 1899) was an Attorney General of the United States, Democratic United States Senator, Confederate States Senator, Confederate States Representative, and Governor of the State of Arkansas. ... William Henry Harrison Miller (September 6, 1840&ndsah;May 25, 1917) was an American lawyer and Attorney General of the United States. ... Richard Olney (September 15, 1835–April 8, 1917) was an American statesman. ... Judson Harmon (February 3, 1846 - February 22, 1927) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Joseph McKenna (August 10, 1843–November 21, 1926) was an American politician who served in all three branches of the U.S. federal government, as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, as U.S. Attorney General and as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. ... John William Griggs (July 10, 1849–November 28, 1927) was an American politician. ... Philander C. Knox Philander Chase Knox (May 6, 1853–October 12, 1921) was an American lawyer and politician who served as Attorney General and U.S. Senator and was Secretary of State from 1909-1913. ... William Henry Moody (23 December 1853–1917) was an American politician and jurist, who held positions in all three branches of the Government of the United States. ... Charles Joseph Bonaparte (June 9, 1851–June 28, 1921) was a grandson of Jérôme Bonaparte (the youngest brother of the French emperor Napoleon I), and a member of the United States Cabinet. ... George Woodward Wickersham (September 19, 1858–January 26, 1936) was an American lawyer and Presidential Cabinet Secretary. ... Justice McReynolds, c. ... Thomas Watt Gregory (November 6, 1861–February 26, 1933) was an American attorney and Cabinet Secretary. ... Alexander Mitchell Palmer (May 4, 1872 - May 11, 1936) was an American lawyer and politician, nicknamed The Fighting Quaker and later the The Quaking Fighter. ... Harry Micajah Daugherty (January 26, 1860–October 12, 1941) (daw-GER-tee) was an American politician. ... Harlan Fiske Stone (October 11, 1872 – April 22, 1946) was an American lawyer and jurist who served as the dean of Columbia Law School, Attorney General of the United States, Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and later Chief Justice of the United States. ... John Garibaldi Sargent (October 13, 1860–March 5, 1939) was an American lawyer and statesman. ... William DeWitt Mitchell (September 9, 1874–August 24, 1955) was U.S. Attorney General for the entirety of Herbert Hoovers Presidency. ... Homer Stille Cummings (1870 - 1956) was a U.S. political figure. ... For the Australian rules footballer, see Frank Murphy (footballer). ... Robert Houghwout Jackson (February 13, 1892–October 9, 1954) was United States Attorney General (1940–1941) and an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court (1941–1954). ... The Nuremberg judges, left to right: John Parker, Francis Biddle, Alexander Volchkov, Iona Nikitchenko, Geoffrey Lawrence, Norman Birkett candice(May 9, 1886 – October 4, 1968) is a hater Biddle was one of four sons of Algernon Biddle, a law professor at the University of Pennsylvania. ... Tom Campbell Clark (September 23, 1899 in Dallas, Texas –June 13, 1977) was United States Attorney General from 1945-1949 and an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (1949-1967). ... McGrath (middle left) with Theodore Francis Green (right) and Harry S. Truman (far right). ... James Patrick McGranery (July 8, 1895–December 23, 1962) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Herbert Brownell, Jr. ... William Pierce Rogers (June 23, 1913 – January 2, 2001) was an American politician, who served as a Cabinet officer in the administrations of two U.S. Presidents in the third quarter of the 20th century. ... RFK redirects here. ... Nicholas deBelleville Katzenbach (born January 17, 1922) was a American lawyer and United States Attorney General. ... William Ramsey Clark (born December 18, 1927) lawyer and political activist . ... Mitchell (far left) meeting with Nixon, J. Edgar Hoover, and John Ehrlichman on May 26, 1971. ... Richard Gordon Kleindienst (August 5, 1923–February 3, 2000) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Elliot Lee Richardson Elliot Lee Richardson (July 20, 1920 – December 31, 1999) was an American lawyer and politician who was a member of the cabinet of President Richard Nixon, but he managed to avoid being tainted by the Watergate Scandal. ... William Bart Saxbe (born June 24, 1916) was an American politician of the Republican Party, who served as a U.S. Senator from Ohio and as U.S. Attorney General under Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald R. Ford. ... Edward H. Levi Edward Hirsch Levi (June 26, 1911 – March 7, 2000) was an American academic leader, scholar, and statesman. ... Griffin Boyette Bell (born October 31, 1918) is an American lawyer and former Presidential Cabinet member. ... Benjamin Richard Civiletti (born July 17, 1935) served as the United States Attorney General during the Carter administration, from 1979 to 1981. ... William French Smith (August 26, 1917–October 29, 1990) was an American lawyer and the 74th Attorney General of the United States. ... Edwin Meese III Edwin Ed Meese III (born December 2, 1931 in Oakland, California) served as the seventy-fifth Attorney General of the United States (1985-1988). ... Richard L. Dick Thornburgh (born July 16, 1932) is a lawyer and Republican politician who served as the Governor of Pennsylvania from 1979 to 1987, and then as the U.S. Attorney General from 1988 to 1991. ... William P. Barr William Pelham Barr (born May 23, 1950) is an American attorney who served as the 77th Attorney General of the United States. ... Janet Reno (born July 21, 1938) was the 78th Attorney General of the United States (1993–2001), and was the first woman to hold that post. ... John David Ashcroft (born May 9, 1942) was the 79th Attorney General of the United States. ... Alberto R. Gonzales (born August 4, 1955) is the 80th and current Attorney General of the United States, becoming the first Hispanic to serve in the position. ... John W. Snow, the current Secretary of the Treasury. ... Seal of the United States Department of the Treasury. ... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 – July 12, 1804) was an American politician, leading statesman, financier, intellectual, military officer, and founder of the Federalist Party. ... Oliver Wolcott Jr. ... Samuel Dexter (May 14, 1761–May 4, 1816) was an early American statesman who served both in Congress and in the Presidential Cabinet. ... Albert Gallatin Abraham Alfonse Albert Gallatin (January 29, 1761 – August 12, 1849) was a Swiss-American ethnologist, linguist, politician, founder of New York University, diplomat, and United States Secretary of the Treasury. ... George W. Campbell George Washington Campbell (February 9, 1769–February 17, 1848) was an American statesman. ... Dallas, as portrayed in an 1881 copy of a Gilbert Stuart painting Alexander James Dallas (June 21, 1759 – January 16, 1817) was an American statesman who served as the U.S. Treasury Secretary under President James Madison. ... Portrait of U.S. politician William H. Crawford William Harris Crawford (February 24, 1772 – September 15, 1834) was an important American politician during the early 19th century. ... Wikipedia also has an entry for Richard Rush (director) Richard Rush Richard Rush (August 29, 1780–July 30, 1859) was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Samuel Delucenna Ingham (September 16, 1779–June 5, 1860) was a U.S. Congressman and U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Andrew Jackson. ... Louis McLane Louis McLane (May 28, 1786–October 7, 1857) represented the state of Delaware in both the United States House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate and served as the Secretary of the Treasury and later the Secretary of State under President Andrew Jackson. ... William John Duane (May 9, 1780 - September 27, 1865) was a U.S. (Irish-born) lawyer. ... Levi Woodbury (December 22, 1789–September 4, 1851) was the first justice of the Supreme Court of the United States to have attended law school. ... Thomas Ewing Thomas Ewing (December 28, 1789–October 26, 1871) was a National Republican and Whig politician from Ohio. ... Walter Forward (January 24, 1786–November 24, 1852) was an American lawyer and politician. ... John Canfield Spencer (January 8, 1788–May 18, 1855) was an American politician who was Secretary of War from 1841 to 1843 and Secretary of the Treasury from 1843 to 1844 under President John Tyler. ... George Mortimer Bibb (October 30, 1776–April 14, 1859) was an American politician. ... Robert John Walker (July 23, 1801–November 11, 1869) was an American economist and statesman. ... William Morris Meredith (June 8, 1799–August 17, 1873) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Thomas Corwin Thomas Corwin (also known as Tom Corwin and The Wagon Boy) (July 29, 1794 - December 18, 1865) was a member of the United States House of Representatives (elected as a Whig to the 22nd Congress and to the four succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1831, until... James Guthrie (December 5, 1792 – March 3, 1869) was an American businessman and politician. ... Howell Cobb (September 7, 1815–October 9, 1868) was an American political figure. ... Philip F. Thomas For the actor, see Philip Michael Thomas. ... John Adams Dix (July 24, 1798–April 21, 1879) was an American politician. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... Hon. ... Hugh McCulloch Hugh McCulloch (December 7, 1808 – May 24, 1895) was an American statesman who served two non-consecutive terms as U.S. Treasury Secretary, serving under three presidents. ... George Sewall Boutwell (January 28, 1818–February 27, 1905) was an American statesman who served as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Ulysses S. Grant. ... William Adams Richardson (November 2, 1821–October 19, 1896) was an American judge and politician. ... Benjamin Helm Bristow (June 20, 1832–June 22, 1896) was an American lawyer and politician who served as the first Solicitor General of the United States and as a U.S. Treasury Secretary. ... Lot Myrick Morrill (May 13, 1813–January 10, 1883) was an American statesman who served as Governor of Maine, and in the United States Senate and as Secretary of the Treasury. ... John Sherman John Sherman (May 10, 1823–October 22, 1900) was a Senator from Ohio and a member of the United States Cabinet. ... William Windom (May 10, 1827–January 29, 1891) was an American politician. ... Charles James Folger (April 16, 1818–September 4, American politician, jurist and U.S. Secretary of the Treasury. ... Walter Quintin Gresham (March 17, 1832–May 28, 1895) was an American statesman and jurist. ... Hugh McCulloch Hugh McCulloch (December 7, 1808 – May 24, 1895) was an American statesman who served two non-consecutive terms as U.S. Treasury Secretary, serving under three presidents. ... Daniel Manning (May 16, 1831–December 24, 1887) was an American businessman and politician. ... Charles Stebbins Fairchild (April 30, 1842–November 24, American businessman and politician. ... William Windom (May 10, 1827–January 29, 1891) was an American politician. ... Charles Foster Charles Foster (April 12, 1828–January 9, 1904) was a U.S. Republican politician from Ohio. ... John G. Carlisle (September 5, 1834 - July 31, 1910) was a prominent American politician in the Democratic Party during the last quarter of the 19th century. ... Lyman Judson Gage (June 28, 1836–January 26, 1927) was an American financier and Presidential Cabinet officer. ... Leslie Mortimer Shaw (November 2, 1848–March 28, 1932) was an American businessman, lawyer and politician. ... G.B. Cortelyou George Bruce Cortelyou (July 26, 1862–October 23, 1940) was an American Presidential Cabinet secretary of the early 20th century. ... Franklin MacVeagh (November 22, 1837–July 6, 1934) was an American banker and Treasury Secretary. ... William Gibbs McAdoo (October 31, 1863–February 1, 1941) was a U.S. Senator and United States Secretary of the Treasury. ... Carter Glass Carter Glass (January 4, 1858–May 28, 1946) was an American politician from Virginia, who served many years in Congress, as well as U.S. Secretary of the Treasury under Woodrow Wilson. ... David Franklin Houston (February 17, 1866–September 2, 1940) was an American academic, businessman and politician. ... Formal portrait of Mellon Andrew William Mellon (March 24, 1855–August 27, 1937) was an American banker, industrialist, philanthropist, art collector and Secretary of the Treasury from March 4, 1921. ... Ogden Livingston Mills (August 23, 1884–October 11, 1937) was an American businessman and politician. ... Woodin, 1933, Time Woodins signature, as used on American currency William Hartman Woodin (1868–1934) was a U.S. industrialist. ... Henry Morgenthau Jr. ... Frederick Moore Vinson (January 22, 1890–September 8, 1953) served the United States in all three branches of government. ... Portrait of John W. Snyder U.S. Secretary of the Treasury painted by Greta Kempton. ... Humphreys signature, as used on American currency George Magoffin Humphrey (March 8, 1890–January 20, 1970) was an American lawyer, businessman and Cabinet secretary. ... Robert Bernard Anderson Andersons signature, as used on American currency Robert Bernard Anderson (June 4, 1910–August 14, 1989) was a U.S. administrator and businessman. ... Dillons signature, as used on American currency Clarence Douglas Dillon (August 21, 1909 – January 10, 2003) son of Clarence and Ann (Douglass) Dillon, was U.S. Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to France (1953-1957) and 57th secretary of the United States Department of the Treasury (1961-1965). ... Henry Hammill Fowler (September 5, 1908–January 3, 2000) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Joseph Walker Barr (January 17, 1918–February 23, 1996) was an American businessman and politician. ... For the American historian, see David M. Kennedy (historian). ... John Connally, Governor of Texas, Secretary of the Treasury Connallys signature, as used on American currency John Bowden Connally, Jr. ... Shultz in his official D.O.L. portrait. ... William Edward Simon (November 27, 1927–June 3, 2000) became the 63rd Secretary of the Treasury on May 8, 1974, during the Nixon administration. ... Blumenthal, on the cover of Time magazine Blumenthals signature, as used on American currency Werner Michael Blumenthal, Ph. ... Chairman Miller, Time, 1978 Millers signature, as used on American currency George William Miller (March 9, 1925 – March 17, 2006) served as the 65th United States Secretary of the Treasury under President Carter from August 6, 1979 to January 20, 1981. ... Donald Thomas Regan (December 21, 1918 – June 10, 2003) was the 66th United States Secretary of the Treasury, from 1981 to 1985, and Chief of Staff from 1985 to 1987 in the Reagan administration, where he advocated supply-side economics and tax cuts to create jobs and stimulate production. ... James Addison Baker III (born April 28, 1930), American politician and diplomat, was Chief of Staff in President Ronald Reagans first administration, United States Secretary of the Treasury from 1985 to 1988 in the second Reagan administration, and Secretary of State in the administration of President George H. W... Nicholas F. Brady Nicholas Frederick Brady (born April 11, 1930, in New York City) was United States Secretary of the Treasury under Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush, and is also known for articulating the Brady Plan in March 1989. ... Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. ... Robert Edward Rubin (b. ... Lawrence Henry Summers (born November 30, 1954) is an American economist and academic. ... Paul H. ONeill Paul Henry ONeill (born December 4, 1935) served as the 72nd United States Secretary of the Treasury for part of President George W. Bushs first Administration. ... John W. Snow John William Snow, Ph. ... Henry Paulson Henry M. (Hank) Paulson, Jr. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Image File history File links Seal_of_the_United_States_Supreme_Court. ... John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American politician, statesman, revolutionary, diplomat and jurist. ... John Rutledge (September 17, 1739 – July 18, 1800) was Governor of South Carolina, delegate to the Constitutional Convention, and served on the U.S. Supreme Court (Chief Justice from August to December 1795). ... Oliver Ellsworth (April 29, 1745 - November 26, 1807), an American lawyer and politician, was a revolutionary against British rule, a drafter of the United States Constitution, and third Chief Justice of the United States. ... John Marshall (September 24, 1755–July 6, 1835) was an American statesman and jurist who more than anyone shaped American constitutional law and made the Supreme Court a center of power. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... Morrison Remick Waite served as the Chief Justice of the United States. ... Melville Weston Fuller (February 11, 1833 – July 4, 1910) was the Chief Justice of the United States between 1888 and 1910. ... Edward Douglass White (November 3, 1845 – May 19, 1921), American politician and jurist, was a United States Senator, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States and the ninth Chief Justice of the United States. ... William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was an American politician; the 27th President of the United States, the 10th Chief Justice of the United States; a leader of the progressive conservative wing of the Republican Party in the early twentieth century; a chaired professor at Yale Law... Charles Evans Hughes (April 11, 1862 – August 27, 1948) was Governor of New York, United States Secretary of State, Associate Justice and Chief Justice of the United States. ... Harlan Fiske Stone (October 11, 1872 – April 22, 1946) was an American lawyer and jurist who served as the dean of Columbia Law School, Attorney General of the United States, Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and later Chief Justice of the United States. ... Frederick Moore Vinson (January 22, 1890–September 8, 1953) served the United States in all three branches of government. ... Earl Warren (March 19, 1891 – July 9, 1974) was a California district attorney of Alameda County, the 30th Governor of California, and the 14th Chief Justice of the United States (from 1953 to 1969). ... Warren Earl Burger (September 17, 1907 – June 25, 1995) was Chief Justice of the United States from 1969 to 1986. ... William Hubbs Rehnquist (October 1, 1924 – September 3, 2005) was an American lawyer, jurist and political figure, who served as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States and later as the Chief Justice of the United States. ... John Glover Roberts, Jr. ... Image File history File links Seal_of_the_United_States_Supreme_Court. ... American jurist Joseph Story Joseph Story (September 18, 1779 - September 10, 1845), American jurist, was born at Marblehead, Massachusetts. ... Smith Thompson (January 17, 1768 - December 18, 1843) was a United States Supreme Court Associate Justice from 1823 until his death in 1843. ... John McLean (March 11, 1785 – April 4, 1861) was an American jurist and politician who served in the United States Congress, as U.S. Postmaster General, and as a justice on the Ohio and U.S. Supreme Courts. ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. Supreme Court justices ... Justice Wayne, in an 1855 photograph by Matthew Brady James Moore Wayne (1790 - July 5, 1867) was an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Georgia. ... This article needs cleanup. ... American jurist Joseph Story Joseph Story (September 18, 1779 - September 10, 1845), American jurist, was born at Marblehead, Massachusetts. ... Smith Thompson (January 17, 1768 - December 18, 1843) was a United States Supreme Court Associate Justice from 1823 until his death in 1843. ... John McLean (March 11, 1785 – April 4, 1861) was an American jurist and politician who served in the United States Congress, as U.S. Postmaster General, and as a justice on the Ohio and U.S. Supreme Courts. ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. Supreme Court justices ... Justice Wayne, in an 1855 photograph by Matthew Brady James Moore Wayne (1790 - July 5, 1867) was an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Georgia. ... This article needs cleanup. ... John Catron (January 7, 1786-May 30, 1865) was an American jurist who served as a Supreme Court justice from 1837 to 1865. ... American jurist Joseph Story Joseph Story (September 18, 1779 - September 10, 1845), American jurist, was born at Marblehead, Massachusetts. ... Smith Thompson (January 17, 1768 - December 18, 1843) was a United States Supreme Court Associate Justice from 1823 until his death in 1843. ... John McLean (March 11, 1785 – April 4, 1861) was an American jurist and politician who served in the United States Congress, as U.S. Postmaster General, and as a justice on the Ohio and U.S. Supreme Courts. ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. Supreme Court justices ... Justice Wayne, in an 1855 photograph by Matthew Brady James Moore Wayne (1790 - July 5, 1867) was an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Georgia. ... This article needs cleanup. ... John Catron (January 7, 1786-May 30, 1865) was an American jurist who served as a Supreme Court justice from 1837 to 1865. ... John McKinley (May 1, 1780-July 19, 1852) was a U.S. senator from the state of Alabama and an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court. ... American jurist Joseph Story Joseph Story (September 18, 1779 - September 10, 1845), American jurist, was born at Marblehead, Massachusetts. ... Smith Thompson (January 17, 1768 - December 18, 1843) was a United States Supreme Court Associate Justice from 1823 until his death in 1843. ... John McLean (March 11, 1785 – April 4, 1861) was an American jurist and politician who served in the United States Congress, as U.S. Postmaster General, and as a justice on the Ohio and U.S. Supreme Courts. ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. Supreme Court justices ... Justice Wayne, in an 1855 photograph by Matthew Brady James Moore Wayne (1790 - July 5, 1867) was an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Georgia. ... John Catron (January 7, 1786-May 30, 1865) was an American jurist who served as a Supreme Court justice from 1837 to 1865. ... John McKinley (May 1, 1780-July 19, 1852) was a U.S. senator from the state of Alabama and an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court. ... Peter Vivian Daniel (April 24, 1784-May 31, 1860), was an American jurist. ... American jurist Joseph Story Joseph Story (September 18, 1779 - September 10, 1845), American jurist, was born at Marblehead, Massachusetts. ... John McLean (March 11, 1785 – April 4, 1861) was an American jurist and politician who served in the United States Congress, as U.S. Postmaster General, and as a justice on the Ohio and U.S. Supreme Courts. ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. Supreme Court justices ... Justice Wayne, in an 1855 photograph by Matthew Brady James Moore Wayne (1790 - July 5, 1867) was an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Georgia. ... John Catron (January 7, 1786-May 30, 1865) was an American jurist who served as a Supreme Court justice from 1837 to 1865. ... John McKinley (May 1, 1780-July 19, 1852) was a U.S. senator from the state of Alabama and an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court. ... Peter Vivian Daniel (April 24, 1784-May 31, 1860), was an American jurist. ... John McLean (March 11, 1785 – April 4, 1861) was an American jurist and politician who served in the United States Congress, as U.S. Postmaster General, and as a justice on the Ohio and U.S. Supreme Courts. ... Justice Wayne, in an 1855 photograph by Matthew Brady James Moore Wayne (1790 - July 5, 1867) was an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Georgia. ... John Catron (January 7, 1786-May 30, 1865) was an American jurist who served as a Supreme Court justice from 1837 to 1865. ... John McKinley (May 1, 1780-July 19, 1852) was a U.S. senator from the state of Alabama and an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court. ... Peter Vivian Daniel (April 24, 1784-May 31, 1860), was an American jurist. ... Samuel Nelson (10 November 1792 - 13 December 1873) was an American attorney and U.S. Supreme Court justice. ... Levi Woodbury (December 22, 1789–September 4, 1851) was the first justice of the Supreme Court of the United States to have attended law school. ... John McLean (March 11, 1785 – April 4, 1861) was an American jurist and politician who served in the United States Congress, as U.S. Postmaster General, and as a justice on the Ohio and U.S. Supreme Courts. ... Justice Wayne, in an 1855 photograph by Matthew Brady James Moore Wayne (1790 - July 5, 1867) was an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Georgia. ... John Catron (January 7, 1786-May 30, 1865) was an American jurist who served as a Supreme Court justice from 1837 to 1865. ... John McKinley (May 1, 1780-July 19, 1852) was a U.S. senator from the state of Alabama and an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court. ... Peter Vivian Daniel (April 24, 1784-May 31, 1860), was an American jurist. ... Samuel Nelson (10 November 1792 - 13 December 1873) was an American attorney and U.S. Supreme Court justice. ... Levi Woodbury (December 22, 1789–September 4, 1851) was the first justice of the Supreme Court of the United States to have attended law school. ... Robert Cooper Grier (March 5, 1794-September 25, 1870), was an American jurist. ... John McLean (March 11, 1785 – April 4, 1861) was an American jurist and politician who served in the United States Congress, as U.S. Postmaster General, and as a justice on the Ohio and U.S. Supreme Courts. ... Justice Wayne, in an 1855 photograph by Matthew Brady James Moore Wayne (1790 - July 5, 1867) was an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Georgia. ... John Catron (January 7, 1786-May 30, 1865) was an American jurist who served as a Supreme Court justice from 1837 to 1865. ... John McKinley (May 1, 1780-July 19, 1852) was a U.S. senator from the state of Alabama and an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court. ... Peter Vivian Daniel (April 24, 1784-May 31, 1860), was an American jurist. ... Samuel Nelson (10 November 1792 - 13 December 1873) was an American attorney and U.S. Supreme Court justice. ... Robert Cooper Grier (March 5, 1794-September 25, 1870), was an American jurist. ... Benjamin Robbins Curtis (4 November 1809 _ 15 September 1874) was an American attorney and United States Supreme Court Justice. ... John McLean (March 11, 1785 – April 4, 1861) was an American jurist and politician who served in the United States Congress, as U.S. Postmaster General, and as a justice on the Ohio and U.S. Supreme Courts. ... Justice Wayne, in an 1855 photograph by Matthew Brady James Moore Wayne (1790 - July 5, 1867) was an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Georgia. ... John Catron (January 7, 1786-May 30, 1865) was an American jurist who served as a Supreme Court justice from 1837 to 1865. ... Peter Vivian Daniel (April 24, 1784-May 31, 1860), was an American jurist. ... Samuel Nelson (10 November 1792 - 13 December 1873) was an American attorney and U.S. Supreme Court justice. ... Robert Cooper Grier (March 5, 1794-September 25, 1870), was an American jurist. ... Benjamin Robbins Curtis (4 November 1809 _ 15 September 1874) was an American attorney and United States Supreme Court Justice. ... John Archibald Campbell (June 24, 1811 – March 12, 1889), was an American jurist. ... John McLean (March 11, 1785 – April 4, 1861) was an American jurist and politician who served in the United States Congress, as U.S. Postmaster General, and as a justice on the Ohio and U.S. Supreme Courts. ... Justice Wayne, in an 1855 photograph by Matthew Brady James Moore Wayne (1790 - July 5, 1867) was an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Georgia. ... John Catron (January 7, 1786-May 30, 1865) was an American jurist who served as a Supreme Court justice from 1837 to 1865. ... Peter Vivian Daniel (April 24, 1784-May 31, 1860), was an American jurist. ... Samuel Nelson (10 November 1792 - 13 December 1873) was an American attorney and U.S. Supreme Court justice. ... Robert Cooper Grier (March 5, 1794-September 25, 1870), was an American jurist. ... John Archibald Campbell (June 24, 1811 – March 12, 1889), was an American jurist. ... Nathan Clifford (August 18, 1803–July 25, 1881) was an American statesman, diplomat and jurist. ... John McLean (March 11, 1785 – April 4, 1861) was an American jurist and politician who served in the United States Congress, as U.S. Postmaster General, and as a justice on the Ohio and U.S. Supreme Courts. ... Justice Wayne, in an 1855 photograph by Matthew Brady James Moore Wayne (1790 - July 5, 1867) was an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Georgia. ... John Catron (January 7, 1786-May 30, 1865) was an American jurist who served as a Supreme Court justice from 1837 to 1865. ... Samuel Nelson (10 November 1792 - 13 December 1873) was an American attorney and U.S. Supreme Court justice. ... Robert Cooper Grier (March 5, 1794-September 25, 1870), was an American jurist. ... John Archibald Campbell (June 24, 1811 – March 12, 1889), was an American jurist. ... Nathan Clifford (August 18, 1803–July 25, 1881) was an American statesman, diplomat and jurist. ... Justice Wayne, in an 1855 photograph by Matthew Brady James Moore Wayne (1790 - July 5, 1867) was an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Georgia. ... John Catron (January 7, 1786-May 30, 1865) was an American jurist who served as a Supreme Court justice from 1837 to 1865. ... Samuel Nelson (10 November 1792 - 13 December 1873) was an American attorney and U.S. Supreme Court justice. ... Robert Cooper Grier (March 5, 1794-September 25, 1870), was an American jurist. ... Nathan Clifford (August 18, 1803–July 25, 1881) was an American statesman, diplomat and jurist. ... Noah Haynes Swayne (December 7, 1804 - June 8, 1884) was an American jurist and politician. ... Samuel Freeman Miller (April 5, 1816 - October 13, 1890), was an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court, 1862-1890. ... David Davis III (March 9, 1815 - June 26, 1886) was a United States Senator from Illinois and associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Justice Wayne, in an 1855 photograph by Matthew Brady James Moore Wayne (1790 - July 5, 1867) was an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Georgia. ... John Catron (January 7, 1786-May 30, 1865) was an American jurist who served as a Supreme Court justice from 1837 to 1865. ... Samuel Nelson (10 November 1792 - 13 December 1873) was an American attorney and U.S. Supreme Court justice. ... Robert Cooper Grier (March 5, 1794-September 25, 1870), was an American jurist. ... Nathan Clifford (August 18, 1803–July 25, 1881) was an American statesman, diplomat and jurist. ... Noah Haynes Swayne (December 7, 1804 - June 8, 1884) was an American jurist and politician. ... Samuel Freeman Miller (April 5, 1816 - October 13, 1890), was an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court, 1862-1890. ... David Davis III (March 9, 1815 - June 26, 1886) was a United States Senator from Illinois and associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Stephen Johnson Field (November 4, 1816 – April 9, 1899) was an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court from May 20, 1863, to December 1, 1897. ...


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m