FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Rodgers and Hammerstein
Rodgers (left) and Hammerstein (right), with Irving Berlin (middle) and Helen Tamiris, watching auditions at the St. James Theatre
Rodgers (left) and Hammerstein (right), with Irving Berlin (middle) and Helen Tamiris, watching auditions at the St. James Theatre

Rodgers and Hammerstein were an American songwriting duo consisting of Richard Rodgers (19021979) and Oscar Hammerstein II (18951960). They are most famous for creating a string of immensely popular Broadway musicals in the 1940s and 1950s, during what is considered the golden age of the medium. Five of their shows were outstanding successes: Oklahoma! (their first collaboration); Carousel; South Pacific; The King and I; and The Sound of Music. In all, among the many accolades their shows (and their film versions) garnered were thirty-four Tony Awards; fifteen Academy Awards; two Pulitzer Prizes; and two Grammys. However, Rodgers and Hammerstein began writing together before the era of the Tonys - Oklahoma! opened in 1943 and Carousel in 1945, and the Tonys did not begin to be awarded until 1947. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2756x2129, 718 KB) High resolution version from http://memory. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2756x2129, 718 KB) High resolution version from http://memory. ... Irving Berlin (May 11, 1888 – September 22, 1989) was an American composer and lyricist, one of the most prodigious and famous American songwriters in history. ... Helen Tamiris Helen Tamiris (1903 -1966) choreographer, modern dancer, and teacher (also known as Helen Becker). ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... For more on his work with his two partners, see Rodgers and Hart and Rodgers and Hammerstein. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... For the song by the Smashing Pumpkins, see 1979 (song). ... For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ... 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... Note on spelling: While most Americans use er (as per American spelling conventions), the majority of venues, performers and trade groups for live theatre use re. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Oklahoma! (1943) was the first musical play written by composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II (see Rodgers and Hammerstein). ... Carousel is a 1945 stage musical by Richard Rodgers (music) and Oscar Hammerstein II (book and lyrics) that was adapted from Ferenc Molnars play Liliom. ... South Pacific is a musical play, with music by Richard Rodgers and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. When it first opened on Broadway on April 7, 1949, it was produced by Leland Hayward and directed by Joshua Logan. ... The King and I is a musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, with a script based on the book Anna and the King of Siam by Margaret Landon. ... The Sound of Music is a musical with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II, and a book by Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse, based on the book The Story of the Trapp Family Singers by Maria von Trapp. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Grammy Award The Grammy Awards (originally called the Gramophone Awards), presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music...

Contents

Previous work and partnerships

See also: Rodgers and Hart

Rodgers had previously been in a successful partnership with Lorenz Hart; among their Broadway hits were the shows Babes in Arms, Pal Joey and A Connecticut Yankee. Hammerstein, a co-writer of the popular Rudolf Friml operetta Rose-Marie, began a successful collaboration with composer Jerome Kern on Sunny, which was a great hit; their 1927 musical Show Boat is considered to be one of the masterpieces of the American musical theatre. Among others, Hammerstein continued to work with Kern and operetta composer Sigmund Romberg on shows such as Sweet Adeline, Music in the Air and Very Warm for May. Although the last of these was panned by critics as a failure, it contained one of Kern and Hammerstein's best-loved songs, All the Things You Are. Rodgers and Hart was the songwriting team consisting of Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart. ... Lorenz (Larry) Hart (May 2, 1895 - November 22, 1943) was the lyricist half of the famed Broadway songwriting team Rodgers and Hart. ... Babes in Arms is a 1937 musical theater production which tells the story of a boy who puts on a show to avoid being sent to a work farm. ... Pal Joey Studio cast album 1950 Pal Joey is a 1940 Broadway musical by American writer John OHara, with music and lyrics by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart. ... A Connecticut Yankee was a 1927 musical by Rogers and Hart, based upon A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthurs Court, a novel by American humorist Mark Twain. ... Rudolf Friml (December 7, 1879 - November 12, 1972) was a composer of operettas, musicals, songs, as well as a pianist. ... Rose Marie (born August 15, 1923) is an actress who had a career as a child star under the name Baby Rose Marie, but is best known for her adult role as Sally Rogers on The Dick Van Dyke Show. ... Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885 – November 11, 1945) was an American composer of popular music. ... Sunny is a 1925 musical play written by Jerome Kern, Oscar Hammerstein II, and Otto Harbach. ... Show Boat is a musical in two acts with music by Jerome Kern and book and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. One notable exception is the song Bill, which was originally written for Kern in 1918 by P. G. Wodehouse but reworked by Hammerstein for Show Boat, and two songs... Sigmund Romberg (July 29, 1887 – November 9, 1951) was an American composer best known for his operettas. ...


In the meantime, Lorenz Hart sank deeper into alcoholism and became more unreliable, prompting Rodgers to approach Hammerstein to ask if he would consider the possibility of working with him. They made a secret arrangement, which came into force when Hart was not available to work on the project that was to become Oklahoma![1] When working with Hart, Rodgers would always write the music for Hart to write the lyrics. However, when he teamed up with Hammerstein, Hammerstein would write the lyrics first and then Rodgers would write the music.


Early work: Oklahoma! and Carousel

Oklahoma!

Main article: Oklahoma!
Oklahoma!

Independently of each other, Rodgers and Hammerstein had been attracted to making a musical based on Lynn Riggs' stage play Green Grow the Lilacs. When Jerome Kern declined Hammerstein's offer to work on such a project and Hart refused Rodgers' offer to do the same, Rodgers and Hammerstein began their first collaboration together. The result, Oklahoma! (1943), marked a revolution in musical drama. Although not the first musical to tell a story of emotional depth and psychological complexity, Oklahoma! introduced a number of new storytelling elements and techniques. These included its focus on emotional empathy; characters and situations far removed from the audience by time and geography; its use of American historical and social materials; and its use of dance and song to convey plot and character rather than act as an intermission or diversion from the story. Oklahoma! (1943) was the first musical play written by composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II (see Rodgers and Hammerstein). ... Image File history File links Oklahoma-DVDcover. ... Green Grow the Lilacs is a folk song of Irish origin that was popular in the United States during the mid 1800s. ... Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885 – November 11, 1945) was an American composer of popular music. ...


The first production was called Away We Go! and opened in the Shubert Theatre in New Haven during March 1943. Only a few changes were made before it opened on Broadway, but two would prove significant: the addition of a show-stopping number, Oklahoma!; and the decision to retitle the musical after it. This article is about the city in Connecticut. ... In software development, a showstopper is a computer bug which prevents a project from going forward, as opposed to a minor bug which can be documented and coped with. ... A number in music is a self-contained piece that is combined with other such pieces in a performance. ... Oklahoma! is the title song from the musical (by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II) This song appears after Curly and Laureys wedding. ...


The original Broadway production opened on March 31, 1943 at the St. James Theatre. At the time, roles in musicals were usually filled by actors who could sing, but Rodgers and Hammerstein chose the reverse, casting singers who could act. As a result, there were also no stars in the production, another unusual step. Nevertheless, the production ran for a then unprecedented 2212 performances, finally closing on May 29, 1948. Many all time musical standards come from this show - among them Oh What a Beautiful Mornin', The Surrey With The Fringe On Top, People Will Say We're In Love, and the title song, Oklahoma! The St. ... Oh What a Beautiful Mornin is a song from the musical Oklahoma! written by composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II. It is sung by Curly at the opening of the first scene. ... The Surrey With the Fringe On Top is a song written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II for the musical Oklahoma!. It is the second song of the show, following the famous opening number sung by Curly Oh, What a Beautiful Morning. In the 1955 film version, Curly was... People Will Say Were In Love was written by Oscar Hammerstein II and composed by Richard Rogers for the musical Oklahoma!. It is sung by Curly McLane and Laurey Williams as a duet. ...


In 1955 it was adapted to make an Academy Award-winning musical film, shot both in the then new 70mm widescreen Todd-AO format and the more established Cinemascope format for theatres without 70mm projection equipment. Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The musical film is a film genre in which several songs sung by the characters are interwoven into the narrative. ... The inner box (green) is the format used in most pre-1952 films and pre-widescreen television. ... Todd-AO was a widescreen film format developed in the mid 1950s. ... A Fox logo used to promote the CinemaScope process. ...


After their initial success with Oklahoma!, the pair took a small break from working together and Hammerstein concentrated on the musical Carmen Jones, a Broadway version of Bizet's Carmen with the characters changed to African-Americans in the then-modern South, for which he wrote the book and lyrics. Carmen Jones was a 1943 Broadway musical, later also performed a 1954 musical film; the play also ran for a season in 1991 at Londons Old Vic. ... Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... Georges Bizet (October 25, 1838 – June 3, 1875), was a French composer of the romantic era best known for his opera Carmen. ... Poster from the 1875 premiere of Carmen Carmen is a French opera by Georges Bizet. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Predominantly Christianity and Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ...


Carousel

Main article: Carousel (musical)

The original production of Carousel was directed by Rouben Mamoulian and opened at Broadway's Majestic Theatre on April 19, 1945, running for 890 performances and closing on May 24, 1947. The original cast included John Raitt, Jan Clayton, Jean Darling, Eric Mattson, Christine Johnson, Murvyn Vye, Bambi Linn, and Russell Collins. From this show came the hit musical numbers The Carousel Waltz (an instrumental), If I Loved You, June Is Bustin' Out All Over, and You'll Never Walk Alone. Carousel is a 1945 stage musical by Richard Rodgers (music) and Oscar Hammerstein II (book and lyrics) that was adapted from Ferenc Molnars play Liliom. ... Rouben Mamoulian (October 8, 1897 – December 4, 1987) was an American film and theatre director. ... Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... The Majestic Theatre is a Broadway theatre at 245 West 44th Street in Manhattan, New York City. ... John Emmett Raitt (January 19, 1917, Santa Ana, California, USA - February 20, 2005, Pacific Palisades, California) was a star of the musical theater stage. ... Jan Clayton (b. ... Jean Darling (born Dorothy Jean LeVake on August 23, 1922) is a former American child actress who was regular in the Our Gang short subjects series from 1927 to 1929. ... Bambi Linn, born on April 26, 1926 in Brooklyn, New York, is an American dancer, choreographer, and actress. ... If I Loved You is a popular song. ... Youll Never Walk Alone is a song written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II for their 1945 musical, Carousel. ...


Carousel was also revolutionary for its time — it was one of the first musicals to contain a tragic plot; the show was adapted from Ferenc Molnar's play Liliom. Carousel is a 1945 stage musical by Richard Rodgers (music) and Oscar Hammerstein II (book and lyrics) that was adapted from Ferenc Molnars play Liliom. ... Ferenc Molnár (b. ... Liliom is a 1909 play by Ferenc Molnár, famous as the basis for the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical Carousel. ...


State Fair

Main article: State Fair

In 1945, a Technicolor musical film version of Phil Stong's novel State Fair, with songs and script by Rodgers and Hammerstein, was released. The film, a remake of a 1933 non-musical Will Rogers movie of the same name, starred Jeanne Crain, Dana Andrews, Dick Haymes and Vivian Blaine. This was the only time the pair ever wrote a score directly for a film. It was a great success, winning R&H their only Oscar, for the song It Might as Well Be Spring. In 1962, there was an unsuccessful remake of the musical film, and it was not until years later that the musical was finally performed onstage for the first time - also unsuccessfully. This article is about three films. ... Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... This article is about three films. ... William Penn Adair Will Rogers (November 4, 1879 – August 15, 1935) was an American comedian, humorist, social commentator, vaudeville performer, and actor. ... Jeanne Crain Jeanne Elizabeth Crain (May 25, 1925 – December 14, 2003) was an American actress. ... Dana Andrews (January 1, 1909 - December 17, 1992) was an American film actor. ... Dick Haymes (born September 13, 1918 in Buenos Aires) was one of the most popular American male vocalists of the 1940s. ... Vivian Blaine Vivian Blaine (born 21 November 1921 in Newark, New Jersey; died 9 December 1995 in New York, New York) was an actress and singer best known for originating the role of Miss Adelaide in the musical theater production Guys and Dolls. ... It Might As Well Be Spring is a song featured in the 1945 film State Fair. ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ...


South Pacific

South Pacific opened on Broadway on April 7, 1949, and ran for more than five years. A number of its songs, such as Bali Ha'i, Younger than Springtime, and Some Enchanted Evening, have become worldwide standards. For their adaptation, Rodgers and Hammerstein, along with co-writer Joshua Logan, won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1950. The play is based upon two short stories by James A. Michener from his book Tales of the South Pacific, which itself was the winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1948. The original cast starred Mary Martin as the heroine Nellie Forbush and opera star Ezio Pinza as Emile de Becque, the French plantation owner. Also in the cast were Juanita Hall, Myron McCormick, Betta St. John, and William Tabbert. The 1958 film version, also directed by Logan, starred Mitzi Gaynor, Rossano Brazzi, John Kerr, Ray Walston, and Juanita Hall. Brazzi, Kerr, and Hall had their singing dubbed by others. Much of the film was shot on location on the island of Kauai in Hawaii. South Pacific is a musical play, with music by Richard Rodgers and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. When it first opened on Broadway on April 7, 1949, it was produced by Leland Hayward and directed by Joshua Logan. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... Joshua Logan (1908-1988), a director and writer, was best known for Broadway and Hollywood shows such as Mister Roberts, Picnic, and South Pacific. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Drama was first awarded in 1918. ... See also: 1949 in literature, other events of 1950, 1951 in literature, list of years in literature. ... James Albert Michener (February 3, 1907? - October 16, 1997) was the American author of such books as Tales of the South Pacific (for which he won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1948), Hawaii, The Drifters, Centennial, The Source, The Fires of Spring, Chesapeake, Caribbean, Caravans, Alaska, Texas, and Poland. ... Tales of the South Pacific is a collection of Pulitzer Prize winning short stories written by James A. Michener in 1946. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded since 1948 for distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life. ... See also: 1947 in literature, other events of 1948, 1949 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Mary Martin photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1949 Mary Virginia Martin (December 1, 1913 – November 3, 1990) born in Weatherford, Texas was a Tony Award winning American star of (mainly stage) musicals. ... Ezio Pinza The Italian bass Ezio Pinza (18 May 1892 - 9 May 1957) was one of the outstanding opera singers of the first half of the 20th century. ... Juanita Hall (born November 6, 1901, died February 28, 1968, Bay Shore, New York) was the first African American to win a Tony Award, for Best Supporting Actress for her role as Bloody Mary in the musical South Pacific in 1950. ... Betta St. ... Mitzi Gaynor (born September 4, 1931 in Chicago, Illinois, although some sources indicate 1930) is an American actress, singer, and dancer. ... Rossano Brazzi (September 18, 1916 – December 24, 1994) was an Italian actor. ... Sir John Robert Kerr, AK, GCMG, GCVO (24 September 1914 – 24 March 1991), 13th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New South Wales and 18th Governor-General of Australia, dismissed the Labor government of Gough Whitlam on 11 November 1975, marking the climax of one of the most significant... Ray Walston (December 2, 1914 – January 1, 2001) was a stage, television and feature film character actor who played the title character on the situation comedy My Favorite Martian and Judge Henry Bone on the drama series Picket Fences. ... Juanita Hall (born November 6, 1901, died February 28, 1968, Bay Shore, New York) was the first African American to win a Tony Award, for Best Supporting Actress for her role as Bloody Mary in the musical South Pacific in 1950. ...


The King and I

Main article: The King and I

Based on Margaret Landon's Anna and the King of Siam, the biographical story of Anna Leonowens, governess to the children of King Mongkut of Siam in the early 1860s, Rodgers and Hammerstein's musical The King and I opened on Broadway on March 29, 1951 and starred Gertrude Lawrence as Anna, and a mostly unknown Yul Brynner as the King. This musical featured the hit songs I Whistle a Happy Tune, Hello Young Lovers, Getting to Know You, We Kiss in a Shadow, Something Wonderful, I Have Dreamed, and Shall We Dance. The King and I is a musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, with a script based on the book Anna and the King of Siam by Margaret Landon. ... Margaret Landon (September 7, 1903 - December 4, 1993) was an American writer who became famous for Anna and the King of Siam, her 1944 novel of the life of Anna Leonowens. ... Anna and the King of Siam is a 1944 book by Margaret Landon, a play and a 1946 movie directed by John Cromwell. ... Anna Leonowens (November, 1831 - January 19, 1915) is chiefly famous for being the British governess portrayed in the musical The King and I. The play, based on adaptations of her factually slipshod memoirs, provides a fictionalised look at her life in the royal court of Siam (present-day Thailand). ... King Mongkut (Rama IV), (October 18, 1804 – October 1, 1868) was king of Siam from 1851 to 1868. ... Motto ชาติ ศาสนา พระมหากษัตริย์ Nation Religion King Anthem Phleng Chat Royal anthem: Phleng Sansoen Phra Barami Capital (and largest city) Bangkok1 Official languages Thai Government Military Junta  -  Head of State HM King Bhumibol Adulyadej  -  Prime Minister General Surayud Chulanont  -  President of the Council of National Security General Sonthi Boonyaratglin Formation  -  Sukhothai kingdom 1238... // The First Transcontinental Railroad in the USA was built in the six year period between 1863 and 1869. ... Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Gertrude Lawrence (June 4, 1898 - September 6, 1952) was an actress and musical performer popular in the 1930s and 1940s, appearing on stage in London and on Broadway, and in several films. ... Yul Brynner (July 11, 1920[1] – October 10, 1985) was a Russian-born Broadway and Academy Award-winning Hollywood actor. ...


It was later adapted for film, in 1956 with Brynner re-creating his role opposite Deborah Kerr. Brynner won an Oscar as Best Actor for his portrayal, and Kerr was nominated as Best Actress. Brynner reprised the role twice on Broadway in 1977 and 1985, and in a short-lived TV sitcom in 1972, Anna and the King. See also: 1955 in film 1956 1957 in film 1950s in film years in film film // Events November 15 - The film Love Me Tender starring Elvis Presley (his first film) opens. ... Deborah Kerr, CBE (born 30 September 1921) is a Golden Globe award winning Scottish actress who is a recipient of an Academy Honorary Award for a motion picture career that has always represented Perfection, Discipline and Elegance. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Best Actor is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actresses working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


The Sound of Music

Main article: The Sound of Music
See also: The Sound of Music (film)

The Sound of Music was Rodgers and Hammerstein's last work together. It told the story of the von Trapp family. It opened on Broadway at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre on November 16, 1959, and starred Mary Martin as Maria and Theodore Bikel as Captain von Trapp. It later was made into a movie (released in 1965) starring Julie Andrews as Maria and Christopher Plummer as the Captain. The movie won five Oscars, including best picture and best director, Robert Wise. Hammerstein did not live to see the movie made. When Rodgers wrote two extra songs for the movie, he wrote the lyrics also. The Sound of Music probably contains more hit songs than any other Rodgers and Hammerstein musical, probably due more than anything to the phenomenal success of the film version - the most financially successful film adaptation of a Broadway musical ever made. The Sound of Music is a musical with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II, and a book by Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse, based on the book The Story of the Trapp Family Singers by Maria von Trapp. ... Rodgers and Hammersteins The Sound of Music is a 1965 film directed by Robert Wise and starring Julie Andrews in the lead role. ... The Sound of Music is a musical with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II, and a book by Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse, based on the book The Story of the Trapp Family Singers by Maria von Trapp. ... The Lunt-Fontanne Theatre is a Broadway theatre, located at 205 West 46th Street. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mary Martin photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1949 Mary Virginia Martin (December 1, 1913 – November 3, 1990) born in Weatherford, Texas was a Tony Award winning American star of (mainly stage) musicals. ... Theodore Bikel. ... Rodgers and Hammersteins The Sound of Music is a 1965 film directed by Robert Wise and starring Julie Andrews in the lead role. ... Dame Julia Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is a BAFTA, Emmy, Grammy and Academy Award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Robert Wise (September 10, 1914 – September 14, 2005) was a sound effects editor, film editor, and Academy Award-winning American film producer and director. ...


Legacy

These two artists completely re-worked the musical theatre genre. Before they came along musicals were whimsical and usually built around a star. After them, musicals contained thought provoking plots and every aspect of the play, dance, song and drama, were important to the plot.


In 1950, the team of Rodgers and Hammerstein received The Hundred Year Association of New York's Gold Medal Award "in recognition of outstanding contributions to the City of New York." In addition to their enduring work, Rodgers and Hammerstein were also honored in 1999 with a United States Postal Service stamp commemorating their partnership. 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... The logo of The Hundred Year Association of New York The Hundred Year Association of New York was founded in 1927 to recognize and reward dedication and service to the City of New York by businesses and organizations that have been in operation in the City for a century or... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... The United States Postal Service (USPS) is an independent establishment of the executive branch of the United States government (see 39 U.S.C. Â§ 201) responsible for providing postal service in the U.S. Within the United States, it is colloquially referred to simply as the post office. ...


The Richard Rodgers Theatre in New York City is named after Rodgers. The Richard Rodgers Theatre was built by Irwin Chanin in 1925. ... Nickname: Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1625 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area  - City  468. ...


List of shows

Oklahoma! (1943) was the first musical play written by composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II (see Rodgers and Hammerstein). ... This article is about three films. ... Carousel is a 1945 stage musical by Richard Rodgers (music) and Oscar Hammerstein II (book and lyrics) that was adapted from Ferenc Molnars play Liliom. ... play the music Fast, lively ... South Pacific is a musical play, with music by Richard Rodgers and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. When it first opened on Broadway on April 7, 1949, it was produced by Leland Hayward and directed by Joshua Logan. ... The King and I is a musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, with a script based on the book Anna and the King of Siam by Margaret Landon. ... ... Pipe Dream is a musical adaptation of John Steinbecks book Cannery Row. ... Rodgers and Hammersteins Cinderella is the name of a musical written for television by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II based upon the fairy tale, Cinderella. ... Flower Drum Song was originally a novel by Chinese American author C.Y. Lee. ... The Sound of Music is a musical with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II, and a book by Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse, based on the book The Story of the Trapp Family Singers by Maria von Trapp. ... A Grand Night for Singing is a musical revue showcasing the music of Richard Rodgers and the lyrics of Oscar Hammerstein II. Featuring songs from such lesser-known works as Allegro, Flower Drum Song, State Fair, and Pipe Dream and hits like Carousel, Oklahoma!, The King and I, South Pacific... State Fair is a musical with a book by Tom Briggs and Louis Mattioli, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II, and music by Richard Rodgers. ... Gustave Dorés illustration for Cendrillon For other uses, see Cinderella (disambiguation). ...

References

  1. ^ Rodgers, Richard Musical Stages, an autobiography W.H. Allen & Co. Ltd., (1975) pp. 207-217 ISBN 0-491-01777-4

1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ...

See also

For more on his work with his two partners, see Rodgers and Hart and Rodgers and Hammerstein. ... For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ... Lorenz (Larry) Hart (May 2, 1895 - November 22, 1943) was the lyricist half of the famed Broadway songwriting team Rodgers and Hart. ...

External links

  • Official Rodgers and Hammerstein Site
  • Biography of Rodgers and Hammerstein at their official site
  • Time Magazine 100 most influential artists
  • Their entry on the Columbian Encyclopedia

  Results from FactBites:
 
Rodgers and Hammerstein - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1366 words)
Rodgers and Hammerstein were an American songwriting duo consisting of Richard Rodgers (1902–1979) and Oscar Hammerstein II (1895–1960).
Rodgers had previously been in a successful partnership with Lorenz Hart; among their Broadway hits were the shows Babes in Arms, Pal Joey, and A Connecticut Yankee.
Hammerstein, a co-writer of the popular Rudolf Friml operetta Rose-Marie, began a successful collaboration with composer Jerome Kern on Sunny, which was a great hit; their 1927 musical Show Boat is considered to be one of the masterpieces of the American musical theatre.
Rodgers and Hammerstein musicals for the beginner (552 words)
Rodgers and Hammerstein began their collaboration in 1943 with "Oklahoma!" "Oklahoma!" opened at the St. James theater in New York City and won them both a Pulitzer Prize.
Rodgers and Kern were not on the best of terms, and Rodgers also stated later that working with Sondheim was "not my first impulse, even while at work with him." The most important part of a musical team is camaraderie and willingness to listen to each other.
Rodgers and Hammerstein have a universal appeal, and rarely cease to delight.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m