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Encyclopedia > Roderic

Roderic (Roderick; Roderik; Rodrigo in Spanish and Portuguese.[1] Ludhriq "لذريق" in Arabic), was king of the Visigoths from 709 to 711, and is sometimes referred to as the last of the Visigothic kings. He succeeded Wittiza to the throne in a period of civil war with his rival Agila, and ruled from Toledo. His defeat and death at the Battle of Guadalete by the Moor Tariq ibn Ziyad was a critical turning point leading to the Umayyad conquest of Hispania over the following decade. The name Roderic means powerful, rich or famous. Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... Migrations The Visigoths (Western Goths) were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe (the Ostrogoths being the other). ... Events Saelred becomes king of Essex Ceolred becomes king of Mercia after his cousin Cenred abdicates to become a monk in Rome A storm separates the Channel Islands of Jethou and Herm Births Emperor Konin of Japan Deaths May 25 - Aldhelm, bishop and scholar Categories: 709 ... See also: phone number 711. ... Wittiza (Witiza) was son of Ergica, king of the Visigoths in Hispania, and ruled jointly with him from 693 to 701 CE. In the latter year Ergica died and Wittiza became sole ruler. ... Agila II was claimed by some to be a king of the Visigoths in Hispania after the defeat of Roderic in 711 CE. On Visigothic king lists, when his reign is recognized, Agila becomes Agila I. Categories: Goths | Spain | Portugal | History of Spain | History of Portugal | Spanish people | Portuguese people... This article is about the city in Spain. ... Combatants Visigoths Muslim forces of the Ummayad Commanders Roderic Tariq ibn Ziyad Strength 20,000-30,000 7,000-9,000 Casualties Unknown Unknown The Battle of Guadalete took place July 19, 711, at the Guadalete River (or La Janda Lake) in the southern extreme of the Iberian peninsula. ... The Moors were the medieval Muslim inhabitants of the western Mediterranean and western Sahara, including: al-Maghrib (the coastal and mountain lands of present day Morocco and Algeria, and Tunisia although Tunisia often is separately called Ifriqiya after the former Roman province of Africa); al-Andalus (the former Islamic sovereign... Tariq ibn Ziyad (d. ... The Umayyad conquest of Hispania (711–718) commenced when an army of the Umayyad Caliphate consisting largely of Moors, the Muslim inhabitants of North and West Africa, invaded Visigothic Christian Hispania (Portugal and Spain) in the year 711 CE. Under the authority of the Umayyad caliph at Damascus, and led...

Contents

Ascension and rule

Following the Catholicization of the Visigothic kings, the Catholic bishops increased in power, until, at the synod held at Toledo in 633, they gained the nobles' right to select a king from among the royal family. When King Ergica died in 701, the throne passed to his son, Wittiza, who had been co-ruler from 693. Upon the deposing or death of King Wittiza in 709, the nobles selected Roderic, the duke of Baetica, who in turn defeated the heirs of Wittiza who claimed a right to rule. Events Oswald of Bernicia becomes Bretwalda. ... Ergica or Egica (c. ... Events September 30 - John VI succeeds Sergius I as Pope. ... Events Births Deaths Categories: 693 ... Roman province of Hispania Baetica, 120 AD In Hispania, which in Greek is called Iberia, there were three Imperial Roman provinces, Hispania Baetica in the south, Lusitania, corresponding to modern Portugal, in the west, and Hispania Tarraconensis in the north and northeast. ...


The family of Wittiza then fled to Ceuta on the northern shore of the Maghreb. In Ceuta, Visigothic rivals of Roderic gathered along with Arians and Jews fleeing forced conversions at the hands of the Catholic bishops who controlled the Visigothic monarchy. The surrounding area of the Maghreb had recently been conquered by Musa Ibn Nosseyr, who established his governor, Tariq ibn Ziyad, at Tangier with a Moorish army of 1,700 men. Area  â€“ Total   28 km² Population  â€“ Total (2005)  â€“ Density  75,276  2688. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about theological views like those of Arius. ... This article is about a title or office in religious bodies. ... “Kingdom” redirects here. ... Musa bin Nusair (640 - 716) was a Yemeni Muslim governor and general under the Umayyads. ... Tariq ibn Ziyad (d. ... A view of Tangier bay at sunrise as seen from Cape Malabata Tangier - Avenue Mohammed VI Tangier (Tanja طنجة in Berber and Arabic, Tánger in Spanish, Tânger in Portuguese, and Tanger in French) is a city of northern Morocco with a population of 669,680 (2004 census). ... The Moors were the medieval Muslim inhabitants of the western Mediterranean and western Sahara, including: al-Maghrib (the coastal and mountain lands of present day Morocco and Algeria, and Tunisia although Tunisia often is separately called Ifriqiya after the former Roman province of Africa); al-Andalus (the former Islamic sovereign...


Julian, count of Ceuta, who the Arabs called Ilyan, was Roderic's vassal but also on increasingly good terms with Tariq, and the family of Wittiza. The Egyptian historian of the Muslim conquest, Ibn Abd-el-Hakem, related a century and a half later that Julian had sent one of his daughters to the Visigothic court at Toledo for education (and as a gauge for Julian's loyalty, no doubt) and that Roderic had made her pregnant. Later ballads and chronicles inflated this tale — she was known in Spanish as la Cava Rumía and attributed Julian's enmity to Roderic's poor treatment of his daughter. In the late seventh and early eighth centuries, Julian, count of Ceuta in North Africa, held the African Pillar of Hercules for Christendom. ... Look up vassal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ibn Abd-el-Hakem (d. ... Police often train to recover hostages taken by force, as in this exercise For the 2005 film, see Hostage (film). ... Rüm, also Roum or Rhum (in Arabic ar-Rum), is a very indefinite term used at different times in the Islamic world for Europeans generally and for the Byzantine Empire in particular, for the Seljuk Sultanate of Rüm in Asia Minor, and for Greeks inhabiting Ottoman territory. ...


Some historians argue that personal power politics may have played a larger part as both Julian and Wittiza's family sought power in the Visgothic kingdom. In exchange for lands in Al-Andalus (the Arab name for the area which the Visigoths still called by its Roman name Hispania) Julian's ships carried Tariq's troops across the Straight of Hercules (Strait of Gibraltar). Al-Andalus is the Arabic name given the Iberian Peninsula by its Muslim conquerors; it refers to both the Caliphate proper and the general period of Muslim rule (711–1492). ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Iberian Peninsula. ... The Strait of Gibraltar as seen from space. ...


Arab & Amazigh invasion

In the spring of 711, Roderic was campaigning against the Basques and Franks near the north Iberian town of Pamplona. Tariq, briefed by Julian, whom he left behind among the merchants, crossed into Visigothic Hispania with a reconnaissance force of some 1,700 men, sailing by night and keeping their size inconspicuous. Ibn Abd-el-Hakem reported that "the people of Andalus did not observe them, thinking that the vessels crossing and recrossing were similar to the trading vessels which for their benefit plied backwards and forwards." Tariq and his men marched up as far as Cartagena on the coast, then to Cordoba, where resistance from the local Visigothic garrison was eventually driven back to the city. See also: phone number 711. ... Languages Basque - few monoglots Spanish - 1,525,000 monoglots French - 150,000 monoglots Basque-Spanish - 600,000 speakers Basque-French - 76,000 speakers [4] other native languages Religions Traditionally Roman Catholic The Basques (Basque: Euskaldunak) are an indigenous people[5] who inhabit parts of northwestern Spain and southwestern France. ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ... The Iberian Peninsula, or Iberia, is located in the extreme southwest of Europe, and includes modern day Spain, Portugal, Andorra and Gibraltar. ... Pamplona (Basque: Iruñea or Iruña) is the capital city of Navarre, Spain. ... For other places of the same name, see Cartagena. ... Location Coordinates : , , Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Córdoba (Spanish) Spanish name Córdoba Founded 8th century BC Postal code 140xx Website http://www. ...


Roderic marched his forces south and met Tariq's men at the Battle of the Rio Barbate or the Battle of Guadalete in the Province of Cadiz. The battle occurred on July 19, 711. Roderic's army of around 25,000 men was defeated by Tariq's force of approximately 7,000. Combatants Visigoths Muslim forces of the Ummayad Commanders Roderic Tariq ibn Ziyad Strength 20,000-30,000 7,000-9,000 Casualties Unknown Unknown The Battle of Guadalete took place July 19, 711, at the Guadalete River (or La Janda Lake) in the southern extreme of the Iberian peninsula. ... Cádiz province Cádiz is a province of southern Spain, in the southwestern part of the autonomous community of Andalusia. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Roderic is believed to have died in the battle, though his exact fate is unknown. The Visigothic army was defeated when the wings commanded by Roderic's relatives Sisbert and Osbert deserted. His defeat left the Visigoths disorganized and leaderless, and the survivors fled north to Écija near Seville. Écija is a city belonging to the province of Seville, Spain. ... Sevilla province Sevilla is a province of southern Spain, in the western part of the autonomous community of Andalusia. ...


The great majority of Roderic's court was also believed killed in the battle (and old tradition says he survived and tried to reach the northern peninsula, in order to defeat the invaders, but die when he was at Viseu, in nowadays Portugal, where some claims his body was buried). The resulting power vacuum is believed to have assisted Tariq's lord, Musa ibn Nusair, in conquering most of the Iberian Peninsula by 718 and the whole of the Visigothic territories by 725. A royal or noble court, as an instrument of government broader than a court of justice, comprises an extended household centered on a patron whose rule may govern law or be governed by it. ... Location  - Region  - Subregion  - District or A.R.   {{{Region}}} {{{Subregion}}} Viseu Mayor  - Party Fernando Ruas PSD Area 507. ... Musa bin Nusair (640 - 716) was a Yemeni Muslim governor and general under the Umayyads. ... Events Pelayo established the Kingdom of Asturias in the Iberian peninsula (modern day Portugal and Spain). ... Events Births Deaths Wihtred, king of Kent Categories: 725 ...


One Visigothic noble, Pelayo of Asturias, escaped capture at the Guadalete River, where he may have been one of the bodyguards of King Roderic. Pelayo returned to his native Asturias (in the northern part of modern day Spain) and became the leader of a rebellion against Munuza, the Moorish governor of the area. Pelayo (in Spanish), Pelágio (in Portuguese), or Pelagius (in Latin) (690–737) was the founder of the Kingdom of Asturias, ruling from 718 until his death. ... Anthem: Asturias, patria querida Capital Oviedo Official language(s) Spanish; Asturian have special status Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 10th  10,604 km²  2. ... Munuza was the Arab leader of northern Spain defeated by Pelayo. ...


Popular culture

The Scottish writer Walter Scott, and the English writers Walter Savage Landor, and Robert Southey had handled the legends associated with these events poetically: Scott in "The Vision of Don Roderick" in 1811, Landor in his tragedy Count Julian in 1812, and Southey in Roderick, the Last of the Goths in 1814. Raeburns portrait of Sir Walter Scott in 1822. ... Walter Savage Landor (January 30, 1775 - September 17, 1864), English writer, eldest son of Walter Landor and his wife Elizabeth Savage, was born at Warwick. ... Robert Southey, English poet Robert Southey (August 12, 1774 – March 21, 1843) was an English poet of the Romantic school, one of the so-called Lake Poets, and Poet Laureate. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ...


The American writer Washington Irving retells the legends in his 1835 Legends of the Conquest of Spain, mostly written while living in that country. These consist of "Legend of Don Roderick," "Legend of the Subjugation of Spain," and "Legend of Count Julian and His Family." Washington Irving (April 3, 1783–November 28, 1859) was an American author of the early 19th century. ...


'Rodrigo' by George Frideric Handel is an operatic version of the conflict between Roderic and Julian. George Frideric Handel, 1733 George Frideric Handel (23 February 1685 – 14 April 1759) was a German-born British Baroque composer who was a leading composer of concerti grossi, operas and oratorios. ...


Notes

**'Catholic' denotes the author's emphasis on European Christianity, as there was not yet any formal schism between Western Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy.

  1. ^ See Rurik for etymology.

Rurik or Riurik (Russian: , Old East Norse Rørik, meaning famous ruler) (ca 830 – ca 879) was a Varangian who gained control of Ladoga in 862 and built the Holmgard settlement (Ryurikovo Gorodishche) in Novgorod. ...

External links

  • Medieval Sourcebook: Ibn Abd-el-Hakem: The Islamic Conquest of Spain
Preceded by:
Wittiza
King of the Visigoths
709–711
Succeeded by:
Agila II

  Results from FactBites:
 
Roderic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (743 words)
In the spring of 711, Roderic was campaigning against the Basques and Franks near the north Iberian town of Pamplona.
Roderic marched his forces south and met Tariq's men at the Battle of the Rio Barbate or the Battle of Guadalete in the Province of Cadiz.
Roderic is believed to have died in the battle, though his exact fate is unknown.
Roderic - definition of Roderic in Encyclopedia (633 words)
Roderic (in Spanish Rodrigo), was the last king of the Visigoths (710 - 711).
Roderic's rivals fled to Septa (Ceuta) on the African shore, the African Pillar of Hercules, which was where the Visigothic dispossessed foregathered, where Arians and Jews fled to avoid forced conversions at the hands of the Catholic bishops that controlled the Visigothic monarchy.
The Egyptian historian of the Arab conquest, Ibn Abd-el-Hakem, related a century and a half later that Julian had sent one of his daughters to the Visigothic court at Toledo for education (and as a gauge for Julian's loyalty, no doubt) and that Roderic had made her pregnant.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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