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Encyclopedia > Rod Serling
Rodman Edward Serling

Rod Serling hosting The Twilight Zone
Born December 25, 1924
Syracuse, New York, USA
Died June 28, 1975 (aged 50)
Rochester, New York, USA
Occupation Screenwriter
Spouse Carol Serling
(19481975)

Rodman Edward "Rod" Serling (December 25, 1924June 28, 1975) was an American screenwriter, most famous for his science fiction anthology television series, The Twilight Zone. Rod Serling hosting The Twilight Zone. ... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 6 days remaining in the year. ... Year 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: The Salt City Location of Syracuse within the state of New York Coordinates: City Government  - Mayor Matthew Driscoll Area  - City 66. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Motto: Rochester: Made for Living Location of Rochester in New York State Country United States State New York County Monroe Government  - Mayor Robert Duffy (D) Area  - City  37. ... Screenwriters, scenarists or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 6 days remaining in the year. ... Year 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Screenwriters, scenarists or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Twilight Zone title. ...

Contents

Biography

The second of two sons (his brother Robert J. Serling later became a novelist), was born in Syracuse, New York to Samuel and Esther Serling, but was raised in Binghamton, New York, where he later graduated Binghamton High School. Though brought up in a Jewish family, Serling became a Unitarian Universalist. Nickname: The Salt City Location of Syracuse within the state of New York Coordinates: City Government  - Mayor Matthew Driscoll Area  - City 66. ... Binghamton is a city located in the Southern Tier of New York in the United States. ... Binghamton High School, previously known as Binghamton Central High School, is a large public high school located in the center of Binghamton, New York. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The flaming chalice is the universally recognized symbol for Unitarian Universalism. ...


Military service

Rod Serling served as a U.S. Army paratrooper and demolition specialist with the 511th Parachute Infantry Regiment, U.S. 11th Airborne Division in the Pacific Theater in World War II from January 1943 to January 1945. He was seriously wounded in the wrist and knee during combat and was awarded the Purple Heart and Bronze Star. The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... An American USMC Paratrooper using a MC1-B series parachute Paratroopers are soldiers trained in parachuting and generally operate as part of an airborne force. ... Shoulder sleeve patch of the 11th Airborne Division. ... A map of the Pacific Theater. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... For other meanings see Purple Heart (disambiguation). ... The Bronze Star Medal is a United States Armed Forces individual military decoration and is the fourth highest award for bravery, heroism or meritorious service. ...


Due to his wartime experiences, Serling suffered from nightmares and flashbacks for the rest of his life. During his service in World War II, he watched as his best friend was crushed to death by a heavy supply crate dropped by parachute onto the field. Though he was rather short (5'4") and slight, Serling was a noted boxer during his military days [1]. The current usage of the term nightmare refers to a dream which causes the sleeper a strong unpleasant emotional response. ... In literature, film, television and other media, a flashback (also called analepsis) is an interjected scene that takes the narrative back in time from the current point the story has reached. ...


Early writing career

Upon leaving the military, Serling entered Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio. He graduated in 1950 with a bachelor's degree in literature. He got his start as a writer after winning second prize in a contest for the radio show Dr. Christian in 1949, while still a college student. Serling and his wife Carol (married in 1948) moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he took a job as staff writer for WLW Radio. Antioch College is a private, independent liberal arts college in Yellow Springs, Ohio and founder of the six campus Antioch University system. ... Yellow Springs is a village in Greene County, Ohio, and is the home of Antioch College. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... WLW is a radio station located in Cincinnati, Ohio, run by Clear Channel Communications and is located at 700 AM. The station runs under the talk format and is the flagship station for Americas Trucking Network (formerly The Truckin Bozo), a popular nationwide, overnight program especially for truckers. ...


Biographers note that throughout his career, Serling was inspired by legendary radio and television playwright Norman Corwin. Both men would trace their careers through the WLW broadcasting franchise to eventually find homes at CBS, and both would be honored for weaving pivotal social themes into their scripts. Norman Corwin is an American writer, producer, essayist and teacher of journalism and writing. ... CBS Broadcasting, Inc. ...


In 1951, Serling started to break into television by writing scripts for The Doctor, Fireside Theater, Hallmark Hall of Fame, Lux Video Theater, Kraft Television Theatre, Suspense and Studio One. He also worked for local Cincinnati TV station WKRC (Channel 12), where he wrote a series of live TV shows titled The Storm. The program was a precursor to The Twilight Zone, as was one of the scripts: Requeim for a Heavyweight. The Doctor was a half-hour medical anthology series that aired Sunday evenings on the NBC television network from 1952-1953. ... Left to right: Phil Proctor, Peter Bergman, Phil Austin, and David Ossman in 2001 The Firesign Theatre is a comedy troupe consisting of Phil Austin, Peter Bergman, David Ossman, and Philip Proctor. ... Hallmark Hall of Fame is a long running anthology program on American television. ... It has been suggested that Kraft Television Theater be merged into this article or section. ... Suspense or tension is the feeling of uncertainty and interest about the outcome of certain actions an audience perceives in a dramatic work. ... Studio One was an American dramatic anthology television series, sponsored by Westinghouse Electric Corporation. ...


In 1955, Kraft Television Theatre presented another of Serling's scripts, the seventy-second to reach the air. To the Serlings, it was just another script, and they missed the first live airing. The name of the show was Patterns and it changed Rod Serling's life. Patterns dramatized the power struggle among a corporate boss, an old hand running out of ideas and energy, and a bright young executive being groomed to take the older man's place. It was a huge hit, and was re-aired the following week, which was nearly unprecedented at the time. The script established Serling as a rarity: a television playwright.


More acclaimed teleplays followed, including The Rack, about a Korean War veteran and the effects of torture, the legendary Requiem for a Heavyweight (from CBS's Playhouse 90 series), and several others, some of which were adapted to the big screen. Requiem, like Patterns, was honored as a milestone in television drama. The installment's producer, Martin Manulis, noted for a PBS biography of Serling that after the live broadcast, CBS chairman William S. Paley called the control room to tell the crew that the show had advanced TV by 10 years. The show's director, Ralph Nelson, wrote and directed a television drama four years later for the Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse about writing Requiem for a Heavyweight called The Man in the Funny Suit, in which Serling appeared as himself. Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... Former crewmembers of the battleship Missouri pose for photos shortly after the Anniversary of the End of World War II ceremony, held aboard the famous ship. ... Torture is defined by the United Nations Convention Against Torture as any act by which severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted on a person for such purposes as obtaining from him or a third person information or a confession, punishing him for an act he... Requiem for a Heavyweight was originally a 1956 teleplay written by Rod Serling and produced for the live television show Playhouse 90 in 1957. ... Playhouse 90 is the name of a 90-minute long dramatic television series that ran on CBS from 1956 to 1961. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... William S. Paley (1901-1990) This article is about the broadcast executive. ... Ralph Nelson (August 12, 1916 - December 21, 1987) was an American movie and television director, producer, writer, and actor. ... The Man in the Funny Suit (1960) is a television drama detailing the agony endured by actor Keenan Wynn while helping his father, legendary comedian Ed Wynn, play a serious role in the original television production of Rod Serlings Requiem for a Heavyweight. ...


Tired of seeing his scripts butchered (removing any political statements, ethnic identities, even the Chrysler Building being removed from a script sponsored by Ford), Serling decided the only recourse for avoiding such artistic interference was to create his own show.


The Twilight Zone

In 1959, CBS aired the first episode of a groundbreaking series, The Twilight Zone. Serling fought hard for creative control, hiring writers he respected (such as Richard Matheson and Charles Beaumont) and launched himself into weekly television. He stated in an interview that the science fiction format would not be controversial and would escape censorship unlike the earlier Playhouse 90 [1]. In reality the show gave him the opportunity to communicate social messages in a more veiled context. CBS Broadcasting, Inc. ... The Twilight Zone is a television series created by Rod Serling. ... Richard Burton Matheson (born February 20, 1926) is an American author and screenwriter, typically of fantasy, horror or science fiction. ... Charles Beaumont (January 2, 1929 – February 21, 1967) was a prolific U.S. author of speculative fiction and horror short stories, beginning in 1951. ...


Serling drew on his own experiences for many episodes, with frequent stories about boxing, military life and aircraft pilots, which integrated Serling's firsthand knowledge. The series also incorporated Serling's progressive social views on racial relations and the like, which were somewhat veiled by the sci-fi/fantasy elements of the shows. Occasionally, however, Serling could be quite blunt, as in the episode I Am The Night--Color Me Black, where America's racism and hatred causes a dark cloud to form in the South before eventually spreading elsewhere. Serling was also progressive on matters of gender, with many stories featuring quick-thinking, resilient women, although he also wrote stories featuring shrewish, nagging wives.


The show lasted five seasons (four of which using a half-hour format, with one half season using an hour-long format), winning awards and critical acclaim for Serling and his staff. While having a loyal fan base, the program never had huge ratings and was twice cancelled, only to be revived. After five years and 156 episodes, 92 of them written by Serling himself, Serling wearied of the show. In 1964, he decided to let the last cancellation be final. This is a list of The Twilight Zone episodes. ...


Serling sold his rights to the series to CBS. His wife later claimed that he did this partly because he believed the studio would never recoup the cost of the show, which frequently went overbudget. In hindsight, this move proved to be a costly mistake.


Night Gallery

In 1969, NBC aired a Serling-penned pilot for a new series, Night Gallery. Set in a dimly lit museum, the pilot film featured Serling (as on-camera host) introducing three tales of the macabre, unveiling canvases that would appear in the subsequent story segments. For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Night Gallery was Rod Serlings follow-up to The Twilight Zone, airing on NBC from 1970 to 1973. ...

Serling as host of Night Gallery.

The series, which premiered in December 1970 (its brief first season rotated as one spoke of a four-series programming wheel titled Four in One), focused more on gothic horror and the occult than did The Twilight Zone. Serling, no longer wanting the burden of an executive position, sidestepped an offer to retain creative control of content — a decision he would come to regret. Although discontented with some of producer Jack Laird's script and creative choices, Serling maintained a stream of creative submissions and ultimately wrote over a third of the series' scripts. Image File history File links Nightgallery3. ... Image File history File links Nightgallery3. ... The gothic novel is an English literary genre, which can be said to have been born with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole. ...


By season three however, Serling began to see many of his script contributions rejected. With his complaints ignored, the disgruntled host dismissed the show as "Mannix in a cemetery." Night Gallery lasted until 1973. Mannix was a television detective series that ran from 1967 through 1975 on CBS. Developed by executive producer Bruce Geller (who also created Mission: Impossible), the title character played by Mike Connors (an actor of Armenian heritage) is an Armenian-American private investigator. ... Year 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1973 Gregorian calendar. ...


While the series has its own cult following, it is not as successful as The Twilight Zone and is generally regarded, sometimes unfairly, as a pale shadow of Serling's previous series.


Fiction

Serling wrote a number of short stories in the science fiction and horror genres, which were collected into three volumes of Twilight Zone stories (1960, 1961, 1962), two of Night Gallery stories (1971, 1972) and a collection of three novellas, The Season to be Wary (1968). This article is in need of attention. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Horror fiction is, broadly, fiction in any medium intended to scare, unsettle, or horrify the reader. ... A novella is a narrative work of prose fiction somewhat longer than a short story but shorter than a novel. ...


A critical essay on Serling's fiction can be found in S. T. Joshi's book The Evolution of the Weird Tale (2004). Joshi emphasises Serling's moralism and the streak of misanthropy imbuing his work, and argues that, far from being merely rewritten scripts, many of Serling's stories can stand as genuinely original and meritorious works of prose fiction. Sunanda Tryambak Joshi (b. ... Moralism is the philosophy of adherence to morality, created by Max Shapiro, of 20th century Los Angeles. ... Misanthropy is a hatred or distrust of the human race, or a disposition to dislike and/or distrust other people. ...


Later years

Subsequent to The Twilight Zone, Serling moved onto cinema screens. He wrote a number of screenplays with a political focus, including Seven Days in May (1964) about an attempted military coup against the President of the US; Planet of the Apes (1968), which is quite scathing about the human condition; and The Man (1972) about the first Black US President. Seven Days in May is a political thriller novel published by Harper & Row, New York in 1962(current hardcover edition: ISBN 0-06-012436-9) written by Fletcher Knebel and Charles W. Bailey. ... Planet of the Apes is a 1968 science fiction film about an astronaut (Charlton Heston) who finds himself stranded on an Earth-like planet two thousand years in the future. ... The Man is a 1972 political drama starring James Earl Jones. ...


Serling had taped introductions for a limited-run summer comedy series on ABC, Keep on Truckin', which was scheduled to begin its run several weeks after his death; these introductions were subsequently edited out of the broadcast episodes.


He also wrote the pilot episode for a short-lived Aaron Spelling series called The New People in 1969. The New People was a short-lived 1969 American television series on ABC that focused on a group of young college students who were returning from a trip in Southeast Asia when their plane crashed on an island in the south Pacific Ocean, killing some of the college students and...


Serling returned to radio in 1974 as the host of a new mystery/adventure series called The Zero Hour.[2] The show aired for two years and Serling wrote several of the scripts. It failed to find a large audience due to its radio serial format and lack of promotion. [3]


Late in his life, Serling taught at Ithaca College in Ithaca, New York where he resided for many years, and did voiceovers for various projects. He narrated documentaries featuring French undersea explorer Jacques-Yves Cousteau and (uncredited) performed the narration for the beginning of the Brian De Palma film Phantom of the Paradise. Ithaca College is a private institution of higher education located on the South Hill of Ithaca, New York. ... The City of Ithaca (named for the Greek island of Ithaca) sits on the southern shore of Cayuga Lake, in Central New York State. ... Jacques-Yves Cousteau in 1976. ... Brian De Palma (born James Giacinto DePalma on September 11, 1940 in Newark, New Jersey) is a prolific, and controversial American film director. ... Phantom of the Paradise is a 1974 muscial, horror-thriller film written and directed by Brian De Palma. ...


In 1975, the 50-year-old Serling suffered two severe heart attacks before entering Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester for heart bypass surgery. He had a third heart attack during the operation and died the following day. He is interred at the cemetery in Interlaken, New York, an area of upstate New York featured prominently in some 'Twilight Zone' episodes. Strong Memorial Hospital is a 750-bed medical facility located at the University of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, New York. ... Nickname: Motto: Rochester: Made for Living Location of Rochester in New York State Country United States State New York County Monroe Government  - Mayor Robert Duffy (D) Area  - City  37. ... Early in a coronary artery bypass surgery during vein harvesting from the legs (left of image) and the establishment of bypass (placement of the aortic cannula) (bottom of image). ... Acute myocardial infarction (AMI or MI), more commonly known as a heart attack, is a disease state that occurs when the blood supply to a part of the heart is interrupted. ... -1... Interlaken is a village in Seneca County, New York, United States. ...


After his death, several Serling scripts were produced. In 1988, J. Michael Straczynski scripted Serling's outline "Our Selena Is Dying" for the 1980s revival of The Twilight Zone; Rod Serling's Lost Classics (1994), was a TV movie based on a Serling script and an outline for another story (the latter was expanded and scripted by Richard Matheson); In the Presence of Mine Enemies (1997) was set in the Warsaw Ghetto; a science-fiction remake of A Town Has Turned to Dust (1998) and A Storm in Summer (2000) followed. Joseph Michael Straczynski (born July 17, 1954) is an award-winning American writer/producer of television series, novels, short stories, comic books, and radio dramas. ... The New Twilight Zone is the popular nickname for the 1985 revival of Rod Serlings acclaimed 1950/60s television series, The Twilight Zone; it was officially titled the same as the original. ... Twilight Zone: Rod Serlings Lost Classics was a 1994 telefilm consisting of two Rod Serling stories. ... Richard Burton Matheson (born February 20, 1926) is an American author and screenwriter, typically of fantasy, horror or science fiction. ... The Ghetto Heroes Memorial in Warsaw The Warsaw Ghetto was the largest of the Jewish ghettos established by Nazi Germany in the General Government during the Holocaust in World War II. Between 1940 and 1943, starvation, disease and deportations to concentration camps and extermination camps dropped the population of the...


Awards and Honors

During his lifetime, Rod Serling received six Emmys, and his biggest successes in writing include: An Emmy Award. ...

Patterns was a live dramatic television show, later developed into a feature film. ... Requiem for a Heavyweight was originally a 1956 teleplay written by Rod Serling and produced for the live television show Playhouse 90 in 1957. ... The Twilight Zone is a television series created by Rod Serling. ... Night Gallery was Rod Serlings follow-up to The Twilight Zone, airing on NBC from 1970 to 1973. ... Planet of the Apes is a 1968 science fiction film about an astronaut (Charlton Heston) who finds himself stranded on an Earth-like planet two thousand years in the future. ...

Legacy in television

When casting for the role of the shady Mr. Morden for the television series Babylon 5, creator J. Michael Straczynski chose Ed Wasser - who had played a bit part in the series' two-hour pilot TV movie - for the role because of his slick looks, charm, and vocal mannerisms reminiscent of a young Rod Serling. The most recent homage to Serling is a modern metal band The Number Twelve Looks Like You, whose name is almost exact to the name of a Twilight Zone episode, Number Twelve Looks Just Like You. This article or section may need to be cleaned up and rewritten because it describes a work of fiction in a primarily in-universe style. ... Babylon 5 is an epic American science fiction television series created, produced, and largely written by J. Michael Straczynski. ... Joseph Michael Straczynski (born July 17, 1954) is an award-winning American writer/producer of television series, novels, short stories, comic books, and radio dramas. ... Categories: Stub | 1964 births ... The Number Twelve Looks Like You (also known as The Number Twelve) is a six-piece mathcore band from Bergen County, New Jersey. ... “Number 12 Looks Just Like You” is an episode of the television series The Twilight Zone. ...


An animated likeness of Serling appeared in an episode of Family Guy which originally aired on March 14, 2000. The episode, titled "Love Thy Trophy", was similar to "The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street" episode from The Twilight Zone. Family Guy is an Emmy award winning American animated television series about a nuclear family in the fictional town of Quahog (IPA or ), Rhode Island. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street is an episode of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone. ...


Serling was ranked #1 in TV Guide's list of the "25 Greatest Sci-Fi Legends" (in the 1 August 2004 issue). TV Guide is the name of two North American weekly magazines about television programming, one in the United States and one in Canada. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


More than 30 years after his death, Serling was digitally resurrected for an episode of the TV series Medium that aired on November 21, 2005. The episode, which was partially filmed in 3-D, opened with Serling introducing the episode and instructing viewers as to when to put on their 3-D glasses. This was accomplished by using footage from The Twilight Zone episode "The Midnight Sun" and digitally manipulating Serling's mouth to match new dialogue spoken by impersonator Mark Silverman. The plot of the episode involved paintings coming to life, a nod to both Twilight Zone and Night Gallery. Medium is an American drama television series about a woman (played by Patricia Arquette) who acts as a research medium for the Phoenix, Arizona, district attorneys office. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In film, the term 3-D (or 3D) is used to describe any visual presentation system that attempts to maintain or recreate moving images of the third dimension, the illusion of depth as seen by the viewer. ... “The Midnight Sun” is an episode of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone. ...


Legacy in other media

Image:TZpinball.jpg
Portrait of Serling from "The Twilight Zone" pinball game

Over the years, a number of pop/rock songs have included tributes and references to Rod Serling and/or The Twilight Zone. Twilight Zone (often abbreviated TZ) is a 1993 widebody pinball game, designed by Pat Lawlor and released by Midway (under the Bally label). ...

  • The Canadian progressive rock band Rush also did a song called "The Twilight Zone" on the other side of their 2112 album, released in 1976.
  • In 1979, the vocal group The Manhattan Transfer scored a big hit with "The Twilight Zone / The Twilight Tone" a jazz-rock variation of the classic Marius Constant theme from the television series (from their Extensions album; their promotional video clip even had lead singer Alan Paul standing beside a door floating in space, mimicking Rod Serling for the introduction.
  • The English heavy metal band Iron Maiden included a song called "Twilight Zone" on the US version of their Killers album, released in 1981, and which may reference The Twilight Zone episode "Night Call".
  • Dutch group Golden Earring had the 1982 hit "Twilight Zone".
  • In the early 1990s the European pop group Ace of Base also had a song called "Twilight Zone" as did the South Korean pop group S.E.S. for their third album released in the spring of the year 2000.
  • On "Threatened", a track from his 2001 album Invincible, pop superstar Michael Jackson used samples of Rod Serling narrations from The Twilight Zone as introduction and conclusion to the song, as well as a montage of clips to make Serling rap in the middle section of the tune.
  • There have been numerous parodies and references to the episode "Nightmare at 20000 feet," which starred William Shatner in his pre-Star Trek days.[2]

On April 5, 1993, Midway introduced The Twilight Zone pinball machine[4] which featured a backglass portrait of Serling surrounded by his creations. Rush is a Canadian rock band comprising bassist, keyboardist, and vocalist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart. ... For the year 2112, see 22nd century. ... The Manhattan Transfer is an American vocal group that was established in New York City in 1972. ... Iron Maiden are a British heavy metal band from east London. ... For the Kiss album, see Killers (Kiss album). ... Golden Earring is a Dutch rock/pop group that was founded in 1961 in The Hague as the Golden Earrings (the s was later dropped). ... Ace of Base is a dance-pop band from Gothenburg, Sweden. ... Invincible is an album by Michael Jackson released on October 30, 2001. ... Michael Joseph Jackson (born August 29, 1958), also known as The King of Pop and Wacko Jacko, is an American musician who has written music spanning many styles including R&B/soul, pop, disco, funk, rock and hip hop. ... RAP may mean: the IATA airport code for Rapid City Regional Airport Rassemblement pour lalternative progressiste, a Québecois political party. ... William Alan Shatner (born on March 22, 1931) is a Canadian actor who gained fame for playing James Tiberius Kirk of the USS Enterprise in the television show Star Trek from 1966 to 1969 and in seven of the subsequent movies. ... The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. ... Midway Games (NYSE: MWY) is an American video game publisher. ... Twilight Zone (often abbreviated TZ) is a 1993 widebody pinball game, designed by Pat Lawlor and released by Midway (under the Bally label). ... An electronic pinball machine (Theatre of Magic), released 1995. ...


In 1994, the Walt Disney World resort opened its premier free fall attraction titled "The Twilight Zone Tower of Terror" at the Disney-MGM Studios theme park in Orlando, Florida. The ride places guests into an unaired episode of The Twilight Zone, where they are introduced to the story by Rod Serling. The story is that at the height of the Hollywood golden age, a famous landmark hotel holding a gala event is struck by lightning during a thunderstorm. Passenger elevators carrying 5 guests mysteriously vanish after plummeting 13 stories, and the tower has stood derelict since that fateful night. Guests board "freight elevators" that carry them upwards and then laterally into the free fall shaft, where they visit the "5th Dimension" room which references the opening TV title sequence. (Footage from "It's a Good Life" was combined with voiceover work of impersonator Mark Silverman). It is a misconception that Serling's trademark cigarette is absent from his hand due to the family-friendly atmosphere of the ride, as it is actually absent in the original footage, as well.[5]
A similar version of the ride appears in California at Disney's California Adventure. The ride differs in aspects of pacing and tone, but none the less, Serling is part of the attraction. The Florida and California editions of the ride feature props from various Twilight Zone episodes.
Tokyo DisneySea has their own version of the Tower of Terror, however the "backstory" departs from the California and Florida versions, erasing all ties to "The Twilight Zone" including any reference, mention, or appearance of Rod Serling.
Disneyland Paris is scheduled to open their version of the ride in January of 2008 and will feature Serling as well as retain "The Twilight Zone" theme. Cinderella Castle, at the center of the Magic Kingdom, is Walt Disney World Resorts most recognizable icon Introduction Owned and operated by The Walt Disney Company, the Walt Disney World Resort in Florida, USA is home to four theme parks, two water parks, several resort hotels and golf courses... This article is about the Disney ride. ... Disney-MGM Studios is a theme park in the Walt Disney World Resort, Florida, USA. It opened on May 1, 1989. ... Theme Park is a simulation computer game designed by Bullfrog Productions, released in 1994, in which the player designs and operates an amusement park. ... Nickname: Location in Orange County and the state of Florida. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... “It’s a Good Life” is an episode of the television series The Twilight Zone. ...


Other filmography

  • The Loner) (TV series)
  • Encounter with the Unknown (1975) (narrator)
  • Narrated many of the TV specials of the "The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau" produced by Alan Landsburg in the 1960s and 1970s.
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

The Loner was an innovative half-hour western series that ran for less than one season on CBS. The series was set in the years immediately following the American Civil War. ... Jacques-Yves Cousteau (June 11, 1910 - June 25, 1997) was a French naval officer, explorer and researcher who studied the sea and all forms of life in water. ... Alan Landsburg (born May 10, 1933 in New York City, New York) is an award-winning American television writer, producer, and director. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ...

References

  1. ^ Rod Serling - Man From the Twilight Zone Clifton Unitarian Church; 2000.
  2. ^ The Zero Hour Radio Log
  3. ^ History of Mutual Radio's Zero Hour
  4. ^ Internet Pinball Database - Twilight Zone. Retrieved on 2007-02-15.
  5. ^ Interview with Mark Silverman. WDWMagic.com (October 2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-25.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... October 2006 is the tenth month of that year and has yet to occur. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 6 days remaining in the year. ...

External links

The Twilight Zone
v  d  e
Series

The Twilight Zone (1959 TV series) | The New Twilight Zone | The Twilight Zone (2002 series) The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Twilight Zone title. ... The Twilight Zone is a television series created by Rod Serling. ... The New Twilight Zone is the popular nickname for the 1985 revival of Rod Serlings acclaimed 1950/60s television series, The Twilight Zone; it was officially titled the same as the original. ... The Twilight Zone title. ...

Key People

Rod Serling | Buck Houghton | Charles Beaumont | Richard Matheson | Jerry Sohl | George Clayton Johnson | Earl Hamner Jr. | Reginald Rose | Ray Bradbury Buck Houghton was a television producer for The Twilight Zone, as well as many other television programs from the 1950s through the 1990s. ... Charles Beaumont (January 2, 1929 – February 21, 1967) was a prolific U.S. author of speculative fiction and horror short stories, beginning in 1951. ... Richard Burton Matheson (born February 20, 1926) is an American author and screenwriter, typically of fantasy, horror or science fiction. ... Gerald Allan Sohl Sr. ... George Clayton Johnson is a science fiction writer most famous for his novel and screenplay Logans Run but also known for his work in television, writing screenplays for such noted series as The Twilight Zone and Star Trek. ... Earl Henry Hamner Jr. ... This article or section is missing needed references or citation of sources. ... Ray Douglas Bradbury (born August 22, 1920) is an American literary, fantasy, horror, science fiction, and mystery writer best known for The Martian Chronicles, a 1950 book which has been described both as a short story collection and a novel, and his 1953 dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451. ...

See Also

Playhouse 90 | List of The Twilight Zone episodes | List of The Twilight Zone (1959 TV series) guest stars | The Twilight Zone (pinball) | Twilight Zone: The Movie | The Twilight Zone Tower of Terror Playhouse 90 is the name of a 90-minute long dramatic television series that ran on CBS from 1956 to 1961. ... This is a list of The Twilight Zone episodes. ... The following is a list of guest stars that appeared on the 1959 television series The Twilight Zone. ... Twilight Zone (often abbreviated TZ) is a 1993 widebody pinball game, designed by Pat Lawlor and released by Midway (under the Bally label). ... Twilight Zone: The Movie was a 1983 movie produced by Steven Spielberg as a theatrical version of The Twilight Zone, a long-running early TV series. ... This article is about the Disney ride. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Rod Serling - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1720 words)
Rod Serling served as a U.S. Army paratrooper and demolition specialist with the 511th Parachute Infantry Regiment, U.S. 11th Airborne Division in the Pacific Theater in World War II from January 1943 to January 1946.
Serling fought hard for creative control, hiring writers he admired (such as Richard Matheson and Charles Beaumont, both television writers known for their science fiction and fantasy stories) and launched himself into weekly television.
Serling wrote a number of short stories in the science fiction and horror genres, which were collected into three volumes of Twilight Zone stories (1960, 1961, 1962), two of Night Gallery stories (1971, 1972) and a collection of three novellas, The Season to be Wary (1968).
Jonathan Lethem - Selected Published and Unpublished Writings, Bibliography and Links (2147 words)
Rod Serling was so many things, and many of them are now hard to keep entirely in focus: Master of a brief, much-lamented era of live plays on television, and paradigmatic figure of that monstrous new medium's potential and decline.
Serling's collaborators on The Comedian were Ernest Lehman, who supplied the original story, the young director John Frankenheimer, and Mickey Rooney in a tour-de-force performance in the lead role -- a depiction of sadism and ruthlessness as persuasive as James Cagney's in White Heat.
Serling's confidence as a writer was always fragile, and it had weathered years in the rough and tumble grind of television.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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