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Encyclopedia > Rod Dedeaux
Rod Dedeaux
Rod Dedeaux

Raoul Martial "Rod" Dedeaux (February 17, 1914January 5, 2006) was an American college baseball coach who compiled what is arguably the greatest record of any coach in the sport's amateur history. Image File history File links Roddedeaux. ... Image File history File links Roddedeaux. ... February 17 is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium II St. ...


Born in New Orleans, Louisiana, Dedeaux attended the University of Southern California, and after playing professional baseball briefly – he appeared in 2 games as a shortstop for the 1935 Brooklyn Dodgers – he turned to playing and coaching in the semi-pro and amateur ranks. Meanwhile, in 1936 he and his father invested $500 to start a trucking firm, Dart (Dedeaux Automotive Repair and Transit) Enterprises, which he successfully built into a thriving regional business. When his college coach Sam Barry entered the United States Navy during World War II, he recommended Dedeaux to take over the team in 1942 for the war's duration, and upon Barry's return in 1946 they served as co-coaches, with Dedeaux running the team each year until Barry finished the basketball season. The arrangement was so successful that USC won the College World Series in 1948. Nickname: The Crescent City, The Big Easy, The City That Care Forgot, NOLA (acronym for New Orleans, LA) Location in the State of Louisiana and the United States Coordinates: Country United States State Louisiana Parish Orleans Founded 1718 Mayor Ray Nagin (D) Area    - City 350. ... The University of Southern California (commonly referred to as USC, SC, Southern California, and incorrectly as Southern Cal[1]), located in the downtown district of Los Angeles, California, was founded in 1880, making it Californias oldest private research university. ... The position of the shortstop A shortstop moves to his left, toward the center of the field, to play a ground ball Shortstop, abbreviated SS, is the baseball fielding position between second and third base. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1935 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1,2,4,19,20,24,32,39,42,53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1911-1912), (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) (Also referred to as Trolley Dodgers 1911-1931) Brooklyn... Justin McCarthy Sam Barry (December 17, 1892 – September 23, 1950) was an American collegiate athletic coach who achieved significant accomplishments in three major sports. ... USN redirects here. ... Combatants Major Allied powers: United Kingdom Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Major Axis powers: Nazi Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Harry Truman Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead... The following are the baseball events of the year 1942 throughout the world. ... Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005. ... The College World Series is the tournament which determines the NCAA Division I collegiate baseball champion. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1948 throughout the world. ...


After Barry's death in September 1950, Dedeaux became the sole coach, and proceeded to build on the early success to establish the strongest program in collegiate baseball. Prior to his retirement in 1986, Dedeaux's teams won 10 additional CWS titles – no other coach won more than 3 until 1997 – including five consecutively from 1970-1974. He also developed dozens of future major leaguers, including Ron Fairly, Don Buford, Tom Seaver, Dave Kingman, Roy Smalley, Fred Lynn, Mark McGwire and Randy Johnson. Throughout his USC career, he accepted only a nominal salary of $1 per year, as his trucking business supplied a substantial income. He turned down numerous offers of major league coaching positions, including invitations from Los Angeles Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda to join his staff, but always rejected them due to his preference for the college game and his desire to remain close to his family. This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 8 - Willie McCovey is the only player elected this year to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America, and becomes the 16th player elected in his first year of eligibility. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ronald Ray Fairly (born July 12, 1938 in Macon, Georgia) is a former Major League Baseball player. ... Don Buford (born Donald Alvin Buford on February 2, 1937 in Linden, Texas) is a former Major League Baseball player. ... George Thomas Seaver (born November 17, 1944 in Fresno, California) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who broke into the major leagues in 1967 and retired in 1986. ... David Arthur Kingman (born December 21, 1948 in Pendleton, Oregon), nicknamed Kong and Sky King, is an American former Major League Baseball slugger who played for the San Francisco Giants (1971-74), New York Mets (1975-77, 1981-83), San Diego Padres (1977), California Angels (1977), New York Yankees (1977... Roy Frederick Smalley III (born October 25, 1952 in Los Angeles, California) is a former shortstop in Major League Baseball. ... Frederic Michael Fred Lynn (born February 3, 1952 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former Major League Baseball outfielder who played for the Boston Red Sox (1974-80), California Angels (1981-84), Baltimore Orioles (1985-88), Detroit Tigers (1988-89) and San Diego Padres (1990). ... Mark McGwire hits a home run during his last Major League season in 2001 with the St. ... Randall David Johnson (born September 10, 1963 in Walnut Creek, California), is a left-handed starting pitcher for the New York Yankees. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1,2,4,19,20,24,32,39,42,53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1911-1912), (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) (Also referred to as Trolley Dodgers 1911-1931) Brooklyn... Thomas Charles Tommy Lasorda (born September 22, 1927 in Norristown, Pennsylvania) was a Major League baseball pitcher and manager. ...


He served as coach of the United States team at both the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, Japan and the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, with baseball being a demonstration sport prior to its elevation to full medal status in 1988. He retired as the winningest coach in college baseball history with 1,332 victories, and for the rest of his life remained a beloved annual presence at the College World Series in Omaha, Nebraska. He was inducted into the American Baseball Coaches Association's Hall of Fame in 1970, and in 1999 was named the Coach of the Century by Collegiate Baseball magazine. The 1964 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVIII Olympiad, were held in 1964 in Tokyo, Japan. ... Tokyo , literally Eastern capital)   is the seat of the Japanese government and the Imperial Palace, the home of the Japanese Imperial Family, and the de facto[1] capital of Japan. ... Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme ( file info) — composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... Nickname: City of Angels Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: State California County Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa Area    - City 1,290. ... Nickname: Gateway to the West Location in Nebraska Coordinates: Country United States State Nebraska County Douglas Founded 1854 Incorporated 1857 Mayor Michael Fahey Area    - City 307. ...


With USC playing its home games at Bovard Field, Dedeaux became known as "The Houdini of Bovard" for its come-from-behind home-field wins. In 1974 USC constructed a new baseball field named Dedeaux Field in honor of the coach. Dedeaux Field is a college baseball stadium in Los Angeles, California, and the home field of the University of Southern California Trojans team. ...


Dedeaux also served as the baseball coach for actors and ballplayers on the film Field of Dreams (1989). Phil Alden Robinson, who directed the film, said the following about Dedeaux: Baseball field from the movie. ... Phil Alden Robinson (born March 1, 1950) in Long Beach, New York, is an American film director and screenwriter whose films include Field of Dreams, Sneakers, and The Sum of All Fears. ...

"All of the ballplayers in the movie were prepped for the film by Rod Dedeaux. He coached at USC for many years, and is a wonderful man, very full of life, energetic, very supportive, just really was very giving of himself and cheerful all the time, was a great spirit to have around. And one day, we were in between setups and I said, Hey, coach, what position did you play? He said, I was a shortstop. I said, Really, could you -- were you good? He got very quiet, and he said, I could field the ball. I said, Could you hit? He said, I could hit the ball. And he was strangely quiet. And I said to him, Well, how come you never played in the majors? And he said, I did. I said, Really. [Dedeaux said] Yes, in 1930-something. I forget what year he said. He was the starting shortstop for the Brooklyn Dodgers. He played one game, broke his back, and that was the end of his career. And I just blanched. I said, My God, you're Doc Graham. He said, That's right. And I said, Do you ever think about, gee, the career I might've had. And he said, Every day. He said it very quietly. It was very out of character for him, and I was so touched by that. And I did look him up in the Baseball Encyclopedia: He did go, I think, 1-for-4 with an RBI. That was his lifetime stats. So having him be the man who trained all these fellows, including the kid who plays Doc Graham, was very meaningful to me, and I know it was to him, too. It was great to have him around. I think about that often, about what that must have been like, to be good enough to start with a Major League team, and for one unlucky moment, not be able to do -- the rest of your life takes another turn. What he did with that is, he put all of that emotion -- which could have gone into bitterness or regret -- into being a phenomenal coach. He sent more people to the majors than, I think, anybody else in college history. He's an amazing man." (Source: Director's commentary recorded for the anniversary edition DVD of Field of Dreams)

Dedeaux died at age 91 in Glendale, California of complications from a December 2, 2005 stroke. He was survived by his wife of 66 years, the former Helen Jones, and their four children. On July 4, 2006, he was a member of the first class of inductees into the College Baseball Hall of Fame. Moonlight Graham Archibald Wright Moonlight Graham (November 9, 1876 – August 25, 1965) was an American professional baseball player who appeared as an outfielder in a single major league game for the New York Giants on June 29, 1905. ... Nickname The Jewel City Location Location of Glendale within Los Angeles County and the State of California. ... December 2 is the 336th day (337th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other articles with similar names, see Stroke (disambiguation). ... For the United States holiday, the Fourth of July, see Independence Day (United States). ... The following are the baseball events of the year 2006 throughout the world. ... The College Baseball Hall of Fame, located in Lubbock, Texas, is a museum operated by the College Baseball Foundation serving as the central point for the study of the history of college baseball in the United States. ...


External links

Preceded by:
Sam Barry
University of Southern California Head Baseball Coach
1942–1986
Succeeded by:
Mike Gillespie

  Results from FactBites:
 
Rod Dedeaux - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (741 words)
Raoul Martial "Rod" Dedeaux (February 17, 1914 – January 5, 2006) was a former college baseball coach who compiled what is arguably the greatest record of any coach in the sport's amateur history.
Born in New Orleans, Louisiana, Dedeaux attended the University of Southern California and played professional baseball briefly – he appeared in 2 games as a shortstop for the 1935 Brooklyn Dodgers – he turned to playing and coaching in the semi-pro and amateur ranks.
Dedeaux died in Glendale, California on January 5, 2006 of complications from a December 2, 2005 stroke.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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