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Encyclopedia > Rocky Mountains
The Rocky Mountains
Range
Countries Canada, United States
Regions British Columbia, Alberta, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico
Part of Pacific Cordillera
Highest point Mount Elbert
 - elevation 14,440 ft (4,401 m)
 - coordinates 39°07′03.90″N 106°26′43.29″W / 39.11775, -106.4453583
Geology Igneous, Sedimentary, Metamorphic
Period Precambrian, Cretaceous
See also: Mountain peaks of the Rocky Mountains

The Rocky Mountains (Hoˀhonáaˀe tse-amoˀėstse "Rock on the Horizon" in Cheyenne), often called the Rockies, are a broad mountain range in western North America. The Rocky Mountains stretch more than 4,800 kilometers (3,000 miles) from northernmost British Columbia, in Canada, to New Mexico, in the United States. The range's highest peak is Colorado's Mount Elbert at 14,440 feet (4,401 meters) above sea level. Though part of North America's Pacific Cordillera, the Rockies are distinct from the Pacific Coast Ranges which are located immediately adjacent to the Pacific coast. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Moraine Lake is known for its picturesque views. ... Moraine Lake Valley of the Ten Peaks is a valley in Banff National Park that is crowned by ten notable peaks and also includes Moraine Lake. ... Moraine Lake, and the Valley of the Ten Peaks Banff National Park is Canadas oldest national park, established in 1885, in the Canadian Rockies. ... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... The Pacific Coast Ranges are the series of mountain ranges that stretch along west coast of North America from Alaska to Mexico. ... Mount Elbert in Colorado is the highest peak in the Rocky Mountains. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Igneous rocks (etymology from Latin ignis, fire) are rocks formed by solidification of cooled magma (molten rock), with or without crystallization, either below the surface as intrusive (plutonic) rocks or on the surface as extrusive (volcanic) rocks. ... Two types of sedimentary rock: limey shale overlaid by limestone. ... Quartzite, a form of metamorphic rock, from the Museum of Geology at University of Tartu collection. ... The Precambrian (Pre-Cambrian) is an informal name for the supereon comprising the eons of the geologic timescale that came before the current Phanerozoic eon. ... // The Cretaceous Period is one of the major divisions of the geologic timescale, reaching from the end of the Jurassic Period (i. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Rocky Mountain could also refer to these places in the United States of America: In Arkansas In California In Colorado Rocky Mountain, Georgia In Idaho In Kentucky In New York In North Carolina In Virginia Category: ... Mount Robson in British Columbia, the most topographically prominent peak of the Rocky Mountains of North America. ... The Cheyenne language (TsÄ—hesenÄ—stsestotse or, in easier spelling, Tsisinstsistots) is a Native American language spoken in present-day Montana and Oklahoma, USA. It is part of the Algonquian language family. ... For exotic financial options, see Mountain range (options). ... North American redirects here. ... “km” redirects here. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Mount Elbert in Colorado is the highest peak in the Rocky Mountains. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ... The Pacific Coast Ranges are the series of mountain ranges that stretch along west coast of North America from Alaska to Mexico. ... The Pacific Coast Ranges are the series of mountain ranges that stretch along the west coast of North America from Alaska to northern and central Mexico. ... Pacific redirects here. ...


The Eastern edge of the rockies rises impressively above the Interior Plains of central North America, including the Front Range which runs from northern New Mexico to northern Colorado, the Wind River Range and Big Horn Mountains of Wyoming, the Crazy Mountains and the Rocky Mountain Front of Montana, and the Clark Range of Alberta, along with a series of ranges in Canada called the Continental Ranges. Mount Robson in British Columbia, at 3,954 meters (12,972 ft) is the highest peak in the Canadian Rockies. The Interior Plains are highlighted in red. ... The Front Range is shown highlighted on a map of the western United States The Front Range is a mountain range in the United States on the eastern edge of the Rocky Mountains, and on the western edge of the Great Plains. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Popo Agie Wilderness in the Wind River Range The Wind River Range is shown highlighted on a map of the western United States The Wind River Range (or Winds for short), is a sub-range of the Rocky Mountains in western Wyoming in the United States. ... The Bighorn Mountains are shown highlighted in red in the western United States The Bighorn Mountains are a mountain range in northern Wyoming in the United States, forming a spur from the Rocky Mountains extending approximately 200 miles (320 km) northward on the Great Plains. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... The Crazies The Crazy Mountains, often called the Crazies, are a mountain range in the northern Rocky Mountains. ... Chief Mountain in Glacier National Park is a prominent peak along the Rocky Mountain Front The Rocky Mountain Front is an area extending over 100 miles (160 km) from the central regions of the U.S. state of Montana to southern Alberta, Canada. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Clark Range ( to ) is a mountain range of the Canadian Rockies, crossing the Continental Divide between Alberta and British Columbia. ... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... Location of the Continental Ranges The Continental Ranges are the largest and most well-known of the three main official subdivisions of the Canadian Rockies, the others being the Hart Ranges and the Muskwa Ranges. ... Mount Robson (or Robson Peak) is the highest point in the Canadian Rockies. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... The Canadian Rockies comprise the Canadian segment of the North American Rocky Mountains range. ...


The western edge of the Rockies, such as the Wasatch Range near Salt Lake City, Utah divides the Great Basin from other mountains further to the west. The Rockies do not extend into the Yukon or Alaska, or into central British Columbia. The Rocky Mountain System within the United States is a United States physiographic region. For the county, see Wasatch County, Utah. ... For ships of the United States Navy of the same name, see USS Salt Lake City. ... Drainage map showing the Great Basin in orange Various Definitions of the Great Basin (NPS) Wheeler Peak in Great Basin National Park, Nevada. ... This article is about the Canadian territory. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... For purposes of description, the physical geography of the United States is split into several major physiographic divisions, one being the Rocky Mountain System. ... Continental U.S physiographic regions Legend for map There are eight distinct U. S. physiographic regions within the continental United States. ...

Contents

Geography and geology

See also: Geography of the United States Rocky Mountain System and Geology of the Rocky Mountains

The Rocky Mountains are commonly allowed to stretch from the Liard River in British Columbia south to the Rio Grande in New Mexico. Other mountain ranges continue beyond those two rivers, including the Selwyn Range in Yukon, the Brooks Range in Alaska, and the Sierra Madre in Mexico, but those are not part of the Rockies, though they are part of the American cordillera. The United States definition of the Rockies, however, includes the Cabinet and Salish Mountains of Idaho and Montana, whereas their counterparts north of the Kootenai River, the Columbia Mountains, are considered a separate system in Canada, lying to the west of the huge Rocky Mountain Trench, which runs the length of British Columbia from its beginnings in the middle Flathead River valley in western Montana.they vary in width from 70 to 300 miles (110 to 480 kilometers) For purposes of description, the physical geography of the United States is split into several major physiographic divisions, one being the Rocky Mountain System. ... It has been suggested that Ancestral Rockies be merged into this article or section. ... The Liard River is a river that flows through the Yukon Territory, British Columbia and the Northwest Territories, and in Canada. ... “Río Bravo” redirects here. ... The Selwyn Range is a range of mountains in the Canadian Rockies in British Columbia. ... This article is about the Canadian territory. ... Brooks Range from near Galbraith Lake The Brooks Range is a mountain range that stretches from west to east across northern Alaska and into Canadas Yukon Territory, a total distance of about 1100 km (700 mi). ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... This is a list of mountain ranges organized alphabetically by continent. ... The American cordillera consists of an essentially continuous sequence of mountain ranges that form the western backbone of both North America and South America. ... The Cabinet Mountains are part of the Rocky Mountains, located in northwest Montana and the panhandle of Idaho, in the United States. ... The Salish Mountains are located in the northwest corner of the U.S. State of Montana. ... The Kootenay River (spelled Kootenai River for its American portions) is the uppermost major tributary of the Columbia River, flowing through British Columbia, Montana and Idaho. ... Location map of Columbia Mountains: dotted lines to left mark boundaries of Okanagan, Shuswap and Quesnel Highlands, dotted lines to lower right mark Salish and Cabinet Mountains. ... The Rocky Mountain Trench is a huge glacial valley stretching 1500 km (930m), running unbroken from the Flathead Lake area of Montana to the Liard River in far northern British Columbia. ...

Mount Timpanogos, in the Wasatch Range, near Orem, Utah.

The younger ranges of the Rocky Mountains uplifted during the late Cretaceous period (100 million-65 million years ago), although some portions of the southern mountains date from uplifts during the Precambrian (3,980 million-600 million years ago). The mountains' geology is a complex of igneous and metamorphic rock; younger sedimentary rock occurs along the margins of the southern Rocky Mountains, and volcanic rock from the Tertiary (65 million-1.8 million years ago) occurs in the San Juan Mountains and in other areas. Millennia of severe erosion in the Wyoming Basin transformed intermountain basins into a relatively flat terrain. The Tetons and other north-central ranges contain folded and faulted rocks of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age draped above cores of Proterozoic and Archean igneous and metamorphic rocks ranging in age from 1.2 billion (e.g., Tetons) to more than 3.3 billion years (Beartooth Mountains).[1][2][3] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x1728, 538 KB) Mount Timpanogos, Utah County, Utah in winter taken by David Jolley. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x1728, 538 KB) Mount Timpanogos, Utah County, Utah in winter taken by David Jolley. ... Orem is an incorporated city in the north-central part of the state of Utah in Utah County. ... // The Cretaceous Period is one of the major divisions of the geologic timescale, reaching from the end of the Jurassic Period (i. ... The Precambrian (Pre-Cambrian) is an informal name for the supereon comprising the eons of the geologic timescale that came before the current Phanerozoic eon. ... Igneous rocks (etymology from Latin ignis, fire) are rocks formed by solidification of cooled magma (molten rock), with or without crystallization, either below the surface as intrusive (plutonic) rocks or on the surface as extrusive (volcanic) rocks. ... Quartzite, a form of metamorphic rock, from the Museum of Geology at University of Tartu collection. ... Two types of sedimentary rock: limey shale overlaid by limestone. ... Tertiary geological time interval covers roughly the time span between the demise of the non-avian dinosaurs and beginning of the most recent Ice Age, approximately 65 million to 1. ... The San Juan Mountains are a rugged mountain range in the Rocky Mountains in southwestern Colorado. ... The Teton Range The Teton Range is a small but dramatic mountain range of the Rocky Mountains in North America. ... The Paleozoic Era (from the Greek palaio, old and zoion, animals, meaning ancient life) is the earliest of three geologic eras of the Phanerozoic eon. ... Mesozoic Era is one of three geologic eras of the Phanerozoic eon. ... The Proterozoic (IPA: ) is a geological eon representing a period before the first abundant complex life on Earth. ... The Archean is a geologic eon; it is a somewhat antiquated term for the time span between 2500 million years before the present and 3800 million years before the present. ... The Bears Tooth in the Beartooth Mountains The Beartooth Mountains are located in south central Montana, U.S. and are part of the 900,000 acre (3,600 km²) Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness, within Custer and Gallatin National Forests. ...


Periods of glaciation occurred from the Pleistocene Epoch (1.8 million-70,000 years ago) to the Holocene Epoch (fewer than 11,000 years ago). Recent episodes included the Bull Lake Glaciation that began about 150,000 years ago and the Pinedale Glaciation that probably remained at full glaciation until 15,000-20,000 years ago.[1][4] Ninety percent of Yellowstone National Park was covered by ice during the Pinedale Glaciation.[1][3]The little ice age was a period of glacial advance that lasted a few centuries from about 1550 to 1860. For example, the Agassiz and Jackson glaciers in Glacier National Park reached their most forward positions about 1860 during the little ice age.[1][5] The Pleistocene epoch (IPA: ) on the geologic timescale is the period from 1,808,000 to 11,550 years BP. The Pleistocene epoch had been intended to cover the worlds recent period of repeated glaciations. ... The Holocene epoch is a geological period, which began approximately 11,550 calendar years BP (about 9600 BC) and continues to the present. ... The Bull Lake Glaciation is a glacial period that began roughly 200,000 years ago and ended 130,000 years ago when several large sheets of ice moved down the Buffalo River valley from the north and from the Tetons in the west. ... The Pinedale Glaciation was the last of the major ice ages to appear over Eurasia and North America. ... The Little Ice Age (LIA) was a period of cooling occurring after a warmer era known as the Medieval climate optimum. ... For the non-adjoining national park by the same name in British Columbia, see Glacier National Park (Canada). ...


Water in its many forms sculpted the present Rocky Mountain landscape.[1][6] Runoff and snowmelt from the peaks feed Rocky Mountain rivers and lakes with the water supply for one-quarter of the United States. The rivers that flow from the Rocky Mountains eventually drain into three of the world's Oceans: the Atlantic Ocean, the Pacific Ocean, and the Arctic Ocean.[1] These rivers include: Ocean (Okeanos, a Greek god of sea and water; Greek ωκεανός) covers almost three quarters (71%) of the surface of the Earth. ...

The Continental Divide is located in the Rocky Mountains and designates the line at which waters flow either to the Atlantic or Pacific Oceans. Triple Divide Peak (8,020 feet / 2,444 m) in Glacier National Park (U.S.) is so named due to the fact that water which falls on the mountain reaches not only the Atlantic and Pacific, but the Arctic Ocean as well. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 133 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 133 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... The northern portion of the Cathedral Group, with Teewinot Mountain on the left, Grand Teton center and Mount Owen at right. ... The Teton Range is a small but dramatic mountain range of the Rocky Mountains in North America. ... Grand Teton National Park is a United States National Park located in western Wyoming, south of Yellowstone National Park. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... The Arkansas River flows through Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas. ... Athabasca River watershed in western Canada The Athabasca River (French: rivière Athabasca) originates from the Columbia Glacier of the Columbia Icefield in Jasper National Park in Alberta, Canada. ... The Clark Fork River is a river in the U.S. states of Montana and Idaho, approximately 360 mi (579 km) long. ... The Clearwater River is a river in northern Idaho, the North Fork of which flows from the Idaho-Montana border westward to join the Snake River at Lewiston. ... Colorado River in the Grand Canyon from Desert View The Colorado River is a river in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, approximately 1,450 mi (2,333 km) long, draining a part of the arid regions on the western slope of the Rocky Mountains. ... The Columbia River (French: fleuve Columbia) is a river in the Pacific Northwest region of North America. ... The Coeur dAlene River flows from the Silver Valley into Lake Coeur dAlene in the U.S. state of Idaho. ... Elk River is the name of numerous rivers and places. ... For other uses of this name see Fraser River (disambiguation). ... The Green River, a tributary of the Colorado, is shown highlighted on a map of the western United States. ... The Kootenay River (spelled Kootenai River for its American portions) is the uppermost major tributary of the Columbia River, flowing through British Columbia, Montana and Idaho. ... The Lochsa River is located in North Central Idaho in the northwestern United States. ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... The North Saskatchewan River is a glacier-fed river flowing east from the Canadian Rockies to Lake Winnipeg. ... For other uses, see Peace River. ... The Payette River is a river in southwestern Idaho, is a major tributary to the Snake River. ... The Platte River, showing the North Platte and South Platte The Platte River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 310 mi. ... “Río Bravo” redirects here. ... The Salmon River is located in Idaho in the northwestern United States. ... The Selway River is located in North Central Idaho in the northwestern United States within the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness. ... The South Saskatchewan River flows eastward from the confluence of the Bow and Oldman Rivers near Grassy Lake, Alberta. ... For other uses, see Snake River (disambiguation). ... The Wind-Bighorn rivers The Wind River is the name applied to the upper reaches of the Bighorn River in Wyoming in the United States. ... Yellowstone River, Fishing Bridge, July 1959. ... A continental divide is a line of elevated terrain which forms a border between two watersheds such that water falling on one side of the line eventually travels to one ocean or body of water, and water on the other side travels to another, generally on the opposite side of... The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one_fifth of its surface. ... For other meanings of Pacific, see Pacific (disambiguation). ... Triple Divide Peak (8020 ft/2444 m) is located in Glacier National Park, Montana, United States. ... For the non-adjoining national park by the same name in British Columbia, see Glacier National Park (Canada). ... The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, sometimes used to define the Arctic region border Artificially coloured topographical map of the Arctic region For the ship, see SS Arctic. ...


Human history

Since the last great Ice Age, the Rocky Mountains were home first to Paleo-Indians and then to the Native American tribes of the Apache, Arapaho, Bannock, Blackfoot, Cheyenne, Crow, Flathead, Shoshoni, Sioux, Ute, Kutenai (Ktunaxa in Canada), Sekani, Dunne-za and others.[1][7] Paleo-Indians hunted the now-extinct mammoth and ancient bison (an animal 20% larger than modern bison) in the foothills and valleys of the mountains. Like the modern tribes that followed them, Paleo-Indians probably migrated to the plains in fall and winter for bison and to the mountains in spring and summer for fish, deer, elk, roots, and berries. In Colorado, along the crest of the Continental Divide, rock walls that Native Americans built for driving game date back 5,400-5,800 years.[1][8] A growing body of scientific evidence indicates that Native Americans had significant effects on mammal populations by hunting and on vegetation patterns through deliberate burning.[1][9] Paleo-Indians is an English term used to refer to the ancient peoples of America who were present at the end of the last Ice Age. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... For other uses, see Apache (disambiguation). ... Scabby Bull, Arapaho 1806 Arapaho camp, ca. ... The Bannock or Banate are a Native American people who traditionally lived in the northern Great Basin in what is now southeastern Oregon and Southern Idaho. ... For other uses, see Blackfoot (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cheyenne (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Crow (disambiguation). ... Bold text Flathead delegation in Washington, D.C. with interpreter, 1884 Flathead family The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation are the Bitterroot Salish, Kootenai and Pend dOreilles Tribes. ... This article is about the Native American tribe. ... Eddie Plenty Holes, a Sioux Indian photographed about 1899. ... The Utes (; yoots) are an ethnically related group of American Indians now living primarily in Utah and Colorado. ... Kootenai may refer to: The Kootenai River (or Kootenay River in Canada) of southeastern British Columbia in Canada and northern Idaho and western Montana in the United States The Kootenai tribe, a Native American tribe in British Columbia, Idaho and Montana, also Kutenai or Ktunaxa The Kootenai language of the... Sikanni is the name of an Athabaskan First Nations people and language in the northern interior of British Columbia. ... An unidentified Dunneza, in the Peace River country, 1911 The Dunneza (also Dunne-za, Beaver, Tasttine) are Athapaskan Aboriginal peoples whose traditional territory is around the Peace River of Alberta, Canada. ... This article is about the genus Mammuthus. ... Binomial name Bison antiquus Leidy, 1852 The Ancient Bison, Bison antiquus, was the most common large herbivore of the North American continent and is a direct ancestor of the living North American bison. ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... This article is about the ruminent animal. ... For other uses, see Elk (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Root (disambiguation). ... This article is about the fruit. ...


Recent human history of the Rocky Mountains is one of more rapid change.[1][10][3] The Spanish explorer Francisco Vásquez de Coronado — with a group of soldiers, missionaries, and African slaves — marched into the Rocky Mountain region from the south in 1540. The introduction of the horse, metal tools, rifles, new diseases, and different cultures profoundly changed the Native American cultures. Native American populations were extirpated from most of their historical ranges by disease, warfare, habitat loss (eradication of the bison), and continued assaults on their culture.[1] Coronado Sets Out to the North, by Frederic Remington, 1861-1909 Francisco Vázquez de Coronado (c. ...

Colorado Rockies

In 1739, French fur traders Pierre and Paul Mallet, while journeying through the Great Plains, discovered a range of mountains at the headwaters of the Platte River, which local American Indian tribes called the "Rockies", becoming the first Europeans to report on this uncharted mountain range.[11] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 159 KB) Description: Colorado Rockies, Colorado, USA File links The following pages link to this file: Rocky Mountains ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 159 KB) Description: Colorado Rockies, Colorado, USA File links The following pages link to this file: Rocky Mountains ... An Alberta fur trader in the 1890s. ... For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... The Platte River, showing the North Platte and South Platte The Platte River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 310 mi. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ...


Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764 - March 11, 1820) became the first European to cross the Rocky Mountains in 1793. He found the upper reaches of the Fraser River and reached what is now the Pacific coast of Canada on July 20 of that year, completing the first recorded transcontinental crossing of North America north of Mexico. He arrived at Bella Coola, British Columbia, where he first reached saltwater at South Bentinck Arm, an inlet of the Pacific Ocean. For other persons named Alexander Mackenzie, see Alexander Mackenzie (disambiguation). ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Lewis and Clark Expedition (1804-1806) was the first scientific reconnaissance of the Rocky Mountains. Specimens were collected for contemporary botanists, zoologists, and geologists.[1][12] The expedition was said to have paved the way to (and through) the Rocky Mountains for European-Americans from the East, although Lewis and Clark met at least 11 European-American mountain men during their travels.[1] Lewis and Clark redirects here. ...


Mountain men, primarily French, Spanish, and British roamed the Rocky Mountains from 1720 to 1800 seeking mineral deposits and furs. The fur-trading North West Company established Rocky Mountain House as a trading post in what is now the Rocky Mountain foothills of Alberta in 1799, and their business rivals the Hudson's Bay Company established Acton House nearby. These posts served as bases for most European activity in the Canadian Rockies in the early 1800s, most notably the expeditions of David Thompson (explorer), the first European to follow the Columbia River to the Pacific Ocean. After 1802, American fur traders and explorers ushered in the first widespread caucasian presence in the Rockies south of the 49th parallel. The more famous of these include Americans included William Henry Ashley, Jim Bridger, Kit Carson, John Colter, Thomas Fitzpatrick, Andrew Henry, and Jedediah Smith. On July 24, 1832, Benjamin Bonneville led the first wagon train across the Rocky Mountains by using Wyoming's South Pass.[1] For the grocery chain, see The North West Company The North West Company a fur trading business headquartered in the city of Montreal in British North America from 1779 to 1821. ... // General Information Rocky Mountain House is a town of 6 584 people in west central Alberta, Canada at the confluence of the Clearwater River and the North Saskatchewan Rivers. ... Hudsons Bay Company (HBC; Compagnie de la Baie dHudson in French) is the oldest commercial corporation in North America and is one of the oldest in the world. ... For other people with this name see David Thompson David Thompson (April 30, 1770 – February 10, 1857), was an English-Canadian fur trader, surveyor, and map-maker, known to some native peoples as the Stargazer. Over his career he mapped over 3. ... The fur trade was a huge part in the early economic development of North America. ... For the peoples actually from the Caucasus, see Peoples of the Caucasus. ... William Henry Ashley (1778-1838) was a pioneering fur trader, entrepreneur, and politician. ... Jim Bridger Jim Bridger (right) is honored along with Pony Express founder Alexander Majors (left) and Kansas City founder John Calvin McCoy at Pioneer Square in Westport in Kansas City. ... Kit Carson Christopher Houston Kit Carson (December 24, 1809 – May 23, 1868) was an American frontiersman. ... Private John Colter (1774–1813), a member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, was the first white American to enter what is now known as Yellowstone National Park, descend into Jackson Hole and see the Grand Teton mountains, in 1808. ... Tom Fitzpatrick may refer to: Thomas J. Fitzpatrick (Cavan politician) (born 1918), Irish Fine Gael politician, Cavan TD and Ceann Comhairle of Dáil Éireann Thomas J. Fitzpatrick (Dublin politician) (born 1926), Irish Fianna Fáil politician and Dublin TD Tom Fitzpatrick (born 1941), American actor[1] Tom Fitzpatrick, Irish... Major Andrew Henry (c. ... // Bold textItalic textLink title Jedediah Smith Jedediah Strong Smith (born January 6, 1799 - presumed date of death May 27, 1831) was a hunter, trapper, fur trader and explorer of the Rocky Mountains, the American West Coast and the Southwest during the nineteenth century. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Benjamin Bonneville Benjamin Louis Eulalie de Bonneville (April 14, 1796-1878) was a French-born officer in the United States Army, fur trapper, and explorer in the American West. ... Wagon Train was a television series on NBC from 1957 to 1962 and on ABC from 1962 to 1965. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ...


Thousands passed through the Rocky Mountains on the Oregon Trail beginning in 1842. The Mormons began to settle near the Great Salt Lake in 1847. From 1859 to 1864, Gold was discovered in Colorado, Idaho, Montana, and British Columbia sparking several gold rushes bringing thousands of prospectors and miners to explore every mountain and canyon and to create the Rocky Mountain's first major industry. The Idaho gold rush alone produced more gold than the California and Alaska gold rushes combined and was important in the financing of the Union Army during the American Civil War. The transcontinental railroad was completed in 1869, and Yellowstone National Park was established as the world's first national park in 1872. While settlers filled the valleys and mining towns, conservation and preservation ethics began to take hold. President Harrison established several forest reserves in the Rocky Mountains in 1891-1892. In 1905, President Theodore Roosevelt extended the Medicine Bow Forest Reserve to include the area now managed as Rocky Mountain National Park.[1][8] Economic development began to center on mining, forestry, agriculture, and recreation, as well as on the service industries that support them.[1][10] Tents and camps became ranches and farms, forts and train stations became towns, and some towns became cities.[1] For other uses, see Oregon Trail (disambiguation). ... This article is about the history and use of the word Mormon. For information about the religious beliefs and culture of Mormons, see Mormonism. ... Great Salt Lake, located in the northern part of the U.S. state of Utah, is the largest salt lake in the Western Hemisphere,[1] the fourth-largest terminal lake in the world,[2] and the 33rd largest lake on Earth. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... For other meanings, see Gold rush (disambiguation) A gold rush is a period of feverish migration of workers into the area of a dramatic discovery of commercial quantities of gold. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... A Transcontinental Railroad is a railway that crosses a continent typically from sea to sea. Terminals are at or connected to different oceans. ... Yellowstone redirects here. ... For other persons named Benjamin Harrison, see Benjamin Harrison (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Rocky Mountain National Park is located in the north-central region of the U.S. state of Colorado. ... This article is about mineral extractions. ... A decidous beech forest in Slovenia. ... “Fun” redirects here. ...


Industry and development

Economic resources of the Rocky Mountains are varied and abundant. Minerals found in the Rocky Mountains include significant deposits of copper, gold, lead, molybdenum, silver, tungsten, and zinc. The Wyoming Basin and several smaller areas contain significant reserves of coal, natural gas, oil shale, and petroleum. For example, the Climax mine, located near Leadville, Colorado, was the largest producer of Molybdenum in the world. Molybdenum is used in heat-resistant steel in such things as cars and planes. The Climax mine employed over 3,000 workers. The Coeur d’Alene mine of northern Idaho produces silver, lead, and zinc. Canada's largest coal mines are near Fernie, British Columbia and Sparwood, British Columbia; additional coal mines exist near Hinton, Alberta[1] and in the Northern Rockies surrounding Tumbler Ridge, British Columbia. For other uses, see Mineral (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... General Name, Symbol, Number lead, Pb, 82 Chemical series Post-transition metals or poor metals Group, Period, Block 14, 6, p Appearance bluish gray Standard atomic weight 207. ... General Name, Symbol, Number molybdenum, Mo, 42 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 6, 5, d Appearance gray metallic Standard atomic weight 95. ... This article is about the chemical element. ... For other uses, see Tungsten (disambiguation). ... General Name, symbol, number zinc, Zn, 30 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 12, 4, d Appearance bluish pale gray Standard atomic weight 65. ... Coal Example chemical structure of coal Coal is a fossil fuel formed in ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... For other uses, see Natural gas (disambiguation). ... Oil shale Oil shale is a general term applied to a fine-grained sedimentary rock containing significant traces of kerogen (a solid mixture of organic chemical compounds) that have not been buried for sufficient time to produce conventional fossil fuels. ... Petro redirects here. ... Categories: Ghost towns | Lake County, Colorado | Stub ... View of Mount Massive looking west from Harrison Street in downtown Leadville Leadville is the county seat of Lake County, Colorado. ... General Name, Symbol, Number molybdenum, Mo, 42 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 6, 5, d Appearance gray metallic Standard atomic weight 95. ... Coeur dAlene (pronounced ) is the county seat and largest city of Kootenai County, Idaho, United States. ... Coal Example chemical structure of coal Coal is a fossil fuel formed in ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... The City of Fernie is located in the southeast corner of British Columbia, Canada, surrounded by the Canadian Rockies. ... Sparwood is a town in British Columbia, Canada. ... Hinton is a town in western Alberta, Canada, about 70 km northeast of Jasper and about 300 km west of Albertas capital city, Edmonton. ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ... Coordinates: , Country Province Regional District Peace River Incorporated April 1981 (district) Government  - Mayor Mike Caisley  - Governing body Tumbler Ridge District Council  - MP Jay Hill  - MLA Blair Lekstrom Area  - Town 1,574. ...

A Drilling rig drills for Natural Gas just west of the Wind River Range in the Wyoming Rockies
A Drilling rig drills for Natural Gas just west of the Wind River Range in the Wyoming Rockies

Abandoned mines with their wakes of mine tailings and toxic wastes dot the Rocky Mountain landscape. In one major example, eighty years of zinc mining profoundly polluted the river and bank near Eagle River in north-central Colorado. High concentrations of the metal carried by spring runoff harmed algae, moss, and trout populations. An economic analysis of mining effects at this site revealed declining property values, degraded water quality, and the loss of recreational opportunities. The analysis also revealed that cleanup of the river could yield $2.3 million in additional revenue from recreation. In 1983, the former owner of the zinc mine was sued by the Colorado Attorney General for the $4.8 million cleanup costs; 5 years later, ecological recovery was considerable.[1][13] Image File history File links Rig_wind_river. ... Image File history File links Rig_wind_river. ... Drilling Rig, Reverse circulation in Western Australia A drilling rig is a machine which creates holes (usually called boreholes) and/or shafts in the ground. ... For other uses, see Natural gas (disambiguation). ... Popo Agie Wilderness in the Wind River Range The Wind River Range is shown highlighted on a map of the western United States The Wind River Range (or Winds for short), is a sub-range of the Rocky Mountains in western Wyoming in the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... The Eagle River, a tributary of the Colorado, is shown highlighted on a map of the western United States The Eagle River is a tributary of the Colorado River, approximately 70 mi (113 km) long, in west central Colorado in the United States. ... Osborne (talk) 20:17, 5 December 2007 (UTC):For the programming language, see algae (programming language) Laurencia, a marine red alga from Hawaii. ... For other uses, see Moss (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Trout (disambiguation). ...


Agriculture and forestry are major industries. Agriculture includes dryland and irrigated farming and livestock grazing. Livestock are frequently moved between high-elevation summer pastures and low-elevation winter pastures,[1] a practice known as transhumance. Sheep are commonly bred as livestock. ... Pastureland Pasture is land with lush herbaceous vegetation cover used for grazing of ungulates as part of a farm or ranch. ... Transhumance is the seasonal movement of livestock between mountainous and lowland pastures. ...


Human population is not very dense in the Rocky Mountains, with an average of four people per square kilometer (10 per square mile) and few cities with over 50,000 people. However, the human population grew rapidly in the Rocky Mountain states between 1950 and 1990. The 40-year statewide increases in population range from 35% in Montana to about 150% in Utah and Colorado. The populations of several mountain towns and communities have doubled in the last 40 years. Jackson Hole, Wyoming, increased 260%, from 1,244 to 4,472 residents, in 40 years.[1] Jackson is a town located in the Jackson Hole valley of Teton County, Wyoming. ...


Tourism

See also: List of U.S. Rocky Mountain ski resorts, List of Alberta ski resorts, List of B.C. ski resorts // Main article: List of ski areas and resorts This is a list of ski areas and resorts in the United States. ... // Main article: List of ski areas and resorts This is a list of ski areas and resorts in Canada. ... // Main article: List of ski areas and resorts This is a list of ski areas and resorts in Canada. ...

Snowmelt runoff fills a reservoir in the Rocky Mountains near Dillon, Colorado.
Snowmelt runoff fills a reservoir in the Rocky Mountains near Dillon, Colorado.
Snowpack accumulation at 14,255 ft (4,345 m). on Longs Peak in Rocky Mountain National Park (photo courtesy of USDA).
Snowpack accumulation at 14,255 ft (4,345 m). on Longs Peak in Rocky Mountain National Park (photo courtesy of USDA).

Every year the scenic areas and recreational opportunities of the Rocky Mountains draw millions of tourists.[1] The main language of the Rocky Mountains is English. But there are also linguistic pockets of Spanish and Native American languages. Download high resolution version (600x902, 107 KB)Image Number K7670-3 Snowmelt runoff fills a reservoir in the Rocky Mountains near Dillon, Colorado. ... Download high resolution version (600x902, 107 KB)Image Number K7670-3 Snowmelt runoff fills a reservoir in the Rocky Mountains near Dillon, Colorado. ... Snowmelt runoff fills a reservoir in the Rocky Mountains near Dillon, Colorado. ... Download high resolution version (600x873, 124 KB)Image Number K7679-3 Snowpack accumulation at 14,255 ft. ... Download high resolution version (600x873, 124 KB)Image Number K7679-3 Snowpack accumulation at 14,255 ft. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ...


People from all over the world visit the sites to hike, camp, or engage in mountain sports.[1] In the summer, main tourist attractions are:


In the United States:

In Canada, the mountain range contains these national parks: This article is about the mountain in Colorado. ... Royal Gorge (also Grand Canyon of the Arkansas) is a canyon on the Arkansas River near Cañon City, Colorado. ... Rocky Mountain National Park is located in the north-central region of the U.S. state of Colorado. ... Yellowstone redirects here. ... Grand Teton National Park is a United States National Park located in western Wyoming, south of Yellowstone National Park. ... For the non-adjoining national park by the same name in British Columbia, see Glacier National Park (Canada). ... The Sawtooth National Recreation Area (SNRA) is a United States National Recreation Area located in central Idaho within the Boise, Challis, and Sawtooth National Forests. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...

Glacier National Park in Montana and Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta border each other and collectively are known as Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park. (See also International Peace Park.) Moraine Lake, and the Valley of the Ten Peaks Banff National Park is Canadas oldest national park, established in 1885, in the Canadian Rockies. ... Jasper National Park is the largest national park in the Canadian Rockies, spanning 10,878 km² (4200 mi²). It is located in the province of Alberta, to the north of Banff National Park and west of the city of Edmonton. ... Kootenay National Park is located in southeastern British Columbia, Canada covering 1,406 km² (543 mi²) in the Canadian Rockies and is part of a World Heritage Site. ... Waterton Lakes National Park is a national park located in the southwest corner of Alberta, Canada, and borders Glacier National Park in Montana, USA. Waterton was Canadas fourth national park, formed in 1895 and named after Waterton Lake. ... Natural Bridge Yoho National Park is located in the Canadian Rocky Mountains along the western slope of the Continental Divide in southeastern British Columbia. ... The Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park is the name of the union of the Glacier National Park in the United States and the Waterton Lakes National Park in Canada. ... A Transboundary Protected Area is a protected area that spans across boundaries of multiple countries, where the political border sections that are enclosed within its area are abolished. ...


In the winter, skiing is the main attraction. A list of the major ski resorts can be found at List of U.S. Rocky Mountain ski resorts. Cross-country skiing (skating style) in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. ... // Main article: List of ski areas and resorts This is a list of ski areas and resorts in the United States. ...


The adjacent Columbia Mountains in British Columbia contain major resorts such, Fernie, Panorama and Kicking Horse, as well as Mount Revelstoke National Park. Location map of Columbia Mountains: dotted lines to left mark boundaries of Okanagan, Shuswap and Quesnel Highlands, dotted lines to lower right mark Salish and Cabinet Mountains. ... Fernie Alpine Resort is an Alpine ski resort, located near the town of Fernie, British Columbia, Canada. ... Panorama Mountain Village is a ski and golf resort located deep within the Purcell Mountains of British Columbia, Canada. ... Kicking Horse Mountain Resort is a new ski resort village located 14 km outside of Golden, British Columbia. ... Mount Revelstoke National Park is located adjacent to the city of Revelstoke, British Columbia in Canada. ...


Climate

Aerial view of the Colorado Rocky Mountains in summer
Aerial view of the Colorado Rocky Mountains in summer
Aerial view of the Colorado Rocky Mountains in winter
Aerial view of the Colorado Rocky Mountains in winter

The Rocky Mountains have a highland climate. The average annual temperature in the valley bottoms of the Colorado Rockies near the latitude of Boulder is 43 °F (6 °C). July is the hottest month there with an average temperature of 82 °F (28 °C). In January, the average monthly temperature is 7 °F (−14 °C), making it the region's coldest month. The average precipitation per year there is approximately 14 inches (360 mm). Aerial view of the Colorado Rocky Mountains File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Aerial view of the Colorado Rocky Mountains File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1360, 1707 KB) Summary Taken by Wing-Chi Poon on 24th December 2005 on board an airplane flying over the state of Colorado, this photo shows an aerial section of snow-covered Rocky Mountain range. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1360, 1707 KB) Summary Taken by Wing-Chi Poon on 24th December 2005 on board an airplane flying over the state of Colorado, this photo shows an aerial section of snow-covered Rocky Mountain range. ...


The summers in this area of the Rockies are warm and dry, because the western fronts impede the advancing of water-carrying storm systems. The average temperature in summer is 59 °F (15 °C) and the average precipitation is 5.9 inches (150 mm). Winter is usually wet and very cold, with an average temperature of 28 °F (−2 °C) and average snowfall of 11.4 inches (29.0 cm). In spring, the average temperature is 40 °F (4 °C) and the average precipitation is 4.2 inches (107 mm). And in the fall, the average precipitation is 2.6 inches (66 mm) and the average temperature is 44 °F (7 °C).


See also

For purposes of description, the physical geography of the United States is split into several major physiographic divisions, one being the Rocky Mountain System. ... It has been suggested that Ancestral Rockies be merged into this article or section. ... Mount Robson in British Columbia, the most topographically prominent peak of the Rocky Mountains of North America. ... The Rocky Mountains subalpine zone is the biotic zone immediately below tree line in the Rocky Mountains of North America. ... The Canadian Rockies comprise the Canadian segment of the North American Rocky Mountains range. ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ... Mount Elbert, the highest peak of the Rocky Mountains of North America. ... View of Mount Elbert in the Sawatch Range, the highest peak of the Rocky Mountains of North America. ... There are many notable lists of mountains around the world. ... Global view centred on North America North America is the third largest continent (1990 est. ... Sedimentary, volcanic, plutonic, metamorphic rock types of North America. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w Stohlgren, T.J. (1998). "Rocky Mountains", in M.J. Mac, P.A. Opler, C.E. Puckett Haeker, and P.D. Doran: Status and Trends of the Nation's Biological Resources. Reston, Va.: U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey. 
  2. ^ (1986) in Peterson, J. A.: Paleotectonics and sedimentation in the Rocky Mountain Region, United States. Tulsa, Okla: American Association of Petroleum Geologists, 1-693. Memoir 41. 
  3. ^ a b c Knight, D. H. (1994). Mountains and plains: the ecology of Wyoming landscapes. New Haven, Conn: Yale University Press, 1-338. 
  4. ^ Pierce, K. L. (1979). History and dynamics of glaciation in the northern Yellowstone National Park area. Washington, D.C: U.S. Geological Survey, 1-90. Professional Paper 729-F. 
  5. ^ Grove, J. M (1990). The little ice age. New York: Rutledge Press, 1-498. 
  6. ^ Athearn, R. G. (1960). High country empire: the High Plains and Rocky Mountains. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1-358. 
  7. ^ Johnson, M. G. (1994). The native tribes of North America: a concise encyclopedia. New York: Macmillian Publishing, 1-210. 
  8. ^ a b Buchholtz, C. W. (1983). Rocky Mountain National Park: a history. Boulder: Colorado Associated University Press, 1-255. 
  9. ^ Kay, C. E. (1994). "Aboriginal overkill". Human Nature. 5:359­398. 
  10. ^ a b Lavender, D. (1975). The Rockies. New York: Harper and Row, 1-433. 
  11. ^ PBS - THE WEST - Events from 1650 to 1800
  12. ^ Jackson, D. (1962). Letters of the Lewis and Clark expedition with related documents. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1-728. 1783­1854. 
  13. ^ Brandt, E. (1993). "How much is a gray wolf worth?". National Wildlife 31: 4­12. 


The Western Rocky Mountains provide an ideal setting for the Wasatch Front metropolitan area of Utah, but they also prevent the population from expanding eastward.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1981x427, 671 KB) Summary i took it Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Rocky Mountains Utah Wasatch Range ... The Wasatch Front is an urban area in the U.S. state of Utah. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...

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Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      Third parties in the United States are political parties other than the two... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      The United States has a federal government, with elected officials at federal (national), state and... Electoral votes by state/federal district, for the elections of 2004 and 2008 The United States Electoral College is a term used to describe the 538 President Electors who meet every 4 years to cast the electoral votes for President and Vice President of the United States; their votes represent... Political Compass. ... This article provides a list of major political scandals of the United States. ... Map of results by state of the 2004 U.S. presidential election, representing states won by the Democrats as blue and those won by the Republican Party as red. ... This article is about the national personification of the USA. For other uses, see Uncle Sam (disambiguation). ... Flag of Puerto Rico The political movement for Puerto Rican Independence (Lucha por la Independencia Puertorriqueña) has existed since the mid-19th century and has advocated independence of the island of Puerto Rico, in varying degrees, from Spain (in the 19th century) or the United States (from 1898 to... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... United States territory is any extent of region under the jurisdiction of the federal government of the United States,[1] including all waters[2] (around islands or continental tracts). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This is a list of the cities, towns, and villages of the United States. ... United States of America, showing states, divided into counties. ... This list of regions of the United States includes official (governmental) and non-official areas within the borders of the United States, not including U.S. states, the federal district of Washington, D.C. or standard subentities such as cities or counties. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... It has been suggested that Middle Atlantic States be merged into this article or section. ... Historic Southern United States. ... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The list of mountains of the United States shows the location of mountains in a given state. ... The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... Rivers in the United States is a list of rivers in the United States. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... The Colorado River from the bottom of Marble Canyon, in the Upper Grand Canyon Colorado River in the Grand Canyon from Desert View The Colorado River from Laughlin Horseshoe Bend is a horseshoe-shaped meander of the Colorado River located near the town of Page, Arizona The Colorado River is... This is a list of the extreme points of the United States, the points that are farther north, south, east, or west than any other location in the country. ... The National Park System of the United States is the collection of physical properties owned or administered by the National Park Service. ... Water supply and sanitation in the United States is provided by towns and cities, public utilities that span several jurisdictions and rural cooperatives. ... USD redirects here. ... This is a list of companies from the United States: #Current companies #Former companies, including acquired and merged ones #By industry #By location #See also Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... The Fed redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The standard of living in the United States is one of the highest in the world by almost any measure. ... For information on household income, see Household income in the United States. ... For information on the income of individuals, see Personal income in the United States. ... This graph shows the household income of the given percentiles from 1967 to 2003, in 2003 dollars. ... Single family homes such as this are indicative of the American middle class. ... The primary regulator of communications in the United States is the Federal Communications Commission. ... This article adopts the US Department of Transportation definition of passenger vehicle The United States is home to the largest passenger vehicle market of any country,[1] which is a consequence of the fact that it has the largest Gross Domestic Product of any country in the world. ... Current U.S. Route shield Current U.S. Route shield in California The system of United States Numbered Highways (often called U.S. Routes or U.S. Highways) is an integrated system of roads and highways in the United States numbered within a nationwide grid. ... There arergwertwertert[1] Kyle Railroad (KYLE) [2] Missouri and Northern Arkansas Railroad (MNA) [3] Montana Rail Link (MRL) [4] Montreal, Maine and Atlantic Railway (MMA) [5] Nebraska, Kansas and Colorado RailNet (NKCR) New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway (NYSW) [6] Northern Plains Railroad Paducah and Louisville Railway (PAL) [7] Palouse... The United States of America has a large and lucrative tourism industry serving millions of international and domestic tourists. ... This article is about the high culture and popular culture of the United States. ... Population of the United States, 1790 to 2000 The demographics of the United States depict a largely urban nation, with 57 percent of its population living in places more than 100 miles away from the ocean (2003). ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens of thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... For other uses, see American Dream (disambiguation). ... The percentage of households and individuals over the age of 25 with incomes exceeding $100,000 in the US.[1][2] Affluence in the United States refers to an individuals or households state of being in an economically favorable position in contrast to a given reference group. ... A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens-of-thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... Percent below each countrys official poverty line, according to the CIA factbook. ... This graph shows the educational attainment since 1947. ... Violent conforntation between working class union members and law enforecement such as the one between teamsters and Minneapolis police above were commonly frowned upon by professional middle class. ... Holidays of the United States vary with local observance. ... Health care in the United States is provided by many separate legal entities. ... This article is about the high culture and popular culture of the United States. ... The United States is home to a wide array of regional styles and scenes. ... American classical music refers to music written in the United States but in the European classical music tradition. ... American folk music, also known as Americana, is a broad category of music including Native American music, Bluegrass, country music, gospel, old time music, jug bands, Appalachian folk, blues, Tejano and Cajun. ... The first major American popular songwriter, Stephen Foster Even before the birth of recorded music, American popular music had a profound effect on music across the world. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... American cinema has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. ... This article is about television in the United States, specifically its history, art, business and government regulation. ... Hollywood redirects here. ... American literature refers to written or literary work produced in the area of the United States and Colonial America. ... The folklore of the United States, or American folklore, is one of the folk traditions which has evolved on the North American continent since Europeans arrived in the 16th century. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Transcendentalism was a group of new ideas in literature, religion, culture, and philosophy that emerged in New England in the early-to mid-19th century. ... The Harlem Renaissance was also known as the New Negro Movement, named after the anthology The New Negro, edited by Alain Locke in 1925. ... Beats redirects here. ... The Rocky Mountains, Landers Peak, 1863 by Albert Bierstadt, one of the Hudson River School painters Visual arts of the United States refers to the history of painting and visual art in the United States. ... Jackson Pollock, No. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Closely related to the development of American music in the early 20th century was the emergence of a new, and distinctively American, art form -- modern dance. ... The United States has a history of architecture that includes a wide variety of styles. ... Social issues are matters which directly or indirectly affect many or all members of a society and are considered to be problems, controversies related to moral values, or both. ... Main articles: Adolescent sexuality and Adolescent sexual behavior Adolescent sexuality in the United States relates to the sexuality of American adolescents and its place in American society, both in terms of their feelings, behaviors and development and in terms of the response of the government, educators and interested groups. ... Affirmative action is a policy or a program of giving preferential treatment to certain designated groups allegedly seeking to redress discrimination or bias through active measures, as in education and employment. ... Progress of America, 1875, by Domenico Tojetti American exceptionalism (cf. ... Anti-Americanism, often Anti-American sentiment, is defined as being opposed or hostile to the United States of America, its people, its principles, or its policies. ... Capital punishment is a controversial issue in the United States and, indeed, in most of the world, with many prominent organizations and individuals participating in the debate. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Detroit police inspecting equipment found in a clandestine underground brewery during the prohibition era. ... The Energy policy of the United States is determined by federal, state and local public entities, which address issues of energy production, distribution and consumption. ... 1970s US postage stamp block In the United States today, the organized environmental movement is represented by a wide range of organizations sometimes called non-governmental organizations or NGOs. ... Gun Politics in the United States, incorporating the political aspects of gun politics, and firearms rights, has long been among the most controversial and intractable issues in American politics. ... The Statue of Liberty. ... - Fence barrier on the international bridge near McAllen, TX . ... Pornography may use any of a variety of media — written and spoken text, photos, movies, etc. ... Racial profiling, also known as ethnic profiling, is the inclusion of racial or ethnic characteristics in determining whether a person is considered likely to commit a particular type of crime (see Offender Profiling). ... International recognition Civil unions and domestic partnerships Recognized in some regions Unregistered co-habitation Recognition debated Civil unions legal, same-sex marriage debated See also Same-sex marriage Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      Same-sex marriage, also called gay...

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Rocky Mountain National Park (U.S. National Park Service) (359 words)
This living showcase of the grandeur of the Rocky Mountains, with elevations ranging from 8,000 feet in the wet, grassy valleys to 14,259 feet at the weather-ravaged top of Longs Peak, provides visitors with opportunities for countless breathtaking experiences and adventures.
With five drive-in campgrounds Rocky Mountain National Park provides a variety of camping experiences.
Rocky Mountain National Park, for all its grand beauty and sense of wildness, is embedded in a human environment that creates special challenges.
Rocky Mountains - MSN Encarta (739 words)
The Rockies are bordered on the east by the Great Plains and on the west by the Great Basin and the Rocky Mountain Trench, a valley running from northwestern Montana to northern British Columbia.
This section, which encompasses Rocky Mountain National Park, is composed chiefly of two northern-southern belts of mountain ranges with several basins, or parks, between the belts.
The Canadian Rockies, located in southwestern Alberta and eastern British Columbia, are composed of a relatively narrow belt of mountain ranges that terminates at the Liard River lowland in northeastern British Columbia.
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