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Encyclopedia > Rocksteady
Music of Jamaica

Kumina - Nyabinghi- Mento - Ska - Rocksteady - Reggae - Sound systems - Lovers rock - Dub - Dancehall - Dub poetry - Toasting - Raggamuffin - Roots reggae Rocksteady may refer to: Rocksteady, a musical genre popular in Jamaica in the 1960s Rock Steady (album), a 2001 album by the band No Doubt. ... Jamaica is known as the birthplace of many popular musical genres including raggamuffin, ska, reggae and dub. ... Kumina is both the religion and the music practiced by the people of eastern Jamaica. ... Nyabinghi is a legendary Amazon queen, who was said to have possesed a Ugandan woman named Muhumusa in the 19th century. ... Mento is a style of Jamaican folk music that predates and has greatly influenced ska and reggae music. ... Ska (pron. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... A reggae sound system is a group of disc jockeys, engineers and MCs playing reggae music. ... Lovers Rock is the United Kingdoms main contribution to reggae. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with ragga. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Toasting, chatting, or DJing is the act of talking or chanting over a rhythm or beat. ... Raggamuffin (or ragga) is a kind of reggae that includes digitized backing instrumentation. ... Roots reggae is a spiritual Rastafari subgenre of reggae music with lyrics that often include praise for Jah Ras Tafari Makonnen, Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia; the Emperor of Ethiopia. ...

Anglophone Caribbean music
Anguilla - Antigua and Barbuda - Bahamas - Barbados - Bermuda - Caymans - Grenada - Jamaica - Montserrat - St. Kitts and Nevis - St. Vincent and the Grenadines - Trinidad and Tobago - Turks and Caicos - Virgin Islands
Sound samples
Other Caribbean music
Aruba and the Dutch Antilles - Cuba - Dominica - Dominican Republic - Haiti - Hawaii - Martinique and Guadeloupe - Puerto Rico - St. Lucia - United States - United Kingdom

Rocksteady is a music genre that was most popular in Jamaica between 1966 and 1968.[citation needed] The Cayman Islands are a Caribbean island chain, currently a territory of the United Kingdom. ... Timeline and Samples Pop genres Calypso - Chutney - Dancehall - Dub - Junkanoo - Ragga - Rapso - Reggae - Ripsaw - Rocksteady - Scratch - Ska - Soca - Spouge - Steelpan Other islands Aruba and the Dutch Antilles - Cuba - Dominica - Dominican Republic - Haiti - Martinique and Guadeloupe - Puerto Rico - Saint Lucia The Turks and Caicos Islands are an overseas dependency of the... 1966 in music Download sample of Alton Ellis rocksteady track Girl Youve Got a Date. Download sample of Cincinatti Kid by Prince Buster, a legendary ska artist. ... Aruba and the five main islands of the Netherlands Antilles are part of the Lesser Antilles island chain. ... The music of Hawaii includes an array of traditional and popular styles, ranging from native Hawaiian folk music to modern rock and hip hop. ... The former French colonies of Martinique and Guadeloupe are small islands in the Caribbean. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The term comes from a dance style that was mentioned in the Alton Ellis song Rock Steady. The rocksteady dance was more relaxed than the earlier ska dancing, and came about when ska musicians mixed in new ideas from gospel and soul. A successor to ska, and a precursor to reggae, rocksteady was performed by Jamaican vocal harmony groups such as The Gaylads, The Kingstonians, Toots & the Maytals and The Paragons. Alton Ellis (born 1944), from Kingston, Jamaica, is a musician best known as the innovator of rocksteady music. ... Skanking is a form of dancing practiced in the ska, ska-core, hardcore punk, and more recently, grime music scenes, The dance style originated in the 1950s or 1960s at Jamaican dance halls, where ska music was played. ... Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... Ska (pron. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Gaylads were a popular rocksteady vocal trio active in Jamaica between 1963 and 1973. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Paragons were an influential rocksteady band from Kingston, Jamaica in the 1960s. ...


Rocksteady differs from ska in that the tempo is slower and more relaxed, and the walking bass line is heavier and more prominent. Guitars and piano replaced trumpets and saxophones from the ska era. Repeated riffs were played using just a few chords, and the lyrics were often about poverty and social problems. The ska-style back beat and the emphasis on the offbeat carried over into rocksteady. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... The trumpet is the highest brass instrument in register, above the French horn, trombone, baritone, euphonium, and tuba. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored instrument of the woodwind family, usually made of brass and played with a single-reed mouthpiece like the clarinet. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ... In music a back beat (or the off-beat) is any of the even beats as opposed to the odd downbeats, ie pulses which are weak on their respective metric levels. ...


History

Rocksteady arose at a time when young people from the Jamaican countryside were flooding into the urban ghettos of Kingston — in neighborhoods such as Riverton City, Greenwich Town and Trenchtown. Though much of the country was optimistic in the immediate post-independence climate, these poverty-stricken youths did not share this sentiment. Many of them became delinquents who exuded a certain coolness and style. These unruly youths became known as rude boys. A ghetto is an area where people from a specific racial or ethnic background live as a group in seclusion, voluntarily or involuntarily. ... The City of Kingston is the capital and largest city of Jamaica. ... Trenchtown is a neighbourhood located in Kingston, the capital and largest city of Jamaica. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...


The rude boy phenomenon had existed in the ska period, but was expressed more obviously during the rocksteady era in songs such as Rude Boy Gone A Jail by the Clarendonians; No Good Rudie by Justin Hinds & the Dominoes; and Don't Be A Rude Boy by The Rulers. Though Alton Ellis is sometimes said to be the father of rocksteady for his hit Girl I've Got a Date, other candidates for the first rocksteady single include Take It Easy by Hopeton Lewis, Tougher Than Tough by Derrick Morgan and Hold Them by Roy Shirley. Justin Hinds (May 7, 1942 - March 16, 2005) is best known as a Jamaican ska singer with his backing vocalists the Dominoes. ... Alton Ellis (born 1944), from Kingston, Jamaica, is a musician best known as the innovator of rocksteady music. ... Derrick Morgan** was a musical artist in 1960s and 70s. ...


The record producer Duke Reid released Alton Ellis' Girl I've Got a Date on his Treasure Isle label, as well as recordings by The Techniques, The Silvertones, The Jamaicans and The Paragons. Reid's work with these groups helped establish the vocal sound of rocksteady. Notable solo artists include Delroy Wilson, Bob Andy, Ken Boothe and Phyllis Dillon (known as the Queen of Rocksteady). In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Duke Reid was a Jamaican record producer, DJ and label owner. ... The Techniques was a Jamaican rock steady group in the late 1960s. ... The Paragons were an influential rocksteady band from Kingston, Jamaica in the 1960s. ... Delroy Wilson (5 October 1948-6 March 1995) was a Jamaican ska, rock steady and reggae singer. ... Ken Boothe was born 22 March 1946, in Denham Town, Kingston, Jamaica. ... Phyllis Dillon (1945 - April 15, 2004) was a Jamaican singer, known as the Queen of Rocksteady. ...


Rocksteady lyrics mainly dealt with love or rude boys — or were simple dance tunes. Rocksteady singers sometimes covered American soul recordings. For example, the song "You don't care" by The Techniques is a cover of "You'll want me back" by The Impressions. "Ilya Kuryakin" by Ike Bennet and The Crystalites is lifted from "Theme from a Summer Place." Musicians who were crucial in creating the music included guitarist Lynn Taitt, keyboard player Jackie Mittoo, drummer Winston Grennan, bassist Jackie Jackson and saxophonist Tommy McCook. As a musical style, rocksteady was shortlived, and existed only for about two years. For this reason original recordings in this genre are often harder to find than those from the ska and reggae era. In contrast to rocksteady, the ska trend lasted several years, and classic reggae lasted for over a decade. The Techniques was a Jamaican rock steady group in the late 1960s. ... Impressions might refer to: The Impressions (American band), a 1960s/1970s American soul musical act from Chicago, Illinois led by Curtis Mayfield and Jerry Butler. ... Lynn Taitt is a Caribbean guitarist who is closely associated with Jamaican rocksteady music. ... Jackie Mittoo (March 3, 1948–December 16, 1990), born in Browns Town, Saint Ann, Jamaica), was a Jamaican pianist. ... Tommy McCook (27 March 1927, Havana, Cuba-4 May 1998) was a Jamaican saxophonist. ...


Transformation into reggae

Several factors contributed to the evolution of rocksteady into reggae in the late 1960s. The emigration to Canada of key musical arrangers Jackie Mittoo and Lynn Taitt — and the modernization of Jamaican studio technology — had a marked effect on the sound and style of the recordings. Rocksteady music was often recorded and mastered very poorly, but with the advent state-of-the-art recording gear in newer studios such as Harry J's and Channel One in the early 1970s, reggae music was able to sonically compete with American and British popular recordings. Musically, bass patterns became more complex and increasingly dominated the arrangements and the piano gave way to the electric organ in the mix. Other developments included horns fading farther into the background; a scratchier, more percussive rhythm guitar; the addition of African-style hand drumming, and a more precise and intricate drumming style. The sound of the records also became more sparse as the dub mix or B-side "version" became popular in Jamaican dancehalls. In music, an arrangement refers either to a rewriting of a piece of existing music with additional new material or to a fleshing-out of a compositional sketch, such as a lead sheet. ... Jackie Mittoo (March 3, 1948–December 16, 1990), born in Browns Town, Saint Ann, Jamaica), was a Jamaican pianist. ... Lynn Taitt is a Caribbean guitarist who is closely associated with Jamaican rocksteady music. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... Classic Hammond B-3 organ. ...


By the early 1970s, as the Rastafari movement gained in popularity, many reggae songs became focused less on romance and more on black consciousness, politics and protest. The release of the film "The Harder They Come" and the rise of Jamaican superstar Bob Marley brought reggae music to an international level that rocksteady had never been able to reach. Although rocksteady was a short-lived phase of Jamaican popular music, it was hugely influential to the reggae and dancehall styles that followed. Many bass lines originally created for rocksteady songs continue to be used in contemporary Jamaican music. Haile Selassie Ras Tafari was the title used by Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia during his time as tenure Regent and Crown Prince (1916-1928). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with ragga. ...


External links

Reggae
Reggae - Mento - Ska - Blue Beat - Rocksteady - Dub music - Dub poetry - Toasting - Lovers Rock - Dancehall - Ragga - Reggae rock - Reggaetón - Roots reggae - 2 Tone
Reggae genres - Music of Jamaica - Caribbean music in the United Kingdom
Related topics
Jamaica - Haile Selassie - Marcus Garvey - Rastafari - Afrocentrism - Black nationalism - Zion - Dreadlocks - Ganja - Rude boy - Skinhead - Suedehead - Dancehall (venue) - Dubplate - Stalag version - Reggae sound system - Sound system (DJ) - Riddim - Jamaican English - Studio One - Trojan Records - Island Records - Coxsone Dodd - Chris Blackwell - Reggae musiciams - Dub artists - Jamaican record producers

  Results from FactBites:
 
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Rocksteady Orthanc provides a simple, manageable approach to providing individual user security and authorization to network servers.
Rocksteady’s Zero-Config Orthanc Keyring can be used to replace the headaches of managing individual server authentication and authorization and, simultaneously, dramatically increase the level of secured access to the servers protected by Orthanc.
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Rocksteady - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (757 words)
Key musical differences between ska and rocksteady were a more relaxed tempo, a diminished use of horns, and a change of the role of the bass.
Rocksteady arose at a time when young people from the Jamaican countryside were flooding into the urban ghettos of Kingston, in neighborhoods known as Riverton City, Greenwich Town and, most notoriously, Trenchtown.
Although rocksteady was a short-lived phase of Jamaican popular music, it was hugely influential to the reggae and dancehall styles that followed, and many basslines originally created for rocksteady songs continue to be recycled and used in contemporary Jamaican music.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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