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Encyclopedia > Rockland County, New York
Rockland County, New York
Map
Map of New York highlighting Rockland County
Location in the state of New York
Map of the USA highlighting New York
New York's location in the USA
Statistics
Founded 1798
Seat New City
Largest City New City
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

516 km² (199 mi²)
451 km² (174 mi²)
65 km² (25 mi²), 12.60%
Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

286,753
636/km² 
Website: www.co.rockland.ny.us
The Tappan Zee Bridge, in a view looking toward Rockland.
The Tappan Zee Bridge, in a view looking toward Rockland.

Rockland County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York, 12 miles north-northwest of New York City. As of the 2000 census, the population was 286,753. The county seat is New City. The name comes from "rocky land," an early description of the area given by settlers. Largely suburban in nature, Rockland is New York's southernmost county west of the Hudson River. Image File history File links Map_of_New_York_highlighting_Rockland_County. ... “NY” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_NY.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): New York ... Year 1798 (MDCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... New City is a hamlet (and also a census-designated place) in Rockland County, New York, USA. The population was 34,038 at the 2000 census. ... New City is a hamlet (and also a census-designated place) in Rockland County, New York, USA. The population was 34,038 at the 2000 census. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2357x871, 473 KB) Summary The Tappan Zee Bridge taken from a train on the eastern shore of the Hudson River. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2357x871, 473 KB) Summary The Tappan Zee Bridge taken from a train on the eastern shore of the Hudson River. ... The Governor Malcolm Wilson Tappan Zee Bridge, almost always referred to as the Tappan Zee Bridge or simply the Tappan Zee (though this can cause confusion with the body of water for which it is named) is a cantilever bridge in New York over the Hudson River at its widest... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of the... “NY” redirects here. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... New City is a hamlet (and also a census-designated place) in Rockland County, New York, USA. The population was 34,038 at the 2000 census. ...


Rockland County ranks 9th on the list of highest-income counties by median household income in the United States with $75,306 according to the 2004 census. It is served by area code 845. A telephone numbering plan is a system that allows subscribers to make and receive telephone calls across long distances. ... The blue area is New York State; the red area is area code 845 Area code 845 is a State of New York telephone area code which serves the Hudson Valley counties of Rockland, Putnam, Orange, Dutchess (except the northeastern corner), Ulster, and Sullivan, as well as small portions of...

Contents

History

The area that would become Rockland County was originally inhabited by Algonquian-speaking Indians, including Munsees, or Lenni Lenape. The Algonquian (also Algonkian) languages are a subfamily of Native American languages that includes most of the languages in the Algic language family (others are Wiyot and Yurok of northwestern California). ... The Lenape or Lenni-Lenape (later named Delaware Indians by Europeans) were, in the 1600s, loosely organized bands of Native American people practicing small-scale agriculture to augment a largely mobile hunter-gatherer society in the region around the Delaware River, the lower Hudson River, and western Long Island Sound. ... The Lenape or Lenni-Lenape (later named Delaware Indians by Europeans) were, in the 1600s, loosely organized bands of Native American people practicing small-scale agriculture to augment a largely mobile hunter-gatherer society in the region around the Delaware River, the lower Hudson River, and western Long Island Sound. ...


In 1609, Henry Hudson, thinking he had found the legendary "Northwest Passage", sailed up the river that would one day bear his name and anchored near the area that is now Haverstraw before continuing to disillusionment at Albany. Haverstraw is the name of two locations in Rockland County, New York: the Town of Haverstraw the Village of Haverstraw There is also a village of West Haverstraw. ... For other uses, see Albany. ...


The area was originally settled by the Dutch. A number of unique Dutch-style red sandstone houses still stand, and many placenames in the county reveal their Dutch origin.


When the Duke of York (who became King James II of England) established the first twelve counties of New York in 1683, present-day Rockland County was part of Orange County. Orangetown was created at the same time, originally encompassing all of modern Rockland County. Haverstraw was separated from Orangetown in 1719 and became a town in 1788; it included the present-day Clarkstown, Ramapo and Stony Point. Clarkstown and Ramapo became towns in 1791, followed by Stony Point in 1865. Rockland County was split from Orange County in 1798. The title Duke of York is a title of nobility in the British peerage. ... James II of England (also known as James VII of Scotland; 14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701) became King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685, and Duke of Normandy on 31 December 1660. ... Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. ... The Orange County Government Center in Goshen, N.Y., designed by Paul Rudolph. ... Orangetown is a town located in Rockland County, New York. ... Year 1798 (MDCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


During the American Revolution, when control of the Hudson River was viewed by the British as strategic to dominating the American territories, Rockland saw skirmishes at Haverstraw, Nyack and Piermont, and significant military engagements at the Battle of Stony Point, where General "Mad" Anthony Wayne earned his nickname. George Washington had headquarters for a time at John Suffern's tavern, the later site of the village of Suffern. John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... Haverstraw is the name of two locations in Rockland County, New York: the Town of Haverstraw the Village of Haverstraw There is also a village of West Haverstraw. ... The Tappan Zee Bridge from Nyack Pier Nyack is a village in Rockland County, New York, United States. ... Piermont is a village located in Rockland County, New York, United States. ... Combatants United States British Commanders Anthony Wayne Henry Johnson Strength 1,350 700 Casualties 15 killed, 83 wounded 63 killed, 70 wounded, 543 prisoners The Battle of Stony Point was a battle of the American Revolutionary War. ... Stony Point is a town located in Rockland County, New York. ... Anthony Wayne (January 1, 1745 - December 15, 1796), was a United States Army general and statesman. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... The Village of Suffern, New York, viewed from the top of Nordkop Mountain Suffern is a village in Rockland County, New York, USA near the southern border of the county and the state in the Town of Ramapo. ...


British Major John André met with American traitor Benedict Arnold near Stony Point to buy the plans for the fortifications at West Point. André was captured with the plans in Tarrytown on his way back to the British lines; he was brought to Tappan for trial in the Tappan church, found guilty, hanged and buried nearby. Major John André John André (May 2, 1750 - October 2, 1780) was a British officer hanged as a spy during the American Revolutionary War for an incident in which he assisted Benedict Arnolds attempted surrender of the fort at West Point, New York to the British. ... For other persons named Benedict Arnold, see Benedict Arnold (disambiguation). ... West Point painting West Point is a federal military base (and a census-designated place) located in the Town of Highlands in Orange County, New York. ... Tarrytown is a village in Westchester County, New York, United States. ... Tappan is a hamlet (and a census-designated place) in Rockland County, New York, United States. ...


The American Industrial Revolution was supplied, in part, from forests and iron mines in Rockland County. Resource utilization extracted a heavy toll on the region, especially from lumbering and agriculture, since the poor, thin soils on hillsides were easily depleted. By the early 1900s development along the lower Hudson River had begun to destroy much of the area's natural beauty. A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... This article is about a community of trees. ... For other uses, see Iron (disambiguation). ... // Public flight demonstration of an airplane by Alberto Santos-Dumont in Paris, November 12, 1906. ...


Many unsuccessful efforts were made to turn much of the Hudson Highlands into a forest preserve. However, when the State of New York tried to relocate Sing Sing Prison to Bear Mountain in 1909, some of the wealthy businessmen who had homes in the area, led by Union Pacific Railroad president E. H. Harriman, donated land as well as large sums of money for the purchase of properties in the area of Bear Mountain. Bear Mountain/Harriman State Park became a reality in 1910, and by 1914 it was estimated that more than a million people a year were coming to the park. Wind Gate, the northern entrance to the Hudson Highlands, as seen from Newburgh. ... Alternative meaning: Sing Sing (band) Sing Sing Correctional Facility is a prison in Ossining, New York. ... According to the USGS GNIS, the state of New York in the United States has 11 peaks named Bear Mountain. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Union Pacific Railroad (AAR reporting marks UP) (NYSE: UNP), headquartered in Omaha, Nebraska, is the largest railroad network in the United States. ... Edward Henry Harriman (February 20, 1848 – September 9, 1909), better known as E. H. Harriman, was a wealthy railroad executive. ... Bear Mountain State Park is located on the west side of the Hudson River in Rockland County, New York. ... There is also a Harriman State Park in Idaho. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Law/Government

County Executive

The county executive is C. Scott Vanderhoef (R), who was re-elected in 2005 to his fourth four-year term. He is the second county executive in Rockland history, having defeated the incumbent, John Grant (D), in 1993. Vanderhoef ran for Lieutenant Governor in 2006. Prior to 1985, Rockland County did not have a county executive. C. Scott Vanderhoef is the County Executive of Rockland County, New York and the Republican nominee for Lieutenant Governor of New York in the 2006 statewide elections. ...


County Legislature

Rockland is divided into 17 single-member legislative districts. The Chairwoman of the Legislature is Harriet Cornell (D). The other legislators are: Gerold Bierker (R-C), Connie Coker (D), William Darden (D), Edwin Day (R), Theodore Dusanenko (R), David Fried (D), Michael Grant (D), Jay Hood Jr. (D), Douglas Jobson (R), Bruce Levine (D), John Murphy (R), Patrick Moroney (R), V.J. Pradhan (D), Ilan Schoenberger (D), Philip Soskin (D), and Patrick Withers (D). Edwin Day (b. ... David Fried (November 30, 1988) was the founder of Max Sieverts Lödlampfabrik, then one of the largest industries in Sundbyberg. ...


County Courts

There are three types of general trial courts in Rockland County: the New York Supreme Court, the County Court and the Justice Courts. The Supreme Court is the trial level court of the New York State Unified Court System, which presents some confusion as the Supreme Court is the highest court of appeals in the federal system as well as in most states (the Court of Appeals is the highest court in New York State). The Supreme Court has broad authority over all categories of cases, both civil and criminal. Generally the Supreme Court in Rockland County hears civil cases involving claims in excess of $25,000. While the Supreme Court has jurisdiction over criminal cases in most counties this is handled by the County Courts. In Rockland however, the Supreme Court does exercise jurisdiction over some criminal cases. The Supreme Court of the State of New York is the basic New York State trial court of general jurisidiction. ... In New York State, all towns and many villages have courts that handle traffic tickets, criminal matters, small claims and local code violations such as zoning. ...


The County Court is inferior to the Supreme Court and is authorized to hear all criminal cases that have occurred in the county as well as limited jurisdiction over civil cases. The County Court handles felony cases exclusively and shares jurisdiction with the town and village justice courts on midemeanor cases and other minor offenses and violations. The County Court's jurisdiction on civil cases is limited to those involving less than $25,000.


Each of the towns and fifteen of the villages have Justice Courts. These courts mostly hear routine traffic ticket cases, especially from the New York State Thruway and the Palisades Interstate Parkway. They also handle drunk driving charges, lower-level criminal misdemeanor matters, and they will occasionally perform arraignment on felonies (most felony proceedings are heard in County Court). These courts generally handle the highest volume of cases, which, considering the population density and highways in the county, is not surprising. In New York State, all towns and many villages have courts that handle traffic tickets, criminal matters, small claims and local code violations such as zoning. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Ticket (notification). ... The New York State Thruway (officially the Governor Thomas E. Dewey Thruway) is a limited-access toll highway in the U.S. state of New York. ... The Palisades Interstate Parkway, officially known (but not signed) as New Jersey State Highway 445 and New York State Reference Route 987C is a four-lane, 42 mile (68 kilometre) long, wooded highway, generally built to freeway standards, extending from Fort Lee, New Jersey (at the George Washington Bridge, which... Drunk driving (drink driving in the UK) or drinking and driving is the act of operating a motor vehicle after having consumed alcohol (i. ... A misdemeanor, or misdemeanour, in many common law legal systems, is a lesser criminal act. ... Arraignment is a common law term for the formal reading of a criminal complaint, in the presence of the defendant, to inform him of the charges against him. ... A felony, in many common law legal systems, is the term for a very serious crime; misdemeanors are considered to be less serious. ...


Geography

Pine Meadow Lake in Harriman State Park.
Pine Meadow Lake in Harriman State Park.

Rockland County lies just north of the New Jersey-New York border, west of the Hudson River, and south of Orange County. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 739 KB)Pine Meadow Lake in Harriman State Park. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 739 KB)Pine Meadow Lake in Harriman State Park. ... There is also a Harriman State Park in Idaho. ... “NJ” redirects here. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and...


According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 516 km² (199 mi²). 451 km² (174 mi²) of it is land and 65 km² (25 mi²) of it (12.60%) is water. Approximately 30% of Rockland County is parkland. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


The highest elevation in the county is Rockhouse Mountain, at 391 m (1,283 feet). However, nearby Jackie Jones Mountain also has a summit above 390 m (1,280 feet) whose exact elevation is not known and may well be higher.


The lowest elevation is sea level along the Hudson River.


Rockland is the smallest county in New York outside of New York City


Adjacent counties

Rockland's borders with Putnam and Passaic counties are short, totalling little more than one mile. The Orange County Government Center in Goshen, N.Y., designed by Paul Rudolph. ... Putnam County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York . ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... Westchester County is a primarily suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Bergen County is the most populous county of the state of New Jersey, United States. ... Bergen and Passaic counties, 1872 Passaic County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ...


Demographics

As of the census² of 2000, there were 286,753 people, 92,675 households, and 70,989 families residing in the county. The population density was 636/km² (1,646/mi²). There were 94,973 housing units at an average density of 210/km² (545/mi²). However, Rocklanders live closer together than the census numbers indicate, as 30 percent of the county is reserved as parkland. The racial makeup of the county was 76.91% White, 10.98% Black or African American, 0.24% Native American, 5.52% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 3.78% from other races, and 2.51% from two or more races. 10.18% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 9.17% reported speaking Spanish at home, 4.96% Yiddish, 4.33% French or a French-based creole, 1.45% Italian, 1.30% Tagalog, 1.25% Hebrew, and 1.01% Russian. Other languages spoken at home by at least 1000 people include Malayalam, Korean, Chinese, German, and Polish.[1] Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The following is a list of sources used in the creation of encyclopedia articles on various geographic topics and locations, such as cities, counties, states, and countries. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... Yiddish (Yid. ... A French creole, more properly French-based creole language, is a creole language with substantial influence from the French language. ... Tagalog (pronunciation: ) is one of the major languages of the Republic of the Philippines. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ... Malayalam ( ) is the language spoken predominantly in the state of Kerala, in southern India. ...


The 2005 estimates show that Rockland county remains a diverse place. 69.2% of the population was grouped under the heading "non-Hispanic whites" but with such high numbers of speakers of such languages as Russian and Italian, this figure hid more than it revealed. The percentage of African-Americans had risen to 11.9. Native Americans were gaining ground now constituting 0.3% of the population. Asians continued to grow in their percentage of the county population, now making up 6.4% of the population. Latinos were now 12.2% of the population.[1]


In 2000 there were 92,675 households out of which 37.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.80% were married couples living together, 10.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.40% were non-families. 19.30% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.01 and the average family size was 3.47. Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


In the county the population was spread out with 28.00% under the age of 18, 7.90% from 18 to 24, 28.00% from 25 to 44, 24.30% from 45 to 64, and 11.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 95.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.30 males.


The median income for a household in the county was $75,306, and the median income for a family was $86,624. Males had a median income of $58,214 versus $43,955 for females. The per capita income for the county was $31,680. The mean, or average, income for a family in Rockland County is $102,542 according to the 2004 census. About 6.30% of families and 9.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.30% of those under age 18 and 7.60% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


31.4% of Rockland residents are Jewish, the highest Jewish population per capita of any county in the United States. [2].The county is also home to several large Orthodox Jewish communities, especially in the hamlet of Monsey, and the villages of New Square, Kaser, New Hempstead, and Wesley Hills. Orthodox Judaism is the formulation of Judaism that adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonised in the Talmudic texts (Oral Torah) and as subsequently developed and applied by the later authorities known as the Gaonim, Rishonim, and Acharonim. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... The definitions of the political subdivisions of the state of New York differ from those in certain other countries or even various other U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ... Monsey is a hamlet (and also a census-designated place) located in Rockland County, New York. ... The definitions of the political subdivisions of the state of New York differ from those in certain other countries or even various other U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ... New Square (Hebrew: שיכון סקווירא) is an all-Hasidic village in the Town of Ramapo in Rockland County, New York. ... Kaser is a village located in Rockland County, New York. ... New Hempstead is a village in Rockland County, New York, United States. ... Wesley Hills is a village located in Rockland County, New York. ...


Communities in Rockland

County map, with town and village boundaries.
County map, with town and village boundaries.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (726x916, 39 KB) Summary I made this file. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (726x916, 39 KB) Summary I made this file. ...

Towns

There are five towns in Rockland County: The definitions of the political subdivisions of the state of New York differ from those in certain other countries or even various other U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ...

Clarkstown is a town located in Rockland County, New York. ... Haverstraw is a town located in Rockland County, New York. ... Orangetown is a town located in Rockland County, New York. ... The Ramapo Torne in Harriman State Park Ramapo is a town in Rockland County, New York, USA. As of the 2000 census, the town had a total population of 108,905. ... Stony Point is a town located in Rockland County, New York. ...

Incorporated villages

There are nineteen incorporated villages in Rockland County, twelve of which are located at least partially in the town of Ramapo: The definitions of the political subdivisions of the state of New York differ from those in certain other countries or even various other U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ...

There are no villages in the town of Stony Point. Airmont is a village in Rockland County, New York, USA. The population was 7,799 at the 2000 census. ... Chestnut Ridge is a village located in Rockland County, New York. ... Grand View-on-Hudson (or Grand View) is a village located in Rockland County, New York. ... Haverstraw is a village in Rockland County, New York. ... Hillburn is a village located in Rockland County, New York. ... Kaser is a village located in Rockland County, New York. ... Montebello is a village in Rockland County, New York, United States. ... New Hempstead is a village in Rockland County, New York, United States. ... New Square (Hebrew: שיכון סקווירא) is an all-Hasidic village in the Town of Ramapo in Rockland County, New York. ... The Tappan Zee Bridge from Nyack Pier Nyack is a village in Rockland County, New York, United States. ... Piermont is a village located in Rockland County, New York, United States. ... Pomona is a village located in Rockland County, New York. ... Sloatsburg is a village located in Rockland County, New York. ... South Nyack is a village located in Rockland County, New York. ... Spring Valley is a village located in Rockland County, New York, USA. As of the 2000 census, the village had a total population of 25,464. ... The Village of Suffern, New York, viewed from the top of Nordkop Mountain Suffern is a village in Rockland County, New York, USA near the southern border of the county and the state in the Town of Ramapo. ... Upper Nyack is a village located in Rockland County, New York. ... Wesley Hills is a village located in Rockland County, New York. ... West Haverstraw is a village located in Rockland County, New York. ...


Unincorporated hamlets

Rockland County has a number of unincorporated hamlets, including: The definitions of the political subdivisions of the state of New York differ from those in certain other countries or even various other U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ...

Bardonia is a census-designated place located in Rockland County, New York. ... Blauvelt is a hamlet (and census-designated place) located in Rockland County, New York. ... Central Nyack is an unincorporated community (hamlet) located in the Township of Clarkstown, Rockland County, approximately 20 miles north of New York City. ... Congers is a hamlet (and a census-designated place) in Rockland County, New York, in the United States. ... Garnerville is a small town in Rockland County, New York, USA which lies directly between Mount Ivy, Stony Point, West Haverstraw, and New City (it borders all four). ... Hillcrest is a census-designated place located in Rockland County, New York. ... Monsey is a hamlet (and also a census-designated place) located in Rockland County, New York. ... Mount Ivy is a hamlet (and census-designated place) located in Rockland County, New York. ... Nanuet is a hamlet (and census-designated place) in Rockland County, New York, 19 miles north of Manhattan, and 2 miles north of the Jersey border. ... New City is a hamlet (and also a census-designated place) in Rockland County, New York, USA. The population was 34,038 at the 2000 census. ... Orangeburg is a hamlet (and a census-designated place) located in the Town of Orangetown in Rockland County, New York. ... Palisades, New York is a very small hamlet located in southeastern Rockland County, New York. ... Pearl River is a hamlet (and a census-designated place) in Rockland County, New York, United States. ... Sparkill is a hamlet in Rockland County, New York, within the town of Orangetown. ... Stony Point is a hamlet (and census-designated place) in Rockland County, New York, USA. The population was 11,744 at the 2000 census. ... Tappan is a hamlet (and a census-designated place) in Rockland County, New York, United States. ... Thiells is a hamlet (and census-designated place) located in Rockland County, New York. ... Tomkins Cove is an unincorporated hamlet in the town of Stony Point, Rockland County, New York. ... Valley Cottage is a hamlet (and a census-designated place) in Rockland County, New York, United States located in the eastern part of the Town of Clarkstown. ... Viola is a hamlet (and a census-designated place) located in Rockland County, New York. ... West Nyack is a hamlet (and census-designated place) located in Rockland County, New York. ...

Historical settlements

  • Doodletown (Town of Stony Point) in Harriman State Park is now a ghost town.

Doodletown was an isolated village located in northern Rockland County, New York which was abandoned during the 1950s and is now part of Bear Mountain State Park. ...

Communities of significant population

According to the 2000 census, these nine Rockland communities have a population exceeding 10,000 people:

  1. New City, a hamlet of 34,038
  2. Spring Valley, a village of 25,464
  3. Nanuet, a hamlet of 16,707
  4. Pearl River, a hamlet of 15,553
  5. Monsey, a hamlet of 14,504
  6. Stony Point, a hamlet of 11,744
  7. Suffern, a village of 11,006
  8. West Haverstraw, a village of 10,295
  9. Haverstraw, a village of 10,117

Education

School Districts

There are 8 school districts in Rockland

Post-Secondary Schools

It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Empire State College, a State University of New York university college, is a multi-site institution that offers higher education to students all over the State of New York as well as the rest of the world. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Long Island University (LIU) is a private university located on Long Island in the U.S. state of New York. ... The New York University School of Social Work is a division within New York University. ... Nyack College is a small, private, liberal arts college located in Nyack, Rockland County, New York. ... Rockland Community College is a two-year college in the SUNY system, located in hamlet of Viola within the Village of Suffern from the Town of Ramapo in Rockland County, New York. ... For other schools named after St. ... Sunbridge College, located in Chestnut Ridge, New York, specializes in educational programs centered on Waldorf education. ...

Twin/Sister cities

Rockland County has been paired with Huehuete, Nicaragua as its Sister City. This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ...


Additionally, the town of Ramapo is twinned with a number of cities.


Famous/Notable people from Rockland County

For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... La Bohème, French for The Bohemian Life, is an opera in four acts by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa, based on La Vie de Bohème by Henri Murger. ... // Original Text The Wild Party, a classic epic poem, is Joseph Moncure Marchs first published work. ... Adam Rodriguez (born April 2, 1975 in Yonkers, New York) is an American actor of Puerto Rican and Cuban descent. ... CBS Broadcasting, Inc. ... CSI: Miami is a spinoff of the popular CBS network series CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. ... Cukor Adolf (Adolph Zukor) (January 7, 1873–June 10, 1976) was the founder of Paramount Pictures Studios, and one of the greatest film moguls of all time. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... Aidan Quinn (born March 8, 1959 Rockford, Illinois, USA) is an Irish-American actor. ... Alfredo James Pacino (born April 25, 1940) is a renowned and influential Academy Award, four time Golden Globe, AFI, two time BAFTA, Emmy Award, and two time Tony Award-winning American stage and film actor who played such iconic roles as Michael Corleone in The Godfather Trilogy and Tony Montana... Yes, Dear is an American television sitcom which aired from 2000 to 2006 on CBS. It starred Anthony Clark, Jean Louisa Kelly, Mike OMalley and Liza Snyder. ... Alan Ruck (born July 1, 1956 in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American stage, television and film actor. ... Andr Watts is a classical pianist. ... Arlene Dahl (born August 11, 1928) is an American movie starlet who was most famous during the 1950s. ... Audrey Landers, (born July 18, 1956, in Philadelphia), is an American actress and singer, who is probably best known for her role in the television drama series Dallas as Afton Cooper. ... Barry Knapp Bostwick (February 24, 1945[1]) is an American actor and singer. ... Spin City was an American sitcom television series that ran from 1996 to 2002 on ABC, and was created by Gary David Goldberg & Bill Lawrence, based on a fictional local government running New York City, originally starring Michael J. Fox as Mike Flaherty, the Deputy Mayor of New York. ... The Rocky Horror Picture Show is a 1975 musical comedy film that parodies horror films, based on the British musical stage production The Rocky Horror Show, with the screenplay written by Richard OBrien and Jim Sharman. ... James Maxwell Anderson (15 December 1888 – 28 February 1959), better known as Maxwell Anderson was a Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, author, poet, reporter and lyricist, and a founding member of The Playwrights Company (which included, at various times, Maxwell Anderson, S. N. Behrman, Elmer Rice, Robert E. Sherwood, Sidney Howard... Ben Hecht (February 28, 1894 – April 18, 1964) was a prolific Hollywood screenwriter, even though he professed disdain for the motion picture industry. ... Betty Friedan, 1960 Betty Friedan (February 4, 1921 – February 4, 2006) was an American feminist, activist and writer, best known for starting what is commonly known as the Second Wave of feminism through the writing of her book The Feminine Mystique. ... William James Bill Murray (born September 21, 1950) is an Academy Award-nominated, Emmy-winning and Golden Globe-winning American comedian and actor. ... Bill T. Jones is an American artistic director, choreographer and dancer. ... Categories: People stubs | 1963 births | Baldwin brothers | Cinema actors | American actors ... Oliver Burgess Meredith (November 16, 1908[1] – September 9, 1997), known as Burgess Meredith, was a versatile American actor. ... Carson McCullers, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1959 Carson McCullers (February 19, 1917 – September 29, 1967) was an American writer. ... Charles Ellis is a deceased U.S. soccer midfielder who is best known for scoring a goal in each of the U.S. national teams first two games. ... Charles MacArthur (November 5, 1895 _ April 21, 1956) was an American playwright and screenwriter, born in Scranton, Pennsylvania. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A Dancers Life poster Chita Rivera (born January 23, 1933) is a Tony Award-winning American actress, dancer, and singer known for her musical theater roles. ... Christine Andreas on the cover of her CD Heres to the Ladies Christine Andreas (born October 1, 1951) is an American actress and singer. ... Connie Sellecca promotional photo from TV Host, November 1989 Sellecca in Doomsday Rock (1997) Connie Sellecca (born Concetta Sellecchia on May 25, 1955) is an American actress. ... Edward Ernest Sauter(born December 2, 1914 in Brooklyn; died April 21, 1981 in New York City) was a jazz arranger most associated with the swing era. ... Nighthawks. ... Elaine Stritch (born on February 2, 1925) is an Irish-American actress and singer. ... Ellen Burstyn (born December 7, 1932 as Edna Rae Gillooly in Detroit, Michigan) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Ellen S. Simon is an American politician who is running as a Democrat for Congress in Arizonas 1st congressional district against the Republican incumbent, Rick Renzi. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Frederick Hubbard Gwynne (July 10, 1926 – July 2, 1993) was an American actor, known for starring in the television sitcoms Car 54, Where Are You? and The Munsters. ... Freddie Roman (born 1937 in Jamaica, Queens, NY) Stand-up comedian, and king of one-liners, best known for his frequent appearances at Borscht Belt clubs. ... The Friars Club is best known for their Roasts. ... Harry Bellaver (February 12, 1905 to August 8, 1993) was a stage, film and television actor who appeared in many roles from the 1930s through the 1980s. ... Harry Edward Nilsson III (June 15, 1941 - January 15, 1994) was an American songwriter, singer, pianist and guitarist, most popular during the 1960s and 1970s. ... Hayden Leslie Panettiere (born August 21, 1989[1]) is an American actress, singer, and a Grammy Award nominee. ... Helen Hayes (October 10, 1900 – March 17, 1993) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress whose successful and award-winning career spanned almost 70 years. ... American architect/painter/potter (1888-1970). ... Ina Claire (15 October, 1893 - 21 February 1985) was an actress. ... The Isley Brothers are an American pop, R&B, funk and soul group who began their musical career in Cincinnati in the early 1950s. ... James Gordon MacArthur (born December 8, 1937 in Los Angeles, California) is an American actor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Break-Up is a Universal Pictures film that was released on June 2, 2006. ... Jimmy Webb (born August 15, 1946 in Elk City, Oklahoma) is an idiosyncratic American popular music composer. ... Rt. ... John Thomas Aloysius Flannagan was the 2nd president of St. ... John Houseman (September 22, 1902 – October 31, 1988) was a Romanian-born actor and film producer. ... The Paper Chase was a 1970 novel, as well as a 1973 movie based on the novel and a television series based on the movie. ... There are multiple people named John Johnson: John Johnson ( c. ... John Ernst Steinbeck (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was one of the best-known and most widely read American writers of the 20th century. ... John William Van Druten (1 June 1901–19 December 1957) was an English dramatist, best known for writing light comedies. ... The Pousette-Dart Band (also known as PDB) was an American soft rock group active in the 1970s and early 1980s. ... Jonathan Vincent Voight (born December 29, 1938) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Jonathan Demme (born February 22, 1944, in Baldwin, New York) is an American film director, producer and writer. ... Judy Landers (October 7, 1961) is an American actress. ... Keith Bullock is an American Football player who currently plays linebacker for the Tennessee Titans of the NFL. Categories: Sports stubs | National Football League players ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kim Stanley photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1961 Kim Stanley (February 11, 1925 – August 20, 2001) was an American actress. ... Kurt Julian Weill (March 2, 1900 – April 3, 1950), born in Dessau, Germany and died in New York City, was a German and in his later years, a German-American composer active from the 1920s until his death. ... Larry Mullen, Jr. ... Lorraine Bracco (born October 2, 1954[1]) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe and Emmy Award nominated and Screen Actors Guild winning American actress best known for her roles as Karen Hill in Goodfellas and Dr. Jennifer Melfi on the hit HBO TV series, The Sopranos. ... Lil Wayne was one of the Hot Boys, an American rap group associated with Cash Money Records. ... Lotte Lenya (October 18, 1898 – November 27, 1981), singer and actor, born Karoline Wilhelmine Blamauer, in Vienna, Austria. ... Margot Kidder (born October 17, 1948) is a Canadian-American film and television actress who achieved fame playing Lois Lane in the Superman movies of the 1970s and 1980s. ... Marion Hargrove (born October 13, 1919 - died August 23, 2003) was an American writer noted for the bestselling World War II comedy novel See Here, Private Hargrove (which was made into a 1944 movie with Robert Walker as Hargrove and Donna Reed as his love interest) as well as almost... New City is a hamlet (and also a census-designated place) in Rockland County, New York, USA. The population was 34,038 at the 2000 census. ... Maurice Evans (1901 - 1989) was an English actor. ... James Maxwell Anderson (15 December 1888 – 28 February 1959), better known as Maxwell Anderson was a Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, author, poet, reporter and lyricist, and a founding member of The Playwrights Company (which included, at various times, Maxwell Anderson, S. N. Behrman, Elmer Rice, Robert E. Sherwood, Sidney Howard... South Mountain Road is a winding, two-lane historic road in New City, New York, a hamlet in Rockland County. ... Michael Phillip Mick Jagger CBE (born July 26, 1943) is an English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ... “Rolling Stones” redirects here. ... Mike Wallace (born Myron Leon Wallace on May 9, 1918) is a former American game show host, television personality, and journalist. ... Alexandra Danilova and Mikhail Baryshnikov, 1976 Mikhail Nikolaevitch Baryshnikov (Russian: ) (born January 28, 1948) is a Russian dancer, choreographer, and actor. ... Milton Arthur Paul Caniff (February 28, 1907-May 3, 1988) was an American cartoonist most famous for Terry and the Pirates. ... Terry and the Pirates is the title of: a comic strip created by Milton Caniff; see: Terry and the Pirates (comic strip) a radio serial, based on the comic strip; see: Terry and the Pirates (radio serial) a television series, also based on the comic strip; see: Terry and the... Steve Canyon was a long-running American adventure comic strip by writer-artist Milton Caniff, published from January 13, 1947, after Caniff had retired from a popular previous strip Terry and the Pirates, through June 4, 1988, shortly after Caniffs death. ... Mitch Miller (born Mitchell William Miller on July 4, 1911 to a Jewish family in Rochester, New York), is remembered as one of the best-selling recording artists of the 1950s and early 60s. ... Morley Safer (born November 8, 1931 in Toronto, Canada) is a reporter and correspondent for CBS News. ... Myron Cohen (July 1, 1902 - March 10, 1986) was an American comedian and storyteller. ... Borscht Belt is an informal term for the summer resorts of the Catskill Mountains in Sullivan and Ulster Counties in upstate New York which were frequented by Ashkenazi Jews. ... Sir Noël Peirce Coward (December 16, 1899 – March 26, 1973) was an English actor, playwright, and composer of popular music. ... Norman Lewis Corwin (born May 3, 1910) is an American writer, screenwriter, producer, essayist and teacher of journalism and writing. ... Pat Hingle (born July 19, 1924) is a TOWERING American actor, born Martin Patterson Hingle in Denver, Colorado. ... Philip Rosenthal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Everybody Loves Raymond is an American sitcom originally broadcast on CBS from 1996 to 2005. ... Randi Weingarten is the current president of the United Federation of Teachers. ... The United Federation of Teachers (UFT) is the labor union that represents most educators in New York City public schools. ... Richard Paul Kiley (March 31, 1922 – March 5, 1999) was an American stage, television, and film actor, though he is best known for his voice work, as narrator of various documentary series. ... Richard Pousette-Dart (1916 – 1992) was an American Abstract Expressionist painter. ... Richard Shoberg (born October 13, 1947 in St. ... Rosie ODonnell (on right) and life-partner Kelli Carpenter-ODonnell speaking after their legal union on February 26, 2004 in San Francisco. ... Rupert Holmes (born February 24, 1947 in Northwich, Cheshire, England) is a composer and writer who grew up in the northern New York City suburb of Nanuet, New York, and attended nearby Nyack High School. ... When Do We Eat? is a 2006 jewish comedy film. ... Sam Rosen, often credited as S. Rosen, lettered many of the Silver Age comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... The New York Rangers are a professional ice hockey team based in New York, New York, U.S.A. They are members of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). ... NFL on FOX is the brand name of the Fox Broadcasting Companys coverage of the National Football Leagues National Football Conference games, produced by Fox Sports. ... Sandy Baron was born Sanford Beresofsky in Brooklyn, New York on May 5, 1937. ... Thomas Berger (born 1933), Canadian politician Thomas Berger, U.S. novelist (Little Big Man) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Meehan, Thomas (March 21, 1826 - November 19, 1901), American Nurseryman and botanist. ... Timothy Daly (born March 1, 1956, in New York) is an American screen and voice actor and producer. ... Timothy J McCann (born ?) is an archivist at the West Sussex Record Office. ... Tito Puente Ernesto Antonio Puente Jr. ... Tom Chapin is a Grammy Award-winning musician, entertainer, and songwriter. ... For the Louisiana politician, see deLesseps Morrison, Jr. ... Tyne Daly (born Ellen Tyne Daly on February 21, 1946 in Madison, Wisconsin) is an Emmy Award and Tony Award-winning American stage and screen actress. ... Valerie Harper (born August 22, 1940 in Suffern, New York) is an Emmy Award-winning American actress, best known for her role as Rhoda Morgenstern-Gerard on the 1970s television show The Mary Tyler Moore Show, and its spinoff, Rhoda. ... Promotional poster for Win A Date With Tad Hamilton! Win a Date with Tad Hamilton! is a 2004 romantic comedy film, directed by Robert Luketic and starring Kate Bosworth, Topher Grace and more. ... William Joseph Cunnane (Born April 24, 1974 in Suffern, New York) is a right handed baseball pitcher who graduated from Clarkstown High School North in New City, New York in 1992. ... League Pacific Coast League Division American Conference Year founded 1998 Major League affiliation St. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... Major league affiliations National League (1969–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 6, 19, 31, 35, 42 Name San Diego Padres (1969–present) Other nicknames Pads, Friars Ballpark PETCO Park (2004–present) Qualcomm Stadium (1969-2003) a. ... Major league affiliations National League (1998–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 4, 19, 34, 42, 44 Name Milwaukee Brewers (1970–present) Seattle Pilots (1969) Other nicknames True Blue Brew Crew, The Brew Crew, The Crew, Beermakers Ballpark Miller Park (2001–present) County Stadium (1970–2000) Sick... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1871, 1874-1889) (a. ... William Hurt (born March 20, 1950) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Zita Johann (14 July 1904 in Temesvar, Austria-Hungary - 20 September 1993 in Nyack, New York) was a Hungarian-born actress, known for her role as Princess Ankhesenamón in Karl Freunds 1932 film version of The Mummy. ...

References

External links

Coordinates: 41°09′N 74°02′W / 41.15, -74.03 Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Rockland County, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1353 words)
Rockland County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York, 16 miles north-northwest of New York City.
Rockland is the smallest county in New York outside of New York City.
In the county the population was spread out with 28.00% under the age of 18, 7.90% from 18 to 24, 28.00% from 25 to 44, 24.30% from 45 to 64, and 11.80% who were 65 years of age or older.
New York Books - Rockland County (2076 words)
Rockland was once rich in high-grade iron ore, though it was embedded in solid rock and difficult to extract.
During the 1950s, the construction of the Palisades Interstate Parkway, the New York State Thruway, and the Tappan Zee Bridge along with several important arteries, led to a dramatic increase in population--from 89,276 in 1950 to 265,475 in 1990.
Rockland County's rich history is immortalized by the Stony Point battlefield and more than fifty historical markers in every part of the county.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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