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Encyclopedia > Rock music
Rock music
Stylistic origins
Cultural origins
Late 1940s United States
Typical instruments
Mainstream popularity One of the best selling music forms since the 1950s
Derivative forms Alternative rock - Heavy metal - Post-rock - Punk rock
Subgenres
Art rock - Christian rock - Classic rock - Desert rock - Detroit rock - Experimental rock - Garage rock - Girl group - Glam rock - Group Sounds - Hard rock - Heartland rock - Instrumental rock - Jam band - Jangle pop - Krautrock - Power pop - Protopunk - Psychedelia - Pub rock (Aussie) - Pub rock (UK) - Rock en español - Soft rock - Southern rock - Surf
Fusion genres
Aboriginal rock - Afro-rock - Anatolian rock - Blues-rock - Boogaloo - Country rock - Flamenco-rock - Folk rock - Indo-rock - Punk Rock - Jazz fusion - Madchester - Merseybeat - Progressive rock - Punta rock - Raga rock - Raï rock - Rockabilly - Rockoson - Samba-rock - Space rock - Stoner rock
Regional scenes
Argentina - Armenia - Australia - Austria - Belarus - Belgium - Bosnia and Herzegovina - Brazil - Cambodia - Canada - Chile - China - Cuba - Croatia - Denmark - Dominican Republic - Estonia - Finland - France - Greece - Germany - Hungary - Iceland - India - Indonesia - Ireland - Israel - Italy - Japan - Latvia - Lithuania - Malaysia - Mexico - Nepal - Netherlands - New Zealand - Norway - Peru - Philippines - Poland - Portugal - Russia - Serbia - Slovenia - South Africa - Spain - Sweden - Switzerland - Tatar - Thailand - Turkey - Ukraine - United Kingdom - United States - Uruguay - SFR Yugoslavia - Zambia
Other topics
Backbeat - Rock opera - Rock band - Performers - Hall of Fame - Social impact

Rock music is a form of popular music with a prominent vocal melody, accompanied by guitar, drums, and bass. Many styles of rock music also use keyboard instruments such as organ, piano, mellotron, and synthesizers. Other instruments sometimes utilized in rock include saxophone, harmonica, violin, flute, French horn, banjo, melodica, and timpani. Also, less common stringed instruments such as mandolin and sitar are used. Rock music usually has a strong back beat, and often revolves around the guitar, either solid electric, hollow electric, or acoustic. Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Rock Music may refer to: Rock and roll, a genre of music that originated in the United States in the 1950s Rock Music, a song by The Pixies from their 1990 album Bossanova Rock Music, a 2003 album by Australian band the Superjesus Category: ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Blues music redirects here. ... Jump blues is a type of up-tempo blues music influenced by big band sound. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Folk song redirects here. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Alternative music redirects here. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... The term post-rock was coined by Simon Reynolds in issue 123 of The Wire (May 1994) to describe a sort of music using rock instrumentation for non-rock purposes, using guitars as facilitators of timbres and textures rather than riffs and powerchords. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... This is a list of music genres derived from rock and roll, including major rock, metal and punk genres: Categories: | ... Art rock is a term used to describe a subgenre of rock music with experimental or avant-garde influences that emphasizes novel sonic texture. ... Christian rock (occasionally abbreviated CR) is a form of rock music played by bands whose members are Christian and who often focus the lyrics on matters concerned with the Christian faith. ... For the magazine, see Classic Rock (magazine). ... Desert Rock is a term given to several bands from the Californian Palm Desert Scene. ... Detroit rock is the name for a style of Australian indie rock, particularly popular in Sydney in the 1980s. ... Experimental rock or Avant rock is a type of art music based on rock and roll which experiments with the basic elements of the genre, and/or which pushes the boundaries of common composition and performance technique. ... Garage rock is a raw form of rock and roll that was first popular in the United States and Canada from about 1963 to 1967. ... The Supremes A Go-Go (1966) was the first album by a female group to reach the top position of the Billboard magazine pop albums chart in the United States. ... Glam rock (also known as glitter rock), is a rock music style that developed in the UK in the post-hippie early 1970s which was performed by singers and musicians wearing outrageous clothes, makeup, hairstyles, and platform-soled boots. ... Group Sounds is a genre of Japanese rock (J-Rock) music in the mid to late 1960s. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... In the late 1970s and 1980s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was heartland rock. ... Instrumental rock and roll is a type of rock and roll music which emphasises musical instruments, and which features no or very little singing. ... The term jam band is commonly used to describe psychedelic rock-influenced bands whose concerts largely consist of bands reinterpreting their songs as springboards into extended improvisational pieces of music. ... Jangle pop is a musical genre that began in United States during the middle of the 1960s, combining angular, chiming guitars and power pop structures. ... Krautrock, also known as Kosmische Musik, is a generic name for the experimental music scene that appeared in Germany in the late 1960s and gained popularity throughout the 1970s. ... Power pop is a long-standing musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop music. ... Protopunk is a term used to describe a number of performers who were important precursors of punk rock, or who have been cited by early punk rockers as influential. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... Pub rock is a style of Australian rock and roll popular throughout the 1970s and 1980s, and still influencing contemporary Australian music today. ... Pub rock was a mid- to late-1970s musical movement, largely centred around North London and South East Essex, particularly Canvey Island and Southend on Sea. ... Rock en español is the latest generation of Spanish language rock and roll. ... Soft rock, also referred to as light rock or easy rock, is a style of music which uses the techniques of rock and roll to compose a softer, supposedly more ear-pleasing sound for listening, often at work or when driving. ... Southern rock is a subgenre of rock music. ... Surf music is a genre of popular music associated with surf culture, particularly Orange County and other areas of Southern California. ... Aboriginal rock is a rather nebulous term for a style of music which mixes traditional rock music elements (guitar, drums, bass etc) with the instrumentation of Indigenous Australians (Didjeridu, clap-sticks etc). ... Afro Rock is a style of music which relies heavily on the use of Western string instruments (electric guitars and bass) and guitar effects played with a rock feel, but played in an african plucked style. ... Genres: Alternative - Classical - Dance - Folk - Hip hop - Jazz - Military - Ottoman - Opera - Pop - Religious - Rock Awards Kral MV, MÃœ-YAP, MGD Charts Billboard Charts Music Festivals Istanbul International Music Festival, Istanbul International Jazz Festival, Izmir European Jazz Festival, Aspendos International Opera and Ballet Festival Media Rolling Stone (Türkiye), MTV (T... Blues Rock or Blues-rock is a fusion genre of music which combines elements of the blues with rock and roll. ... Boogaloo (shing-a-ling, popcorn music) is a genre of Latin music and dance that was very popular in the United States in the late 1960s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... New Flamenco (Nuevo Flamenco) is the name for a Flamenco music style, which is influenced by many different modern musical genres. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Indie rock is rock music that falls within the indie music description. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Jazz fusion (or jazz-rock fusion or fusion) is a musical genre that merges elements of jazz with other styles of music, particularly pop, rock, folk, reggae, funk, metal, country, R&B, hip hop, electronic music and world music. ... An NME Originals issue covering the Madchester movement. ... For the TV program please see Merseybeat Merseybeat, sometimes referred to as Merseysound, was a style of music popular during the 1960s. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... Punta rock is a form of the traditional punta rhythm of the Garifuna people of Central America. ... Raga rock is a generic term used to describe rock and roll records with heavy South Asian influence, either in construction or use of instrumentation, such as sitar and tabla. ... Raï (Arabic: راي) is a form of folk music, originated in Oran, Algeria from Bedouin shepherds, mixed with Spanish, French, African-American and Arabic musical forms, which dates back to the 1930s and has been evolved by women mainly. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... A form of Cuban music made with elements of timba, nueva trova and rock and roll made since the late 1980s by groups like Vanito y La Lucha Almada and Habana Abierta. ... Samba-rock - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... For space rocks, see asteroid. ... Stoner rock and stoner metal are interchangeable terms describing sub-genres of rock and metal music. ... Argentinean rock - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Australian rock and rock musicians have produced a wide variety of music. ... Chinese Rock (中国摇滚, pinyin: Zhōngguó yáogÇ”n; also 中国摇滚音乐, Zhōngguó yáogÇ”n yÄ«nyuè, lit. ... Croatia is a former Yugoslav republic. ... Indonesia is culturally diverse, and every one of the 18,000 islands has its own cultural and artistic history and character[1]. This results hundreds of differernt forms of music, which often accompanies dance and theater. ... The rock music scene of Nepal originated with the arrival of Hippies in the Kathmandu valley. ... Serbian rock is the rock music scene of Serbia. ... The first Tatar rock band was Bolğar, a band active in the late 1980s. ... SFR Yugoslav pop and rock scene includes the pop and rock music of the former SFR Yugoslavia (a state that existed until 1991) incl. ... Backbeat can mean one of two things: Backbeat or Back beat is a style of rock music percussion Backbeat is a 1994 bio-pic of the early career of The Beatles, starring Stephen Dorff, Sheryl Lee, and Ian Hart Categories: Disambiguation ... The Whos Tommy, the first album explicitly billed as a rock opera A rock opera is a rock music album or stage production that resembles the form of an opera. ... This article is about the type of musical group. ... This is a list of rock and roll performers. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... The massive popularity and worldwide scope of rock and roll resulted in an unprecedented level of social impact. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany The organ is a keyboard instrument played using one or more manuals and a pedalboard. ... A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... The Mellotron is an electro-mechanical, polyphonic keyboard originally developed and built in Birmingham, England in the early 1960s. ... The term synthesiser is also used to mean frequency synthesiser, an electronic system found in communications. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored musical instrument usually considered a member of the woodwind family. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... For the Anne Rice novel, see Violin (novel). ... â™  This article is about the family of musical instruments. ... The horn is a brass instrument consisting of tubing wrapped into a coiled form. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... A Hohner melodica The melodica is a free-reed instrument similar to the accordion and harmonica. ... A timpanist in the United States Air Forces in Europe Band. ... This article is about the musical instrument. ... Diagram of some sitar parts. ... In music a back beat (also called the, or a, backbeat) is a term applied to the beats 2 and 4 in a 4/4 bar or a 12/8 bar [1] as opposed to the odd downbeat, (quarter beat 1). ...


Rock music has its roots in 1940s and 1950s rock and roll and rockabilly, which evolved from blues, country music and other influences. According to the All Music Guide, "In its purest form, Rock & Roll has three chords, a strong, insistent back beat, and a catchy melody. Early rock & roll drew from a variety of sources, primarily blues, R&B, and country, but also gospel, traditional pop, jazz, and folk. All of these influences combined in a simple, blues-based song structure that was fast, danceable, and catchy."[1] Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... Blues music redirects here. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music, owned by All Media Guide. ...


In the late 1960s, rock music was blended with folk music to create folk rock, blues to create blues-rock and with jazz, to create jazz-rock fusion, and without a time signature to create psychedelic rock. In the 1970s, rock incorporated influences from soul, funk, and latin music. Also in the 1970s, rock developed a number of subgenres, such as soft rock, heavy metal, hard rock, progressive rock, and punk rock. Rock subgenres that emerged in the 1980s included synthpop, hardcore punk and alternative rock. In the 1990s, rock subgenres included grunge, Britpop, indie rock, and nu metal. Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Blues Rock or Blues-rock is a fusion genre of music which combines elements of the blues with rock and roll. ... Jazz fusion (or jazz-rock fusion or fusion) is a musical genre that merges elements of jazz with other styles of music, particularly pop, rock, folk, reggae, funk, metal, country, R&B, hip hop, electronic music and world music. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... For other uses, see Soul (disambiguation). ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Soft rock, also referred to as light rock or easy rock, is a style of music which uses the techniques of rock and roll to compose a softer, supposedly more ear-pleasing sound for listening, often at work or when driving. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Synthpop is a subgenre of New Wave in which the synthesizer is the dominant musical instrument. ... Hardcore punk, now commonly known as hardcore, is a subgenre of punk rock that originated in North America in the late 1970s. ... Alternative music redirects here. ... Grunge redirects here. ... Britpop was a mid-1990s British alternative rock genre and movement. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Nu metal (also called aggro metal, or nü metal using the traditional heavy metal umlaut) is a musical genre that has origins in the mid 1990s. ...


A group of musicians specializing in rock music is called a rock band or rock group. Many rock groups consist of a guitarist, lead singer, bass guitarist, and drummer, forming a quartet. Some groups omit one or more of these roles and/or utilize a lead singer who plays an instrument while singing, forming a trio or duo; others include additional musicians such as one or two rhythm guitarists and/or a keyboardist. More rarely, groups also utilize stringed instruments such as violins or cellos, and/or horns like saxophones, trumpets or trombones. For the popular-music magazine, see Musician (magazine). ... For the UK magazine, see Guitarist (magazine). ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... Fender Precision Bass Bass Guitar is a commonly spoken phrase used to refer to the electric bass and horizontal acoustic basses, a stringed instrument similar in design to the electric guitar, but larger in size, commonly fretted and sometimes fretless and with a lower range. ... For the comic book character, see Drummer (comics). ... For other uses, see Quartet (disambiguation). ... Look up trio in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Duo, duo, and duo- in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Rhythm guitar is a guitar that is primarily used to provide rhythmic and harmonic accompaniment for a singer or for other instruments in an ensemble. ... A keyboardist is a musician who plays keyboard instruments. ... For the Anne Rice novel, see Violin (novel). ... This article is about the stringed musical instrument. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored musical instrument usually considered a member of the woodwind family. ... Trumpeter redirects here. ... The trombone is a musical instrument in the brass family. ...

Contents

The mid-1950s-early 1960s

Early British rock

Main article: British rock

In the United Kingdom the trad jazz movement brought visiting blues music artists to Britain, While BAC was developing the Concorde, Lonnie Donegan's 1955 hit "Rock Island Line" was a major influence, and helped to develop the trend of skiffle music groups throughout the country, including John Lennon's the Quarry Men. Britain developed a major rock and roll scene, without the race barriers which kept "race records" or rhythm and blues separate in the U.S. British rock was born out of the influence of rock and roll and rhythm and blues from the United States, but added a new drive and urgency, exporting the music back and widening the audience for black R & B in the U.S. as well as spreading the gospel world... Trad jazz, short for traditional jazz is a music genre popular in Britain and Australia from the 1940s onward through the 1950s and which still has enthusiasts today. ... Blues is a vocal and instrumental musical form which evolved from African American spirituals, shouts, work songs and chants and has its earliest stylistic roots in West Africa. ... Lonnie Donegan MBE (29 April 1931 – 3 November 2002) was a skiffle musician, possibly the most famous of them all, with more than 20 UK Top 30 hits to his name. ... Rock Island Line is an American blues/folk song, written and originally performed by Lead Belly in the 1930s. ... Skiffle music is a type of folk music with a jazz and blues influence, usually using homemade or improvised instruments such as the washboard, tea-chest bass, kazoo, cigar-box fiddle, or a comb and paper, and so forth. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... The Quarry Men were a little-known skiffle group formed around Liverpool, England in March 1957 by John Lennon. ... R&B redirects here. ...


Cliff Richard had the first British rock 'n' roll hit with "Move It", effectively ushering in the sound of British rock. At the start of the 1960s, his backing group The Shadows was one of a number of groups having success with surf music instrumentals. And while rock 'n' roll was fading into lightweight pop and schmaltzy ballads, at clubs and local dances British rock groups, heavily influenced by blues-rock pioneers like Alexis Korner, were starting to play with an intensity and drive seldom found in white American acts. Sir Cliff Richard OBE (born Harry Rodger Webb on 14 October 1940) is an English singer, actor and businessman. ... Move it was the first hit single by British pop/rock music legend Cliff Richard. ... British rock was born out of the influence of rock and roll and rhythm and blues from the United States, but added a new drive and urgency, exporting the music back and widening the audience for black R & B in the U.S. as well as spreading the gospel world... The Shadows were an English instrumental rock n roll group active from the 1950s to the 2000s. ... Surf music is a genre of popular music associated with surf culture, particularly Orange County and other areas of Southern California. ... Rock band (or rock group) is a generic name to describe a group of musicians specializing in a particular form of electronically amplified music. ... Blues Rock or Blues-rock is a fusion genre of music which combines elements of the blues with rock and roll. ... Alexis Korner (born Alexis Andrew Nicholas Korner, 19 April 1928 in Paris, France - died on 1 January 1984 in Westminster, London, England) Korner is probably best remembered as the Founding Father of British Blues and a pioneering blues musician. ...


By the end of 1962, the British rock scene had started, with groups drawing on a wide range of American influences including soul music, rhythm and blues and surf music. Initially, they reinterpreted standard American tunes, playing for dancers doing the twist, for example. These groups eventually infused their original rock compositions with increasingly complex musical ideas. British rock was born out of the influence of rock and roll and rhythm and blues from the United States, but added a new drive and urgency, exporting the music back and widening the audience for black R & B in the U.S. as well as spreading the gospel world... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In mid-1962 The Rolling Stones started as one of a number of groups increasingly showing blues influence, along with The Animals and The Yardbirds. In late 1964, The Kinks, The Who and The Pretty Things represented the new Mod style. Towards the end of the decade, British rock groups began to explore psychedelic musical styles that made reference to the drug subculture and hallucinogenic experiences. Rolling Stones redirects here. ... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ... Not to be confused with Yard Birds. ... The Kinks were an English rock group formed in 1963 by lead singer-songwriter Ray Davies, his brother, lead guitarist and vocalist Dave Davies, and bassist Pete Quaife. ... The Who are an English rock band that formed in 1964. ... The Pretty Things are a 1960s and 1970s rock and roll band from London. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


1960s Garage rock

Main article: Garage rock

The British Invasion spawned a wave of imitators that played mainly to local audiences and made inexpensive recordings, a movement later called garage rock. Some music from this trend is included in the compilation album Nuggets. Some of the better known bands of this genre include The Sonics, Question Mark & the Mysterians, and The Standells. Garage rock is a raw form of rock and roll that was first popular in the United States and Canada from about 1963 to 1967. ... For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ... Garage rock is a raw form of rock and roll that was first popular in the United States and Canada from about 1963 to 1967. ... Nuggets: Original Artyfacts From the First Psychedelic Era is a compilation album of garage rock from the mid- to late 1960s, assembled by Jac Holzman, founder of Elektra Records. ... The Sonics were a member of the wave of Pacific Northwest American garage rock groups in the early and mid-1960s, pioneered by The Kingsmen and The Wailers . ... Question Mark and the Mysterians (or ? and the Mysterians) were an American rock and roll band formed in Flint, Michigan, in 1962. ... The Standells were a 1960s rock and roll band from Los Angeles, California who, like the The Seeds, exemplified the garage rock style. ...


1960s Surf music

Main article: Surf music

The rockabilly sound influenced a wild, mostly instrumental sound called surf music, though surf culture saw itself as a competing youth culture to rock and roll. This style, exemplified by Dick Dale and The Surfaris, featured faster tempos, innovative percussion, and reverb- and echo-drenched electric guitar sounds. In the UK, British groups included The Shadows. Other West Coast bands, such as The Beach Boys and Jan and Dean slowed the tempos down and added lush harmony vocals to create what became known as the "California Sound"... Surf music is a genre of popular music associated with surf culture, particularly Orange County and other areas of Southern California. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... Surf music is a genre of popular music associated with surf culture, particularly Orange County and other areas of Southern California. ... Surf culture is the people, language, fashion and sporting life surrounding the sport of modern surfing. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... This article is about the surf guitarist. ... The Surfaris in 2007 The Surfaris were an American surf music band formed in Glendora, California in 1962. ... An electric guitar An electric guitar is a type of guitar that uses pickups to convert the vibration of its steel-cored strings into electrical current, which is then amplified. ... The Shadows were an English instrumental rock n roll group active from the 1950s to the 2000s. ... The Beach Boys is an American rock and roll band. ... Jan & Dean were a rock and roll duo, popular from the late 1950s through the mid 1960s, consisting of William Jan Berry (3 April 1941 – 26 March 2004) and Dean Ormsby Torrence (born 10 March 1940). ...


Rock as a counterculture movement (1963-1974)

Main article: Counterculture

In the late 1950s the US beatnik counterculture was associated with the wider anti-war movement building against the threat of the atomic bomb, notably CND in Britain. Both were associated with the jazz scene and with the growing folk song movement. Counterculture (also counter-culture) is a sociological word used to describe the values and norms of behavior of a cultural group, or subculture, that run counter to those of the social mainstream of the day,[1] the cultural equivalent of political opposition. ... For other uses, see Beatnik (disambiguation). ... CND redirects here. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Folk music, in the original sense of the term, is music by and of the people. ...


Folk rock

Main articles: Bob Dylan and Folk rock

The folk scene was made up of folk music lovers who liked acoustic instruments, traditional songs, and blues music with a socially progressive message. The folk genre was pioneered by Woody Guthrie. Bob Dylan came to the fore in this movement, and his hits with Blowin' in the Wind and Masters of War brought "protest songs" to a wider public. This article is about the recording artist. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Woodrow Wilson Guthrie (July 14, 1912–October 3, 1967) was a prolific American songwriter and folk musician. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Blowin in the Wind is a song written by Bob Dylan, and released on his 1963 album The Freewheelin Bob Dylan. ... Masters of War is a song by Bob Dylan, written in 1963 and released on the album The Freewheelin Bob Dylan. ... A protest song is a song which protests perceived problems in society. ...


The Byrds, playing Bob Dylan's Mr. Tambourine Man, helped start the trend of folk rock, and helped stimulate the development of psychedelic rock. Dylan continued, with his "Like a Rolling Stone" becoming a US hit single. Neil Young's lyrical inventiveness and wailing electric guitar attack created a variation of folk rock. Other folk rock artists include Simon & Garfunkel, Joan Baez, The Mamas & the Papas, Joni Mitchell, Bobby Darin and The Band. The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1964) were an American rock band. ... Mr. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... Highway 61 Revisited track listing Like a Rolling Stone (1) Tombstone Blues (2) Music sample: Bob Dylan - Like a Rolling Stone 30 seconds (of 6:10) Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... This article is about the musician. ... Bridge Over Troubled Water was Simon and Garfunkels last album; the title track was their only number one hit in the United Kingdom. ... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... The Mamas & the Papas (credited as The Mamas and the Papas on the debut album cover) were a leading vocal group of the 1960s. ... Joni Mitchell, CC (born Roberta Joan Anderson on November 7, 1943) is a Canadian musician, songwriter, and painter. ... Bobby Darin (born Walden Robert Bobby Cassotto, May 14, 1936 – December 20, 1973) was one of the most popular American big band performers and rock and roll teen idols of the late 1950s. ... For other uses, see Band. ...


In Britain, Fairport Convention began applying rock techniques to traditional British folk songs, followed by groups such as Steeleye Span, Lindisfarne, Pentangle, and Trees. Alan Stivell in Brittany had the same approach. Fairport Convention are often credited with being the first English electric folk band. ... Steeleye Span are a British folk-rock band, formed in 1969 and remaining active today. ... Lindisfarne were a popular British folk/rock group of the 1970s, fronted by singer/songwriter Alan Hull. ... Pentangle is a British folk rock (or folk-jazz) band. ... Trees (Bias Boshell is first on the left) Trees were a British folk rock band that existed between 1970 and 1973. ... Alan Stivell at Lorient Alan Stivell (born Alan Cochevelou January 6, 1944) is a Breton musician from the town of Gourin. ...


Psychedelic rock

Main article: Psychedelic rock

Psychedelia began in the folk scene, with the Holy Modal Rounders introducing the term in 1964. With a background including folk and jug band music, with bands like the Grateful Dead and Big Brother & the Holding Company being two famous bands of the genre. Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... The Holy Modal Rounders were an American folk music duo from the Lower East Side started in the early 1960s, consisting of Peter Stampfel and Steve Weber. ...


The Fillmore was a regular venue for groups like another former jug band, Country Joe and the Fish, and Jefferson Airplane. Elsewhere, The Byrds had a hit with Eight Miles High. The 13th Floor Elevators titled their album The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators. The music increasingly became associated with opposition to the Vietnam War. The Fillmore (also known as the Fillmore Auditorium or, for several years, The Elite Club), is a historic music venue in San Francisco, California made famous by Bill Graham (1931–1991). ... Country Joe and the Fish, from the cover of Feel Like Im Fixin to Die Country Joe and the Fish was a rock music/folk music band known for musical protests against the Vietnam War, from 1965 to 1970. ... Jefferson Airplane was an American rock band from San Francisco, a pioneer of the psychedelic rock movement. ... The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1964) were an American rock band. ... Eight Miles High is a song by Gene Clark, Jim McGuinn, and David Crosby, first appearing as a single from 1966 by the rock band The Byrds. ... The 13th Floor Elevators was a psychedelic rock music group founded in Austin, Texas in late 1965. ... The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators is a 1966 album by 13th Floor Elevators. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


In England, Pink Floyd had been developing psychedelic rock since 1965 in the underground culture scene. In 1966 the band Soft Machine was formed. Donovan had a folk music-influenced hit with Sunshine Superman, one of the early psychedelic pop records. In August 1966 The Beatles released their Revolver album, which featured psychedelia in "Tomorrow Never Knows" and in "Yellow Submarine", along with the memorable album cover. The Beach Boys responded in the U.S. with Pet Sounds. From a blues rock background, the British supergroup Cream debuted in December, and Jimi Hendrix became popular in Britain before returning to the US. Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the book by William S. Burroughs, see The Soft Machine. ... For other uses, see Donovan (disambiguation). ... Sunshine Superman is the title of a 1965 song written and recorded by British popular musician Donovan; it is also became title track of his 1966 album of the same name. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... The Beatles U.S. chronology Alternate cover Cover of the original 1966 U.S. LP Back cover Back cover of the original 1966 UK LP. The main photo was edited in separate parts for the booklet of the 1988 Compact Disc release. ... Tomorrow Never Knows is the final track of The Beatles 1966 studio album Revolver, but it was the first to be recorded for the album. ... Music sample Yellow Submarine Problems? See media help. ... The Beach Boys is an American rock and roll band. ... Pet Sounds is a 1966 album recorded by American pop group the Beach Boys. ... Blues-rock is a hybrid musical genre combining elements of the blues with rock and roll, with an emphasis on the electric guitar. ... Cream were a 1960s British rock band comprising guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce and drummer Ginger Baker. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ...


1967 was the year when the psychedelic scene truly took off. Many pioneering records came out including the first album from The Doors and Jefferson Airplane's highly successful Surrealistic Pillow. The Beatles' groundbreaking album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band was released in June, and by the end of the year Pink Floyd's The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, Cream's Disraeli Gears and even The Rolling Stones's Their Satanic Majesties Request. As the Summer of Love reached its peak, the Monterey Pop Festival went underway headlining the top bands of the genre including Jefferson Airplane and also introducing Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix to the mainstream. The Doors were an American rock band formed in 1965 in Los Angeles by vocalist Jim Morrison, keyboardist Ray Manzarek, drummer John Densmore, and guitarist Robby Krieger. ... Jefferson Airplane was an American rock band from San Francisco, a pioneer of the psychedelic rock movement. ... Surrealistic Pillow is an album by American psychedelic band Jefferson Airplane, released in February of 1967. ... For other uses, see Sgt. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... The Piper at the Gates of Dawn is Pink Floyds debut album and the only one made under Syd Barretts leadership, although he made some contributions to the follow-up, A Saucerful of Secrets. ... Disraeli Gears is the second album by British blues-rock group Cream. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Their Satanic Majesties Request is a psychedelic rock album by The Rolling Stones recorded and released in 1967. ... The Summer of Love was the summer of 1967, particularly in the Haight-Ashbury district of San Francisco, where thousands of young people loosely and freely united for a new social experience. ... Poster promoting the festival The Monterey International Pop Music Festival took place from June 16 to June 18, 1967. ... Jefferson Airplane was an American rock band from San Francisco, a pioneer of the psychedelic rock movement. ... Janis Lyn Joplin (19 January 1943 – 4 October 1970) was an American singer, songwriter, and music arranger, from Port Arthur, Texas. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ...


The culmination of rock and roll as a socially-unifying force was seen in the rock festivals of the late '60s, the most famous of which was Woodstock in 1969 which began as a three-day arts and music festival and turned into a "happening", as hundreds of thousands of youthful fans converged on the site. A rock festival, or a rock fest, is a large-scale outdoor rock music concert, featuring multiple acts, often spread out over several days. ... The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was a historic event held at Max Yasgurs 600 acre (2. ...


Psychedelic rock enjoyed a modest revival in the mid-1980s as prominent bands like Echo and the Bunnymen and R.E.M. incorporated sounds lifted from earlier groups like The Doors and The Byrds into the burgeoning post-punk scene. Additionally, the collectively-titled Paisley Underground bands of Los Angeles epitomized the role played by Sixties psychedelia and folk-rock in American new wave. Echo & the Bunnymen is a British rock group formed in Liverpool in 1978. ... REM or R.E.M. is an acronym for: Rapid Eye Movement, a phase during sleep U.S. rock music band R.E.M., formed in Athens, Georgia in 1980 Roentgen equivalent man, a unit for measuring levels of exposure to radiation. ... Paisley Underground is a term used to describe a genre of rock music, based primarily in Los Angeles, California, which was at its most popular in the mid-1980s. ... The term New Wave has been used to describe several movements in art. ...


Progressive rock

Main article: Progressive rock

Progressive rock bands went beyond the established rock music formulas by experimenting with different instruments, song types, and musical forms. The Who popularized the rock opera. Some bands such as The Animals, Pink Floyd, The Moody Blues, Procol Harum, and Deep Purple experimented with new instruments including wind sections, string sections, and full orchestras. Many of these bands moved well beyond the formulaic three-minute rock songs into longer, increasingly sophisticated songs and chord structures. With inspiration from these earlier artists, referred to as "proto-prog", it flowered into its own genre, initially based in the UK, after King Crimson's 1969 genre-defining debut album, In the Court of the Crimson King. Progressive rock bands borrowed musical ideas from classical, jazz, electronic, and experimental music. Progressive rock songs ranged from lush, beautiful songs to atonal, dissonant, and complex songs. Few achieved major mainstream success, but large cults followed many of the groups. Pink Floyd, Yes, Rush, Jethro Tull, Genesis, and a few less notable others were able to work in hit singles to their otherwise complex and untraditional albums to garner a larger audience. For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... The Who are an English rock band that formed in 1964. ... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... The Moody Blues are a British rock band originally from Birmingham, England. ... Procol Harum is an English rock band, formed in the 1960s, who built a heavy foundation for what would become progressive rock. ... This article is about the rock band. ... In the Court of the Crimson King (an observation by King Crimson) is the 1969 debut album by the British progressive rock group King Crimson. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rush is a Canadian rock band originally formed in August 1968, in the Willowdale neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario; presently comprised of bassist, keyboardist, and lead vocalist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart. ... For the 18th-century agriculturist after whom the band was named, see Jethro Tull (agriculturist). ... Genesis are an English rock band formed in 1967. ...

Main article: Krautrock

By the late-1960s, German audiences began listening to progressive rock bands from Britain and the United States. During this period, avant-garde musicians in Germany were playing electronic classical music. These German avant-garde musicians adapted their electronic instruments for a style of music that blended progressive rock and psychedelic rock sounds. By the early 1970s, German progressive rock (later called krautrock) bands were blending jazz (Can) and Asian music (Popol Vuh). The music by bands such as Kraftwerk influenced the development of techno and other related genres. Krautrock, also known as Kosmische Musik, is a generic name for the experimental music scene that appeared in Germany in the late 1960s and gained popularity throughout the 1970s. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... Can was a musical group formed in West Germany in 1968. ... Popol Vuh is a German cosmic music band founded by pianist and keyboardist Florian Fricke in 1970 together with Holger Trulzsch (percussion) and Frank Fiedler (electronics). ... Kraftwerk (pronounced , German for power station) is a Grammy award nominated, electronic music band from Düsseldorf, Germany. ... Techno is a form of electronic dance music that became prominent in Detroit, Michigan during the mid-1980s with influences from electro, New Wave, Funk and futuristic fiction themes that were prevalent and relative to modern culture during the end of the Cold War in industrial America at that time. ...

Main article: Italian rock

In Italy progressive rock was also popular in the 1970s. Some Italian progressive rock bands were Premiata Forneria Marconi, Le Orme, Banco del Mutuo Soccorso and Area International Popular Group. Italy is a European country, and has had a long relationship with rock and roll, a style of music which spread to the country by the early 1960s from the United States. ... Premiata Forneria Marconi (PFM) is an Italian progressive rock band that achieved a high level of popularity in the 1970s, with success in both the British and American charts. ... Le Orme Italian Rock band. ... Banco del Mutuo Soccorso - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Area was an Italian jazz fusion and progressive rock group formed in 1972. ...

Main article: Pakistani rock

Although Pakistan has a long history of rock music producing legendary bands such as Junoon and Strings it was only in the 90s that progressive rock made its mark on Pakistani rock scene. One of the bands is Mizraab from the city of Karachi who started of in 1996 with their first album An Abstract Point of View. Then Panchi in 1999. Failing to leave an impact with their first albums Mizraab launched their third album Mazi Haal Mustaqbil in 2004 which proved a great success. Pakistani progressive rock is slowly gaining popularity and more bands are making this kind of music. Pakistani rock music in has become very popular not only in Pakistan but across South Asia. ... Junoon (Urdu: جنون) (meaning obsession in Urdu and madness in Arabic) is one of Pakistan and South Asias most popular Rock bands, based out of Karachi, Pakistan, and formed in 1990 by guitarist/songwriter/medical doctor Salman Ahmad. ... Strings is a Pakistani pop band comprising two members, Bilal Maqsood (Urdu: بلال مقصود)and Faisal Kapadia (Urdu: فیصل کپاڈیا). Strings started with four college students (Bilal, Faisal,Rafiq and Kareem) in 1990, when they came out with a self-titled album. ... Mizraab is a Progressive Metal band from Pakistan. ...   (Sindhi: , Urdu: ) is the largest city in Pakistan and is the provincial capital of Sindh province. ... Panchi (Urdu: پنچھی) is an album by Mizraab, considered by many to be the first Progressive Rock in Pakistan is a touching and dark portrait of the shattered dreams and betrayal of the urban youth of Pakistan. ... Mazi Haal Mustaqbil (Urdu: ماضی حال مستقبل) by Mizraab was released after more than 3 years of struggle in order to release the album Mizraab finally managed to release Pakistans first metal Urdu album in 2004. ...

Main article: Indian rock

There are a few rock bands in India, like Silk Route or Euphoria. The music is mainly targeted at young adults and is gaining more acceptance in recent years. Timeline and Samples Genres . ...


In Turkey progressive rock began to grow with Barış Manço in the mid-1970s. His symphonic-progressive rock album 2023, released in 1975, is one of the most important albums in Turkey. He made a contribution to the other genres of rock music with his other albums and became a famous rock star in Turkey. Barış Manço (also spelt Baris Mancho in some European album releases) (January 2, 1943 - February 1, 1999) was a Turkish singer, composer, television producer and celebrity. ...


Soft rock

Main article: soft rock

Rock music had a short-lived "bubble gum pop" era, of soft rock, including groups such as The Partridge Family, The Cowsills, The Osmonds, and The Archies. Other bands or artists added more orchestration and created a popular genre known as soft rock. Performers included Barry Manilow, Neil Diamond, Olivia Newton-John, Elton John, Billy Joel, Gerry Rafferty and Eric Carmen, and groups such as Bread, The Carpenters, Electric Light Orchestra, Fleetwood Mac, England Dan & John Ford Coley, Chicago and Tina Turner. Soft rock, also referred to as light rock or easy rock, is a style of music which uses the techniques of rock and roll to compose a softer, supposedly more ear-pleasing sound for listening, often at work or when driving. ... The Partridge Family was an American television sitcom about a widowed mother and her five children living in San Pueblo, a small fictional town in Northern California, originally broadcast on ABC from 1970 to 1974. ... The Cowsills were a band specializing in what would later be defined as Pop or Bubblegum Rock. ... The Osmonds are an American family pop group who achieved enormous worldwide success as teenage music idols in the 1970s. ... The Archies, ca. ... Barry Manilow (born Barry Alan Pincus on June 17, 1943) is an American singer and songwriter best known for such recordings as I Write the Songs, Mandy, Weekend in New England and Copacabana. ... Neil Leslie Diamond (born January 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter and occasional actor. ... Olivia Newton-John AO OBE (born 26 September 1948) is a Grammy Award-winning and Golden Globe-nominated English-born Australian pop singer, songwriter and actress. ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... William Joseph Martin Billy Joel (born May 9, 1949) is an American pianist and singer-songwriter. ... A portrait of Gerry Rafferty by John Patrick Byrne on the cover of the album City to City. ... Eric Howard Carmen (born August 11, 1949, in Cleveland, Ohio, USA) is an American singer, songwriter, guitarist and keyboardist. ... Bread was a 1970s rock and roll band from Los Angeles, California. ... For other uses, see Carpenter (disambiguation). ... ELO redirects here. ... This article is about the band. ... They were a pop rock duo. ... This article is about the American pop-rock-jazz band. ... Tina Turner (born Anna Mae Bullock) November 26, 1939) is an 11 time Grammy Award-winning (sharing three), American Singer, Dancer, Record Producer, Executive Producer, Film Producer, Actress, Writer, Performer, Songwriter, Author and occasional Painter whose career has spanned from 1956 to present. ...


The mid to late 70s

Hard rock and heavy metal

Main article: Hard rock

A second wave of British and American rock bands became popular during the early 1970s the largest being Led Zeppelin. Bands such as Grand Funk Railroad, The Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple, Queen, Alice Cooper, Judas Priest, Status Quo, Aerosmith, Black Sabbath, The Who, and Uriah Heep played highly amplified, guitar-driven hard rock. Hard Rock languished into obscurity in the late 1970s. A few bands including Kiss, Black Sabbath, Queen, AC/DC, Led Zeppelin, Aerosmith and Rush maintained large followings and there were occasional mainstream hits such as Blue Öyster Cult's "(Don't Fear) the Reaper". Music critics overwhelmingly disliked the genre. This began to change in 1978 following the release of Van Halen's self-titled debut album. The album helped to usher in an era of more commercialized rock and roll, based out of Los Angeles, California. Hard Rock redirects here. ... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... Grand Funk Railroad is an American rock band. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... This article is about the rock band. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Alice Cooper (born Vincent Furnier February 4, 1948) is an American rock singer, songwriter and musician whose career spans five decades. ... For other uses, see Judas priest (curse). ... This article is about the English rock band. ... This article is about the band Aerosmith. ... For other uses, see Black Sabbath (disambiguation). ... The Who are an English rock band that formed in 1964. ... Uriah Heep are an English rock band, formed in December 1969 when record producer Gerry Bron invited keyboardist Ken Hensley (previously a member of The Gods and Toe Fat) to join Spice, a band signed to his own Bronze Records label. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... Kiss is an American rock band formed in New York City in January 1973. ... For other uses, see Black Sabbath (disambiguation). ... This article is becoming very long. ... This article is about the band. ... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... This article is about the band Aerosmith. ... Rush is a Canadian rock band originally formed in August 1968, in the Willowdale neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario; presently comprised of bassist, keyboardist, and lead vocalist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart. ... Blue Öyster Cult is an American rock band formed in New York in 1967 and still active in 2008. ... (Dont Fear) The Reaper is a song by the hard rock band Blue Öyster Cult from their 1976 album, Agents of Fortune. ... This article is about the band Van Halen. ... Van Halen is the self-titled debut album by American hard rock band Van Halen, released in 1978. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ...


Arena rock

Main article: Arena rock

The Rolling Stones, Grand Funk Railroad and The Who began the practice of live performances for large audiences in stadiums and arenas. The growing popularity of metal and progressive rock led to more bands selling out large venues. Entertainment companies marketed a series of arena rock bands, such as Journey, Boston, Styx, REO Speedwagon, Heart, and Foreigner in the late 70s. Arena rock, also called stadium rock or anthem rock, is a loosely-defined term describing a rock era. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Grand Funk Railroad is an American rock band. ... The Who are an English rock band that formed in 1964. ... Arena rock, also called stadium rock or anthem rock, is a loosely-defined term describing a rock era. ... Journey is an American rock band formed in 1973 in San Francisco, California. ... Boston is an American rock band from Boston, Massachusetts that achieved its most notable successes during the 1970s and 1980s. ... Styx (pronounced sticks) is an American rock band that has been popular since the 1970s, with such hits as Come Sail Away, Babe, Lady, Suite Madame Blue, Mr. ... REO Speedwagon is an American rock band which grew in popularity in the Midwestern United States during the 1970s and peaked in the early 1980s. ... For other uses, see Heart (disambiguation). ... Foreigner is a hard rock band formed in New York City in 1976 by veteran musicians Mick Jones and ex-King Crimson member Ian McDonald, along with then-unknown vocalist Lou Gramm (Louis Grammatico). ...


Bands carried on driving the development of technology for large scale concerts, notably The Who, Aerosmith, Led Zeppelin, Peter Frampton, Pink Floyd and Queen. The Who are an English rock band that formed in 1964. ... This article is about the band Aerosmith. ... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... Peter Kenneth Frampton (born April 22, 1950 in Beckenham, Kent) is an English musician, best known today for his solo work in the mid-1970s and as one of the original members of the band Humble Pie. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... This article is becoming very long. ...


Punk rock

Main article: Punk rock

Punk rock started off as a reaction to the lush, producer-driven sounds of disco, and against the increasing commercialism of hard rock and arena rock. Early punk borrowed heavily from the garage band ethic: played by bands for which expert musicianship was not a requirement, punk was stripped-down, three-chord music that could be played easily. Many of these bands also intended to shock mainstream society. Ramones drummer Tommy Ramone stated, "In its initial form, a lot of [1960s] stuff was innovative and exciting. Unfortunately, what happens is that people who could not hold a candle to the likes of Hendrix started noodling away. Soon you had endless solos that went nowhere. By 1973, I knew that what was needed was some pure, stripped down, no bad rock 'n' roll".[2] While the Ramones were often regarded as the first punk band,[3][4] they had many contemporaries from the same era in the New York scene. Artists like Patti Smith, The Heartbreakers, and Television played the same fast paced, stripped-down, style of rock, and often played shows along with the Ramones at burgeoning club CBGB's. Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... This article is about the band. ... Tommy Ramone (born Tamás Erdélyi, January 29, 1952 in Budapest, Hungary) is a Hungarian-American record producer and drummer. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Patricia Lee (Patti) Smith (born December 30, 1946) is an American musician, singer, and poet. ... The Heartbreakers was a punk rock group formed in New York in May 1975 by Johnny Thunders (vocals/guitar) and Jerry Nolan (drums) who had just quit the New York Dolls and Richard Hell (vocals/bass) who was forced out of Television, the band he had founded with Tom Verlaine... CBGB (Country, Blue Grass, and Blues) was a music club at 315 Bowery at Bleecker Street in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. ...


In 1976 the Ramones, along with British punk band the Sex Pistols, went on a tour of the United Kingdom. The tour was widely credited for inspiring the first wave of English punk bands such as The Clash, The Damned, and The Buzzcocks. In England, the music became a more violent and political form of expression, represented with the Sex Pistols first two singles "Anarchy in the U.K." and "God Save the Queen". Despite an airplay ban on the BBC, the records rose to the top chart position in the UK. Other bands, like the Clash, were less nihilistic, more overtly political and idealistic. Sex Pistols are an iconic and highly influential English punk rock band, formed in London in 1975. ... This article is about the English punk rock band. ... This article is about the music group. ... Buzzcocks were a punk rock band, formed in Manchester, England in 1976. ... Anarchy in the U.K. is the title track of the first single by Sex Pistols, released on November 26, 1976. ... God Save the Queen (B-side Did You No Wrong) was the second single released by the punk rock band Sex Pistols. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


As the Sex Pistols toured America, they spread their music to the West Coast. Before, punk was mostly an East Coast phenomenon in the US, with scenes in New York and Washington D.C.. In the late 70s California punk bands such as the Dead Kennedys, X, the Germs and Black Flag, gained greater exposure. Washington, D.C. had one of the first and one of the most influential hardcore punk scenes in the United States during the 1980s. ... The California punk scene is a regional punk rock music scene that started in the late 1970’s and still exists today. ... The Dead Kennedys are a hardcore punk band from San Francisco, California. ... For other bands named X, see X (band). ... The Germs are a punk rock band from Los Angeles formed in the late 1970s. ... Black Flag was a hardcore punk band formed in 1976 in southern California, largely as the brainchild of Greg Ginn: the guitarist, primary songwriter and sole continuous member through multiple personnel changes. ...


New Wave

Main article: New Wave (music)

Punk rock attracted devotees from the art and collegiate world and soon bands sporting a more literate, arty approach, such as Talking Heads, and Devo began to infiltrate the punk scene; in some quarters the description New Wave began to be used to differentiate these less overtly punk bands. The New Wave was a movement in American, Australian and British popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, growing out of the New York City musical scene centered around the club CBGB. The term itself is a source of much confusion. ... The Talking Heads was an American rock band formed in 1974 in New York City and active until 1991. ... Devo (pronounced DEE-vo or dee-VO, often spelled DEVO or DEV-O) is an American New Wave group formed in Akron, Ohio in 1972. ... The New Wave was a movement in American, Australian and British popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, growing out of the New York City musical scene centered around the club CBGB. The term itself is a source of much confusion. ...


If punk rock was a social and musical phenomenon, it garnered little in the way of record sales (small specialty labels such as Stiff Records had released much of the punk music to date) or American radio airplay, as the radio scene continued to be dominated by mainstream formats such as disco and album-oriented rock. Record executives, who had been mostly mystified by the punk movement, recognized the potential of the more accessible New Wave acts and began aggressively signing and marketing any band that could claim a remote connection to punk or New Wave. Many of these bands, such as The Cars and the Go-Go's were essentially pop bands dressed up in New Wave regalia; others, including the Police and the Pretenders managed to parlay the boost of the New Wave movement into long-lived and artistically lauded careers. Stiff Records logo Stiff Records is a record label created in London in 1976 by entrepreneurs Dave Robinson and Andrew Jakeman (aka Jake Riviera), and active until 1985. ... This article is about the music genre. ... Album-oriented rock (sometimes referred to as adult-oriented rock), abbreviated AOR and originally called album-oriented radio, was originally an American FM radio format focusing on album tracks by rock artists. ... The Cars were an American rock band, fronted by Ric Ocasek, that emerged from the early punk scene in the late 1970s. ... For the 1960s band, see The Go-Gos (1960s). ... The Pretenders are an Anglo-American rock band. ...


Between 1982 and 1985, influenced by Kraftwerk, David Bowie and Gary Numan, New Wave went in the direction of such New Romantics as Duran Duran, A Flock of Seagulls, Psychedelic Furs, Culture Club, Talk Talk and the Eurythmics, sometimes using the synthesizer to replace all other instruments. This period coincided with the rise of MTV and led to a great deal of exposure for this brand of synth-pop. Some rock bands reinvented themselves and profited too from MTV's airplay, for instance Golden Earring, who had a second round of success with "Twilight Zone", but in general the times of guitar-oriented rock were over. Although many "Greatest of New Wave" collections feature popular songs from this era, New Wave more properly refers to the earlier "skinny tie" rock bands such as the Knack or, more famously Blondie. Kraftwerk (pronounced , German for power station) is a Grammy award nominated, electronic music band from Düsseldorf, Germany. ... David Bowie (pronounced ) (born David Robert Jones on 8 January 1947) is an iconic English musician, actor, producer, arranger, and audio engineer. ... For the video game programmer Garry Newman, see Garrys Mod. ... New Romantic was a New Wave music subgenre and fashion movement that occurred primarily in the United Kingdom during the early 1980s. ... Duran Duran are an English rock band notable for a long series of popular singles and vivid music videos. ... For the bands self-titled debut album, see A Flock of Seagulls (album). ... The Psychedelic Furs are an influential British post-punk band founded in the late 1970s. ... Culture Club is a popular English new romantic rock group, that achieved considerable global success in the 1980s. ... Talk Talk was a popular English music group that was active from 1981 to 1991. ... For the approach to music education, see Eurhythmics. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... Synthpop is a style of popular music in which the synthesizer is the dominant musical instrument. ... Airplay is a technical term used in the radio industry to state how frequently a song is being played on a radio station. ... Golden Earring is a Dutch rock/pop group that was founded in 1961 in The Hague as the Golden Earrings (the s was later dropped). ... Twilight Zone is a 1982 hit song by the Dutch hard rock band Golden Earring. ... This article is about the band. ... Blondie is the name of an American rock band that first gained fame in the late 1970s, and which has sold over 140 million records. ...


Post-punk

Main article: Post-punk

Alongside New Wave, post-punk developed as an outgrowth of punk rock. Sometimes thought of as interchangeable with New Wave, post-punk was typically more challenging, arty, and abrasive. The movement was effectively started by the debut of Public Image Ltd. in 1978, formed by former Sex Pistols singer John Lydon (formerly Johnny Rotten), and was soon joined by bands such as Joy Division, Siouxsie & the Banshees, The Fall, Gang of Four, and Echo & the Bunnymen. Predominantly a British phenomenon, the genre continued into the 1980s with some commercial exposure domestically and overseas, but the most successful band to emerge from post-punk was Ireland's U2, which by the late 1980s had become one of the biggest bands in the world. Post punk generally refers to the particularly fertile and creative period following the initial punk rock explosion. During the first wave of punk, roughly spanning 1976-1983, bands such as The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Ramones and The Damned began to challenge the current styles and conventions of rock... Post punk generally refers to the particularly fertile and creative period following the initial punk rock explosion. During the first wave of punk, roughly spanning 1976-1983, bands such as The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Ramones and The Damned began to challenge the current styles and conventions of rock... Public Image Ltd. ... Sex Pistols are an iconic and highly influential English punk rock band, formed in London in 1975. ... John Joseph Lydon (born 31 January 1956), also known as Johnny Rotten, is an English rock musician. ... This article is about the band. ... Siouxsie and the Banshees were a British rock band that formed in 1976. ... This article is about the band. ... Gang of Four is an English post-punk group from Leeds. ... Echo & the Bunnymen are an English post-punk group, formed in Liverpool in 1978. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ...


Rock diversifies in the 1980s

In the 1980s, popular rock diversified. This period also saw the New Wave of British Heavy Metal with bands such as Iron Maiden and Def Leppard gaining popularity. The early part of the decade saw Eddie Van Halen achieve musical innovations in rock guitar, while vocalists David Lee Roth (of Van Halen) and Freddie Mercury (of Queen as he had been doing throughout the 1970s) raised the role of frontman to near performance art standards. Concurrently, pop-New Wave bands remained popular, with performers like Billy Idol and The Go-Go's gaining fame. American heartland rock gained a strong following, exemplified by Bruce Springsteen, Bob Seger, Donnie Iris, John (Cougar) Mellencamp and others. Led by the American folk singer-songwriter Paul Simon and the British former prog rock star Peter Gabriel, rock and roll fused with a variety of folk music styles from around the world; this fusion came to be known as "world music", and included fusions like aboriginal rock. Also, more extreme forms of rock music began to evolve; in the early eighties, the harsh and aggressive thrash metal attracted large underground audiences and a few bands, including Metallica and Megadeth, went on for mainstream success. The New Wave of British Heavy Metal (frequently abbreviated as NWOBHM or N.W.O.B.H.M.) emerged in the late 1970s and reached mainstream attention in the late 1970s, in the United Kingdom, as a reaction in part to the decline of early heavy metal bands such as... Iron Maiden are an English heavy metal band from Leyton in the East End of London. ... Def Leppard are an English hard rock band from Sheffield who formed in 1977 as part of the New Wave of British Heavy Metal movement. ... Edward Lodewijk Eddie Van Halen (born January 26, 1955)[1], is a Dutch guitarist, keyboardist, songwriter and producer most famous for being the lead guitarist and a co-founder of the hard rock band, Van Halen. ... David Lee Roth (sometimes referred to as Diamond Dave) (born 10 October 1954, Bloomington, Indiana) is an American rock vocalist, songwriter, actor, author, and former radio personality, best known for his work with the band Van Halen. ... This article is about the band Van Halen. ... Freddie Mercury (born Farrokh Bulsara; 5 September 1946 – 24 November 1991) was a British musician, best known as the lead singer of the rock band Queen (inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2001). ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1971 in London by guitarist Brian May, lead vocalist Freddie Mercury, and drummer Roger Taylor, with bassist John Deacon joining the following year. ... Billy Idol (born William Michael Albert Broad) is a British hard rock singer-songwriter and musician. ... For the 1960s band, see The Go-Gos (1960s). ... In the late 1970s and 1980s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was heartland rock. ... Springsteen redirects here. ... Robert Clark Seger (born May 5, 1945) is a Rock and Roll singer, songwriter, and musician from Michigan. ... Donnie Iris (born February 28, 1943) is an American rock musician known for his work with The Jaggerz and Wild Cherry during the 1970s, and for his solo albums during the 1980s. ... John Mellencamp, Circa 1996, from johnmellencamp. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... Paul Frederic Simon (born October 13, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, half of the folk-singing duo Simon and Garfunkel who continues a successful solo career. ... The progressive rock band Yes performing in 1977. ... Peter Brian Gabriel (born 13 February 1950, in Cobham,[1] Surrey, England) is an English musician. ... World music is, most generally, all the music in the world. ... Aboriginal rock is a rather nebulous term for a style of music which mixes traditional rock music elements (guitar, drums, bass etc) with the instrumentation of Indigenous Australians (Didjeridu, clap-sticks etc). ... Thrash metal is a subgenre of heavy metal music, one of the extreme metal subgenres that is characterised by high speed riffing and aggression. ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ... Megadeth is an American heavy metal band led by founder, frontman, guitarist, and songwriter Dave Mustaine. ...


Glam metal

Main article: Glam metal

One genre that was widely popular in the 1980s (c.1983) was glam metal. Taking influence from various artists such as Aerosmith, Queen, Kiss, Alice Cooper, Sweet and the New York Dolls. The earliest glam metal bands to gain notability included: Mötley Crüe, W.A.S.P., Ratt and Quiet Riot. They became known for their debauched lifestyles, teased hair and use of make-up and clothing. Their songs were bombastic and often defiantly macho, with lyrics focused on sex, drinking, drugs, and the occult. Glam metal is a sub-genre of heavy metal music that arose in the late 1970s - early 1980s in the United States. ... Glam metal is a sub-genre of heavy metal music that arose in the late 1970s - early 1980s in the United States. ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1971 in London by guitarist Brian May, lead vocalist Freddie Mercury, and drummer Roger Taylor, with bassist John Deacon joining the following year. ... Kiss is an American rock band formed in New York City in January 1973. ... Alice Cooper (born Vincent Furnier February 4, 1948) is an American rock singer, songwriter and musician whose career spans five decades. ... Sweet (referred to as The Sweet on albums before 1974 and singles before 1975) were a popular 1970s British band. ... For the self-titled debut album, visit New York Dolls (album) The New York Dolls are a rock band formed in New York City in 1971. ... Mötley Crüe (IPA pronunciation: ) is an American Hard Rock band formed in Los Angeles, California in 1981. ... W.A.S.P. is an American heavy metal band formed in 1982. ... Ratt is an American sleaze metal and semi glam metal band that formed in San Diego and enjoyed significant commercial success during the 1980s. ... Quiet Riot is an American heavy metal band, whose 1983 & 1984 success contributed to launching the 1980s glam metal scene. ...


In 1987 a second wave of glam metal acts emerged including Bon Jovi, L.A. Guns and Faster Pussycat. Bon Jovi is a hard rock band originating from Sayreville, New Jersey. ... L.A. Guns is a rock band from Los Angeles, California, originally formed in 1983 and continuing on today. ... Faster Pussycat is an American hard rock band from Los Angeles, California formed in 1986, named after the 1965 film Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!. The group was most successful during the late 1980s with their albums Faster Pussycat and 1989 gold album Wake Me When Its Over that sold...


Instrumental rock

See also: Instrumental rock

Instrumental rock was also popularized during this period with Joe Satriani's release of Surfing with the Alien. Many guitarists, feeling constrained by the style of music performed by their respective bands, began releasing solo albums that showcased their guitar skills. Guitarists such as: Steve Vai, Paul Gilbert, Vinnie Moore, Tony MacAlpine, Eric Johnson, Yngwie Malmsteen, Buckethead and Steve Morse have all greatly contributed to the genre. Instrumental rock and roll is a type of rock and roll music which emphasises musical instruments, and which features no or very little singing. ... Instrumental rock and roll is a type of rock and roll music which emphasises musical instruments, and which features no or very little singing. ... Joseph Satch Satriani (born on July 15, 1956, in Westbury, New York, U.S.) is an American guitarist and former guitar instructor. ... Surfing with the Alien is the second album by instrumental rock solo artist Joe Satriani, released in 1987. ... Steven Steve Siro Vai (born June 6, 1960 in Carle Place, New York) is a Grammy Award winning guitarist, composer, vocalist, and record producer. ... Paul Brandon Gilbert (November 6, 1966) is a guitarist best known for his work with Racer X and Mr. ... Vinnie Moore at Dallas Guitar Show 2005 Vinnie Moore (April 14, 1964, New Castle, Delaware) plays melodic instrumental rock. ... Tony Jeff MacAlpine (born August 29, 1960 in Springfield, Massachusetts) is an American guitarist and keyboardist with a unique style blending elements of neo-classical and jazz fusion. ... For other persons named Eric Johnson, see Eric Johnson (disambiguation). ... Yngwie Johann Malmsteen (IPA pronunciation: //) (born Lars Johann Yngve Lannerbäck on June 30, 1963 in Stockholm, Sweden) is a Swedish guitarist, composer and bandleader. ... This article is about the avant-garde metal composer and musician. ... Steve Morse Steven J. Morse is a rock guitarist and guitar virtuoso, best known for his position as guitarist in the Dixie Dregs and Deep Purple. ...


Alternative music and the indie movement

Main article: Alternative rock

The term alternative music (also often known as alternative rock) was coined in the early 1980s to describe bands which didn't fit into the mainstream genres of the time. Bands dubbed "alternative" could be most any style not typically heard on the radio; however, most alternative bands were unified by their collective debt to punk. Important bands of the '80s alternative movement included R.E.M., Sonic Youth, The Smiths, Pixies, Fall of Troy, Hüsker Dü, The Cure, and countless others. Artists largely were confined to indie record labels, building an extensive underground music scene based around college radio, fanzines, touring, and word-of-mouth. Although these groups never generated spectacular album sales, they exerted a considerable influence on the generation of musicians who came of age in the 80s and ended up breaking through to mainstream success in the 1990s. Notable styles of alternative rock during the 80s include jangle pop, gothic rock, college rock, and indie rock. The next decade would see the success of grunge in the US and Britpop in the UK, bringing alternative rock into the mainstream. Alternative music redirects here. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... R.E.M. is an American rock band formed in Athens, Georgia in 1980 by Bill Berry (drums), Peter Buck (guitar), Mike Mills (bass guitar), and Michael Stipe (vocals). ... Sonic Youth is an American alternative rock band formed in New York City in 1981. ... The Smiths were an English rock band active from 1982 to 1987. ... The Pixies are an American alternative rock music group formed in Boston, Massachusetts in 1986. ... The Fall of Troy is a three-piece post-hardcore/prog-rock band from Mukilteo, Washington. ... This article is about the rock band called Hüsker Dü. For other uses, see Husker Du. ... This article is about the band. ... In popular music, indie music (from independent) is any of a number of genres, scenes, subcultures and stylistic and cultural attributes, characterised by perceived independence from commercial pop music and mainstream culture and an autonomous, do-it-yourself (DIY) approach. ... Campus radio (also known as college radio, university radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college, university or other educational institution. ... Jangle pop is a musical genre that began in United States during the middle of the 1960s, combining angular, chiming guitars and power pop structures. ... Gothic rock (sometimes called goth rock or simply goth) is a genre of alternative rock that originated during the late 1970s. ... College rock was a term used in the USA to describe 1980s alternative rock before the term alternative came into common usage. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Grunge redirects here. ... Britpop was a mid-1990s British alternative rock genre and movement. ...


Alternative goes mainstream (Early-mid 1990s)

Grunge

Main article: Grunge music

By the 1990s, rock was dominated by slick and commercial glam metal, hair metal and arena rock artists. MTV had arrived and promoted this excessive focus on image and style. Disaffected by this, in the mid-1980s, bands in Washington state (particularly in the Seattle area) formed a new style of rock music which sharply contrasted the mainstream rock of the time. Grunge redirects here. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ...


The developing genre came to be known as "grunge", a term meaning "dirt" or "filth". The term was perhaps seen as appropriate due to the dirty sound of the music and the unkempt appearance of most musicians. Grunge fused elements of hardcore punk and heavy metal into a single sound, and made heavy use of guitar distortion, fuzz and feedback. The lyrics were typically apathetic and angst-filled, and often concerned themes such as social alienation and entrapment, although it was also known for its dark humor and parodies of commercial rock. Hardcore punk, now commonly known as hardcore, is a subgenre of punk rock that originated in North America in the late 1970s. ... Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ... In the world of guitar music and guitar amplification, distortion is actively sought, evaluated, and appreciatively discussed in its endless flavors. ... A 1965 Gibson Maestro Fuzz-Tone FZ-1A, one of the first commercially available fuzzboxes. ... Audio feedback (also known as the Larsen effect after the Danish scientist, Søren Larsen, who first discovered its principles) is a special kind of feedback which occurs when a sound loop exists between an audio input (for example, a microphone or guitar pickup) and an audio output (for example...


Bands such as Green River, Soundgarden, the Melvins and Skin Yard pioneered the genre, with Mudhoney becoming the most successful by the end of the decade. However grunge remained largely a local phenomenon until 1991, when Nirvana's album Nevermind broke into the mainstream. Pearl Jam also contributed to this with their album Ten. Both bands were more melodic than their predecessors and were instant sensations worldwide, but they refused to buy in to corporate promotion and marketing mechanisms. During 1991 and 1992, other grunge bands such as Soundgarden, Alice in Chains and Candlebox gained a wider audience. Commercial rock and metal faded almost completely from the mainstream. Green River was an influential Seattle based rock band active from 1984 to 1987. ... Soundgarden was an American rock band formed in Seattle, Washington in 1984 by lead singer and drummer Chris Cornell, lead guitarist Kim Thayil, and bassist Hiro Yamamoto. ... The Melvins are an American experimental sludge metal/grunge band that usually perform as a trio. ... Skin Yard was a grunge band from Seattle, Washington, who were active from 1985 to 1992. ... Mudhoney is a grunge band, formed in Seattle in 1988. ... This article is about the American grunge band. ... For other uses, see Nevermind (disambiguation). ... This article is about the rock group. ... Singles from Ten Released: 1991 Released: 1992 Released: 1992 Released: 1992 Ten is the debut studio album of Seattle-based rock band Pearl Jam, released on August 27, 1991 through Epic Records. ... Soundgarden was an American rock band formed in Seattle, Washington in 1984 by lead singer and drummer Chris Cornell, lead guitarist Kim Thayil, and bassist Hiro Yamamoto. ... This article is about the grunge band. ... Candlebox is a Post-Grunge band from Seattle, Washington. ...


While grunge itself can be seen as somewhat limited in range, its influence was felt across many geographic and musical boundaries; many artists who were similarly disaffected with commercial rock music suddenly found record companies and audiences willing to listen, and dozens of disparate acts positioned themselves as alternatives to mainstream music; thus alternative rock emerged from the underground. This helped pave the way for bands such as the Smashing Pumpkins and Stone Temple Pilots who were initially stereotyped as grunge but later enjoyed commercial and critical success independent of the genre. The Smashing Pumpkins are an American alternative rock band that formed in Chicago in 1988. ... Stone Temple Pilots (abbreviated STP) is an American rock band consisting of Scott Weiland (vocals), brothers Robert (bass guitar, vocals) and Dean DeLeo (guitar), and Eric Kretz (drums, percussion). ...


In early April 1994, grunge took a sudden shift in popularity with the death of Nirvana's frontman Kurt Cobain. Although grunge bands continued to release albums, the genre began to decline in popularity and, by the end of the decade, many grunge bands had split up, stopped touring, or had changed their musical direction. Kurt Donald Cobain (February 20, 1967 – c. ...


Britpop

Main article: Britpop

While the American mainstream was focused on grunge, post-grunge, and hip hop, numerous British groups launched a 1960s revival in the mid-90s, often called Britpop, with bands such as Suede, Oasis, Supergrass, The Verve, Radiohead, Pulp and Blur among the front-runners. These bands drew on myriad styles from the 80s British rock underground, including twee pop, shoegazing and space rock as well as traditional British guitar influences like the Beatles and glam rock. For a time, the Oasis-Blur rivalry was similar to the Beatles-Rolling Stones rivalry, or the Nirvana-Pearl Jam rivalry in America. While bands like Blur tended to follow on from the Small Faces and The Kinks, Oasis mixed the attitude of the Rolling Stones with the melody of the Beatles. The Verve and Radiohead took inspiration from performers like Elvis Costello, Pink Floyd and R.E.M. with their progressive rock music, manifested in Radiohead's most heralded album, OK Computer. Many of these bands became very successful (although Britpop's popularity in America was short, with the exception of Oasis), and for a time Oasis was given the title "the biggest band in the world" thanks to an album selling some 19 million copies worldwide, but the movement slowed down after numerous band breakups, publicity disasters in the United States and slightly less popular support. The Verve disbanded after on-going turmoil in the band between singer Richard Ashcroft and guitarist Nick McCabe. Radiohead has since gone in a more experimental, less radio-friendly direction, beginning with their critically well-received album Kid A. As a consequence, they have been subject to reduced general popularity. Of the major Britpop bands, only Oasis, Supergrass and Radiohead are still active. Britpop was a mid-1990s British alternative rock genre and movement. ... Britpop was a mid-1990s British alternative rock genre and movement. ... Suede (or The London Suede in the U.S.) were a popular and influential English rock band of the 1990s that helped start the Britpop musical movement of the decade. ... Oasis are an English rock band that formed in Manchester in 1991. ... For the witnesses who betray information about associated criminals, see Supergrass (informer). ... The Verve (originally Verve) are an English rock band formed in Wigan, Greater Manchester in 1989 at Winstanley Sixth Form College, by vocalist Richard Ashcroft, guitarist Nick McCabe, bassist Simon Jones, and drummer Peter Salisbury. ... Radiohead are an English alternative rock band from Oxfordshire. ... Pulp were a rock band, formed in Sheffield, England in 1978, by then 15-year-old school boy Jarvis Cocker (vocals, guitar). ... Blur were an English rock band that formed in Colchester in 1989. ... This article is about the genre of music. ... Shoegazing (also known as shoegaze or shoegazer; practitioners referred to as shoegazers) is a genre of alternative rock that emerged from the United Kingdom in the late 1980s. ... For space rocks, see asteroid. ... This article is about the group Small Faces. ... The Kinks were an English rock group formed in 1963 by lead singer-songwriter Ray Davies, his brother, lead guitarist and vocalist Dave Davies, and bassist Pete Quaife. ... Elvis Costello (born Declan Patrick McManus August 25, 1954) is an English musician, singer, and songwriter. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... R.E.M. is an American rock band formed in Athens, Georgia in 1980 by Bill Berry (drums), Peter Buck (guitar), Mike Mills (bass guitar), and Michael Stipe (vocals). ... OK Computer is the third album by the English rock band Radiohead, released in 1997. ... Singles from (Whats the Story) Morning Glory? Released: 24 April 1995 Released: 14 August 1995 Released: 15 September 1995 (Australia only) Released: 30 October 1995 Released: 19 February 1996 Released: 13 May 1996 (Australia and USA only) (Whats the Story) Morning Glory? is the second album by the... This article is about the Radiohead album. ...


Indie rock

Main article: Indie rock

By the mid-90s, the term "alternative music" had lost much of its original meaning as rock radio and record buyers embraced increasingly slick, commercialized, and highly marketed forms of the genre. At the end of the decade, hip hop music had pushed much of alternative rock out of the mainstream, and most of what was left played pop-punk and highly polished versions of a grunge/rock mishmash. Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Pop punk (also known as punk pop and other names) is a fusion genre that combines elements of punk rock with pop music, to varying degrees. ...


Many acts that, by choice or fate, remained outside the commercial mainstream became part of the indie rock movement. Indie rock acts placed a premium on maintaining complete control of their music and careers, often releasing albums on their own independent record labels and relying on touring, word-of-mouth, and airplay on independent or college radio stations for promotion. Linked by an ethos more than a musical approach, the indie rock movement encompasses a wide range of styles, from hard-edged, grunge influenced bands like Superchunk to do-it-yourself experimental bands like Pavement to punk-folk singers such as Ani DiFranco. Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Superchunk (left to right): Mac McCaughan, Jim Wilbur, Jon Wurster, Laura Ballance. ... Pavement was an American indie rock band in the 1990s. ... Ani DiFranco (IPA: ) (born Angela Maria Difranco on September 23, 1970) is a singer, guitarist, and songwriter. ...


Currently, many countries have an extensive local indie scene, flourishing with bands with much less popularity than commercial bands, just enough of it to survive inside the respective country, but virtually unknown outside them. In popular music, indie music (from independent) is any of a number of genres, scenes, subcultures and stylistic and cultural attributes, characterised by perceived independence from commercial pop music and mainstream culture and an autonomous, do-it-yourself (DIY) approach. ...


Success of hybrid genres

Pop punk

Main article: Pop punk

One result of the 70s punk explosion was pop punk. Championed by bands such as the Buzzcocks and the Ramones, the genre was never as commercially successful as the name may have suggested, but its influence can be still be heard in many artists today; the fusion of pop melodies, rapid-fire playing of instruments, and the raw and visceral lyrics and sound of punk rock is apparent in everyone from Nirvana to Oasis. Pop punk is used for two separate subgenres of punk rock music: the kind typically found on Lookout! Records, which stray very little from the three-chord formula that The Ramones pioneered, as well as a newer subgenre of melodic, more emotional punk, which includes by bands like NOFX and... Buzzcocks were a punk rock band, formed in Manchester, England in 1976. ... The Ramones (L-R, Johnny, Tommy, Joey, Dee Dee) on the cover of their debut self-titled album (1976), cementing their place at the dawn of the punk movement. ... This article is about the Buddhist concept. ... Oasis are an English rock band that formed in Manchester in 1991. ...


Today, pop punk is used to describe modern rock bands with a heavy pop influence such as Green Day, Rancid, The Offspring and NOFX are common examples of the sub-genre, while Blink-182 and Sum 41 brought the sub-genre to new commercial heights in the late nineties to early 2000s. This article is about the band Green Day. ... Rancid is a punk band, formed in 1991 in Albany, California, by Matt Freeman and Tim Armstrong. ... For other uses, see Offspring (disambiguation). ... NOFX is an American punk rock band formed in Los Angeles, California (now based in San Francisco), in 1983. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Sum 41 is a Canadian rock band from Ajax, Ontario. ...


Post-grunge

Main article: Post-grunge

In the wake of Cobain's death a new style of music called post-grunge evolved. Similar to the relationship between pop punk and punk rock, post-grunge differed from grunge in its more radio-friendly pop-oriented sound. After Australia's Silverchair achieved international success with their debut album Frogstomp record labels began to actively search for the "next Nirvana". Former Nirvana drummer Dave Grohl's new band the Foo Fighters helped further popularize the genre, and other bands such as Bush, Seether, Creed, Collective Soul, Everclear and Live helped cement post-grunge as one of the most commercially viable sub-genres of the late nineties. Post-grunge is a very diverse subgenre of alternative rock music that emerged in the mid-1990s immediately following the downfall of grunge music as an offshoot. ... Kurt Donald Cobain (February 20, 1967 – c. ... This article is about the band. ... Frogstomp is the first album from Australian musical group, Silverchair. ... David Eric Grohl (b. ... This article is about the band. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Seether is a post-grunge band from South Africa. ... This article is about the American Post-Grunge band. ... Collective Soul is an American rock band from Stockbridge, Georgia. ... Everclear is a rock band formed in Portland, Oregon, USA, in 1992. ... Live (IPA pronunciation: , rhymes with five)[2] (also typeset as LIVE) is an American alternative rock band from York, Pennsylvania, comprised of Ed Kowalczyk (lead vocals and guitar), Chad Taylor (lead guitar), Patrick Dahlheimer (bass guitar) and Chad Gracey (drums). ...


Female solo artist Alanis Morissette also found success while being labeled under the post-grunge tag. In 1995 her album Jagged Little Pill became a major hit by featuring blunt, revealing songs such as "You Oughta Know". Combining the confessional, female-centered lyrics of artists such as Tori Amos with a post-grunge, guitar-based sound created by producer Glen Ballard, it succeeded in moving the introspection that had become so common in grunge to the mainstream. The success of Jagged Little Pill influenced successful more pop-oriented female artists during the late 90s including Fiona Apple, Jewel and Liz Phair. Alanis redirects here. ... Jagged Little Pill is the third studio album and the first internationally released album by Canadian singer-songwriter Alanis Morissette. ... You Oughta Know is a Grammy-winning song written by Alanis Morissette and Glen Ballard, and produced by Ballard for Morissettes third album Jagged Little Pill (1995). ... Tori Amos (born Myra Ellen Amos on August 22, 1963) is an American pianist and singer-songwriter. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Fiona Apple (born September 13, 1977) is a Grammy-winning American singer-songwriter. ... For R&B singer Jewell Caples, see Jewell (singer). ... Liz Phair (born Elizabeth Clark Phair on April 17, 1967 in New Haven, Connecticut) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist. ...


Nu metal and Rap Rock

Main article: Rap rock
Main article: Nu metal

In the early 90s, Faith No More broke into the mainstream with their success of the single 'Epic'. This paved ways for bands like Rage Against the Machine and later Limp Bizkit, Korn, System Of A Down and Slipknot. This brought a fresh sound by combining rap and rock with much success. Later in the decade this style, which contained a mix of grunge, metal, and hip-hop, became known as rap rock and spawned a wave of successful bands like Linkin Park and P.O.D.. Many of these bands also considered themselves a part of the similar genre nu metal. Rap rock is a hybrid of rap and rock music. ... Nu metal (also called aggro metal, or nü metal using the traditional heavy metal umlaut) is a musical genre that has origins in the mid 1990s. ... FNM redirects here. ... Rage Against the Machine is an American rock band formed in Los Angeles, California in 1991. ... Limp Bizkit is a nu metal band from Jacksonville, Florida. ... This article is about the band. ... System of a Down (commonly referred to as System or abbreviated as SOAD) is an American rock band, formed in 1995 in Glendale, California. ... Look up Slipknot in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Rap rock is a hybrid of rap and rock music. ... Linkin Park is a rock band from Agoura Hills, California. ... This article is about the band. ...


Present day (2000-present)

Internet influence

In the early 2000s the entire music industry was shaken by claims of massive theft of music rights using file-sharing tools such as Napster, resulting in lawsuits against private file-sharers by the recording industry group the RIAA. See Shared resource for the conventional meaning of file sharing File sharing is the practice of making files available for other users to download over the Internet and smaller networks. ... Napster was a file sharing service that paved the way for decentralized P2P file-sharing programs such as Kazaa, Limewire, iMesh, Morpheus, and BearShare, which are now used for many of the same reasons and can download music, pictures, and other files. ... RIAA redirects here. ...


During much of the 2000s, rock has not featured as prominently in album sales in the US as in other countries such as the UK and Australia. By contrast to those countries, hip hop music has dominated the US single charts, with artists such as the Game, Snoop Dogg, Kanye West, Nelly, Eminem and Jay-Z. According to a recent study by Teenage Research Unlimited, hip hop is the most popular format of music among adults from ages 18-34 in the United States. R&B acts like Mariah Carey, Usher and Alicia Keys are very popular on the pop charts, although with the exception of Carey, none of these acts, rap or R&B, sell as many albums as rock did. Nearly all of the best selling albums of all time are still rock[citation needed]. Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Jayceon Terrell Taylor, known commonly as The Game (a. ... Calvin Cordozar Broadus, Jr. ... Kanye Omari West (pronounced /kɑnjɛj/) (born June 8, 1977) is an American record producer and rapper who rose to fame in the mid 2000s. ... For other uses, see Nelly (disambiguation). ... Marshall Bruce Mathers III (born October 17, 1972), better known as Eminem or Slim Shady, is a Grammy and Academy Award-winning American rapper, record producer and actor from the Detroit, Michigan area. ... Jay-Z (aka the Jigga, HOV and Hova, born Shawn Carter on December 4, 1970 in Brooklyn, New York) is an African American rapper/hip hop artist and record label executive; one of the most popular and successful rappers of the late 1990s and early 2000s. ... This article is about the singer. ... Usher Raymond IV (born October 14, 1978), is an American R&B/pop singer and actor who rose to fame in the mid-late 1990s. ... Alexis is Alicias #1 fan. ...


The biggest factor that has affected the production and distribution of rock music is the rise of paid digital downloads in the 2000s. During the 90s, the importance of the buyable music single faded when Billboard allowed singles without buyable, album-separate versions to enter its Hot 100 chart (charting only with radio airplay). The vast majority of songs bought on paid download sites are singles bought from their albums; songs that are bought on a song-by-song basis off artist's albums are considered sales of singles, even though they have no official buyable single. Digital Downloads are official legally-released music singles released by artists to the public. ... Alternate meanings: Single In music, a single is a short (usually ten minutes or less) record, usually featuring one or two tracks as A-sides, often accompanied by several B-sides—usually remixes or other songs. ... Billboard is a weekly American magazine devoted to the music industry. ... “Hot 100” redirects here. ...


Garage rock revival

Main article: Garage rock revival

After existing in the musical underground, garage rock saw a resurgence of popularity with the garage rock revival. Bands like The White Stripes, The Strokes, The Vines, and The Hives all released successful singles and albums. This wave is also sometimes referred to as back-to-basics rock because of its raw sound. Garage rock was a simple, raw form of rock and roll created by a number of American bands in the mid-1960s. ... Garage rock was a simple, raw form of rock and roll created by a number of American bands in the mid-1960s. ... This article is about the American duo. ... For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). ... The Vines are an Australian garage rock band notable for producing a raw musical hybrid of 60s rock and 90s alternative music. ... This article is about the Swedish band. ...


Post-punk revival

Main article: Post-punk revival

Additionally, the retro trend has led to a Post-punk revival with bands like The Libertines, The Killers, Bloc Party, Franz Ferdinand, Interpol, and Editors. Many of these bands are also sometimes included under the umbrella term of indie rock. The post-punk revival is a movement in modern rock music consisting of Indie Rock, Punk Rock, Goth Rock, and Electronic bands that draw from the conventions of the original Post-Punk sound of the early 1980s, as well as the early 90s Britpop, 80s New Wave and... The post-punk revival is a movement in modern rock music consisting of Indie Rock, Punk Rock, Goth Rock, and Electronic bands that draw from the conventions of the original Post-Punk sound of the early 1980s, as well as the early 90s Britpop, 80s New Wave and... The Libertines were an English rock band formed in London in 1997 and active until 2004. ... The Killers are an American rock band from Las Vegas, Nevada, most famous for their hit singles Somebody Told Me, Mr. ... This article is about the English alternative rock band. ... Franz Ferdinand are an award winning rock band, from Glasgow, Scotland. ... For the international organisation, see Interpol. ... For other uses, see editor. ...


Emo

In the early 2000s, pop punk began to regain popularity. Media institutions began to label this scene as emo despite the fact that emo was originally an underground offshoot of 80s hardcore rock, involving such bands as Sunny Day Real Estate. There is still a lot of debate over which bands truly are emo, and the term could be used to describe everything including Fugazi. As the name suggests, the lyrics in many emo songs are often about depression and troubled relationships. Recently dubbed emo bands include: 30 Seconds To Mars, My Chemical Romance,[5] Fall Out Boy,[6] Cute Is What We Aim For[7] The Used and Panic at the Disco.[8]. Sunny Day Real Estate or SDRE was an alternative rock band formed in Seattle, Washington. ... Fugazi may refer to: an Italian slang term for something that is fake/not authentic. ... For other uses, see Depression. ... 30 Seconds to Mars (or Thirty Seconds to Mars) is an alternative rock band from Los Angeles, California, featuring Jared Leto, Shannon Leto and Tomo Milicevic // Created in 1998 by Jared Leto and his brother, Shannon, 30 Seconds to Mars began as a small family project. ... My Chemical Romance are an American rock band formed in 2001. ... Fall Out Boy (commonly abbreviated as FOB) is an American band from Wilmette, Illinois (a suburb of Chicago) that formed in 2001. ... Cute Is What We Aim For (CIWWAF) is a Pop/Rock band, formed in 2005 in Buffalo, New York and currently signed to Fueled by Ramen. ... The Used is a rock band from Orem, Utah. ... Panic! At The Disco is an Alternative Rock band from Las Vegas, Nevada. ...


Metalcore

Metalcore evolved in the early 90's but only came to prominence in the early 21st century with the video play of bands such as Killswitch Engage or Avenged Sevenfold on TV music channels. Metalcore came about from combining hardcore punk and post-hardcore with metal. Influences from early emocore and screamo are also common. Killswitch Engage (often abbreviated as KSE or Killswitch) is a Grammy nominated metalcore band from Westfield, Massachusetts. ... For the self-titled album, see Avenged Sevenfold (album). ... Main article: Emo Emocore (abbreviated from emotional hardcore) was a term that was used most popularly in the 1980s and 1990s to describe a genre of music that was an offshoot of the hardcore music scene. ... Screamo is a musical genre which evolved from emo and punk in the early 1990s. ...


Social impacts

The influence of rock and roll is far-reaching, and has had significant impact worldwide on fashion and film styles. Its impact has been positive as well, with the trend of many rock stars facilitating charity events such as Live Aid. Saving the World is becoming a more and more common phrase associated with rock music today. The massive popularity and worldwide scope of rock and roll resulted in an unprecedented level of social impact. ... Ethiopia, as its borders were in 1985. ...


There are also spiritual aspects tied to rock music. Songwriters like Pete Townshend have explored these in their work. The common usage of the term rock god acknowledges the religious quality of the adulation some rock stars receive. Pete Townshend (born Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend on 19 May 1945 in Chiswick, London), is an award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, composer, and writer. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Rock music
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Rock music

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... This article is about the genre of popular music. ... Rock and roll emerged as a defined musical style in America in the 1950s, though elements of rock and roll can be seen in rhythm and blues records as far back as the 1920s. ...

References

  1. ^ allmusic - Rock and Roll/rap (Featuring 50 Cent, Ludrics, Hanna Montana, and Korn)
  2. ^ Ramone, Tommy, "Fight Club", Uncut, January 2007
  3. ^ The Ramones | Music Artist | Videos, News, Photos & Ringtones | MTV
  4. ^ Ramones
  5. ^ Henderson, Alex. All Music Guide - biography. All Media Guide. Retrieved on 2008-01-04.
  6. ^ Loftus, Johnny; Apar, Corey. All Music Guide - Fall Out Boy biography. All Media Guide. Retrieved on 2008-01-04.
  7. ^ Apar, Corey. All Music Guide - Cute Is What We Aim For biography. All Media Guide. Retrieved on 2008-01-04.
  8. ^ Apar, Corey. All Music Guide - Panic! at the Disco biography. All Media Guide. Retrieved on 2008-01-04.
Uncut special issue on Queen. ... All Media Guide (commonly known as AMG), is the company which owns and maintains All Music Guide, All Game Guide and All Movie Guide. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... All Media Guide (commonly known as AMG), is the company which owns and maintains All Music Guide, All Game Guide and All Movie Guide. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... All Media Guide (commonly known as AMG), is the company which owns and maintains All Music Guide, All Game Guide and All Movie Guide. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... All Media Guide (commonly known as AMG), is the company which owns and maintains All Music Guide, All Game Guide and All Movie Guide. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Alternative music redirects here. ... Genres: Alternative - Classical - Dance - Folk - Hip hop - Jazz - Military - Ottoman - Opera - Pop - Religious - Rock Awards Kral MV, MÜ-YAP, MGD Charts Billboard Charts Music Festivals Istanbul International Music Festival, Istanbul International Jazz Festival, Izmir European Jazz Festival, Aspendos International Opera and Ballet Festival Media Rolling Stone (Türkiye), MTV (T... Arena rock, also called stadium rock or anthem rock, is a loosely-defined term describing a rock era. ... Art rock is a term used to describe a subgenre of rock music with experimental or avant-garde influences that emphasizes novel sonic texture. ... It has been suggested that Merseybeat be merged into this article or section. ... Blues Rock or Blues-rock is a fusion genre of music which combines elements of the blues with rock and roll. ... Boogaloo (shing-a-ling, popcorn music) is a genre of Latin music and dance that was very popular in the United States in the late 1960s. ... For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ... The Canterbury Scene (or Canterbury Sound) is a term used to loosely describe the group of progressive rock musicians that were based around the city of Canterbury, Kent, England during the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Christian rock (occasionally abbreviated CR) is a form of rock music played by bands whose members are Christian and who often focus the lyrics on matters concerned with the Christian faith. ... Comedy rock is a term used to describe rock music that mixes the music with general comedy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Frat rock was an early influential American subgenre of rock and roll / roots rock. ... Garage rock is a raw form of rock and roll that was first popular in the United States and Canada from about 1963 to 1967. ... Glam rock (also known as glitter rock), is a rock music style that developed in the UK in the post-hippie early 1970s which was performed by singers and musicians wearing outrageous clothes, makeup, hairstyles, and platform-soled boots. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... Instrumental rock and roll is a type of rock and roll music which emphasises musical instruments, and which features no or very little singing. ... The term jam band is commonly used to describe psychedelic rock-influenced bands whose concerts largely consist of bands reinterpreting their songs as springboards into extended improvisational pieces of music. ... Jangle pop is a musical genre that began in United States during the middle of the 1960s, combining angular, chiming guitars and power pop structures. ... Krautrock, also known as Kosmische Musik, is a generic name for the experimental music scene that appeared in Germany in the late 1960s and gained popularity throughout the 1970s. ... For other uses, see Pop rock (disambiguation). ... Power pop is a long-standing musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop music. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... Pub rock was a mid- to late-1970s musical movement, largely centred around North London and South East Essex, particularly Canvey Island and Southend on Sea. ... Pub rock is a style of Australian rock and roll popular throughout the 1970s and 1980s, and still influencing contemporary Australian music today. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Rap rock is a hybrid of rap and rock music. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Samba-rock - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Soft rock, also referred to as light rock or easy rock, is a style of music which uses the techniques of rock and roll to compose a softer, supposedly more ear-pleasing sound for listening, often at work or when driving. ... Southern rock is a subgenre of rock music. ... Stoner rock and stoner metal are interchangeable terms describing sub-genres of rock and metal music. ... In the early 1960s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was surf rock. ... This is a list of music genres derived from rock and roll, including major rock, metal and punk genres: Categories: | ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... The massive popularity and worldwide scope of rock and roll resulted in an unprecedented level of social impact. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
rock music. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05 (1583 words)
Essentially hybrid in origin, rock music includes elements of several fl and white American music styles: fl guitar-accompanied blues; fl rhythm and blues, noted for saxophone solos; fl and white gospel music; white country and western music; and the songs of white popular crooners and harmony groups.
Rock music again surged to popularity in 1962 with the emergence of the Beatles, a group of four long-haired lads from Liverpool, England.
A turning point in rock music occurred in the mid-1970s in the form of punk rock, which was a response to the stagnation of the genre and a nihilistic political statement.
Museum of Rock music (2745 words)
Rock generally is used to refer to any popular rock music recorded since the early 60's.
Indie rock is a sub genre of rock music which is often used to refer to bands that are on small independent or "rock" record labels or who aren't on labels at all.
Alternative music was a phrase invented in early 80s describing bands which broke from the barrage of pop and hair metal and formed a new direction of more focused and honest rock.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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