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Encyclopedia > Rock and roll
Rock and Roll
Stylistic origins
Cultural origins
United States in the period up to the 1950s
Typical instruments
Mainstream popularity One of the best selling music forms since the 1950s
Derivative forms rock, soft rock, pop

Rock and roll (also known as rock 'n' roll) is a form of music that evolved in the United States in the late 1940s and early 1950s, and quickly spread to the rest of the world. Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... This article is about the genre. ... This article is about the genre. ... Rock and roll or Rock n roll may refer to: Rock and roll, a popular music style Rock and roll (dance) Rock n Roll (computer game) Rock n Roll, a GI Joe character Rock and Roll: an Introduction to The Velvet Underground, a 2001 compilation album Rock N Roll, an... Gospel music is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. ... Folk song redirects here. ... Blues music redirects here. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Two different electric guitars. ... Side and front views of a modern double bass with a French bow. ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set) is a collection of drums, cymbals and sometimes other percussion instruments, such as a cowbell, wood block, chimes or tambourines, arranged for convenient playing by a single drummer. ... Pianoforte redirects here. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored musical instrument usually considered a member of the woodwind family. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... This article is about the genre. ... Soft rock, also referred to as light rock or easy rock, is a style of music which uses the techniques of rock and roll to compose a softer, supposedly more ear-pleasing sound for listening, often at work or when driving. ... This article is about the genre of popular music. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ...


Classic rock and roll is played with one or two electric guitars (one lead, one rhythm), a string bass or (after the mid-1950s) an electric bass guitar, and a drum set. In the earliest rock and roll styles of the late 1940s and early 1950s, either the piano or saxophone was often the lead instrument, but these were generally replaced or supplemented by guitar in the middle to late 1950s. The beat is essentially a boogie woogie blues rhythm with an accentuated backbeat, the latter almost always provided by a snare drum. Two different electric guitars. ... Side and front views of a modern double bass with a French bow. ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... An extended 4-piece drum kit A drum kit (or drum set or trap set - the latter an old-fashioned term) is a collection of drums, cymbals and other percussion instruments arranged for convenient playing by a sole percussionist (drummer), usually for jazz, rock, or other types of contemporary music. ... Pianoforte redirects here. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored musical instrument usually considered a member of the woodwind family. ... For other uses, see Boogie-woogie (disambiguation). ... Blues music redirects here. ... Backbeat can mean one of two things: Backbeat or Back beat is a style of rock music percussion Backbeat is a 1994 bio-pic of the early career of The Beatles, starring Stephen Dorff, Sheryl Lee, and Ian Hart Categories: Disambiguation ... The snare drum or side drum is a tubular drum made of wood or metal with skins, or heads, stretched over the top and bottom openings, and with a set of snares (cords) stretched across the bottom head. ...


The massive popularity and eventual worldwide view of rock and roll gave it an unprecedented social impact. Far beyond simply a musical style, rock and roll, as seen in movies and in the new medium of television, influenced lifestyles, fashion, attitudes, and language. It went on to spawn various sub-genres, often without the characteristic backbeat, that are more properly called simply 'rock music'. This article is about the genre. ...

Contents

Origins of the style

The immediate origins of rock and roll lie in the late 1940s and early 1950s through a mixing together of various popular musical genres of the time. These included gospel, folk music, and the blues - particularly the electric forms being developed in Memphis, Chicago, New Orleans, Texas, California, and elsewhere - piano-based boogie woogie, and jump blues, which were collectively becoming known as rhythm and blues. Also in the melting pot creating a new musical form were country and western music (including Western swing and influences from traditional Appalachian folk music), jazz, and gospel music. Rock and roll emerged as a defined musical style in America in the 1950s, though elements of rock and roll can be seen in rhythm and blues records as far back as the 1920s. ... Rock and roll emerged as a defined musical style in America in the 1950s, though elements of rock and roll can be seen in rhythm and blues records as far back as the 1920s. ... Gospel music is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. ... Folk song redirects here. ... Blues is a vocal and instrumental musical form which evolved from African American spirituals, shouts, work songs and chants and has its earliest stylistic roots in West Africa. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Boogie-woogie (disambiguation). ... Jump blues is a type of up-tempo blues music influenced by big band sound. ... R&B redirects here. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Western swing is, first and foremost, a fusion of country music, several styles of jazz, pop music and blues aimed at dancers. ... Appalachian folk music is a distinctive genre of folk music originating in the Appalachia region of the United States of America. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Gospel music is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. ...


However, elements of rock and roll can be heard in country records of the 1930s, and in blues records from the 1920s.[citation needed] During that period many white Americans enjoyed African-American jazz and blues performed by white musicians.[citation needed] Often "black" music was usually relegated to "race music" outlets (music industry code for rhythm and blues stations) and was rarely heard by mainstream white audiences.[citation needed] A few black rhythm and blues musicians, notably Louis Jordan, the Mills Brothers, and The Ink Spots, achieved crossover success;[citation needed] in some cases (such as Jordan's "Choo Choo Ch'Boogie") this success was achieved with songs written by white songwriters.[citation needed] The Western swing genre in the 1930s, generally played by white musicians, also drew heavily on the blues and in turn directly influenced rockabilly and rock and roll, as can be heard, for example, on Elvis Presley's "Jailhouse Rock" (1957).[citation needed] African American music (also called black music, formerly known as race music) is an umbrella term given to a range of musical genres emerging from or influenced by the culture of African Americans, who have long constituted a large ethnic minority of the population of the United States. ... Louis Jordan swinging on sax, Paramount Theatre, NYC, 1946 (Photo: William P. Gottlieb) Louis Jordan (July 8, 1908 – February 4, 1975) was a pioneering African-American blues, jazz and rhythm & blues musician and songwriter who enjoyed his greatest popularity from the late 1930s to the early 1950s. ... The Mills Brothers were a major African-American jazz and pop vocal quartet of the 20th century producing more than 2,000 recordings that sold more than 50 million copies and garnered at least three dozen gold records. ... The Ink Spots were a popular black vocal group that helped define the musical genre that led to rhythm & blues and rock and roll, and the subgenre doo-wop. ... Choo Choo ChBoogie is an American song originally recorded in January 1946 by Louis Jordan and his Tympany Five. ... Elvis redirects here. ...


Going back even further, rock and roll can trace one lineage to the old Five Points, Manhattan district of mid-19th century New York City, the scene of the first fusion of heavily rhythmic African shuffles and sand dances with melody-driven European genres, particularly the Irish jig[1].[citation needed] Five Points (or The Five Points) was a notorious slum centered on the intersection of Worth St. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The jig (sometimes seen in its French language or Italian language forms gigue or giga) is a folk dance type as well as the accompanying dance tune type, popular in Ireland and Scotland. ...


Origins of the phrase

In 1951, Cleveland, Ohio disc jockey Alan Freed began playing rhythm and blues music for a multi-racial audience. Freed is credited with first using the phrase "rock and roll" to describe the music. However, the term had already been introduced to US audiences, particularly in the lyrics of many rhythm and blues records. Three different songs with the title "Rock And Roll" were recorded in the late 1940s; one by Paul Bascomb in 1947, another by Wild Bill Moore in 1948, and yet another by Doles Dickens in 1949, and the phrase was in constant use in the lyrics of R&B songs of the time. One such record where the phrase was repeated throughout the song was "Rock And Roll Blues," recorded in 1949 by Erline "Rock And Roll" Harris. The phrase was also included in advertisements for the film Wabash Avenue, starring Betty Grable and Victor Mature. An ad for the movie that ran April 12, 1950 billed Ms. Grable as "...the first lady of rock and roll" and Wabash Avenue as "...the roaring street she rocked to fame". Cleveland redirects here. ... For other meanings of DJ, see DJ (disambiguation). ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... R&B redirects here. ... William M. Moore (b 13 June 1918, Houston, Texas – d 8 August 1983, Los Angeles, California), known as Wild Bill Moore, was an American R&B tenor saxophone player. ... Erline Harris was an American rhythm and blues singer in the 1940s and early 1950s. ... Betty Grable (December 18, 1916 – July 2, 1973) was an American dancer, singer, and actress. ... Victor Mature (29 January 1913 – 4 August 1999), an American film actor, was born in Louisville, Kentucky to a Tyrolean father, Marcellus George Mature, a cutler, and a Swiss-American mother, Clara Mature. ...


Before then, the phrase "rocking and rolling", as secular black slang for dancing or sex, appeared on record for the first time in 1922 on Trixie Smith's "My Man Rocks Me With One Steady Roll". Even earlier, in 1916, the term "rocking and rolling" was used with a religious connotation, on the phonograph record "The Camp Meeting Jubilee" by an unnamed male "quartette".[2] The word "rock" had a long history in the English language as a metaphor for "to shake up, to disturb or to incite". In 1937, Chick Webb and Ella Fitzgerald recorded "Rock It for Me," which included the lyric, "So won't you satisfy my soul with the rock and roll." "Rocking" was a term used by black gospel singers in the American South to mean something akin to spiritual rapture. By the 1940s, however, the term was used as a double entendre, ostensibly referring to dancing, but with the subtextual meaning of sex, as in Roy Brown's "Good Rocking Tonight." The verb "roll" was a medieval metaphor which meant "having sex". Writers for hundreds of years have used the phrases "They had a roll in the hay" or "I rolled her in the clover"[3]. The terms were often used together ("rocking and rolling") to describe the motion of a ship at sea, for example as used in 1934 by the Boswell Sisters in their song "Rock and Roll"[4], which was featured in the 1934 film "Transatlantic Merry-Go-Round",[5][6] and in Buddy Jones' "Rockin' Rollin' Mama" (1939). Country singer Tommy Scott was referring to the motion of a railroad train in the 1951 "Rockin and Rollin'". [7]. Trixie Smith (1895 - 21 September 1943), was a blues singer and recording artist. ... For other meanings, see Rapture (disambiguation). ... A double entendre is a figure of speech similar to the pun, in which a spoken phrase can be understood in either of two ways. ... Roy Brown (10 September 1925–25 May 1981) was a blues musician who brought a soul singing style (from gospel music) to the emerging genre of rock and roll. ... Good Rocking Tonight was originally a jump blues song released in 1947 by its writer, Roy Brown. ... The Boswell Sisters on the cover of the reissue album collection Thats How Rhythm Was Born The Boswell Sisters were a close harmony singing group that attained national prominence in the USA in the 1930s. ... Buddy Jones (1906- October 20, 1956) was an American Western swing musician who recorded in the 1930s and 1940s. ...


Early rock and roll records

There is much debate as to what should be considered the first rock & roll record. One leading contender is "Rocket 88" by Jackie Brenston and his Delta Cats (in fact, Ike Turner and his band The Kings of Rhythm), recorded by Sam Phillips for Sun Records in 1951. Four years later, Bill Haley's "Rock Around the Clock" (1955) became the first rock and roll song to top Billboard magazine's main sales and airplay charts, and opened the door worldwide for this new wave of popular culture. Rolling Stone magazine argued in 2004 that "That's All Right (Mama)" (1954), Elvis Presley's first single for Sun Records in Memphis, was the first rock and roll record[8]. But, at the same time, Big Joe Turner's "Shake, Rattle & Roll", later covered by Haley, was already at the top of the Billboard R&B charts. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... There are many candidates for the title of the first rock and roll record. ... There are many candidates for the title of the first rock and roll record. ... Rocket 88 is a rhythm and blues song from 1951. ... Rocket 88, a rhythm and blues song from 1951 claimed by Sun Records owner and pioneer rock and roll record producer Sam Phillips as the first rock and roll song. The record was credited to Jackie Brenston and his Delta Cats, but the band did not actually exist. ... Ike Turner (born Ike Wister Turner, November 5, 1931 – December 12, 2007) was an two-time Grammy Award-winning American musician, bandleader, talent scout, and record producer, best known for his work with his then wife Tina Turner as one half of the Ike & Tina Turner duo. ... Sam Phillips, born Samuel Cornelius Phillips (January 5, 1923 – June 30, 2003), was a record producer who played an important role in the emergence of rock and roll as the major form of popular music in the 1950s. ... Label of the fourth Sun Records Sun Records has been the name for four 20th century record labels. ... Bill Haley, with his band, the Comets, was one of the first rock and roll acts to tour the United Kingdom. ... Rock Around the Clock is a rock n roll song from 1952, written by Max C. Freedman and James E. Myers (the latter under the pseudonym Jimmy De Knight). Although first recorded by Sonny Dae & the Knights, the more famous version by Bill Haley & His Comets is not, strictly speaking... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Billboard is a weekly American magazine devoted to the music industry. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Thats All Right (Mama) is the name of the first song released by Elvis Presley. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... Label of the fourth Sun Records Sun Records has been the name for four 20th century record labels. ... Big Joe Turner (born Joseph Vernon Turner Jr. ... Shake, Rattle and Roll is a prototypical twelve bar blues-form rock and roll song written by Jesse Stone (under his working name Charles Calhoun). ... Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs, formerly known by various names including Hot Soul Singles, Hot Black Singles, and Hot R&B Singles (before the hip-hop term was added in the late 1990s), is a chart released weekly by Billboard in the United States. ...


Turner was one of many forerunners. His 1939 recording, "Roll 'Em Pete", is close to '50s rock and roll. Sister Rosetta Tharpe was also recording shouting, stomping music in the 1930s and 1940s that in some ways contained major elements of mid-1950s rock and roll. She scored hits on the pop charts as far back as 1938 with her gospel songs, such as "This Train" and "Rock Me", and in the 1940s with "Strange Things Happenin Every Day", "Up Above My Head", and "Down By The Riverside." Moon Mullican was one of the first white singers to record a style of uptempo blues that was identical to black music and not white country music. His "Pipeliner Blues", first recorded in 1940, swung like Big Joe Turner's "Roll 'Em Pete", and the unreleased 1946 track "Let Me Rock You Baby" went even further. By 1952, he was rocking with such jump blues as "Rocket to the Moon" that were similar in style to "Rock Around the Clock". Other significant records of the 1940s and early 1950s included Roy Brown's "Good Rocking Tonight" and Hank Williams' "Move It On Over" and Amos Milburn's Chicken Shack Boogie (all 1947); Jimmy Preston's "Rock the Joint" and Fats Domino's "The Fat Man" and Big Joe Turner's "Ooo-Ouch-Stop" (all 1949); and Les Paul and Mary Ford's "How High the Moon" (1951). Roll Em Pete is a rhythm and blues song originally recorded in 1938 by Big Joe Turner and pianist Pete Johnson. ... Sister Rosetta Tharpe (March 20, 1915 - October 9, 1973) was a gospel artist who attained great popularity in the 1930s and 1940s with a unique mixture of Holiness vocals and jazzy guitar accompaniment. ... Moon Mullican was an American country and western singer and pianist in the late 1940s and 1950s from Louisiana. ... Roll Em Pete is a rhythm and blues song originally recorded in 1938 by Big Joe Turner and pianist Pete Johnson. ... There have been a number of notable people named Roy Brown: Roy Brown, the Canadian pilot who is credited with shooting down the Red Baron Roy Brown, a Blues musician who was a pioneer of Rock and Roll Roy Brown, a Puerto Rican musician Roy Brown, a famous clown most... Good Rocking Tonight was originally a jump blues song released in 1947 by its writer, Roy Brown. ... For other persons named Hank Williams, see Hank Williams (disambiguation). ... Move It On Over is a song written and recorded by the American country music singer-songwriter Hank Williams in 1947. ... Amos Milburn (April 1, 1927 – January 3, 1980) was an American rhythm and blues singer, and pianist, popular in the 1940s and 1950s. ... Jimmy Preston (b 18 August 1913, Chester, Pennsylvania – d December 1984, Philadelphia, PA) was an R&B bandleader, alto saxophonist and singer who made an important contribution to early rock and roll. ... Rock the Joint, also known as Were Gonna Rock This Joint Tonight, is a boogie song recorded by various proto-rock and roll singers, notably Jimmy Preston and Bill Haley, either of whose versions has been cited as a contender for being the first rock and roll record.[1... Antoine Dominique Fats Domino (born February 26, 1928) is a classic R&B and rock and roll singer, songwriter and pianist. ... The Fat Man was a rhythm and blues song by Fats Domino, considered to be one of the first rock and roll records. ... This article or section should be merged with Les Paul Les Paul (b. ... How High the Moon is a jazz standard with lyrics by Nancy Hamilton and music by Morgan Lewis. ...


Both rock and roll and boogie woogie have four beats (usually broken down into eight eighth-notes/quavers) to a bar, and are twelve-bar blues. Rock and roll however has a greater emphasis on the backbeat than boogie woogie. Little Richard combined boogie-woogie piano with a heavy backbeat and over-the-top, shouted, gospel-influenced vocals that the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame says "blew the lid off the '50s." However, others before Little Richard were combining these elements, including Esquerita, Cecil Gant, Amos Milburn, Piano Red, and Harry Gibson. Little Richard's wild style, with shouts and "wooo wooos," had itself been used by female gospel singers, including the 1940s' Marion Williams. Roy Brown did a Little Richard style "yaaaaaaww" long before Richard in "Ain't No Rockin no More." Backbeat can mean one of two things: Backbeat or Back beat is a style of rock music percussion Backbeat is a 1994 bio-pic of the early career of The Beatles, starring Stephen Dorff, Sheryl Lee, and Ian Hart Categories: Disambiguation ... Backbeat can mean one of two things: Backbeat or Back beat is a style of rock music percussion Backbeat is a 1994 bio-pic of the early career of The Beatles, starring Stephen Dorff, Sheryl Lee, and Ian Hart Categories: Disambiguation ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... Esquerita was the stage name of singer, songwriter and pianist Eskew Reeder Jr. ... Cecil Gant Cecil Gant (April 4, 1913 - February 4, 1951) was an American Blues singer & pianist. ... Amos Milburn (April 1, 1927 – January 3, 1980) was an American rhythm and blues singer, and pianist, popular in the 1940s and 1950s. ... Piano Red (born Willie Perryman, later recording as Dr. Feelgood & the Interns) was an American blues musician, and the first to hit the pop music charts. ... Harry The Hipster Gibson (June 27, 1915 – May 3, 1991) was a jazz pianist, singer, and songwriter. ... Marion Williams (August 29, 1927 - July 2, 1994) was a legendary American gospel singer, often regarded as one of the most powerful voices in American music history. ... There have been a number of notable people named Roy Brown: Roy Brown, the Canadian pilot who is credited with shooting down the Red Baron Roy Brown, a Blues musician who was a pioneer of Rock and Roll Roy Brown, a Puerto Rican musician Roy Brown, a famous clown most...


Bo Diddley's 1955 hit "Bo Diddley" backed with "I'm A Man" introduced a new, pounding beat, and unique guitar playing that inspired many artists. Other artists with early rock and roll hits were Chuck Berry and Little Richard, as well as many vocal doo-wop groups. Within the decade crooners such as Eddie Fisher, Perry Como, and Patti Page, who had dominated the previous decade of popular music, found their access to the pop charts significantly curtailed. Bo Diddley (born December 30, 1928) aka The Originator, is an influential American rock and roll singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... Bo Diddley is a rhythm and blues song first recorded and sung by Bo Diddley at the Universal Recording Studio in Chicago and released on the Chess Records subsidiary, Checker Records in 1955. ... Im A Man is a song written (credited to Ellas McDaniel) and released by Bo Diddley in March 1955 on Checker Records. ... Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born 18 October 1926, St. ... Richard Wayne Penniman (born December 5, 1932), better known by the stage name Little Richard, is an African-American singer, songwriter, and pianist, who began performing in the 1940s and was a key figure in the transition from rhythm & blues to rock and roll in the mid-1950s. ... Doo-wop is a style of vocal-based rhythm and blues music popular in the mid-1950s to the early 1960s in America. ... Eddie Fisher (born August 10, 1928) is an American singer and entertainer. ... Pierino Ronald Como (May 18, 1912 – May 12, 2001) was an American crooner. ... Patti Page (born Clara Ann Fowler on November 8, 1927 in Claremore, Oklahoma) is one of the best-known female singers in traditional pop music. ...


Rockabilly

Main article: Rockabilly

"Rockabilly" usually (but not exclusively) refers to the type of rock and roll music which was played and recorded in the mid 1950s by white singers such as Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis, who openly drew on both the country and R&B roots of the music. Many other popular rock and roll singers of the time, such as Fats Domino, Chuck Berry and Little Richard, came out of the black rhythm and blues tradition, making the music attractive to white audiences, and are not usually classed as "rockabilly". Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... Elvis redirects here. ... For other persons named Carl Perkins, see Carl Perkins (disambiguation). ... Jerry Lee Lewis (born September 29, 1935), also known by the nickname The Killer, is an American rock and roll and country music singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... Antoine Dominique Fats Domino (born February 26, 1928) is a classic R&B and rock and roll singer, songwriter and pianist. ... Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born 18 October 1926, St. ... Richard Wayne Penniman (born December 5, 1932), better known by the stage name Little Richard, is an African-American singer, songwriter, and pianist, who began performing in the 1940s and was a key figure in the transition from rhythm & blues to rock and roll in the mid-1950s. ...


In July 1954, Elvis Presley recorded the regional hit "That's All Right (Mama)" at Sam Phillips' Sun studios in Memphis. Two months earlier in May 1954, Bill Haley & His Comets recorded "Rock Around the Clock". Although only a minor hit when first released, when used in the opening sequence of the movie Blackboard Jungle, a year later, it really set the rock and roll boom in motion. The song became one of the biggest hits in history, and frenzied teens flocked to see Haley and the Comets perform it, causing riots in some cities. "Rock Around the Clock" was a breakthrough for both the group and for all of rock and roll music. If everything that came before laid the groundwork, "Clock" introduced the music to a global audience. Thats All Right (Mama) is the name of the first song released by Elvis Presley. ... Sam Phillips, born Samuel Cornelius Phillips (January 5, 1923 – June 30, 2003), was a record producer who played an important role in the emergence of rock and roll as the major form of popular music in the 1950s. ... Sun Studio Sun Studio opened by rock pioneer Sam Phillips at 710 Union Avenue in Memphis, Tennessee, on January 3, 1950. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Rock Around the Clock is a rock n roll song from 1952, written by Max C. Freedman and James E. Myers (the latter under the pseudonym Jimmy De Knight). Although first recorded by Sonny Dae & the Knights, the more famous version by Bill Haley & His Comets is not, strictly speaking... Blackboard Jungle is a 1955 social commentary film about teachers in an inner-city school. ...


Cover versions

Main article: Cover version

Many of the earliest white rock and roll hits were covers or partial re-writes of earlier rhythm and blues or blues songs. Through the late 1940s and early 1950s, R&B music had been gaining a stronger beat and a wilder style, with artists such as Fats Domino and Johnny Otis speeding up the tempos and increasing the backbeat to great popularity on the juke joint circuit. Before the efforts of Freed and others, black music was taboo on many white-owned radio outlets. However, savvy artists and producers quickly recognized the potential of rock, and raced to cash in with white versions of this black music. White musicians also fell in love with the music and played it everywhere they could. This, however, is somewhat unfair and a lot of the early rock hits were country based songs too. Many of Presley's early hits were covers, like "That's All Right" (a countryfied arrangement of a blues number, it's flip side Blue Moon of Kentucky was also successful), "Baby, Let's Play House", "Lawdy Miss Clawdy" and "Hound Dog". "Heartbreak Hotel", the song that brought Presley to a world-wide audience (and his first ever release that was not a cover) was composed by country writers. // In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ... Johnny Otis Johnny Otis (born Ioannis (Yannis) Veliotes on December 28, 1921 in Vallejo, California) is an American blues and rhythm and blues pianist, vibraphonist, drummer, singer, bandleader, and impresario. ... Juke joint (or jook joint) is the vernacular term for an informal establishment featuring blues music, dancing, and alcoholic drinks, primarily operated by African American people in the southeastern United States. ... Blue Moon of Kentucky is a waltz written in 1947 by bluegrass musician Bill Monroe and recorded by his band, The Blue Grass Boys. ... For the Whitney Houston song, see Heartbreak Hotel (Whitney Houston song). ...


Covering was customary in the music industry at the time; it was made particularly easy by the compulsory license provision of United States copyright law (still in effect [9]). One of the first successful rock and roll covers was Wynonie Harris's transformation of Roy Brown's "Good Rocking Tonight" from a jump blues to a showy rocker. The most notable trend, however, was white pop covers of black R&B numbers. Exceptions to this rule included Wynonie Harris covering the Louis Prima rocker "Oh Babe" in 1950, and Amos Milburn covering what may have been the first white rock and roll record, Hardrock Gunter's "Birmingham Bounce," in 1949. A compulsory license is a license to use a patent, copyright, or other exclusive right that a government forces the holder to grant to others. ... United States copyright law governs the legally enforceable rights of creative and artistic works in the United States. ... Wynonie Mr. ... There have been a number of notable people named Roy Brown: Roy Brown, the Canadian pilot who is credited with shooting down the Red Baron Roy Brown, a Blues musician who was a pioneer of Rock and Roll Roy Brown, a Puerto Rican musician Roy Brown, a famous clown most... Jump blues is a type of up-tempo blues music influenced by big band sound. ... Sidney Louie Gunter Jr. ...


Black performers saw their songs recorded by white performers, an important step in the dissemination of the music, but often at the cost of feeling and authenticity (not to mention revenue). Most famously, Pat Boone recorded sanitized versions of Little Richard songs, though Boone found "Long Tall Sally" so intense that he couldn't cover it. Later, as those songs became popular, the original artists' recordings received radio play as well. Little Richard once called Pat Boone from the audience and introduced him as "the man who made me a millionaire." Charles Eugene Patrick Pat Boone (born June 1, 1934) is a singer whose smooth style made him a popular performer of the 1950s. ... Richard Wayne Penniman (born December 5, 1932), better known by the stage name Little Richard, is an African-American singer, songwriter, and pianist, who began performing in the 1940s and was a key figure in the transition from rhythm & blues to rock and roll in the mid-1950s. ...


The cover versions were not necessarily straightforward imitations. For example, Bill Haley's incompletely bowdlerized cover of "Shake, Rattle and Roll" transformed Big Joe Turner's humorous and racy tale of adult love into an energetic teen dance number, while Georgia Gibbs replaced Etta James's tough, sarcastic vocal in "Roll With Me, Henry" (covered as "Dance With Me, Henry") with a perkier vocal more appropriate for an audience unfamiliar with the song to which James's song was an answer, Hank Ballard's "Work With Me, Annie." Etta James (born Jamesetta Hawkins on January 25, 1938) is an American blues, soul, R&B, and jazz singer and songwriter. ... This is an incomplete list. ... Hank Ballard (born John Henry Kendricks) (November 18, 1927 - March 2, 2003) was an African American R&B/rock singer and the lead vocalist of Hank Ballard & the Midnighters. ...


Blues would continue to inspire rock performers for decades. Delta blues artists such as Robert Johnson and Skip James also proved to be important inspirations for British blues-rockers such as The Yardbirds, Cream, and Led Zeppelin. The reverse, black artists making hits with covers of songs by white songwriters, although less common, did occur. Amos Milburn got a hit with Don Raye's "Down the Road a Piece," Maurice Rocco covered Raye's "Beat Me Daddy Eight To The Bar," and Wynonie Harris covered "Don't Roll Your Bloodshot Eyes At Me" by Hank Penny and "Oh, Babe" by Louis Prima, for the R&B market. Delta blues are named for the Mississippi Delta. ... Robert Johnson, born Robert Leroy Johnson (May 8, 1911 – August 16, 1938) is among the most famous of Delta blues musicians. ... Nehemiah Curtis Skip James (June 21, 1902 – October 3, 1969) was an American blues singer, guitarist, pianist and songwriter. ... The British blues is a type of blues music that originated in the late 1950s. ... Blues-rock is a hybrid musical genre combining elements of the blues with rock and roll, with an emphasis on the electric guitar. ... Not to be confused with Yard Birds. ... Cream were a 1960s British rock band comprising guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce and drummer Ginger Baker. ... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... Amos Milburn (April 1, 1927 – January 3, 1980) was an American rhythm and blues singer, and pianist, popular in the 1940s and 1950s. ... Don Raye (March 16, 1909 - January 29, 1985) was an American Vaudevillian and songwriter, best known for his songs for the Andrews Sisters such as Beat Me Daddy, Eight to the Bar and Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy. ... A song written in 1940 by Don Raye, which was written as a boogie woogie number for Will Bradleys big band, who recorded it in August and gained a top 10 hit with it in the closing months of the year. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Louis Prima (December 7, 1910 – August 24, 1978) was an American entertainer, singer, actor, songwriter, and trumpeter. ...


Cultural impact

Alan Freed is credited with first using the phrase "rock and roll" to describe rhythm and blues music played for a multi-racial audience. While working as a disc jockey at radio station WJW in Cleveland, he also organized the first rock and roll concert, called "The Moondog Coronation Ball" on March 21, 1952. The event proved a huge drawing card — the first event had to be ended early due to overcrowding. Thereafter, Freed organized many rock and roll shows attended by both whites and blacks, further helping to introduce African-American musical styles to a wider audience. This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... R&B redirects here. ... For the complete history of WKNR in Cleveland from 1990 to 2001, and its predecessor WGAR (AM), see WHKW. WKNR is an AM all-sports station in Cleveland, Ohio, broadcasting at 850 kHz with its transmitter in North Royalton, Ohio and studios at its former transmitter site in Broadview Heights... The Moondog Coronation Ball was a concert held at the Cleveland Arena on March 21, 1952. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Rock and roll appeared at a time when racial tensions in the United States were coming to the surface. African Americans were protesting segregation of schools and public facilities. The "separate but equal" doctrine was nominally overturned by the Supreme Court in 1954, and the difficult task of enforcing this new doctrine lay ahead. This new musical form combining elements of white and black music inevitably provoked strong reactions. Racial segregation characterised by separation of different races in daily life, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the movies, or in the rental or purchase of a home. ... Separate but equal was a policy enacted into law throughout the U.S. Southern states during the period of segregation, in which African Americans and Americans of European descent would receive the same services (schools, hospitals, water fountains, bathrooms, etc. ... An African American man gives a piano lesson to a young African American woman, in 1899 or 1900, in Georgia, USA. Photograph from a collection of W.E.B. DuBois. ...


After "The Moondog Coronation Ball", the record industry soon understood that there was a white market for black music that was beyond the stylistic boundaries of rhythm and blues. Even the considerable prejudice and racial barriers could do nothing against market forces. Rock and roll was an overnight success in the U.S., making ripples across the Atlantic, and perhaps culminating in 1964 with the British Invasion. The record industry is the part of the music industry that earns profit by selling sound recordings of music. ... R&B redirects here. ... A market economy (also called a free market economy or a free enterprise economy) is an economic system in which the production and distribution of goods and services take place through the mechanism of free markets (though completley useless to some dumbasses) guided by a free price system. ... For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ...


The social effects of rock and roll were worldwide and massive. Far beyond simply a musical style, rock and roll influenced lifestyles, fashion, attitudes, and language. In addition, rock and roll may have helped the cause of the civil rights movement because both African American teens and white American teens enjoyed the music. It also birthed many other rock influenced styles. Progressive, alternative, punk, and heavy metal are just a few of the genres that sprang forth in the wake of Rock and Roll. The massive popularity and worldwide scope of rock and roll resulted in an unprecedented level of social impact. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ...


Teen culture

A teen idol was a recording artist who attracted a very large following of (mostly) female "teenagers", because of their good looks and "sex appeal" as much as their musical qualities. A good example is Frank Sinatra in the 1940s, although a case can be made for Rudy Vallee even earlier. With the birth of rock and roll, Elvis Presley became one of the greatest teen idols of them all. His success led promoters to the deliberate creation of new "rock and roll" idols, such as Frankie Avalon and Ricky Nelson. Other musicians of the time also achieved mass popularity. In 1959, Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and the Big Bopper (J.P. Richardson) were killed when a plane Holly had chartered from Mason City, Iowa, to Fargo, North Dakota crashed in a corn field, after a performance at the Winter Dance Party. For other uses, see Teen idol (disambiguation). ... Teenagers is the fourth single and eleventh track from My Chemical Romances third studio album, The Black Parade. ... ... Sinatra redirects here. ... Rudy Vallee (July 28, 1901 - July 3, 1986) was a popular United States singer, actor, bandleader, and entertainer. ... Francis Thomas Avallone (born September 18, 1939 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) was an American actor and teen idol in the 1950s and early 1960s. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For the Weezer song, see Buddy Holly (song). ... Ritchie Valens (born Ricardo Steven Valenzuela, May 13, 1941 – February 3, 1959) was a pioneer of rock and roll and a forefather to the Latin Rock movement. ... Jiles Perry (J.P.) Richardson, Jr. ... Jiles Perry (J.P.) Richardson, Jr. ... Mason City is a city in Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, United States. ... “Fargo” redirects here. ...

Teen idols of the rock and roll years were followed by many other artists with massive appeal to a teenaged audience, including the Beatles and the Monkees. Teen idols were not only known for their catchy pop music, but good looks also played a large part in their successes. It was because of this that certain fan magazines, exclusively geared to the fans of teen idols (16 Magazine, Tiger Beat, etc.), were created. These monthly magazines typically featured a popular teen idol on the cover, as well as pin-up photographs, a Q&A, and a list of each idol's "faves" (i.e. favorite color, favorite vegetable, favorite hair color, etc.). Monument at Crash Site, September 16, 2003. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... The Monkees in 1968 (left to right): Micky Dolenz, Peter Tork, Mike Nesmith and Davy Jones The Monkees were a four-person band who appeared in an American television series of the same name, which ran on NBC from 1966 to 1968. ... 16 Magazine is a fan magazine based out of New York City. ... Tiger Beat is an American fan magazine marketed primarily to adolescents. ...


Teen idols also influenced toys, Saturday morning cartoons and other products. At the height of each teen idol's popularity, it was not uncommon to see Beatle wigs, Davy Jones' "love beads", or perhaps even Herman's Hermits lunchboxes for sale. For other persons of the same name, see Davy Jones. ... Hermans Hermits were an English rock band in the 1960s, formed in Manchester in 1963. ...


Dance styles

From its early-1950s inception through the early 1960s, rock and roll music spawned new dance crazes. Teenagers found the irregular rhythm of the backbeat especially suited to reviving the jitterbug dancing of the big-band era. "Sock-hops," gym dances, and home basement dance parties became the rage, and American teens watched Dick Clark's American Bandstand to keep up on the latest dance and fashion styles. From the mid-1960s on, as "rock and roll" yielded gradually to "rock," later dance genres followed, starting with the twist, and leading up to funk, disco, house and techno. The Jitterbug is a swing dance, a subset of Lindy Hop, with an emphasis on 6-count moves and fast spins. ... For other persons named Dick Clark, see Dick Clark (disambiguation). ... Dick Clark, host of American Bandstand American Bandstand was a long-running dance music television show that aired in various versions from 1952 to 1989. ... The word Twist has the following meanings: The Twist, 1960s dance Wing twist, change of the cross-section shape of a wing along the span. ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... This article is about the music genre. ... House music is a style of electronic dance music that was developed by dance club DJs in Chicago in the early to mid-1980s. ... For the comic book character previously known as Techno, see Fixer (comics). ...


British rock and roll

Main article: British rock

The trad jazz movement brought blues artists to Britain, and in 1955 Lonnie Donegan's version of "Rock Island Line" began skiffle music which inspired many young people to have a go. These included John Lennon and Paul McCartney, whose group The Quarrymen, formed in March 1957, would gradually change and develop into The Beatles. These developments primed the United Kingdom to respond creatively to American rock and roll, which had an impact across the globe. In Britain, skiffle groups, record collecting and trend-watching were in full bloom among the youth culture prior to the rock era, and colour barriers were less of an issue with the idea of separate "race records" seeming almost unimaginable. Countless British youths listened to R&B and rock pioneers and began forming their own bands. Britain quickly became a new center of rock and roll. British rock was born out of the influence of rock and roll and rhythm and blues from the United States, but added a new drive and urgency, exporting the music back and widening the audience for black R & B in the U.S. as well as spreading the gospel world... Trad jazz, short for traditional jazz is a music genre popular in Britain and Australia from the 1940s onward through the 1950s and which still has enthusiasts today. ... Lonnie Donegan MBE (29 April 1931 – 3 November 2002) was a skiffle musician, possibly the most famous of them all, with more than 20 UK Top 30 hits to his name. ... Rock Island Line is an American blues/folk song, written and originally performed by Lead Belly in the 1930s. ... Skiffle music is a type of folk music with a jazz and blues influence, usually using homemade or improvised instruments such as the washboard, tea-chest bass, kazoo, cigar-box fiddle, or a comb and paper, and so forth. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer-songwriter, composer, multi-instrumentalist, poet, entrepreneur, painter, record producer, film producer, and animal-rights activist. ... The Quarry Men (sometimes Quarrymen) were a little-known skiffle group formed around Liverpool, England in March 1957 by John Lennon. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ...


In 1958 three British teenagers became Cliff Richard and the Drifters (later renamed Cliff Richard and the Shadows). The group recorded a hit, "Move It", marking not only what is held to be the very first true British rock and roll single, but also the beginning of a different sound — British rock. Richard and his band introduced[citation needed] many important changes, such as using a "lead guitarist" (Hank Marvin) and an electric bass. Sir Cliff Richard OBE (born Harry Rodger Webb on 14 October 1940) is an English singer, actor and businessman. ... Move it was the first hit single by British pop/rock music legend Cliff Richard. ... British rock was born out of the influence of rock and roll and rhythm and blues from the United States, but added a new drive and urgency, exporting the music back and widening the audience for black R & B in the U.S. as well as spreading the gospel world... Brian Robson Rankin (born 28 October 1941), known by the stage name Hank B. Marvin, is an English guitarist, lead guitarist for The Shadows. ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ...


The British scene developed, with others including Tommy Steele, Adam Faith and Billy Fury vying to emulate the stars from the U.S. Some touring acts attracted particular popularity in Britain, an example being Gene Vincent. This inspired many British teens to begin buying records and follow the music scene, thus laying the groundwork for Beatlemania. Tommy Steele OBE (born December 17, 1936 in London, England) is an English entertainer. ... Terence (Terry) Nelhams-Wright, known as Adam Faith (June 23, 1940—March 8, 2003) was an English singer and actor. ... Originally from Wavertree in south Liverpool, Billy Fury was born on April 17, 1940, at Smithdown Hospital, now Sefton General Hospital, Smithdown Road, Liverpool, Merseyside. ... Gene Vincent, real name Vincent Eugene Craddock, (February 11, 1935 - October 12, 1971) was an American rocknroll pioneer musician, best known for his hit Be-Bop-A-Lula. // His parents, Ezekiah Jackson and Mary Louise Craddock, were shop owners in Norfolk, Virginia. ... This article is about Beatlemania, fan frenzy towards The Beatles. ...


At the start of the 1960s, instrumental dance music was very popular in the UK. Hits such as "Apache" by The Shadows and "Telstar" by The Tornados (produced by Joe Meek), form a British branch of instrumental music. Apache was a popular 1960 instrumental song written by Jerry Lordan and recorded by British group The Shadows. ... The Shadows were an English instrumental rock n roll group active from the 1950s to the 2000s. ... Telstar was a 1962 instrumental record by The Tornados. ... The Tornados EP-cover 1963 The Tornados (in USA they were credited as The Tornadoes) were an English instrumental group of the 1960s, who acted as the in-house back-up group for many of Joe Meeks productions. ... For Joe Meek the mountain man, see Joseph Meek Joe Meek (born Robert George Meek; April 5, 1929 in Newent, Gloucestershire — February 3, 1967 in London[1]) was a pioneering English record producer and songwriter acknowledged as one of the worlds first and most imaginative independent producers. ... An instrumental is, in contrast to a song, a musical composition or recording without lyrics or any other sort of vocal music; all of the music is produced by musical instruments. ...


At the same time, in the late 1950s and early 1960s, R&B fans such as Alexis Korner promoted authentic American blues music directly in London clubs, and elsewhere, at a time when this music was declining in popularity back in the USA. This led directly to the formation of such groups as The Rolling Stones and The Yardbirds in London, The Animals in Newcastle, and Them in Belfast. In the USA, such groups became known as part of the "British Invasion". Alexis Korner (born Alexis Andrew Nicholas Korner, 19 April 1928 in Paris, France - died on 1 January 1984 in Westminster, London, England) Korner is probably best remembered as the Founding Father of British Blues and a pioneering blues musician. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Not to be confused with Yard Birds. ... The Animals were an English music group of the 1960s known in the United States as part of the British Invasion. ... , Newcastle upon Tyne (usually shortened to Newcastle) is a large city in Tyne and Wear, England. ... Them was a Northern Irish band formed in Belfast in April 1964, best known for the garage rock standard Gloria and launching singer Van Morrisons career. ... This article is about the capital city of Northern Ireland. ... For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ...


Further reading

  • The Fifties by Pulitzer Prize winning author David Halberstam (1996) Random House (ISBN 0-517-15607-5) provides information and analysis on Fifties popular culture exploring major social and cultural changes including television, transistor radios, the phenomenon of Elvis Presley and the rise of rock-and-roll.
  • The Rolling Stone Illustrated History of Rock and Roll : The Definitive History of the Most Important Artists and Their Music by editors James Henke, Holly George-Warren, Anthony Decurtis, Jim Miller. (1992) Random House (ISBN 0-679-73728-6)
  • Rock Chicks:The Hottest Female Rockers from the 1960’s to Now by Stieven-Taylor, Alison (2007). Sydney. Rockpool Publishing. ISBN 9781921295065
  • The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll by Holly George-Warren, Patricia Romanowski, Jon Pareles (2001) Fireside Press (ISBN 0-7432-0120-5).
  • Rock and Roll: A Social History, by Paul Friedlander, Westview Press, 1996. ISBN 0-8133-2725-3
  • Anna Oxa and Amir Hoxha, two parallel singers in the same rock, by Fatmir Hajdari - Dituria publisher - Tirana, pp.143
  • "The Rock Window: A Way of Understanding Rock Music" by Paul Friedlander, in Tracking: Popular Music Studies, Volume I, number 1, Spring, 1988.
  • The Sound of the City: the Rise of Rock and Roll, by Charlie Gillett, New York: E.P. Dutton, 1970.

// Events and trends The 1950s in Western society was marked with a sharp rise in the economy for the first time in almost 30 years and return to the 1920s-type consumer society built on credit and boom-times, as well as the the baby boom from returning GIs who... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... This article is about the author and journalist. ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ... Regency TR-1. ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ... Charlie Gillett born Feb 20, 1942 is a British radio presenter and writer, and in recent years has become one of the countrys most influential proponents of world music. Gillett began in journalism in 1968 with a weekly column in the Record Mirror. ...

See also

This is a list of music genres derived from rock and roll, including major rock, metal and punk genres: Categories: | ... This is a list of albums that are particularly notable or influential. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, showing Lake Erie in the background The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum is a museum and institution in Cleveland, Ohio, United States, dedicated, as the name suggests, to recording the history of some of the best-known and most influential... The Rockabilly Hall of Fame was established on March 21, 1997 to present early rock and roll history and information relative to the artists and personalities involved in this pioneering American music genre. ... This article is about the genre. ... A revolution occurred in 20th century music listening as the radio gained popularity worldwide, and new media and technologies were developed to record, capture, reproduce and distribute music. ... There are many candidates for the title of the first rock and roll record. ...

References

  1. ^ Origin of dances at Radio Canada (French)
  2. ^ http://www.littlewonderrecords.com/music-library.html and click record number 158 to hear it
  3. ^ Bill Haley & The Comets
  4. ^ The Sisters
  5. ^ Transatlantic Merry-Go-Round (1934)
  6. ^ Go, Cat, Go! by Carl Perkins and David McGee 1996 page 76 Hyperion Press ISBN 0-7868-6073-1
  7. ^ Scott, Tommy (RCS Artist Discography)
  8. ^ Elvis Presley at Sun Studios in 1954
  9. ^ CD Baby: How to Legally Sell Downloads of Cover Songs

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Rock music

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... This article is about the genre. ... Alternative music redirects here. ... Genres: Alternative - Classical - Dance - Folk - Hip hop - Jazz - Military - Ottoman - Opera - Pop - Religious - Rock Awards Kral MV, MÜ-YAP, MGD Charts Billboard Charts Music Festivals Istanbul International Music Festival, Istanbul International Jazz Festival, Izmir European Jazz Festival, Aspendos International Opera and Ballet Festival Media Rolling Stone (Türkiye), MTV (T... Arena rock, also called stadium rock or anthem rock, is a loosely-defined term describing a rock era. ... Art rock is a term used to describe a subgenre of rock music with experimental or avant-garde influences that emphasizes novel sonic texture. ... It has been suggested that Merseybeat be merged into this article or section. ... Blues Rock or Blues-rock is a fusion genre of music which combines elements of the blues with rock and roll. ... Boogaloo (shing-a-ling, popcorn music) is a genre of Latin music and dance that was very popular in the United States in the late 1960s. ... For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ... The Canterbury Scene (or Canterbury Sound) is a term used to loosely describe the group of progressive rock musicians that were based around the city of Canterbury, Kent, England during the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Christian rock (occasionally abbreviated CR) is a form of rock music played by bands whose members are Christian and who often focus the lyrics on matters concerned with the Christian faith. ... Comedy rock is a term used to describe rock music that mixes the music with general comedy. ... For the geological term, see Country rock (geology). ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Frat rock was an early influential American subgenre of rock and roll / roots rock. ... Garage rock is a raw form of rock and roll that was first popular in the United States and Canada from about 1963 to 1967. ... Glam rock (also known as glitter rock), is a rock music style that developed in the UK in the post-hippie early 1970s which was performed by singers and musicians wearing outrageous clothes, makeup, hairstyles, and platform-soled boots. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... Instrumental rock and roll is a type of rock and roll music which emphasises musical instruments, and which features no or very little singing. ... The term jam band is commonly used to describe psychedelic rock-influenced bands whose concerts largely consist of bands reinterpreting their songs as springboards into extended improvisational pieces of music. ... Jangle pop is a musical genre that began in United States during the middle of the 1960s, combining angular, chiming guitars and power pop structures. ... Krautrock, also known as Kosmische Musik, is a generic name for the experimental music scene that appeared in Germany in the late 1960s and gained popularity throughout the 1970s. ... For other uses, see Pop rock (disambiguation). ... Power pop is a long-standing musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop music. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... Pub rock was a mid- to late-1970s musical movement, largely centred around North London and South East Essex, particularly Canvey Island and Southend on Sea. ... Pub rock is a style of Australian rock and roll popular throughout the 1970s and 1980s, and still influencing contemporary Australian music today. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Rap rock is a hybrid of rap and rock music. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... Samba-rock - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Soft rock, also referred to as light rock or easy rock, is a style of music which uses the techniques of rock and roll to compose a softer, supposedly more ear-pleasing sound for listening, often at work or when driving. ... Southern rock is a subgenre of rock music. ... Stoner rock and stoner metal are interchangeable terms describing sub-genres of rock and metal music. ... In the early 1960s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was surf rock. ... This is a list of music genres derived from rock and roll, including major rock, metal and punk genres: Categories: | ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... The massive popularity and worldwide scope of rock and roll resulted in an unprecedented level of social impact. ...


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