FACTOID # 17: Though Rhode Island is the smallest state in total area, it has the longest official name: The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Rock (music)
Rock
Stylistic origins: Rock and roll, ultimately blues (mostly jump blues and Chicago blues), country music and R&B
Cultural origins: Late 1940s United States
Typical instruments: Guitar - Bass - Drums
Mainstream popularity: Much, constant and worldwide since the 1950s
Derivative forms: Alternative rock - Heavy metal - Punk rock - Progressive rock
Subgenres
Art rock - Cello rock - Christian rock - Classic rock - Country rock - Desert rock - Detroit rock - Dialect rock - Garage rock - Girl group - Glam rock - Glitter rock - Group Sounds - Hard rock - Heartland rock - Instrumental rock - Jam band - Jangle pop - Math rock - Post-rock - Power pop - Psychedelia - Pub rock (Aussie) - Pub rock (UK) - Rock en espanol - Soft rock - Southern rock - Surf - Symphonic rock
Fusion genres
Aboriginal rock - Afro-rock - Anatolian rock - Blues-rock - Boogaloo - Country rock - Cumbia rock - Flamenco-rock - Folk-rock - Indo-rock - Jazz rock - Madchester - Merseybeat - Progressive rock - Punta rock - Raga rock - Raï rock - Rockabilly - Rockoson - Samba-rock - Tango-rockéro
Regional scenes
Argentina - Armenia - Australia - Austria - Belarus - Belgium - Bosnia and Herzegovina - Brazil - Cambodia - Canada - Chile - China - Colombia - Czech Republic - Croatia - Denmark - Estonia - Finland - France - Greece - Germany - Hungary - Iceland - Indonesia - Ireland - Israel - Italy - Japan - Latvia - Lithuania - Malaysia - Mexico - Nepal - Netherlands - New Zealand - Norway - Peru - Philippines - Portugal - Russia - Serbia and Montenegro - Slovenia - South Africa - Spain - Sweden - Switzerland - Tatar - Thailand - Turkey - Ukraine - United Kingdom - United States - Uruguay - Vietnam - Zambia
Other topics
Backbeat - Rock opera - Rock band - Performers - Rock anthem - Hall of Fame - Samples - Social impact

Rock is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars, and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles, however saxophones have been omitted from newer subgenres of rock music since the 90's. The genre of rock is broad, and its boundaries loosely-defined, with distantly related genres such as soul sometimes being included. Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... The blues is a vocal and instrumental form of music based on a pentatonic scale and a characteristic twelve-bar chord progression. ... The jump blues is a type of blues music, characterized by a jazzy, saxophone (or other horn instruments) sound, driving rhythms and shouted vocals. ... The Chicago blues is a form of blues music that developed in Chicago by adding electricity, drums, piano, bass guitar and sometimes saxophone to the basic string/harmonica Delta blues. ... Country music, also called country and western music or country-western, is an amalgam of popular musical forms developed in the Southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, Celtic Music, Blues, Gospel music, and Old-time music. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... // Events and trends World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrination, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons such as the atomic bomb. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... A guitar is a stringed musical instrument. ... Bass guitars typically have four strings instead of six as found on regular guitars. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... // Events and trends This map shows two essential global spheres during the Cold War in 1959. ... The terms alternative rock and alternative music were coined in the early 1980s to describe punk rock-inspired music genres which didnt fit into the mainstream genres of the time. ... Heavy metal, sometimes referred to as simply metal, is a form of music characterised by aggressive, driving rhythms and highly amplified distorted guitars. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... ... This is a list of music genres derived from rock and roll Alternative rock Aquabeat Arena rock Art-Metal Art-Pop Art-Punk Avant-rock Avant-progressive rock Blues-rock British Blues Rock British Invasion Bubblegum Rock Cello rock Celtic rock Christian rock Classic rock Comedy rock Country rock Death... Art rock is a sub-genre of rock music that is characterized by ambitious lyrical themes and melodic or rhythmic experimentation, often extending beyond standard pop song forms and toward influences in jazz, classical, or the avant-garde. ... Cello rock is a genre of music characterized by the use of cellos and other stringed instruments such as violin and viola to create a sound, beat, and texture similar to that of familiar rock music, but distinctly reshaped by the unique timbres and more traditional genres of the cello... Christian rock is a form of rock music played by bands where the musicians are openly Christian. ... Classic rock was originally conceived as a radio station programming format which evolved from the album oriented rock (AOR) format in the mid-1980s. ... Country rock is a musical genre formed from the fusion of rock and roll with country music. ... Desert Rock is a term given to several bands that hail from the California desert. ... Detroit rock is the name for a style of Australian indie rock, particularly popular in Sydney in the 1980s. ... Dialect rock - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Garage rock (performed by garage bands, not to be confused with UK Garage dance music) was a simple, raw form of rock and roll that emerged in the mid-1960s, largely in the United States. ... A girl group, as the name implies, is a musical group featuring a group of young female singers, singing usually pop and R&B songs. ... Glam rock (less commonly, and mostly in the US, known as glitter rock), was a style of rock music popularised in the early 1970s. ... Glitter rock, a short-lived genre in the mid-1970s, was an extreme exploration of the fantasy-side of the reality-fantasy parents of heavy metal. ... Group Sounds is a genre of Japanese rock (J-Rock) music in the mid to late 1960s. ... Hard rock is a form of rock and roll music which finds its closest roots in early 1960s garage rock. ... In the late 1970s and 1980s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was heartland rock. ... Instrumental rock is a type of rock and roll which features only musical instruments, and no singing. ... The term jam band is commonly used to describe psychedelic rock-influenced bands whose concerts largely consist of bands reinterpreting their songs as springboards into extended improvisational pieces of music. ... Jangle pop was an American musical genre that arose in the middle of the 1960s, combining angular, chiming guitars and power pop structures. ... Math rock is a style of rock music that emerged in the late 1980s. ... The term post-rock was coined by Simon Reynolds in issue 123 of The Wire (May 1994) to describe a sort of music using rock instrumentation for non-rock purposes, using guitars as facilitators of timbres and textures rather than riffs and powerchords. ... Power pop is a long-standing musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop music. ... Psychedelic music draws its inspiration from the experience of mind-altering drugs such as cannabis, psilocybin, mescaline, ecstasy and especially LSD. Characteristic features of the style include modal melodies, lengthy instrumental solos, esoteric lyrics and trippy special effects such as reversed, distorted, delayed and/or phased sounds. ... Pub rock is a style of Australian rock and roll popular throughout the 1970s and 1980s and still influencing contemporary Australian music today. ... Pub rock was a mid- to late-1970s musical movement, largely centred around North London and South East Essex, particularly Canvey Island and Southend on Sea. ... Rock en Español is the latest generation of Spanish language rock and roll. ... Soft rock, also referred to as lite rock, easy rock, and formally mellow rock, is a style of music which uses the techniques of rock and roll to compose a softer, supposedly more ear-pleasing sound for listening, often at work. ... Southern rock is a style of rock music that was very popular in the 1970s, and retains a fan base to the present. ... Surf music is a genre of popular music associated with surf culture. ... Symphonic rock is a style of rock music that incorporates elements from classical music. ... Aboriginal rock is a rather nebulous term for a style of music which mixes traditional rock music elements (guitar, drums, bass etc) with the instrumentation of the Australian Aborigines (Didjeridu, clap-sticks etc). ... Afro Rock is a style of music which relies heavily on the use of Western string instruments (electric guitars and bass) and guitar effects played with a rock feel, but played in an african plucked style. ... The Turkish rock scene began in the mid- to late 1960s, when popular United States and United Kingdom bands became well-known. ... Blues Rock or Blues-rock is a fusion genre of music which combines elements of the blues with rock and roll. ... Boogaloo (shing-a-ling, popcorn music) is a genre of Latin music and dance that was very popular in the United States in the late 1960s. ... Country rock is a musical genre formed from the fusion of rock and roll with country music. ... New Flamenco (Nuevo Flamenco) is the name for a Flamenco music style, which is influenced by many different modern musical genres. ... Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Indie rock is rock music that falls within the indie music description. ... Jazz fusion (sometimes referred to simply as fusion) is a musical genre that loosely encompasses the merging of jazz with other styles, particularly rock, funk, R&B, and world music. ... An NME original issue covering the Madchester movement. ... For the TV program please see Merseybeat Merseybeat, sometimes referred to as Merseysound, was a style of music popular during the 1960s. ... ... Punta rock is a form of the traditional punta rhythm of the Garifuna people of Central America. ... Raga rock was a term used in the 1960s to describe rock and roll records with Indian musical influences, especially—but not exclusively—those using the sitar, tabla, and other Eastern instrumentation. ... Raï (Arabic: راي) is a form of folk music, originated in Oran, Algeria from Bedouin shepherds, mixed with Spanish, French, African-American and Arabic musical forms, which dates back to the 1930s and has been evolved by women mainly. ... Rockabilly is the earliest form of rock and roll as a distinct style of music. ... A form of Cuban music made with elements of timba, nueva trova and rock and roll made since the late 1980s by groups like Vanito y La Lucha Almada and Habana Abierta. ... Samba-rock - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... The first Tatar rock band was Bolğar, a band active in the late 1980s. ... Backbeat can mean one of two things: Backbeat or Back beat is a style of rock music percussion Backbeat is a 1994 bio-pic of the early career of The Beatles, starring Stephen Dorff, Sheryl Lee, and Ian Hart Categories: Disambiguation ... The Whos Tommy, the first album explicitly billed as a rock opera A rock opera or rock musical is a musical production in the form of an opera or a musical in a modern rock and roll style rather than more traditional forms. ... Rock group (or later rock band) is a generic name to describe a group of musicians specializing in a particular form of electronically amplified music. ... This is a list of rock and roll performers. ... A rock and roll anthem is a celebratory rock and roll song. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, showing Lake Erie in the foreground The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum is a museum and institution in Cleveland, Ohio, United States, dedicated, as the name suggests, to recording the history of some of the best-known and most influential... Rockabilly Main article: Rockabilly Rockabilly is a fusion of country & western music with 1950s-style rock. ... The massive popularity and worldwide scope of rock and roll resulted in an unprecedented level of social impact. ... Popular music is music belonging to any of a number of musical styles that are accessible to the general public and mostly distributed commercially. ... An electric guitar is a type of guitar with a solid or semi-solid body that utilizes electronic pickups to convert the vibration of the steel-cored strings into electrical current. ... Headline text In popular music the gary fucked barryback beat drum beat is a percussion style or technique used in common time (4/4) where a strong rhythmic accent is sounded on the second and fourth beats of the bar, the backbeats, most often from striking a snare drum. ... Saxophones of different sizes play in different registers. ... Soul music is a combination of rhythm and blues and gospel which began in the late 1950s in the United States. ...


Bo Diddley claims that the term rock and roll came from in an Australian radio interview from Alan Freed describing Diddley as 'the main with the original sound that's going to rock and roll you out of of your seat'. The term Rock and Roll, Rhythym and Blues was then born. Bo Diddleys emphasis on rhythm largely influenced popular music, especially that of rock and roll in the 1960s. ...


A major formative influence was rock and roll, and the terms are sometimes used interchangeably. In the early 1960s rock 'n' roll was seen as being out of fashion, and at the outset of '60s British rock there was an insistence on using the term rock music. With the "British Invasion" this reinvigorated music spread back to the United States, and became a lasting international cultural phenomenon with considerable social impact on the world. Competing claims have credited it with ending wars and spreading peace and tolerance, as well as corrupting the innocent and spreading moral rot. Rock has become popular across the globe, and has evolved into a multitude of highly-varying styles with widespread popularity in most countries today. Overall in terms of album sales, rock is the most popular form of music since the advent of sound recording. Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... British rock was born out of the influence of rock and roll and rhythm and blues from the United States, but added a new drive and urgency, exporting the music back and widening the audience for black R & B in the U.S. as well as spreading the gospel world... The appearance of The Beatles on the The Ed Sullivan Show, February 9, 1964, marked the dramatic start of the British Invasion. ... The massive popularity and worldwide scope of rock and roll resulted in an unprecedented level of social impact. ...

Contents


Origins

Main article: Origins of rock and roll

Rock and Roll in its various guises came from a fusion of musical cultures, and in turn its influence fed back to these cultures, a process of borrowings, influences and new ideas that continues to develop rock music. Rock and roll emerged as a defined musical style in America in the 1950s, though elements of rock and roll can be seen in rhythm and blues records as far back as the 1920s. ...


Rock 'n' Roll diversifies

Main article: rock and roll

Rock 'n' Roll had runaway success in the U.S. and quickly brought sanitised rhythm and blues influenced music to an international audience. Its success led to a dilution, as promoters were quick to attach the label to other commercial pop, and original stars such as Elvis Presley were diverted into ballads more in keeping with previous ideas of pop. The excitement and drive of the music was not forgotten, and there was a widening diversification of styles. Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Rhythm and blues (or R&B) was coined as a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Jerry Wexler at Billboard magazine, used to designate upbeat popular music performed by African American artists that combined jazz and blues. ... Elvis Aron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), also known as The King of Rock n Roll, was an American singer, song producer and actor. ...


The American rock style began to influence other genres. Vocalized R&B became doo wop, for example, while uptempo, secularized gospel music became soul, and audiences flocked to see Appalachian-style folk bands playing a rock-influenced pop version of their style. Places like Southern California produced their own varieties of pop music, such as surf. Young adults and teenagers across the country were playing in amateur rock bands, laying the roots for local scenes which would pave the way for garage rock and the so-called San Francisco Sound. // 1950s Covers: Early 50s Through the late 1940s and early 1950s, rhythm and blues music had been gaining a stronger beat and a wilder style, with artists such as Fats Domino and Johnny Otis speeding up the tempos and increasing the backbeat to great popularity on the juke-joint circuit. ... A genre is any of the traditional divisions of art forms from a single field of activity into various kinds according to criteria particular to that form. ... Doo-wop is a style of vocal-based rhythm and blues music popular in the mid-1950s to the early 1960s in America. ... Gospel music may refer either to the religious music that first came out of African-American churches in the 1930s or, more loosely, to both black gospel music and to the religious music composed and sung by white southern Christian artists. ... Soul music is a combination of rhythm and blues and gospel which began in the late 1950s in the United States. ... Surf music is a genre of popular music associated with surf culture. ... Garage rock (performed by garage bands, not to be confused with UK Garage dance music) was a simple, raw form of rock and roll that emerged in the mid-1960s, largely in the United States. ... The San Francisco Sound refers to rock music performed live and recorded by San Francisco-based rock groups of the mid 1960s to early 1970s. ...


Early Rock 'n' Roll

Main article: Rock 'n' Roll

Rock 'n' Roll started off in the early-mid 1950s in the United States of America. Artists such as Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Bo Diddley and Fats Domino played predominantly to African American crowds. While these key early rockers were indisposed to racism, local authorities and dance halls were very much divided upon racial lines. Rock and roll - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Chuck Berry Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born October 18, 1926) is an influential African-American guitarist, singer, and composer, and one of the pioneers of rock & roll music. ... Little Richard on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, (issue RS 58, May 28, 1970) Little Richard (born Richard Wayne Penniman, December 5, 1932 in Macon, Georgia) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist, and an early African-American pioneer of rock and roll. ... Bo Diddleys emphasis on rhythm largely influenced popular music, especially that of rock and roll in the 1960s. ... Fats Domino Antoine Dominique Fats Domino (born February 26, 1928 in New Orleans, Louisiana), is a classic R&B and rock and roll singer, songwriter and pianist. ...


Mainstream acceptance of rock and roll in the mid-1950s when what Bo Diddley describes as 'au fait dudes' (or caucasians) signed to major labels and started covering their material. Elvis Presley and Bill Haley and the Comets are the biggest examples of such stars to achieve early mainstream success. Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, The Big Bopper, Jerry Lee Lewis and the more rockabilly Johnny Cash are also early innovators of the genre. These artists were 'tight' and often toured and played together in dance halls and clubs across America and Britain. Elvis Aron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), also known as The King of Rock n Roll, was an American singer, song producer and actor. ... The original members of Bill Haley and His Comets, c. ... Charles Hardin Holley (September 7, 1936 – February 3, 1959), better known as Buddy Holly, was an American singer, songwriter, and a pioneer of Rock and Roll. ... Richard Steven Valenzuela (May 13, 1941 – February 3, 1959), better known as Ritchie Valens, was a pioneer of rock and roll and, as a Mexican-American born in Los Angeles, California, became the first Mexican–American rock and roll star. ... The Big Bopper Jiles Perry (J.P.) Richardson, Jr. ... Jerry Lee Lewis (born September 29, 1935) is an American rock and roll and country music singer, songwriter, and pianist, as well as an early pioneer of rock and roll music. ...


Arguably, Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley are two of the most influencial guitarists in Rock and Roll history. Particularly to British group the Rolling Stones. Berry for his guitar riff orientated style and soloing, and Diddley for his experimentation with tremelo and rhythym.


Towards the end of the 1950s 'chessboard' crowds (both black and white patrons) would emerge at Rock and Roll concerts as fans would discover the original artists of the songs they knew from television and the radio, such as Little Richard's Tutti Frutti.


They went on to inspire the British invasion of the 1960s. Buddy Holly and the Crickets inspired the name The Beetles, which of course was later changed to The Beatles. The Crickets were the backing band formed by singer/songwriter Buddy Holly in the 1950s. ... The Beatles were a British rock music group from Liverpool, England held in very high regard for both their artistic achievements and their considerable commercial success, and have amassed an enormous worldwide fanbase that continues to exist to this day. ...


Surf music

Main article: Surf music

The rockabilly sound influenced the West Coast development of a wild, mostly instrumental sound called surf music, though surf culture saw itself as a competing youth culture to Rock and Roll. This style, exemplified by Dick Dale and The Surfaris, featured faster tempos, innovative percussion, and processed electric guitar sounds with a British equivalent at the same time from groups like The Shadows, which would be highly influential upon future rock guitarists. Other West Coast bands, notably The Beach Boys and Jan and Dean, would capitalize on the surf craze, slowing the tempos back down and adding harmony vocals to create the "California Sound." Surf music is a genre of popular music associated with surf culture. ... Surf music is a genre of popular music associated with surf culture. ... Spectators at Pipeline on the North Shore of Oahu. ... A young crowd enjoys a rave in Manhattan NY. Youth culture generally refers to the ways young people (adolescents and teenagers) differentiate themselves from the general culture of their community. ... Dick Dale (born Richard Mansour on May 4, 1937) is a pioneer of surf rock and one of the most influential guitarists of the early 1960s. ... The Surfaris were a surf rock band formed in California in 1962, and are best known for two songs that hit the charts in the Los Angeles area, and nationally by May, 1963 : Surfer Joe (the A side), andWipe Out on the B side of a 45 RPM single. ... An electric guitar is a type of guitar with a solid or semi-solid body that utilizes electronic pickups to convert the vibration of the steel-cored strings into electrical current. ... The Shadows are a British instrumental rock n roll group active from the 1950s to the 2000s. ... The Beach Boys are a pop music group formed in Hawthorne, California in 1961, whose popularity has lasted into the 21st century. ... Jan Berry (April 3, 1941, Los Angeles -- March 26, 2004) and Dean Torrence (born March 10, 1940, Los Angeles) were a rock and roll duo popular from the late 1950s through the mid-1960s. ...


British rock

Main article: British rock

In the United Kingdom the Trad jazz movement brought visiting blues music artists and Lonnie Donegan's 1955 hit "Rock Island Line" began Skiffle music groups throughout the country, including John Lennon's "The Quarry Men" formed in March 1957 as a precursor to The Beatles. Britain was quick to become a new centre of rock and roll, without the color barriers which kept "race records" or Rhythm and Blues separate in the U.S.. Cliff Richard had the first British rock 'n' roll hit with "Move It", beginning the different sound of British rock. British rock was born out of the influence of rock and roll and rhythm and blues from the United States, but added a new drive and urgency, exporting the music back and widening the audience for black R & B in the U.S. as well as spreading the gospel world... Trad jazz, short for traditional jazz is a music genre popular in Britain and Australia from the 1940s onward through the 1950s and which still has enthusiasts today. ... Blues is a vocal and instrumental musical form which evolved from African American spirituals, shouts, work songs and chants and has its earliest stylistic roots in West Africa. ... Lonnie Donegan MBE (April 29, 1931 – November 3, 2002) was a skiffle musician, possibly the most famous of them all. ... The Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad (AAR reporting mark RI) was a Class 1 railroad in the United States. ... Skiffle music is a type of folk music with a jazz and blues influence, usually using homemade or improvised instruments such as the washboard, tea-chest bass, kazoo, cigar-box fiddle, or a comb and paper, and so forth. ... John Winston Lennon (later John Ono Lennon) (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980) was best known as a singer, songwriter, poet and guitarist for the British rock band The Beatles. ... The Quarry Men were a little-known skiffle group formed around Liverpool, England in March 1957 by John Lennon. ... The Beatles were a British rock music group from Liverpool, England held in very high regard for both their artistic achievements and their considerable commercial success, and have amassed an enormous worldwide fanbase that continues to exist to this day. ... Rhythm and blues (or R&B) was coined as a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Jerry Wexler at Billboard magazine, used to designate upbeat popular music performed by African American artists that combined jazz and blues. ... Cliff Richard Sir Cliff Richard (born Harry rodger webb in Lucknow, India, on October 14, 1940) is one of the United Kingdoms most popular singers. ... British rock was born out of the influence of rock and roll and rhythm and blues from the United States, but added a new drive and urgency, exporting the music back and widening the audience for black R & B in the U.S. as well as spreading the gospel world...


At the start of the 1960s his backing group The Shadows was one of a number of groups having success with Surf music instrumentals. Rock 'n' Roll' was fading into lightweight pop and schmaltzy ballads, but at clubs and local dances British rock groups were starting to play with an intensity and drive seldom found in white American acts, heavily influenced by Blues-rock pioneers like Alexis Korner. By the end of 1962 the British rock scene had started, with groups drawing on a wide range of American influences including Soul music, Rhythm and Blues and Surf music, playing for dancers doing the Twist. The music quickly evolved and developed to dominate pop music world-wide. First reinterpreting standard American tunes, these groups then infused their original rock compositions with an industrial-class sensibility and increasingly complex musical ideas. The Shadows are a British instrumental rock n roll group active from the 1950s to the 2000s. ... Surf music is a genre of popular music associated with surf culture. ... Rock band (or rock group) is a generic name to describe a group of musicians specializing in a particular form of electronically amplified music. ... Blues Rock or Blues-rock is a fusion genre of music which combines elements of the blues with rock and roll. ... Alexis Korner (April 19, 1928 - January 1, 1984), was an English blues musician. ... British rock was born out of the influence of rock and roll and rhythm and blues from the United States, but added a new drive and urgency, exporting the music back and widening the audience for black R & B in the U.S. as well as spreading the gospel world... Soul music is a combination of rhythm and blues and gospel which began in the late 1950s in the United States. ... Rhythm and blues (or R&B) was coined as a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Jerry Wexler at Billboard magazine, used to designate upbeat popular music performed by African American artists that combined jazz and blues. ... Surf music is a genre of popular music associated with surf culture. ... The twist was a rock and roll dance popular in the early 1960s and also the name of the song that originated it. ...


The Beatles rose to the fore, bringing together an appealing mix of image, songwriting, and personality. In late 1963 the Rolling Stones started, as one of a number of groups increasingly showing blues influence such as The Animals and The Yardbirds, and in late 1964 The Kinks, followed by The Who, represented the new Mod style. The increasing musical adventurousness of the groups is exemplified by the Beatles' Rubber Soul of 1965. Drug references increased as music moved towards the birth of Psychedelia. The Beatles were a British rock music group from Liverpool, England held in very high regard for both their artistic achievements and their considerable commercial success, and have amassed an enormous worldwide fanbase that continues to exist to this day. ... -1... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ... Yardbirds album cover The Yardbirds were an early British rock band, noted for spawning the careers of several of rock musics most famous guitarists, including Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Jimmy Page. ... The Kinks were a British rock group. ... The Who is a British rock band of 1960s and 1970s fame. ... The logo of the mod movement was a stylised target, based on the roundel of the Royal Air Force. ... Rubber Soul is an album by British rock band The Beatles, first released in December 1965. ...


British invasion

Main article: British Invasion

After their initial success in the UK, The Beatles launched a large-scale US tour to ecstatic reaction, a phenomenon quickly dubbed Beatlemania. Although they were not the first British band to come to America, The Beatles spearheaded the Invasion, triumphing in the US on their first visit in 1964 (including historic appearances on the Ed Sullivan Show). In the wake of Beatlemania other British bands headed to the U.S., notably the Rolling Stones (who disdained the Beatles' clean-cut image and presented a darker, more aggressive image), and other acts like The Animals and The Yardbirds. Throughout the early and mid-'60s Americans seemed to have an insatiable appetite for British rock. Other British bands, including The Who, had some success during this period but saved their peak of popularity for the second wave of British invasion in the late 1960s. The appearance of The Beatles on the The Ed Sullivan Show, February 9, 1964, marked the dramatic start of the British Invasion. ... The Beatles were a British rock music group from Liverpool, England held in very high regard for both their artistic achievements and their considerable commercial success, and have amassed an enormous worldwide fanbase that continues to exist to this day. ... Beatlemania is a term that was used during the 1960s to describe fan frenzy (particularly by young teenaged girls) towards The Beatles. ... For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ... The Ed Sullivan Show was an American television variety show that ran from June 20, 1948, to June 6, 1971, and was hosted by Ed Sullivan. ... -1... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ... Yardbirds album cover The Yardbirds were an early British rock band, noted for spawning the careers of several of rock musics most famous guitarists, including Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Jimmy Page. ... The Who is a British rock band of 1960s and 1970s fame. ...


1960s garage rock

Main article: Garage rock

The British Invasion spawned a wave of imitators in the U.S. and across the globe. Many of these bands were cruder than the bands they tried to emulate. Playing mainly to local audiences and recording cheaply, very few of these bands broke through to a higher level of success. This movement, later known as Punk rock or Garage Rock, latergained a new audience when record labels started re-issuing compilations of the original singles; the best known of these is a series called Nuggets. Some of the better known band of this genre include The Sonics, ? & the Mysterians, and The Standells. Garage rock (performed by garage bands, not to be confused with UK Garage dance music) was a simple, raw form of rock and roll that emerged in the mid-1960s, largely in the United States. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Garage rock (performed by garage bands, not to be confused with UK Garage dance music) was a simple, raw form of rock and roll that emerged in the mid-1960s, largely in the United States. ... Nuggets: Original Artyfacts From the First Psychedelic Era is a compilation album of garage rock from the mid- to late 1960s, assembled by Jac Holzman, founder of Elektra Records. ... This article is on the garage rock band The Sonics; see Seattle SuperSonics for the basketball team. ... ? & the Mysterians were an American garage rock band from the mid 1960s, originating in Saginaw, MI. The group is best known for 96 Tears a classic garageband record from late 1966 which also made #1 on the pop chart. ... The Standells were a 1960s rock and roll band from Los Angeles, California who, like the The Seeds, exemplified the garage rock style. ...


Development of a counterculture (1963-1974)

Main article: Counterculture

In the late 1950s the U.S. Beatnik counterculture was associated with the wider anti-war movement building against the threat of the atomic bomb, notably CND in Britain. Both were associated with jazz and with the growing folk song movement, which attracted idealistic communists and left-wingers working for an egalitarian overthrow of race discrimination in the U.S. and of the class structure in Britain. In sociology, counterculture is a term used to describe a cultural group whose values and norms are at odds with those of the social mainstream, a cultural equivalent of a political opposition. ... Beatnik cartoon The term Beatnik was first coined by Herb Caen in an article published by the San Francisco Chronicle on April 2, 1958. ... CND logo In British politics, the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament has been at the forefront of the peace movement in the United Kingdom and claims to be Europes largest single-issue peace campaign. ... Jazz master Louis Armstrong remains one of the most loved and best known of all jazz musicians. ... Folk music, in the original sense of the term, is music by and of the people. ... Communism - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition...


Rock and roll was seen as commercial pop, but subverted the race barriers in the U.S., and with the British invasion the reverence of groups for black Rhythm and blues stars brought these stars a wider public. The Beatles era brought outrage at longer hair styles, with unsmiling or sullen groups on record covers in contrast to the previous standard of clean-cut musicians with cheesy grins. The Rolling Stones took this further and are credited with being the first band to dispense with band uniforms; band members simply wore whatever clothes they wished, and these clothes were often outlandish or controversial. Such seemingly trivial rebelliousness led to bigger shifts. Rhythm and blues (or R&B) was coined as a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Jerry Wexler at Billboard magazine, used to designate upbeat popular music performed by African American artists that combined jazz and blues. ... -1...


Bob Dylan and folk-rock

Main articles: Bob Dylan and Folk-rock Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman on 24 May 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, musician and poet whose enduring contributions to American song are comparable, in fame and influence, to those of Stephen Foster, Irving Berlin, Woody Guthrie, and Hank Williams. ... Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ...


The folk scene had strong links between Britain and America, and in both countries a puritanical opposition to electric instruments and revival of traditional songs combined with enthusiasm for acoustic blues music and promotion of new songs with a social message, a genre pioneered by Woody Guthrie. Despite his adolescent musical forays into electric rock 'n' roll, Bob Dylan came to the fore in this movement, and his hits with Blowin' in The Wind and Masters of War brought "protest songs" to a wider public. Like others on the folk circuit, he viewed The Beatles at first as tritely commercial bubblegum pop, but just as they drew inspiration from his The Times They Are A-Changin album, he in turn was influenced by them to bring in electric rock instrumentation in his March 1965 album Bringing It All Back Home. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Woody Guthrie with his famous This Machine Kills Fascists guitar. ... Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman on 24 May 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, musician and poet whose enduring contributions to American song are comparable, in fame and influence, to those of Stephen Foster, Irving Berlin, Woody Guthrie, and Hank Williams. ... Masters Of War is a song by Bob Dylan, written in 1963 and released on the album The Freewheelin Bob Dylan. ... A protest song is a song intended to protest perceived problems in society such as injustice, racial discrimination, war, globalization, inflation, social inequalities. ... Bubblegum pop (bubblegum rock, bubblegum music) is a genre of popular music and rock and roll. ... Categories: Music stubs | Bob Dylan albums | 1964 albums ... Bringing It All Back Home is an album of original songs by American musician Bob Dylan, released on March 22, 1965. ...


Before the album came out, The Byrds beat him to it with a jangling electric hit single version of Mr. Tambourine Man taken from a preview of an acoustic track on the album. This effectively started Folk-rock, as well as setting off Psychedelic rock. Dylan's own contribution continued, with his "Like a Rolling Stone" becoming a U.S. hit single. Among his many disciples, Neil Young's lyrical inventiveness and often wailing electric guitar attack further widened Folk-rock's audience and presaged grunge. Others including Simon & Garfunkel, The Mamas & the Papas, Joni Mitchell and The Band developed the genre in America. The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California in 1964) were an American rock group. ... Mr. ... Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Psychedelic music draws its inspiration from the experience of mind-altering drugs such as cannabis, psilocybin, mescaline, ecstasy and especially LSD. Characteristic features of the style include modal melodies, lengthy instrumental solos, esoteric lyrics and trippy special effects such as reversed, distorted, delayed and/or phased sounds. ... Like a Rolling Stone is a song by Bob Dylan, from the album Highway 61 Revisited. ... Neil Young with guitar (from the 1991 Weld tour) Neil Percival Kenneth Robert Ragland Young, better known as Neil Young (born November 12, 1945) is a Canadian singer-songwriter who has become one of the most respected and influential musicians of his generation. ... Grunge music (sometimes also referred to as the Seattle Sound) is a genre of alternative rock inspired by hardcore punk, heavy metal, and indie rock. ... Bridge Over Troubled Water was Simon and Garfunkels last album; the title track was their only number one hit in the United Kingdom. ... The Mamas & the Papas (credited as The Mamas and the Papas on the debut album cover) were a leading vocal group of the 1960s. ... Joni Mitchell, CC (born Roberta Joan Anderson on November 7, 1943, in Fort Macleod, Alberta, Canada), is a musician and painter. ... The Band on the cover of their second album: Manuel, Helm, Danko, Hudson, Robertson The Band were an influential Canadian-American rock and roll group of the 1960s and 1970s. ...


In Britain, Fairport Convention began applying rock techniques to traditional British folk songs, followed by groups such as Steeleye Span, Lindisfarne and Pentangle in an approach which is still going strong today. Cover of Heyday: BBC Radio Sessions 1968-1969. ... Steeleye Span is a British folk-rock band that has been active since 1970. ... This article is about Lindisfarne, England. ... Pentangle is a synonym for pentagram. ...


Psychedelic rock

Main article: Psychedelic rock

Psychedelia began in the folk scene, with the Holy Modal Rounders introducing the term in 1964. With a background including folk and jug band music, The Grateful Dead fell in with Ken Kesey's LSD fuelled Merry Pranksters, playing at their Acid Tests then providing an electric Acid rock soundtrack to their Trips Festival of January 1966 , together with Big Brother & the Holding Company. Within a fortnight the Filmore Stadium was providing a regular venue for groups like another former jug band, Country Joe and the Fish, and the Jefferson Airplane whose debut album, recorded at the end of 1965, would have widespread influence that year. Elsewhere, The Byrds had a hit with Eight Miles High and the 13th Floor Elevators titled their album The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators. The music increasingly became involved in opposition to the Vietnam War. Psychedelic music draws its inspiration from the experience of mind-altering drugs such as cannabis, psilocybin, mescaline, ecstasy and especially LSD. Characteristic features of the style include modal melodies, lengthy instrumental solos, esoteric lyrics and trippy special effects such as reversed, distorted, delayed and/or phased sounds. ... Holy Modal Rounders Steve Weber (l. ... Bold text The Grateful Dead was an American psychedelia-influenced rock band. ... Ken Kesey (September 17, 1935 – November 10, 2001) was an American author, best known for his novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest, and as a cultural icon whom some consider a link between the beat generation of the 1950s and the hippies of the 1960s. ... For other uses, see LSD (disambiguation). ... The Merry Pranksters were a circle of people who collected around American novelist Ken Kesey and Beat literature figurehead Neal Cassady, as well as main cohort Ken Babbs. ... Acid rock is a form of psychedelic music and was the first form of it to achieve popular acclaim. ... Janis Joplin on the cover of her posthumously-released live album In Concert Janis Lyn Joplin (January 19, 1943 - October 4, 1970) was an American blues-influenced rock and soul singer and occasional songwriter with a distinctive voice. ... Country Joe and the Fish, from the cover of Feel Like Im Fixin to Die Country Joe and the Fish was a rock music/folk music band known for musical protests against the Vietnam War, from 1965 to 1970. ... Jefferson Airplane was an American rock band from San Francisco, a pioneer of the LSD-influenced psychedelic rock movement. ... The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California in 1964) were an American rock group. ... Eight Miles High, is a single from The Byrds 1966 album Fifth Dimension. ... 13th Floor Elevators were a rock music group founded in Austin, Texas in late 1965. ... The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators is a 1966 album by 13th Floor Elevators. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam) United States of America South Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand the Philippines Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) National Liberation Front (Viet Cong) Commanders Strength ~1,200,000 (1968) ~420,000 (1968) Casualties South Vietnamese dead: 1,250,000+ US dead: 58,226 US...


In Britain, Pink Floyd had been developing psychedelic rock since 1965 in the underground culture scene, and in 1966 the Soft Machine formed. From the folk music side, Donovan had a hit with Sunshine Superman, one of the very first overtly psychedelic pop records. In August 1966 The Beatles joined in the fun with their Revolver featuring psychedelia in Tomorrow Never Knows and in Yellow Submarine which combined these references with appeal to children and nostalgia, a formula which would keep their music widely popular. The Beach Boys responded in the U.S. with Pet Sounds. From a blues rock background, the British supergroup Cream debuted in December, and Jimi Hendrix became popular in Britain before returning to storm America. Pink Floyd (formed in 1965 in Cambridge, England) is an English rock band, noted for their progressive compositions, philosophic lyrics, sonic experimentation, cover art and elaborate live shows. ... Underground culture, or just underground, is a term to describe various alternative cultures which either consider themselves different to the mainstream of society and culture, or are considered so by someone. ... The Soft Machine were a pioneering British psychedelic, progressive rock and jazz band from Canterbury, Kent, England, named after the book The Soft Machine by William S. Burroughs. ... Donovan Leitch Donovan Philips Leitch (usually known simply as Donovan) (born May 10, 1946) is a Scottish musician. ... Sunshine Superman is the title of a 1965 song written and recorded by British popular musician Donovan; it is also became title track of his 1966 album of the same name. ... The Beatles were a British rock music group from Liverpool, England held in very high regard for both their artistic achievements and their considerable commercial success, and have amassed an enormous worldwide fanbase that continues to exist to this day. ... For the album by The Haunted, see rEVOLVEr. ... Tomorrow Never Knows is the final track of The Beatles 1966 studio album Revolver, but it was the first to be recorded for the album. ... Yellow Submarine can refer to: Yellow Submarine (song), Original song by The Beatles, released in 1966. ... The Beach Boys are a pop music group formed in Hawthorne, California in 1961, whose popularity has lasted into the 21st century. ... Pet Sounds is the title of the 1966 album recorded by American pop group the Beach Boys. ... Blues-rock, or Blues Rock, is a hybrid musical genre combining elements of the blues with rock and roll. ... Cream (also The Cream) was a seminal 1960s British rock band which featured guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce, and drummer Ginger Baker. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


January 1967 brought the first album from The Doors. As the year went by many other pioneering groups got records out, with Pink Floyd's Arnold Layne in March only hinting at their live sound. The Beatles' groundbreaking album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band was released in June, and by the end of the year Pink Floyd's The Piper at the Gates of Dawn and Cream's Disraeli Gears. The Doors, Legacy (Clockwise from top right): Jim Morrison, John Densmore, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek The Doors (formed in 1965 in Los Angeles, California) were a popular and influential American rock band. ... Sgt. ... Pink Floyd (formed in 1965 in Cambridge, England) is an English rock band, noted for their progressive compositions, philosophic lyrics, sonic experimentation, cover art and elaborate live shows. ... The Piper at the Gates of Dawn is Pink Floyds debut album, and the only one made under Syd Barretts leadership, although he made some contributions to the follow-up, A Saucerful of Secrets. ... Disraeli Gears is the second LP release by British blues-rock group Cream. ...


The culmination of rock and roll as a socially-unifying force was seen in the rock festivals of the late '60s, the most famous of which was Woodstock which began as a three-day arts and music festival and turned into a "happening", as hundreds of thousands of youthful fans converged on the site. U2 at Live Aid A rock festival, or rock fest, is a large-scale outdoor rock music concert, featuring multiple acts, often spread out over several days. ... Woodstock redirects here. ...


Progressive rock

Main article: Progressive rock

The music itself broadened past the guitar-bass-drum format; while some bands had used saxophones and keyboards before, now acts like The Beach Boys and The Beatles (and others following their lead) experimented with new instruments including wind sections, string sections, and full orchestration. Many bands moved well beyond three-minute tunes into new and diverse forms; increasingly sophisticated chord structures, previously limited to jazz and orchestrated pop music, were heard. ... A guitar is a stringed musical instrument. ... Bass guitars typically have four strings instead of six as found on regular guitars. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... The Beach Boys are a pop music group formed in Hawthorne, California in 1961, whose popularity has lasted into the 21st century. ... The Beatles were a British rock music group from Liverpool, England held in very high regard for both their artistic achievements and their considerable commercial success, and have amassed an enormous worldwide fanbase that continues to exist to this day. ...


Dabbling heavily in classical, jazz, electronic, and experimental music resulted in what would be called progressive rock (or, in its German wing, krautrock). Progressive rock could be lush and beautiful or atonal and dissonant, highly complex or minimalistic, sometimes all within the same song. At times it was hardly recognizable as rock at all. Some notable practitioners include King Crimson, Jethro Tull, Genesis, Gentle Giant, The Nice, Yes, Golden Earring , Gong, Emerson, Lake & Palmer, Magma, Can, Pink Floyd, Rush, and Faust. ... Krautrock is a generic name for the experimental bands who appeared in Germany in the early 1970s. ... The famous cover of King Crimsons debut album In the Court of the Crimson King (1969), painted by Barry Godber. ... Jethro Tulls fourth album, Aqualung Jethro Tull is a progressive rock band that formed in Blackpool, England in the 1960s. ... Genesis are a British rock band, formed in 1967. ... Gentle Giant was a British band considered to be one of the most original progressive rock bands of the 1970s. ... The Nice are a progressive rock band from the 1960s, known for their unique blend of rock, jazz and classical music. ... Yes is a progressive rock band that formed in London in 1968. ... Golden Earring is a Dutch Rock/Pop Group that was founded in 1961 in The Hague as the Golden Earrings (the s was later dropped). ... Gong are a progressive rock band formed by Australian musician Daevid Allen. ... Emerson, Lake & Palmer (ELP) were a British progressive rock group. ... Magma is a French progressive rock band founded in 1969 by classically-trained drummer Christian Vander, who claimed as his inspiration a vision of humanitys spiritual and ecological future that profoundly disturbed him. ... Can was an experimental rock group founded in Germany in 1968. ... Pink Floyd (formed in 1965 in Cambridge, England) is an English rock band, noted for their progressive compositions, philosophic lyrics, sonic experimentation, cover art and elaborate live shows. ... Rush is a Canadian progressive rock band comprising bassist, keyboardist and vocalist Geddy Lee (real name Gary Lee Weinrib), guitarist Alex Lifeson (real name Alexander Zivojinovich), and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart (pronounced: Peert, as in cheer) (IPA: ). Since the release of their eponymous debut in 1974, the band became... Faust is a German band composed of Uwe Nettelbeck, Hans Joachim Irmler, Zappi Diermaier, Arnulf Meifert, Jean Herve Peron, Gunther Wustoff and Rudolf Sosna. ...


German prog

Main article: Krautrock

In the mid-1960s, American and British rock entered Germany, especially British progressive rock bands. At the time, the musical avant-garde in Germany were playing a kind of electronic classical music, and they adapted the then-revolutionary electronic instruments for a progressive-psychedelic rock sound. By the early 1970s, the scene, now known as krautrock, had begun to peak with the incorporation of jazz (Can) and Asian music (Popol Vuh). This sound, and later pioneers like Neu! and Kraftwerk, were to prove enormously influential in the development of techno and other genres later in the century. Krautrock is a generic name for the experimental bands who appeared in Germany in the early 1970s. ... Electronic music is a term for music created using electronic devices. ... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... Can was an experimental rock group founded in Germany in 1968. ... There are two bands named Popol Vuh: Popol Vuh (Norwegian band) Popol Vuh (German band) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Neu! (the German word for new, pronounced nɔɪ) were a German band, probably the archetypal example of what the UK music press at the time dubbed Krautrock. ... Album cover of Trans-Europe Express (1977). ... Techno is a form of electronic music that emerged in the mid-1980s and primarily refers to a particular style founded in America with influences from Germany and developed in and around Detroit and subsequently adopted by European producers. ...


Italian prog

In Italy progressive rock had a great success in the 1970s and some bands played prog at the same level of the more famous American groups and went in tour in the States. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ...


Some Italian progressive rock bands were Premiata Forneria Marconi, Banco del Mutuo Soccorso and Area International Popular Group. Premiata Forneria Marconi (PFM) is an Italian progressive rock band that achieved a high level of popularity in the 1970s, with success in both the British and American charts. ... Banco del Mutuo Soccorso - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


Birth of heavy metal

Main article: Heavy metal music

A second wave of British bands and artists gained great popularity during this period. These bands typically were more directly steeped in American blues music than their more pop-oriented predecessors, but their performances took a highly amplified, often spectacular form. Guitar-driven acts such as Cream and Led Zeppelin were early examples of this blues-rock form, but heavier rock bands including Rush, Deep Purple, and most notably Black Sabbath are all believed to have had greater influence on metal music. This more aggressive style of rock would come to be known as heavy metal. Heavy metal, sometimes referred to as simply metal, is a form of music characterised by aggressive, driving rhythms and highly amplified distorted guitars. ... Cream (also The Cream) was a seminal 1960s British rock band which featured guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce, and drummer Ginger Baker. ... Led Zeppelin was a British rock band that became one of the most popular and influential musical ensembles ever. ... Blues Rock or Blues-rock is a fusion genre of music which combines elements of the blues with rock and roll. ... Rush is a Canadian progressive rock band comprising bassist, keyboardist and vocalist Geddy Lee (real name Gary Lee Weinrib), guitarist Alex Lifeson (real name Alexander Zivojinovich), and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart (pronounced: Peert, as in cheer) (IPA: ). Since the release of their eponymous debut in 1974, the band became... This article is about the rock group. ... This article is about the British heavy metal band. ... Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ...


Corporate movements out of the counterculture (the 1970s)

Arena rock

Main article: Arena rock

The Beatles and the Rolling Stones had set the table for massive live performances in stadiums and arenas. The growing popularity of metal and progressive rock led to more bands selling out large venues. The corporate world saw the chance for huge profits and began marketing a series of what came to be called arena rock bands. Bands whose roots were in other genres, like Queen, Pink Floyd and Genesis, paved the way by putting on extravagant live shows drawing a large number of fans. Following in their wake, Boston, Styx, Foreigner, Journey, and many other bands began playing similar music, often less progressive and metal-like. This movement became a precursor to the power pop of future decades, and set the mold for live performances by popular artists Arena rock is a loosely defined style of rock music, often also called stadium rock or opera rock. ... Arena rock is a loosely defined style of rock music, often also called stadium rock or opera rock. ... This article may contain original research or unverified claims. ... Pink Floyd (formed in 1965 in Cambridge, England) is an English rock band, noted for their progressive compositions, philosophic lyrics, sonic experimentation, cover art and elaborate live shows. ... Genesis are a British rock band, formed in 1967. ... Bostons first, self-titled album cover Boston is a best-selling American rock band that achieved its most notable successes during the 1970s and 1980s. ... Styx is the first musical act to ever have four consecutive triple platinum albums, and remain one of the most popular musical acts in history. ... Foreigner is a rock and roll band formed in New York, USA in 1976 by veteran musicians Mick Jones and Ian McDonald (see 1976 in music). ... Journey is an American rock band formed in 1973 in San Francisco. ... Power pop is a long-standing musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop music. ...


Soft rock/Pop

Main article: Pop music

Even rock music would get soft, or at least in between soft and hard. Out of the short-lived "bubble gum pop" era came such groups as The Partridge Family, The Cowsills, The Osmonds, and The Archies (the last "group" was actually one person, Ron Dante, who would go on to help manage the career of Barry Manilow). For the 1979 song by M, see Pop Muzik. ... The opening titles, featuring animated partridge hatchlings, was created by artist Sandy Dvore. ... The Cowsills was a band that was formed in 1965 by four brothers — Barry, Bill, Bob, and John Cowsill — in Newport, Rhode Island. ... The Osmonds are an American family pop group who achieved enormous worldwide success as teenybopper idols in the 1970s. ... The Archies are a group of adolescent fictional characters of the Archie universe, a garage band founded by Archie Andrews, Reggie Mantle, and Jughead Jones. ... Ron Dante is an American singer, songwriter and record producer. ... Barry Manilow Barry Manilow (born Barry Alan Pincus in Brooklyn, New York on June 17, 1943) is an American singer and songwriter best known for his hit recordings I Write The Songs, Mandy and Copacabana (At The Copa). Manilow dominated the soft rock scene in the 1970s with a string...


With the demise of The Beatles as a group, other bands and artists would take this emerging soft rock format and add a touch of orchestration to partially form some of the first "power ballads". Solo artists such as Manilow, Olivia Newton-John, and Eric Carmen, and groups such as Bread, The Carpenters, and England Dan & John Ford Coley would make popular the format we know today as Soft rock. Barry Manilow Barry Manilow (born Barry Alan Pincus in Brooklyn, New York on June 17, 1943) is an American singer and songwriter best known for his hit recordings I Write The Songs, Mandy and Copacabana (At The Copa). Manilow dominated the soft rock scene in the 1970s with a string... Olivia Newton-John, 1988 Olivia Newton-John (born September 26, 1948, Cambridge) is a British-born Australian singer and actress. ... Eric Carmen (born August 11, 1949, Cleveland, Ohio) is an American singer, songwriter, guitarist and keyboardist. ... Bread was a 1970s rock and roll band from Los Angeles, California. ... Karen and Richard Carpenter This article is about a musical group. ...


Other well-known artists, not specifically rock stars, from the 1960s such as Neil Diamond and Barbra Streisand were continuing to chart. Essential Neil Diamond album cover. ... Barbra Streisand - Guilty Pleasures. ...


Classic rock emerging

Main article: Classic rock

Meanwhile, groups such as Queen, Led Zeppelin, AC/DC, Aerosmith, REO Speedwagon, ZZ Top, Van Halen,Golden Earring and The Rolling Stones as well as such solo artists as Peter Frampton were being heard mainly on AM radio and sharing the charts with their soft rock counterparts. Classic rock was originally conceived as a radio station programming format which evolved from the album oriented rock (AOR) format in the mid-1980s. ... This article may contain original research or unverified claims. ... Led Zeppelin was a British rock band that became one of the most popular and influential musical ensembles ever. ... AC/DC is an Australian hard rock band. ... Aerosmith is the preeminent American rock band. ... REO Speedwagon is a rock band which grew in popularity in the Midwestern United States during the 1970s and peaked in the early 1980s. ... ZZ Top on the cover of the March 1991 issue of the Guitar World magazine. ... Van Halen is an American rock band formed in the early-1970s and discovered by KISS bassist and co-founder Gene Simmons. ... Golden Earring is a Dutch Rock/Pop Group that was founded in 1961 in The Hague as the Golden Earrings (the s was later dropped). ... -1... Peter Framptons solo career skyrocketed after the release of Frampton Comes Alive!, one of the most successful live albums. ...


For example, Frampton's 1976 live album Frampton Comes Alive, rapidly becoming the best-selling live album of all time, had spawned a number of singles that hit the Top Ten charts, such as "Show Me The Way" and "Baby, I Love Your Way". Aerosmith's rock anthem "Walk This Way", among others, were becoming popular with junior high and high school students. It was an era where both soft and hard rock mixed together. Extremely popular recordings, such as Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven" and Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody," actually put the two together. Frampton Comes Alive! is a live album by Peter Frampton. ... Stairway to Heaven is a song by the British rock group Led Zeppelin released in 1971 on their fourth studio album, . It is widely accepted as one of the greatest of all rock songs and is the most frequently requested song on FM radio stations in the United States, despite... Bohemian Rhapsody is a song written by Freddie Mercury and originally recorded by the band Queen for their 1975 album A Night at the Opera. ...


Rock crosses borders

In the early 1970s Mexican singer Rigo Tovar took not only the musical elements of rock melody and blues and fused it with cumbia, and tropical music. He was the first to also used the rock and roll image; sporting long black shaggy hair, ray ban aviator glasses, glam outfits, and tattoos. He also started the use electric guitars, synthesizers and electronic effects previously unused in mexican music. In his live performances he would cover songs by Ray Charles and the Beatles. His fame and influence were not limited to Mexico and Latin America but eventually went world wide reaching Europe. Many of today's Mexican "rockeros" cite Rigo as an influence. Rigoberto Tovar García (March 29, 1946 – March 27, 2005). ... The blues is a vocal and instrumental form of music based on a pentatonic scale and a characteristic twelve-bar chord progression. ... Cumbia is a Colombian folk dance and dance music. ... This article is about the tattoo, a design in ink or some other pigment, usually decorative or symbolic, placed permanently under the skin. ... Mariachi music is the most well-known regional music of Mexico. ... Ray Charles was the stage name of Ray Charles Robinson (September 23, 1930 – June 10, 2004). ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


Disco, punk and New Wave (1973-1981)

Disco

Main article: Disco

While Funk music had been part of the rock and roll scene in the early 1970s, it would eventually give way to more accessible songs with a danceable beat. The Disco format was propelled by such groups as K.C. and the Sunshine Band, MFSB, The Three Degrees, The O'Jays, Barry White, Gloria Gaynor, Chic, and The Trammps. Suddenly, many popular hits featured the danceable disco beat, and discotheques -- previously a European phenomenenon -- began to open in the U.S., notably Studio 54 in New York, which became the model for dozens of disco clubs nationwide. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Funk is a distinct style of music originated by African-Americans, e. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... KC and the Sunshine Band is an American musical group. ... MFSB (short for, officially, Mother, Father, Sister, Brother, although some claimed that it actually stood for Mother Fuckin SonovaBitch, according to the book Last Night A DJ Saved My Life [Bill Brewster and Frank Broughton, Grove Press, 2000, ISBN 0-8021-3688-5]) were a loose conglomeration of studio musicians... The Three Degrees are a female Philly soul and disco vocal musical group formed in 1963 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... The OJays are a popular Philadelphia soul group, originally consisting of Walter Williams, Bill Isles, Bobby Massey, William Powell and Eddie Levert. ... Barry White Barry Eugene White (September 12, 1944 – July 4, 2003) was an American record producer and singer responsible for the creation of numerous hit soul and disco songs. ... Gloria Gaynor Gloria Gaynor (real name Gloria Fowles, born September 7, 1949 in Newark, New Jersey) is a singer best-known for the disco hits I Will Survive (Hot 100 #1, 1979) and Never Can Say Goodbye (Hot 100 #9, 1974). ... Chic is also an American band that was formed in 1975/1976 by guitarist Nile Rodgers and bassist Bernard Edwards. ... The Trammps, based in Philadelphia, were one of the first disco bands. ... Discothèque redirects here. ... The original Studio 54 logo Studio 54 was a legendary New York City disco located on West 54th Street in Manhattan. ...


The group most associated with the Disco era was The Bee Gees, whose music for the 1977 Paramount film Saturday Night Fever marked the pinnacle of the era. Many mainstream rock acts, including the Rolling Stones, Rod Stewart, Queen and even the Grateful Dead, incorporated disco beats into their releases in attempts to keep up with the trend; many rock radio stations began to adopt all-disco formats. The Bee Gees: Maurice, Barry and Robin The Bee Gees were a British and Australian band, originally a pop singer-songwriter combination, reborn as funk and disco. ... // Events In the Academy Awards, Peter Finch, Faye Dunaway and Beatrice Straight win Best Actor and Actress and Supporting Actress awards for Network. ... The Paramount Pictures logo used since 2003. ... Saturday Night Fever is a 1977 movie starring John Travolta as Tony Manero, a troubled Brooklyn youth whose weekend activities are dominated by visits to a New York discotheque. ... -1... Rod Stewart - before he was a Celtic fan. ... This article may contain original research or unverified claims. ... Bold text The Grateful Dead was an American psychedelia-influenced rock band. ...


But by the end of the 1970s an anti-disco backlash occurred as, in the rush to capitalize on the popular format, the overall quality of disco music began to fall and as rock fans reacted to the perceived loss of traditional rock outlets in favor of disco. The anti-disco movement culminated in the disco demolition riot in Chicago during the summer of 1979. Punk band Jimi LaLumia & the Psychotic Frogs began the anti disco movement in America with the release of their international underground smash hit single Death To Disco-Disco Sucks in 1977. ... Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden) Official website: http://egov. ...


While much of the cachet of disco as a genre had dissipated by the end of the '70s, danceable sounds persisted; disco, in its own way, would spin off Rap/Hip-Hop music as we know today, when The Sugarhill Gang took portions of Chic's hit "Good Times" and transformed them into "Rapper's Delight", generally considered to be the first popular rap single. Hip-Hop music is a style of popular music. ... The Sugarhill Gang (FYI they were the first rap group not L.L. cool J like some people think) an American hip hop group, known mostly for one hit, Rappers Delight, the first rap single to become a Top 40 hit. ... Rappers Delight is a 1979 (see 1979 in music) single by American hip hop trio The Sugarhill Gang; it is widely acknowledged as the first hip hop hit single. ...


Punk Rock

Main article: Punk rock

Punk rock started off as a reaction to the lush, producer-driven sounds of disco, and against the perceived commercialism of progressive rock that had become arena rock. Early punk borrowed heavily from the garage band ethic: played by bands for which expert musicianship was not a requirement, punk was stripped-down, three-chord music that could be played easily. Many of these bands also intended to shock mainstream society, rejecting the "peace and love" image of the prior musical rebellion of the 1960s which had degenerated, punks thought, into mellow disco culture. Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... ...


Punk rose to public awareness nearly simultaneously in Britain with the Sex Pistols and Clash and in America with The Ramones. Sex Pistols were, despite their short existence, one of the most influential English punk bands. ... The Ramones (L-R, Johnny, Tommy, Joey, Dee Dee) on the cover of their debut self-titled album (1976), cementing their place at the dawn of the punk movement. ...


The Sex Pistols chose aggressive stage names (including "Johnny Rotten" and "Sid Vicious") and did their best to live up to them, deliberately rejecting anything that symbolized "hippies": long hair, soft music, loose clothing, and politics, and displaying an anarchic, often confrontational, stage presence; well represented on their first two singles "Anarchy in the U.K." and "God Save the Queen". Despite an airplay ban on the BBC, the record rose to the top chart position in the UK. The Sex Pistols paved the way for The Clash, whose approach was less nihilistic but more overtly political and idealistic. A stage name, or a screen name for movie stars, is a pseudonym used by performers and actors. ... Anarchy in the U.K. (B-side I Wanna Be Me) was the first single by the punk band the Sex Pistols. ... God Save the Queen (B-side Did You No Wrong) was the second single by punk band the Sex Pistols. ... Corporate logo of the British Broadcasting Corporation. ... The Clash was one of the most successful British punk rock groups that existed from 1976 to 1986. ...


The Ramones exemplified the American side of punk: equally aggressive but mostly apolitical, more alienated, and not above fun for its own sake. The Ramones reigned as the kings of the New York punk scene, which also included Richard Hell and Television, and centered around rough-and-tumble clubs, notably CBGB's. Punk was mostly an East-coast phenomenon in the US until the late 1970s when Los Angeles-based bands such as X and Black Flag broke through. Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 27th 141,205 km² 455 km 530 km 13. ... Richard Hell (born October 2, 1949) is the stage name of Richard Meyers, an American singer, songwriter and writer, probably best-known as frontman for the early punk band Richard Hell and the Voidoids. ... CBGB, also CBGBs or CBs is a legendary club in the Manhattan Bowery district of New York City, New York. ... Nickname: City of Angels Motto: Official website: http://www. ... X on the cover of their 1997 collection Beyond and Back: The X Anthology. ... Black Flag was a hardcore punk group formed in 1976 in southern California, largely as the brainchild of Greg Ginn, guitarist, primary songwriter and sole continuous member through multiple personnel changes. ...


In 1994, Green Day broke through the curse of being punk rockers and not being able to go mainstream, by releasing their third album, Dookie, on record label Reprise. Green Day were cast out of the underground, because they had risen to fame in the mainstream world. The popularization of punk in the 1990s led to its continued audibility in today's popular music as well as to a brief explosion of ska music in the late 1990s. Green Day is a California-based Pop punk/Punk rock band, consisting of Billie Joe Armstrong (lead vocals, guitar), Mike Dirnt (born Michael Pritchard; bass, backing vocals), and Tré Cool (born Frank Edwin Wright III; drums, backing vocals). ... Dookie is the third album by the pop-punk band Green Day. ... Green Day is a California-based Pop punk/Punk rock band, consisting of Billie Joe Armstrong (lead vocals, guitar), Mike Dirnt (born Michael Pritchard; bass, backing vocals), and Tré Cool (born Frank Edwin Wright III; drums, backing vocals). ... This page is about the musical style. ...


It was also through punk and to an extent, new wave, that Australia made its first major impacts on the global popular music scene. After Johnny O'Keefe's last major hit in 1961, Australian popular music was dominated by clean-cut family bands. Bubbling beneath the surface, however, was a group of pioneering bands like the surf band The Atlantics, but it was not until the late 1970s, with acts like acts like The Birthday Party, INXS, SPK, and Midnight Oil offering an energetic experimentalism that the country's role in pop music became manifest. 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Surf music is a genre of popular music associated with surf culture. ... The Atlantics were an Australian surf rock band in the early 1960s and arguably Australias most successful of the genre. ... The Birthday Party is the name of an acclaimed play (and later movie) written by Harold Pinter: The Birthday Party (play); and an influential post-punk band led by Nick Cave: The Birthday Party (band). ... INXS (pronounced In Excess) is an Australian rock group. ... SPK can refer to: Sozialistisches PatientenKollektiv. ... Midnight Oil was an Australian rock band known for their driving hard rock sound, intense live performances and their overt left-wing political activism. ...


New Wave

Main article: New Wave music

Punk rock attracted devotees from the art and collegiate world and soon bands sporting a more literate, arty approach, such as the Talking Heads and Devo began to infiltrate the punk scene; in some quarters the description New Wave began to be used to differentiate these less overtly punk bands. New Wave is a term that has been used to describe many developments in music, but is most commonly associated with a movement in American, Australian, British, Canadian and European popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s. ... Talking Heads. ... Devo (pronounced either DEE-vo or de-VO, sometimes spelled Dev-O and often DEVO) is an American rock music music group formed in Akron, Ohio in 1972. ... New Wave is a term that has been used to describe many developments in music, but is most commonly associated with a movement in American, Australian, British, Canadian and European popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s. ...


If punk rock was a social and musical phenomenon, it garnered little in the way of record sales (small specialty labels such as Stiff Records had released much of the punk music to date) or American radio airplay, as the radio scene continued to be dominated by mainstream formats such as disco and album-oriented rock. Record executives, who had been mostly mystified by the punk movement, recognized the potential of the more accessible New Wave acts and began aggressively signing and marketing any band that could claim a remote connection to punk or New Wave. Many of these bands, such as The Cars and The Go-Go's were essentially pop bands dressed up in New Wave regalia; others, including The Police and The Pretenders managed to parlay the boost of the New Wave movement into long-lived and artistically lauded careers. The Stiff Records record label was created in London in 1976, at the outset of the punk boom by entrepreneurs Dave Robinson and Andrew Jakeman (aka Jake Riviera). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... AOR can refer to any of the following: AOR is an abbreviation of Album Oriented Rock. ... The album cover for Heartbeat City, one of The Cars most successful and well known albums. ... The Go-Gos classic line-up, (L-R): Charlotte Caffey, Gina Shock, Belinda Carlisle, Kathy Valentine, Jane Wiedlin. ... The Police was a three-piece British new wave band which was strongly influenced by reggae. ... Pretenders album cover, 1980 The Pretenders are a British rock band known for innovative songwriting and charismatic performances. ...


Between 1982 and 1985, influenced by Kraftwerk and Gary Numan, New Wave went in the direction of such New Romantics as Duran Duran, A Flock of Seagulls, Psychedelic Furs, Talk Talk and the Eurythmics, sometimes using the synthesizer entirely in place of guitar. This period coincided with the rise of MTV and led to a great deal of exposure for this brand of synth-pop. Although many "Greatest of New Wave" collections feature popular songs from this era, New Wave more properly refers to the earlier "skinny tie" rock bands such as The Knack or Blondie. 1982 (MCMLXXXII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Album cover of Trans-Europe Express (1977). ... Gary Numan Gary Numan (born Gary Anthony James Webb on March 8, 1958) is a British singer, songwriter and electropop pioneer. ... New Romantic was a New Wave music subgenre and fashion movement that occurred primarily in the United Kingdom during the early 1980s. ... Duran Duran are an electronic pop-rock band, often classified into the aggregate 80s rock genre and notable for a long series of catchy, synthesizer-driven hit singles and vivid music videos. ... A Flock of Seagulls. ... The Psychedelic Furs are an influential English post-punk band founded in the late 1970s. ... Talk Talk was a British music group that was active from 1981 to 1991. ... Duo Annie Lennox and David Stewart in a promotional shot for their 1999 album, Peace. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Synthpop is a style of popular music in which the synthesizer is the dominant musical instrument. ... Original UK 45 rpm single picture cover The Knack - My Sharona The Knack are a Los Angeles-based rock band that rose to fame with their first single, My Sharona, in 1979 (see 1979 in music) from their debut album, Get the Knack. ... Blondie is an American rock band that first gained fame in the 1970s and early 1980s. ...


Punk and post-punk bands would continue to appear sporadically, but as a musical scene, punk had largely self-destructed and been subsumed into mainstream New Wave pop by the mid-1980s, but the influence of punk has been substantial. The grunge movement of the late 1980s owes much to punk, and many current mainstream bands claim punk rock as their stylistic heritage. Punk also bred other genres, including hardcore, industrial music, and goth. Post punk generally refers to the particularly fertile and creative period following the initial punk rock explosion. During the first wave of punk, roughly spanning 1976-1983, bands such as The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Ramones and The Damned began to challenge the current styles and conventions of rock... Grunge music (sometimes also referred to as the Seattle Sound) is a genre of alternative rock inspired by hardcore punk, heavy metal, and indie rock. ... Hardcore punk (or hardcore) is a faster and heavier version of Punk Rock usually characterized by short, loud, and often passionate songs with exceptionally fast tempos and chord changes. ... Industrial music is a loose term for a number of different styles of electronic and experimental music. ... Gothic woman, trad style, with spikes and piercings This article is about the contemporary goth/gothic subculture. ...


Rock diversifies in the 1980s

Main article: Timeline of trends in music (1980-1989)

In the 1980s, popular rock diversified. The early part of the decade saw Eddie Van Halen achieve musical innovations in rock guitar, while vocalists David Lee Roth (of Van Halen) and Freddie Mercury (of Queen) raised the role of frontman to near performance art standards. Concurrently, pop-New Wave bands remained popular, while pop-punk performers, like Billy Idol and The Go-Go's, gained fame. American heartland rock gained a strong following, exemplified by Bruce Springsteen, Bob Seger, and others. Led by the American folk singer-songwriter Paul Simon and the British former prog rock star Peter Gabriel, rock and roll fused with a variety of folk music styles from around the world; this fusion came to be known as "world music", and included fusions like Aboriginal rock. // 1980 in music International trends Post-punk artists like Joy Division (Closer) and U2 (Boy) achieve some popularity with influential releases; they are accompanied by popular punk and New Wave releases from Devo (Freedom of Choice), Talking Heads (Remain in Light), The Pretenders (Pretenders), The Clash (London Calling) and The... The 1980s decade refers to the years from 1980 to 1989, inclusive. ... Edward Lodewijk Van Halen, (born January 26, 1955 in Nijmegen, Netherlands) is a virtuoso guitarist, classically-trained pianist, and founding member of the hard rock band Van Halen. ... David Lee Roth, also known as Diamond Dave, (born October 10, 1954 in Bloomington, Indiana) is an American rock vocalist, songwriter, actor, author, and radio personality, best known for his work with the band Van Halen and his fast-talking, oversized personality. ... Freddie Mercury - Live at Wembley 1986. ... Pop punk is a term applied to a style of punk rock music, most popular in the 2000s but beginning in the late 1970s. ... Billy Idol Billy Idol (born William Michael Albert Broad on November 30, 1955 in Middlesex, England) is an English musician. ... The Go-Gos classic line-up, (L-R): Charlotte Caffey, Gina Shock, Belinda Carlisle, Kathy Valentine, Jane Wiedlin. ... In the late 1970s and 1980s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was heartland rock. ... Bruce Springsteen on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine. ... Bob Seger Robert Clark Bob Seger (born May 6, 1945 in Detroit) is an American rock musician who achieved his greatest success in the 1970s and 1980s and whose music continues to be influential today. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... Publicity still for Youre the One, released in 2000 This article is about the musician; for other Paul Simons, see Paul Simon (disambiguation). ... The progressive rock band Yes performing in 1977. ... Cover art from the album So, Gabriels biggest commercial success Peter Brian Gabriel (born February 13, 1950, in Cobham, Surrey) is an English musician. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Aboriginal rock is a rather nebulous term for a style of music which mixes traditional rock music elements (guitar, drums, bass etc) with the instrumentation of the Australian Aborigines (Didjeridu, clap-sticks etc). ...


Hard rock and hair metal

Main article: Hair metal
See also: Hard rock and Heavy metal music

Heavy metal languished in obscurity until the mid- or late 1970s. A few hard rock bands maintained large followings, like Queen, AC/DC, Led Zeppelin and Aerosmith, and there were occasional mainstream hits, like Blue Öyster Cult's "Don't Fear the Reaper". Music critics overwhelmingly hated the genre, and mainstream listeners generally avoided it because of its strangeness. However this changed in 1978 with the release of the hard rock band Van Halen's eponymous debut, which ushered in an era of widely popular, high-energy rock and roll, based out of Los Angeles, California. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Classic Metal. ... Hard rock is a form of rock and roll music which finds its closest roots in early 1960s garage rock. ... Heavy metal, sometimes referred to as simply metal, is a form of music characterised by aggressive, driving rhythms and highly amplified distorted guitars. ... This article may contain original research or unverified claims. ... AC/DC is an Australian hard rock band. ... Led Zeppelin was a British rock band that became one of the most popular and influential musical ensembles ever. ... Aerosmith is the preeminent American rock band. ... Blue Öyster Cult is a psychedelic/heavy metal band probably best known for two songs: their 1976 single (Dont Fear) The Reaper from the album Agents of Fortune, and their 1981 single Burnin for You from the album Fire of Unknown Origin. ... Link title 1978 (MCMLXXVIII in Roman) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... Hard rock is a form of rock and roll music which finds its closest roots in early 1960s garage rock. ... Van Halen is an American rock band formed in the early-1970s and discovered by KISS bassist and co-founder Gene Simmons. ... Van Halen is the self-titled debut album by American hard rock band Van Halen, released in 1978 (see 1978 in music). ... Nickname: City of Angels Motto: Official website: http://www. ...


While bands like Van Halen and Metallica innovated in the genre, and the New Wave of British Heavy Metal found fans, a group of musicians formulated what later became known as hair metal. Taking cues from Van Halen, but without their humor, Mötley Crüe, Bon Jovi, and Ratt are often regarded as the first hair metal bands to gain popularity. They became known for their debauched lifestyles, teased hair, feminized use of make-up, clothing (usually spandex,) and over-the-top posturing. Their songs were bombastic, aggressive, and often defiantly macho, with lyrics focused on sex, drinking, drugs, and the occult. After Def Leppard's wildly popular Pyromania, and Van Halen's seminal 1984, hair metal became ubiquitous. Many hair metal bands became one-hit wonders, or as David Lee Roth once said of them, "here today, gone later today," (for example, Winger and Slaughter.) Metallica is an American heavy metal band formed in October 1981. ... // NWOBHM Beginnings The New Wave of British Heavy Metal (NWOBHM) emerged in the late 1970s, in part a reaction to the decline of traditional heavy metal bands such as Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple and Black Sabbath. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Classic Metal. ... Mötley Crüe (pronounced as mott-ley crew) is an American heavy metal/Glam Metal band whose members include Nikki Sixx, Tommy Lee, Mick Mars, and Vince Neil. ... Bon Jovi is a Rock and Roll band from New Jersey that has sold more than 32 million albums in the U.S. alone during the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s,while over 100,000,000 albums worldwide, and played live concerts in major cities in Asia, Europe, Australia, Canada and... Ratt, on the cover of their 1999 CD. Jizzy Pearl with Ratt (2005) Ratt is a U.S. Los Angeles hard rock band that enjoyed significant commercial success in the 1980s. ... Spandex or elastane is a synthetic fiber known for its exceptional elasticity (stretchability). ... Def Leppard are a British rock band from Sheffield, England, that formed in 1977 as part of the New Wave of British Heavy Metal. ... For the album by Def Leppard, see Pyromania (album) Pyromania is an obsession with fire and starting fires, in an intentional fashion, usually on multiple occasions. ... 1984 is the title of several albums: 1984, released by British keyboardist Rick Wakeman in 1981. ... In the music industry, a one-hit wonder is an artist who is generally known for only one hit single. ... Winger is a hair metal band formed in 1986 by Kip Winger, formerly of Alice Coopers band, in which Winger members Reb Beach and Paul Taylor have also played. ... Slaughter may refer to: result of slaughtering, see slaughterhouse a music group Slaughter Jimmy Ray Slaughter awaiting execution in Oklahoma amidst brain fingerprinting controversy This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


By the middle of the 1980s, a formula developed in which a hair metal band had two hits -- one a soft ballad, and the other a hard-rocking anthem. The original line-up of Van Halen broke up in 1985, creating something of a quality vacuum in the genre; however, in 1987, Guns N' Roses released Appetite for Destruction, which became phenomenally successful. Until hair metal's demise in the early-1990s, Guns N' Roses were hard rock's standard-bearers, and influenced its sound by incorporating influences from punk rock, and thrash metal. This article is about the year. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Guns n Roses (GNR) are an American hard rock band. ... Appetite for Destruction was rock and roll band Guns N Roses breakthrough album. ... The 1990s decade refers to the years from 1990 to 1999, inclusive, the last decade of the 20th Century. ... Thrash metal is a subgenre of heavy metal music. ...


Birth of Chinese rock

Main article: Chinese rock

Beginning about 1986, the Northwest Wind (xibeifeng, ???) style of rock began to enter the burgeoning youth culture in China. The first Chinese rock song may be "I Have Nothing" by Cui Jian, now the widely-admired godfather of the Chinese rock scene. Spurred by pro-democracy activism, such as at Tiananmen Square, and by governmental repression, rock flourished in the Chinese counterculture. Of especial popularity later in the decade were melancholy tunes called prison songs. By 1990, Chinese rock had begun to enter the mainstream, but almost immediately incorporated sounds and styles from the Cantopop style. Though alternative bands remained, Chinese rock became subverted, often by bands working in cohesion with the Chinese government and in favor of the status quo; many of rock's fans in China became disillusioned as a result, leading to a general decline in popularity later in the decade. Chinese rock (中国摇滚, pinyin: Zhōngguó yáogÇ”n; also 中国摇滚音乐, Zhōngguó yáogÇ”n yÄ«nyuè, lit. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cui Jian (崔健, Pinyin: CuÄ« Jiàn) (born August 2, 1961) is a native Beijinger, trumpet player, guitarist and composer. ... Tiananmen Square (Simplified Chinese: 天安门广场; Traditional Chinese: 天安門廣場; Hanyu Pinyin: ) is the large plaza near the center of Beijing, China, named for the Tiananmen (literally, Gate of Heavenly Peace) which sits to its north, separating it from the Forbidden City. ... This article is about the year. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Alternative music and the indie movement

Main article: Alternative rock

The term alternative music (also often known as alternative rock) was coined in the early 1980s to describe bands which didn't fit into the mainstream genres of the time. Bands dubbed "alternative" could be most any style not typically heard on the radio; however, most alternative bands were unified by their collective debt to punk. Important bands of the '80s alternative movement included R.E.M., Sonic Youth, The Smiths, Pixies, Husker Du, The Cure, and countless others. Artists largely were confined to indie record labels, building an extensive underground music scene based around college radio, fanzines, touring, and word-of-mouth. Although these groups never generated spectacular album sales, they exerted a considerable influence on the generation of musicians who came of age in the 80s and ended up breaking through to mainstream success in the 1990s. Notable styles of alternative rock during the 80s include jangle pop, gothic rock, college rock, and indie rock. The next decade would see the success of grunge in the US and Britpop in the UK, bringing alternative rock into the mainstream. The terms alternative rock and alternative music were coined in the early 1980s to describe punk rock-inspired music genres which didnt fit into the mainstream genres of the time. ... The terms alternative rock and alternative music were coined in the early 1980s to describe punk rock-inspired music genres which didnt fit into the mainstream genres of the time. ... The 1980s decade refers to the years from 1980 to 1989, inclusive. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... R.E.M. is an alternative rock band formed in Athens, Georgia in early 1980 by drummer Bill Berry, guitarist Peter Buck, bassist Mike Mills, and vocalist Michael Stipe. ... Sonic Youth is a rock group formed in New York City in 1981. ... The Smiths were a British rock group active from 1982 to 1987. ... Pixies are an alternative rock music group. ... Hüsker Dü was an influential hardcore punk trio from Minnneapolis/St. ... The Cure is a British band widely seen as one of the leading pioneers of the British alternative rock and post-punk scenes of the 1980s. ... In popular music, indie music (from independent) is any of a number of genres, scenes, subcultures and stylistic and cultural attributes, characterised by (real or perceived) independence from commercial pop music and mainstream culture and an autonomous, do-it-yourself (DIY) approach. ... College radio (also known as university radio, campus radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college or university. ... Jangle pop was an American musical genre that arose in the middle of the 1960s, combining angular, chiming guitars and power pop structures. ... Gothic rock evolved out of post-punk during the late 1970s. ... In the USA, college rock was a term used to describe 1980s alternative rock before the term alternative came into common usage. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Grunge music (sometimes also referred to as the Seattle Sound) is a genre of alternative rock inspired by hardcore punk, heavy metal, and indie rock. ... Britpop was a British alternative rock movement from the mid 1990s, characterised by the appearance of bands who were influenced by British guitar pop music of the 1960s and 1970s. ...


Alternative goes mainstream (the 1990s)

Grunge and the anti-corporate rock movement

Main article: Grunge music

By the late 1980s rock radio was dominated by aging rock artists, slick commercial pop-rock, and hair metal; MTV had arrived and brought with it a perception that style was more important than substance. Any remaining traces of rock and roll rebelliousness or the punk ethic seemed to have been subsumed into corporate-sponsored and mass-marketed musical product. Disaffected by this trend, some young musicians began to reject the polished, glamor-oriented posturing of hair metal, and created crude, sometimes angry music. The American Pacific Northwest region, especially Seattle, became a hotbed of this style, dubbed grunge. Grunge music (sometimes also referred to as the Seattle Sound) is a genre of alternative rock inspired by hardcore punk, heavy metal, and indie rock. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Darker red states are always part of the Pacific Northwest. ... This article is about the city. ...


Early grunge bands, particularly Alice in Chains and Soundgarden, took much of their sound from early heavy metal and much of their approach from punk, though they eschewed punk's ambitions towards political and social commentary to proceed in a more nihilistic direction. Grunge remained a mostly local phenomenon until the breakthrough of Nirvana in 1991 with their album Nevermind. A slightly more melodic, more completely produced variation on their predecessors, Nirvana was an instant sensation worldwide and made much of the competing music seem stale and dated by comparison, after Guns N' Roses' bombastic 1991 double-album Use Your Illusion I and II hair metal faded almost completely from the mainstream. Alice in Chains was an influential grunge group formed by lead singer Layne Staley (1967-2002) in the mid-1980s as Alice N Chains before the spelling of the name was changed. ... Soundgarden was a seminal Seattle rock band who helped to define the sound that came to be called grunge. ... This article is about the grunge band Nirvana. ... Look up right in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Nevermind is the second studio album from the American grunge band, Nirvana. ... Guns n Roses (GNR) are an American hard rock band. ... 1991 (MCMXCI in Roman) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Nirvana whetted the public's appetite for more direct, less polished rock music, leading to the success of bands like Pearl Jam and Soundgarden who took a somewhat more traditional rock approach than other grunge bands but shared their passion and rawness. Pearl Jam were a major commercial success from their debut but, beginning with their second album, refused to buy in to the corporate promotion and marketing mechanisms of MTV and Ticketmaster, with whom they famously engaged in legal skirmishes over ticket service fees. Pearl Jam is a Seattle, Washington based rock band which is considered to be one of the most popular and influential artists of the 1990s. ... Soundgarden was a seminal Seattle rock band who helped to define the sound that came to be called grunge. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ticketmaster is the worlds largest seller of event tickets. ...


While grunge itself can be seen as somewhat limited in range, its influence was felt across many geographic and musical boundaries; many artists who were similarly disaffected with commercial rock music suddenly found record companies and audiences willing to listen, and dozens of disparate acts positioned themselves as alternatives to mainstream music; thus alternative rock emerged from the underground. The terms alternative rock and alternative music were coined in the early 1980s to describe punk rock-inspired music genres which didnt fit into the mainstream genres of the time. ...


Britpop

Main article: Britpop

While America was full of grunge, post-grunge, and hip hop, Britain launched a 1960s revival in the mid-90s, often called Britpop, with bands like Oasis, the Verve, Radiohead, Pulp and Blur. These bands drew on myriad styles from the 80s British rock underground, including twee pop, shoegazing and space rock as well as traditional British guitar influences like the Beatles and glam rock. For a time, the Oasis-Blur rivalry was similar to the Beatles-Rolling Stones rivalry. While bands like Blur tended to follow on from the Small Faces and The Kinks, Oasis mixed the attitude of the Rolling Stones with the melody of the Beatles. The Verve and Radiohead took inspiration from performers like Elvis Costello, Pink Floyd and R.E.M. with their progressive rock music, manifested in Radiohead's most famous album, OK Computer. These bands became very successful, and for a time Oasis was given the title "the biggest band in the world" thanks to an album selling some 14 million copies worldwide but slowed down after band breakups, publicity disasters in the United States and slightly less popular support. The Verve disbanded after on-going turmoil in the band, but on the other hand Radiohead threw themselves into electronic experimentation in their latest records and have stood the test of time in both the U.K and the USA as a major act. Britpop was a British alternative rock movement from the mid 1990s, characterised by the appearance of bands who were influenced by British guitar pop music of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Britpop was a British alternative rock movement from the mid 1990s, characterised by the appearance of bands who were influenced by British guitar pop music of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Oasis are a British rock group originally formed in Manchester. ... The Verve were a English rock and roll band of the 1990s, originally formed in Wigan, England in 1989 by vocalist Richard Ashcroft, guitarist Nick McCabe, bassist Simon Jones and drummer Peter Salisbury. ... Radiohead are a British alternative rock band from Oxford and nearby Abingdon. ... Pulp are a British Britpop band, formed in Sheffield, England, in 1978 by then 15-year-old school-boy Jarvis Cocker (vocals, guitar). ... Blur is the name of a British rock band. ... Twee (or Twee pop) is a type of indie rock that is known for simple, sweet melodies and lyrics, often with jangling guitars. ... Shoegazing is a style of music that emerged in the UK in the late 1980s. ... For space rocks, see asteroid. ... Declan Patrick Aloysius MacManus, aka Elvis Costello. ... Pink Floyd (formed in 1965 in Cambridge, England) is an English rock band, noted for their progressive compositions, philosophic lyrics, sonic experimentation, cover art and elaborate live shows. ... R.E.M. is an alternative rock band formed in Athens, Georgia in early 1980 by drummer Bill Berry, guitarist Peter Buck, bassist Mike Mills, and vocalist Michael Stipe. ... OK Computer is the third album by British rock band Radiohead. ...


Indie rock

Main article: Indie rock

Alternative music and the rebellious, DIY ethic it espoused became the inspiration for grunge, the popularity of which, paradoxically, took alternative rock into the mainstream. By the mid-90s, the term "alternative music" had lost much of its original meaning as rock radio and record buyers embraced increasingly slick, commercialized, and highly marketed forms of the genre. At the end of the decade, hip hop music had pushed much of alternative rock out of the mainstream, and most of what was left played pop-punk and highly polished versions of a grunge/rock mishmash. Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... The DIY punk ethic refers to the idea of doing it yourself, i. ... Hip hop music (also referred to as rap or rap music) is a style of popular music. ... Pop punk is a term applied to a style of punk rock music, most popular in the 2000s but beginning in the late 1970s. ...


Many acts who, by choice or fate, remained outside the commercial mainstream, became part of the indie rock movement. Indie rock acts placed a premium on maintaining complete control of their music and careers, often releasing albums on their own independent record labels and relying on touring, word-of-mouth, and airplay on independent or college radio stations for promotion. Linked by an ethos more than a musical approach, the indie rock movement encompasses a wide range of styles, from hard-edged, grunge influenced bands like Superchunk to punk-folk singers such as Ani DiFranco. Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Superchunk. ... Ani DiFranco Ani DiFranco (IPA: É‘-ni) (born Angela Marie Difranco on September 23, 1970) is a singer, guitarist, and songwriter. ...


Currently, many countries have an extensive local Indie scene, flourishing with bands with much less popularity than commercial bands, just enough of it to survive inside the respective country, but virtually unknown outside them.


Stoner rock

Main article: Stoner rock

With some influences of Rsychedelic Rock and riff orientated structure of early Heavy Metal, stoner rock emerged in the late 1980s. Bands such as the Melvins, Kyuss, Fu Manchu, Nebula and Queens of the Stone Age. Characterised by sludgey sounding, heavily distorted amps and detuned guitars, stoner rock tries to simulate the experience of an LSD trip or smoking marijuana. Many stoner rock bands can often play one song for up to 20 minutes with incredible variation in emotion, speed and genre. Stoner Metal and Sludge Metal are often used interchangeably, but some fans make distinctions: Sludge metal has more similarities with grindcore and hardcore punk. ... Melvins are an American rock music band and usually play as a trio. ... Kyuss (pronounce: KIGH-us; original name was Sons of Kyuss until the release of their first album) was an influential stoner rock band, originally from Palm Desert, California. ... This article is about the fictional literature character. ... The Triangulum Emission Nebula NGC 604 lies in a spiral arm of Galaxy M33, 2. ... Queens of the Stone Age (QOTSA) is a rock music band from the Palm Desert, California area in the United States, formed in 1997. ... For other uses, see LSD (disambiguation). ...


Stoner rock remains the cornerstone of the independent recording industry, with few mainstream exceptions. Most notably Josh Homme who was the songwriter for both Kyuss and Queens of the Stone Age. Joshua (Josh) Homme (born May 17, 1973) is a United States musician from Palm Desert, California. ... Kyuss (pronounce: KIGH-us; original name was Sons of Kyuss until the release of their first album) was an influential stoner rock band, originally from Palm Desert, California. ...


Post-grunge and pop punk (1995-2000)

With the death of Kurt Cobain, rock and roll music searched for a new face, sound, and trend. A second wave of alternative rock bands began to become popular, with grunge declining in the mid-90s. The Foo Fighters, Green Day, Radiohead, and Creed spearheaded rock radio, and 311 and Rage Against the Machine brought a fresh rap/rock hybrid sound. In 1995, a Canadian pop star Alanis Morissette arose, and released Jagged Little Pill, a major hit that featured blunt, personally-revealing lyrics. It succeeded in moving the introspection that had become so common in grunge to the mainstream. The success of Jagged Little Pill spawned a wave of popularity in the late 90s of confessional rock releases by female artists including Jewel, Tori Amos, Fiona Apple, and Liz Phair. Many of these artists drew on their own alternative rock heroes from the 1980s and early 90s, including the folksy Tracy Chapman and various Riot Grrl bands. The use of introspective lyrics bled into other styles of rock, including those dubbed alternative. Kurt Cobain Kurt Donald Cobain (February 20, 1967 – ca. ... Foo Fighters are a rock group formed by musician Dave Grohl in 1995. ... Green Day is a California-based Pop punk/Punk rock band, consisting of Billie Joe Armstrong (lead vocals, guitar), Mike Dirnt (born Michael Pritchard; bass, backing vocals), and Tré Cool (born Frank Edwin Wright III; drums, backing vocals). ... Radiohead are a British alternative rock band from Oxford and nearby Abingdon. ... A creed is a statement of belief—usually religious belief—or faith. ... 311 (pronounced three eleven) is a band that formed in late 1988 in Omaha, Nebraska as a rapcore/punk rock/reggae group. ... Rage Against the Machine, also known as Rage or RATM, was an American rock band noted both for their dilligent political conscience and for their pioneering blend of rock music and rap music which over time would come to be known variously as Rock, Rap Rock or Rap Metal (Both... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Jagged Little Pill was Canadian singer/songwriter Alanis Morissettes third album, released on June 13, 1995 (see 1995 in music). ... Jewel performing in Central Park Jewel Kilcher (born May 23, 1974 in Payson, Utah) is a singer-songwriter, actress, philanthropist, and author, better known by her first name, Jewel. ... -1... Fiona Apple (born September 13, 1977) is an American singer-songwriter. ... Liz Phair (born April 17, 1967) is an American singer/songwriter and guitarist. ... Tracy Chapman on the cover of her self-titled album Tracy Chapman (born March 30, 1964) is an African American singer-songwriter, best known for classic singles Fast Car, Talkin Bout a Revolution, and Give Me One Reason. ... Riot grrl (also frequently spelled riot grrrl) is a form of hardcore punk rock music, known for its militant feminist stance. ...


The late 1990s brought about a wave of mergers and consolidations among US media companies and radio stations such as the Clear Channel Communications conglomerate. This has resulted in a homogenization of music available. Bands like blink-182 and Green Day defined pop punk at the end of the 90s. At this time, "nu metal" began to take popular form, it contained a mix of grunge, metal, and hip-hop. Using downtuned 7 string guitars, KoRn first created their heavy crushing riffs in 1994 with their first self-titled album. This then helped spawn a wave of nu metal bands such as Linkin Park, Slipknot, Static-X, Disturbed, and Limp Bizkit. This article is about the company. ... blink-182 was a Southern-Californian pop punk band that was formed in 1992 by Tom DeLonge, Mark Hoppus, and Scott Raynor in the northern San Diego suburb of Poway, California. ... Green Day is a California-based Pop punk/Punk rock band, consisting of Billie Joe Armstrong (lead vocals, guitar), Mike Dirnt (born Michael Pritchard; bass, backing vocals), and Tré Cool (born Frank Edwin Wright III; drums, backing vocals). ... Nu metal (or aggro metal) is a subgenre of heavy metal music. ... Linkin Park is a nu metal/rapcore band from Los Angeles, California, currently signed to Warner Brothers Records. ... Slipknot can refer to several things: Slip knot, a kind of knot. ... Static-X current line-up. ... Lead singer, David Draiman singing at a concert in New Jersey. ... Limp Bizkit is an American rapcore band who, with KoЯn, is often credited with the popularization of the genre sometimes dubbed nu metal. ...


Present day (2000-Present)

In the early 2000s the entire music industry was shaken by claims of massive theft of music rights using file-sharing tools such as Napster, resulting in lawsuits against private file-sharers by the recording industry group the RIAA. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Second version (revised 2001) of Napster logo: Cat wearing headphones. ... The RIAA Logo. ...


After existing in the musical underground, garage rock saw a resurgence of popularity in the early 2000s, with bands like The White Stripes, The Strokes, Jet, The Vines, and The Hives all releasing successful singles and albums. This wave is often referred to as back-to-basics rock because of its raw sound. Currently popular rock trends include pop-punk, often times wrongly referred to as emo which draws its style from softer punk and alternative rock styles from the 1980s. Many new bands have become well-known since 2001, including Jimmy Eat World, Hawthorne Heights, Dashboard Confessional and Taking Back Sunday; however, this subgenre has come to be frequently maligned by many rock enthusiasts. Additionally, the retro trend has led to the revitalization of dance-rock. Bands like Franz Ferdinand, Hot Hot Heat, The Killers and The Bravery mix post-punk sensibilities with electronic beats. The most recent pop-rock successes have been acts such as Fall Out Boy, Relient K, Simple Plan, and Good Charlotte. This article is about the year 2000. ... The White Stripes are a minimalist rock/country/blues duo from Detroit, composed of Jack White on guitar and lead vocals, and Meg White on drums. ... The Strokes are an American rock band that rose to fame in the early 2000s. ... Cover art for Jets album, Get Born. ... The Vines are an Australian garage rock band that emerged along with a new breed of alternative rockers such as The Strokes, The Hives and The White Stripes in 2002. ... The Hives, from L to R: Dr. Matt Destruction, Nicolaus Arson, Howlin Pelle Almqvist, Chris Dangerous, Vigilante Carlstroem The Hives are a garage rock or (more accurately) garage punk band from Fagersta, Sweden that emerged in the US and the UK in the early 2000s. ... Pop punk is a term applied to a style of punk rock music, most popular in the 2000s but beginning in the late 1970s. ... This article deals with the genre of music. ... Jimmy Eat World is an American rock group from Mesa, Arizona, formed in 1993. ... Hawthorne Heights is a melodic/post hardcore band that formed in Dayton, Ohio in June of 2001. ... Dashboard Confessional is an American acoustic/electric guitar driven emo outfit, led by singer-songwriter and guitarist Chris Carrabba from Boca Raton, Florida. ... Taking Back Sunday is a band from Amityville, Long Island and signed to Warner Bros. ... Franz Ferdinand is a British art rock band from Glasgow. ... Hot Hot Heat is a Synth pop/Dance-punk rock band from Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. ... The Killers are a 21st century synth rock band from Las Vegas, Nevada, who formed in 2002. ... The Bravery is an American indie/alternative rock band from New York City that consists of Sam Endicott (vocals/guitar), John Conway (keyboards), Anthony Burulcich (drums), Michael Zakarin (guitar), and Mike Hindirt (bass). ... Fall Out Boy is a band from the suburbs of Chicago, Illinois that formed in 2000. ... Relient K is a Christian pop-punk band that was formed in 1998 in Canton, Ohio. ... Simple Plan is a pop-punk band that formed in 1999 in Quebec, Canada. ... Good Charlotte is a pop rock band from Maryland that formed in 1996. ...


The biggest factor that has contributed to the resurgence of rock music is the rise of paid digital downloads in the 2000s. During the 90s, the importance of the buyable music single faded when Billboard allowed singles without buyable, album-separate versions to enter its Hot 100 chart (charting only with radio airplay). The vast majority of songs bought on paid download sites are singles bought from their albums; songs that are bought on a song-by-song basis off artist's albums are considered sales of singles, even though they have no official buyable single. Digital Downloads are official legally-released music singles released by artists to the public. ... 2000s - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Alternate meanings: Single In music, a single is a short (usually ten minutes or less) record, usually featuring one or two tracks as A-sides, often accompanied by several B-sides—usually remixes or other songs. ... An example of a Billboard Magazine. ... The Billboard Hot 100 is the United States music industry standard singles popularity chart issued weekly by Billboard magazine. ...


Meanwhile, "Top 40" music today is dependent on either synthesizer orchestration or sampling, prominent in such pop artists like Gwen Stefani, Ashlee Simpson, Hilary Duff, Lindsay Lohan, Jessica Simpson, and Kelly Clarkson. Gwen Renée Stefani (born October 3, 1969) is an American singer and actress, and is the frontwoman of the ska/rock band No Doubt. ... IM A FUCKING BITCH !!!!! IM THINK IM BAD ASS AND PUNK BUT IM JUST FAKE A POSER!!!THATS WHAT I AM!!!! Simpson rose to prominence in mid-2004 through the success of her number-one debut album Autobiography and the accompanying reality series The Ashlee Simpson Show. ... Hilary Erhard[1] Duff (born September 28, 1987) is an American actress and singer. ... Lindsay Dee Lohan[1] (born 2 July 1986) is an American actress and pop music singer. ... Jessica Ann Simpson (born July 10, 1980) is an American pop music singer who rose to fame during the late 1990s. ... Kelly Brianne Clarkson (born April 24, 1982) is an American Grammy Award-winning singer, songwriter, and occasional actress who rose to prominence after winning the first season of the reality-television series American Idol in 2002. ...


Rap/hip hop music dominates the U.S. charts pop charts, with artists like 50 cent, Snoop Dogg, Kanye West, Nelly, Eminem and Jay Z selling millions of records since the turn of the millennium. R&B acts like Mariah Carey , Usher and Alicia Keys are very popular on the pop charts, although none of these acts, rap or R&B, sell as many albums as rock did. Nearly all the best selling albums of all time are still rock. Hip hop music (also referred to as rap or rap music) is a style of popular music. ... Curtis James Jackson III (born July 6, 1975), known commonly as Snitch BooBoo death of hiphop 40 Cent (pronounced fordy-cent as one word, he is also known as 40 cent because he dropped a dime), is a popular African-American rapper who rose to fame following the success of... Snoop Dogg performing in Hawaii for U.S. military personnel Snoop Dogg (real name: Cordozar Calvin Broadus Jr. ... Kanye West (first name pronounced /kahn/yay/) (born Kanye Omari West, June 8, 1977 in Atlanta, Georgia) is an American hip hop producer and rapper from Chicago, Illinois. ... Cornell Haynes Jr. ... For information about the free improvisation record label, see Emanem Records Eminem, (born Marshall Bruce Mathers III on October 17, 1972), a Grammy and Oscar-winner, is one of todays most popular and controversial rappers. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Mariah Carey (born March 27, 1970) is an American R&B and pop singer, songwriter, record producer and occasional actress of the 1990s and 2000s. ... Usher Raymond IV, known commonly as Usher, born on October 14, 1978 in Chattanooga, Tennessee, United States) is an American singer, dancer, songwriter and actor. ... This article needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ...


In The UK, Rock figures much more prominently in album sales than in the US. Rap and Hip Hop, although popular in the UK are not as dominant as in the USA. American Bands such as The White Stripes, and The Strokes have more sucess in the UK than in the USA, and British bands such as The Libertines, Franz Ferdinand, Coldplay, Oasis, and Arctic Monkeys are still the UK's biggest selling artists, and emo has little to no popularity in the UK. The White Stripes are a minimalist rock/country/blues duo from Detroit, composed of Jack White on guitar and lead vocals, and Meg White on drums. ... The Strokes are an American rock band that rose to fame in the early 2000s. ... The Libertines in concert, 2004 The Libertines were a critically acclaimed British rock and roll band noted for their chaotic live outings, often seemingly ramshackle touring schedule and quintessentially English take on punk rock. ... Franz Ferdinand is a British art rock band from Glasgow. ... Coldplay is a post-Britpop/alternative rock band from London, England well known for their rock melodies and introspective lyrics. ... Oasis are a British rock group originally formed in Manchester. ... Arctic Monkeys are a four-piece indie rock band from High Green, a suburb of Sheffield, England. ...


Social impacts

Main article: Social impact of rock and roll

The influence of rock and roll is far-reaching, and has had significant impact worldwide on fashion, film styles, and attitudes towards sex and sexuality and use of drugs and alcohol. This impact is broad enough that "rock and roll" may also be considered a life style in addition to a form of music. The massive popularity and worldwide scope of rock and roll resulted in an unprecedented level of social impact. ...


Trivia

  • The first record released in Britain to feature the words Rock and Roll was "Bloodnock's Rock And Roll Call", a 1956 record from The Goon Show.
  • There have been many songs with the title "Rock and Roll" from The Treniers in the 1950s to Led Zeppelin, The Velvet Underground, and Gary Glitter in the 1970s. However, Trixie Smith is possibly the first artist to incorporate the words in the 1922 record "My Baby Rocks with One Steady Roll".

1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... DVD of The Last Goon Show of All, aired by the BBC in 1972. ... The Treniers (Cliff and Claude Trenier) played a cross between swing and early rock n roll. ... Led Zeppelin was a British rock band that became one of the most popular and influential musical ensembles ever. ... The Velvet Underground (sometimes abbreviated as The Velvets or V.U.) were an American rock band which was first active from 1965 to 1973. ... Gary Glitter in London 2000. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Rock and roll | Rock genres

Aboriginal rock | Alternative rock | Anatolian rock | Art rock | Avant-rock | Blues-rock | Boogaloo | Cello rock | Chicano rock | Christian rock | Country rock | Desert rock | Detroit rock | Dialect rock | Emo | Flamenco-rock | Folk-rock | Garage rock | Girl group | Glam rock | Hard rock | Hardcore | Heartland rock | Heavy metal | Indo-rock | Instrumental rock | Jam band | Jangle pop | Madchester | Math rock | Merseybeat | Piano rock | Post-rock | Power pop | Progressive rock | Psychedelia | Pub rock (Aussie) | Pub rock (UK) | Punk rock | Punta rock | Raga rock | Raï rock | Rock en Español | Rockabilly | Rockoson | Samba-rock | Skiffle | Soft rock | Southern rock | Surf | Symphonic rock | Tango rockero Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... Wikiquote logo Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... This is a list of music genres derived from rock and roll Alternative rock Aquabeat Arena rock Art-Metal Art-Pop Art-Punk Avant-rock Avant-progressive rock Blues-rock British Blues Rock British Invasion Bubblegum Rock Cello rock Celtic rock Christian rock Classic rock Comedy rock Country rock Death... Aboriginal rock is a rather nebulous term for a style of music which mixes traditional rock music elements (guitar, drums, bass etc) with the instrumentation of the Australian Aborigines (Didjeridu, clap-sticks etc). ... The terms alternative rock and alternative music were coined in the early 1980s to describe punk rock-inspired music genres which didnt fit into the mainstream genres of the time. ... The Turkish rock scene began in the mid- to late 1960s, when popular United States and United Kingdom bands became well-known. ... Art rock is a sub-genre of rock music that is characterized by ambitious lyrical themes and melodic or rhythmic experimentation, often extending beyond standard pop song forms and toward influences in jazz, classical, or the avant-garde. ... see Experimental Rock ... Blues Rock or Blues-rock is a fusion genre of music which combines elements of the blues with rock and roll. ... Boogaloo (shing-a-ling, popcorn music) is a genre of Latin music and dance that was very popular in the United States in the late 1960s. ... Cello rock is a genre of music characterized by the use of cellos and other stringed instruments such as violin and viola to create a sound, beat, and texture similar to that of familiar rock music, but distinctly reshaped by the unique timbres and more traditional genres of the cello... Chicano Rock Music is rock music performed by Mexican American groups or music with themes derived from Chicano culture. ... Christian rock is a form of rock music played by bands where the musicians are openly Christian. ... Country rock is a musical genre formed from the fusion of rock and roll with country music. ... Desert Rock is a term given to several bands that hail from the California desert. ... Detroit rock is the name for a style of Australian indie rock, particularly popular in Sydney in the 1980s. ... Dialect rock - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... This article deals with the genre of music. ... New Flamenco (Nuevo Flamenco) is the name for a Flamenco music style, which is influenced by many different modern musical genres. ... Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Garage rock (performed by garage bands, not to be confused with UK Garage dance music) was a simple, raw form of rock and roll that emerged in the mid-1960s, largely in the United States. ... A girl group, as the name implies, is a musical group featuring a group of young female singers, singing usually pop and R&B songs. ... Glam rock (less commonly, and mostly in the US, known as glitter rock), was a style of rock music popularised in the early 1970s. ... Hard rock is a form of rock and roll music which finds its closest roots in early 1960s garage rock. ... Hardcore punk (or hardcore) is a faster and heavier version of Punk Rock usually characterized by short, loud, and often passionate songs with exceptionally fast tempos and chord changes. ... In the late 1970s and 1980s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was heartland rock. ... Heavy metal, sometimes referred to as simply metal, is a form of music characterised by aggressive, driving rhythms and highly amplified distorted guitars. ... Indie rock is rock music that falls within the indie music description. ... Instrumental rock is a type of rock and roll which features only musical instruments, and no singing. ... The term jam band is commonly used to describe psychedelic rock-influenced bands whose concerts largely consist of bands reinterpreting their songs as springboards into extended improvisational pieces of music. ... Jangle pop was an American musical genre that arose in the middle of the 1960s, combining angular, chiming guitars and power pop structures. ... An NME original issue covering the Madchester movement. ... Math rock is a style of rock music that emerged in the late 1980s. ... For the TV program please see Merseybeat Merseybeat, sometimes referred to as Merseysound, was a style of music popular during the 1960s. ... Piano rock, sometimes referred to as piano pop, is a term for a style of music that is based around the piano, and sometimes around piano-related instruments, such as the Fender Rhodes, the Wurlitzer electric piano, and keyboard-based synthesizers. ... The term post-rock was coined by Simon Reynolds in issue 123 of The Wire (May 1994) to describe a sort of music using rock instrumentation for non-rock purposes, using guitars as facilitators of timbres and textures rather than riffs and powerchords. ... Power pop is a long-standing musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop music. ... ... Psychedelic music is a musical genre inspired by or attempting to replicate the mind-altering experience of drugs such as cannabis, psilocybin, mescaline, and especially LSD. It is not rigorously defined, and is sometimes interpreted to include everything from Acid Rock and Flower Power music to Hard Rock. ... Pub rock is a style of Australian rock and roll popular throughout the 1970s and 1980s and still influencing contemporary Australian music today. ... Pub rock was a mid- to late-1970s musical movement, largely centred around North London and South East Essex, particularly Canvey Island and Southend on Sea. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Punta rock is a form of the traditional punta rhythm of the Garifuna people of Central America. ... Raga rock was a term used in the 1960s to describe rock and roll records with Indian musical influences, especially—but not exclusively—those using the sitar, tabla, and other Eastern instrumentation. ... Raï (Arabic: راي) is a form of folk music, originated in Oran, Algeria from Bedouin shepherds, mixed with Spanish, French, African-American and Arabic musical forms, which dates back to the 1930s and has been evolved by women mainly. ... Rock en español is the latest generation of Spanish language rock and roll. ... Rockabilly is the earliest form of rock and roll as a distinct style of music. ... A form of Cuban music made with elements of timba, nueva trova and rock and roll made since the late 1980s by groups like Vanito y La Lucha Almada and Habana Abierta. ... Samba-rock - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Skiffle music is a type of folk music with a jazz and blues influence, usually using homemade or improvised instruments such as the washboard, tea-chest bass, kazoo, cigar-box fiddle, or a comb and paper, and so forth. ... Soft rock, also referred to as lite rock, easy rock, and formally mellow rock, is a style of music which uses the techniques of rock and roll to compose a softer, supposedly more ear-pleasing sound for listening, often at work. ... Southern rock is a style of rock music that was very popular in the 1970s, and retains a fan base to the present. ... In the early 1960s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was surf rock. ... Symphonic rock is a style of rock music that incorporates elements from classical music. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
rock music. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05 (1583 words)
Essentially hybrid in origin, rock music includes elements of several fl and white American music styles: fl guitar-accompanied blues; fl rhythm and blues, noted for saxophone solos; fl and white gospel music; white country and western music; and the songs of white popular crooners and harmony groups.
Rock music again surged to popularity in 1962 with the emergence of the Beatles, a group of four long-haired lads from Liverpool, England.
A turning point in rock music occurred in the mid-1970s in the form of punk rock, which was a response to the stagnation of the genre and a nihilistic political statement.
Museum of Rock music (2745 words)
Rock generally is used to refer to any popular rock music recorded since the early 60's.
Indie rock is a sub genre of rock music which is often used to refer to bands that are on small independent or "rock" record labels or who aren't on labels at all.
Alternative music was a phrase invented in early 80s describing bands which broke from the barrage of pop and hair metal and formed a new direction of more focused and honest rock.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m