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Encyclopedia > Rock 'n' roll
Rock and roll - Wikipedia

Rock and roll

From Wikipedia

Rock and roll (also spelled rock 'n' roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. As a cultural phenomenon, rock's social impact on the world is likely unparalleled by any other kind of music. It has been credited with ending wars and spreading peace and tolerance, as well as corrupting the innocent and spreading moral rot. Rock, born in the United States, has become popular across the globe, and has evolved into a multitude of highly-varying styles. Popular music, sometimes abbreviated pop music, is music belonging to any of a number of musical styles that are broadly popular. ... An electric guitar is a type of guitar with a solid or semi-solid body that utilizes electromagnetic pickup (music)s to convert the vibration of the steel-cored strings into electrical current. ... In popular music back beat is a percussion style or technique used in common time (4/4) where a strong rhythmic accent is sounded on the second and fourth beats of the bar, the backbeats, most often from striking a snare drum. ... Saxophones of different sizes play in different registers. ... Rock and rebellion From its beginnings, rock and roll has been associated with youth, rebellion, and anti-establishmentism. ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ...


The genre of rock and roll is broad, and its boundaries loosely-defined. It is sometimes used to describe a number of genres only distantly related, including soul, heavy metal and even hip hop. The All Music Guide uses specifically rock and roll to refer to the genre's early years in the 1950s and 1960s, and the shorter rock as an umbrella category. For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... Heavy metal is a form of rock music characterized by aggressive, driving rhythms and highly amplified distorted guitars, generally with grandiose lyrics and virtuosic instrumentation. ... Hip hop is a cultural movement that began amongst urban African American youth in New York and has since spread around the world. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a globally comprehensive metadata database about music owned by All Media Guide. ... Events and trends Technology United States tests the first fusion bomb. ... Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s - 1960s - 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s Years: 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ...

Rock and roll
Stylistic origins: Jump blues
Cultural origins: Late 1940s United States
Typical instruments: Guitar - Bass - Drums
Mainstream popularity: Much, constant and worldwide since the 1950s
Derivative forms: Alternative rock - Heavy metal - Punk rock - Progressive rock
Subgenres
Art rock - Cello rock - Country rock - Desert rock - Detroit rock - Dialect rock - Garage rock - Girl group - Glam rock - Glitter rock - Hard rock - Heartland rock - Instrumental rock - Jam band - Jangle pop - Post-rock - Power pop - Psychedelia - Pub rock (Aussie) - Pub rock (UK) - Rock en espanol - Soft rock - Southern rock - Surf - Symphonic rock
Fusion genres
Aboriginal rock - Anadolu rock - Blues-rock - Boogaloo - Country rock - Cumbia rock - Flamenco-rock - Folk-rock - Indo-rock - Madchester - Merseybeat - Progressive rock - Punta rock - Raga rock - Raï rock - Rockabilly - Samba-rock - Tango-rockéro
Regional scenes
Argentina - Armenia - Australia - Austria - Belgium - Canada - Chile - China - Colombia - Croatia - Denmark - Estonia - Finland - France - Greece - Germany - Iceland - Ireland - Israel - Italy - Japan - Mexico - Nepal - New Zealand - Norway - Peru - Philippines - Portugal - Russia - Serbia and Montenegro - Slovenia - South Africa - Spain - Sweden - Switzerland - Tatar - Thailand - Turkey - Ukraine - United Kingdom - United States - Uruguay - Zambia
Other topics
Backbeat - Rock opera - Rock band - Performers - Rock anthem - Hall of Fame - Samples - Social impact
Table of contents

2.1 Rockabilly
2.2 Covers
The jump blues is a type of blues music, characterized by a jazzy, saxophone (or other horn instruments) sound, driving rhythms and shouted vocals. ... Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s - 1940s - 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s Years: 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 Events and trends Technology First nuclear bomb First cruise missile, the V1 flying bomb and the first ballistic missile, the... A musical instrument is a device that has been constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... The classical guitar typically has nylon strings. ... Fender Precision Bass Bass Guitar is a commonly spoken phrase used to refer to the electric bass and horizontal acoustic basses, a stringed instrument similar in design to the electric guitar, but larger in size, commonly fretted and sometimes fretless and with a lower range. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... Events and trends Technology United States tests the first fusion bomb. ... The term alternative rock or alternative music1 was coined in the early 1980s to describe bands which didnt fit into the mainstream genres of the time. ... Heavy metal is a form of rock music characterized by aggressive, driving rhythms and highly amplified distorted guitars, generally with grandiose lyrics and virtuosic instrumentation. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... The progressive rock band Yes performing in 1977. ... This is a list of music genres derived from rock and roll Modern Rock Alternative Rock Rock en Español Experimental Rock Indie Rock Noise Rock Post Rock Space Rock Jam Rock Goth Rock Rock Classic Rock Acid Rock Garage Rock Blues Rock British Blues Rock British Invasion Folk Rock... Art rock is a sub-genre of rock music that is characterized by ambitious lyrical themes and melodic or rhythmic experimentation, often extending beyond standard pop song forms and toward influences in jazz, classical, or the avant garde. ... Cello rock is a genre of music characterized by the use of cellos and other stringed instruments such as violin and viola to create a sound, beat, and texture similar to that of rock music. ... Country rock is a musical genre formed from the fusion of rock and roll with country music. ... Desert Rock is a term given to several bands that hail from the California desert. ... Detroit rock is the name for a style of Australian indie rock, particularly popular in Sydney in the 1980s. ... Garage rock was a simple, raw form of rock and roll created by a number of American bands in the mid-1960s. ... A girl group is the equivalent of a boy band, but, as the name implies, featuring a group of female rather than male singers. ... Glam rock is a style of rock music popularised in the 1970s, and was mostly a British phenomenon. ... Glitter rock, a short-lived genre in the mid-1970s, was an extreme exploration of the fantasy-side of the reality-fantasy parents of heavy metal. ... Hard rock is a form of rock and roll music that finds its closest roots in early 1960s garage rock. ... In the late 1970s and 1980s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was heartland rock. ... From its earliest days, rock and roll emphasized catchy melodies, which were usually presented with easily remembered lyrics. ... The term jam band is commonly used to describe psychedelic rock-influenced bands whose concerts largely consist of bands reinterpreting their songs as springboards into extended improvisational pieces of music. ... Jangle pop was an American musical genre that arose in the middle of the 1960s, combining angular, chiming guitars and power pop structures. ... The term post-rock was coined by Simon Reynolds in issue 123 of The Wire (May 1994) to describe a sort of music using rock instrumentation for non-rock purposes, using guitars as facilitators of timbres and textures rather than riffs and powerchords. ... Power pop is a long-standing musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop music. ... Psychedelic music draws its inspiration from the experience of mind-altering drugs such as cannabis, psilocybin, mescaline, ecstasy and especially LSD. Characteristic features of the style include modal melodies, lengthy instrumental solos, esoteric lyrics and trippy special effects such as reversed, distorted, delayed and/or phased sounds. ... Pub rock is a style of Australian rock and roll popular throughout the 1970s and 1980s and still influencing contemporary Australian music today. ... Pub rock was a mid to late 1970s musical movement, largely centred around North London and South East Essex, particularly Canvey Island and Southend on Sea. ... Rock en Español is the latest generation of Spanish language rock and roll. ... Soft rock, also referred to as lite rock, easy rock, and formally Mellow rock, is a style of music which uses the techniques of rock and roll to compose a softer, supposedly more ear-pleasing sound for listening, often at work. ... Southern rock is a style of rock music that was very popular in the 1970s, and retains a fan base to the present. ... In the early 1960s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was surf rock. ... Symphonic rock is a style of rock music (see rock and roll) that incorporates elements from classical music. ... Aboriginal rock is a rather nebulous term for a style of music which mixes traditional rock music elements (guitar, drums, bass etc) with the instrumentation of the Australian Aborigines (Didjeridu, clap-sticks etc). ... Blues Rock or Blues-rock is a fusion genre of music which combines elements of the blues with rock and roll. ... Boogaloo (shing-a-ling, popcorn music) is a genre of Latin music and dance that was very popular in the United States in the late 1960s. ... Country rock is a musical genre formed from the fusion of rock and roll with country music. ... Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Madchester refers to a period during the late 1980s and early 1990s when Manchester was the focus for a lot of the new musical talent hitting the UK indie music scene. ... Merseybeat, sometimes referred to as Merseysound, was a style of music popular during the 1960s. ... The progressive rock band Yes performing in 1977. ... Punta rock is a form of the traditional punta rhythm of the Garifuna people of Central America. ... Rockabilly is one of the component parts of rock and roll. ... Rock and roll is a United States. ... Australian rock and rock musicians have produced a wide variety of music. ... Rock and roll is a style of popular African American music, established in Belgium only in the late 1970s, long after the style had penetrated most of the rest of the world. ... Canada has been a source ofrock and roll music for decades. ... Rock and roll is a style of popular African American music, known throughout the world. ... Chinese rock (中国摇滚) is oftenly and inaccurately described as a style of music which combines Chinese musical instruments with techniques of Western-style rock and roll. ... Denmark is a European country that began importing popular American rock and roll music in the 1950s, when that style was conquering audiences across the continent. ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Stub | Rock music by nation | Finnish music ... American rock and roll began entering the French mainstream in the 1950s, when stars like Johnny Hallyday arose, rivaling the popular yé-yé craze. ... Krautrock (most likely derived from the slang term Kraut for Germans) is often used as a term as though synonymous with German rock in general, although it may be more specifically applied to a group of early-1970s bands like Tangerine Dream and Faust, many of whom worked closely with... Rock and roll is a style of popular African American music which has spread across the world, including to the North Atlantic island nation of Iceland. ... Rock and roll is a genre of popular African American music, and has been a part of the music of Ireland since the 1960s, when the British Invasion brought British blues, psychedelic rock and other styles to the island. ... The Israeli rock scene began in the 1960s, when American and British bands like The Beatles became popular. ... Italy is a European country, and has had a long relationship with rock and roll, a style of music which spread to the country by the early 1960s from the United States. ... Japanese rock is a form of popular music, often abbreviated to J-Rock in much the same way that J-Pop is used as an abbreviation of Japanese Pop. ... Rock and roll is a genre of African American music which became popular across the world beginning in the late 1950s. ... The first rocknroll hit by a New Zealand was Ray Columbuss hit Shes a Mod. However, Kiwi rocks birth can probably best be dated to The Formyulas release of Nature. In the 1970s Kiwi rock began to take off, and some of the more... Norway has produced a number of famous rock bands, including the pop group a-ha. ... Rock and roll is a style of African American popular music which is renowned across the world, including in Peru. ... Pinoy rock is a genre of music, specifically rock and roll produced in the Philippines or by Filipinos. ... The Portuguese rock scene began in 1980 with the release of Ar de Rock by Rui Velosa, which was the first popular Portuguese rock song. ... Rock and roll is a style of African American music which has long been popular in Russia. ... Rock and roll is a musical genre from the United States, popularized worldwide beginning in the 1950s. ... Spain has produced a great variety of rock and roll, but the most distinctive style may be flamenco-rock. ... The Turkish rock scene began in the mid- to late 1960s, when popular United Kingdom bands became well-known. ... Outside of its home in the United States, the UKs brand of rock is undoubtedly the most well-known and widespread. ... 1950s Covers: Early 50s Through the late 1940s and early 1950s, rhythm and blues music had been gaining a stronger beat and a wilder style, with artists such as Fats Domino and Johnny Otis speeding up the tempos and increasing the backbeat to great popularity on the juke-joint circuit. ... Zam-rock is rock and roll music from the African nation of Zambia. ... In popular music back beat is a percussion style or technique used in common time (4/4) where a strong rhythmic accent is sounded on the second and fourth beats of the bar, the backbeats, most often from striking a snare drum. ... A rock opera or rock musical is a musical production in the form of an opera or a musical in a modern rock and roll style rather than more traditional forms. ... Rock band (or rock group) is a generic name to describe a group of musicians specializing in a particular form of electronically amplified music. ... This is a list of rock and roll performers. ... A rock and roll anthem is a celebratory rock and roll song. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, showing Lake Erie in the background The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum is a museum in Cleveland, Ohio, United States, dedicated, as the name suggests, to recording the history of some of the best-known and most influential rock and... Rockabilly Main article: Rockabilly Rockabilly is a fusion of country & western music with 1950s-style rock. ... Rock and rebellion From its beginnings, rock and roll has been associated with youth, rebellion, and anti-establishmentism. ...

Precursors and origins

Main article: Origins of rock and roll Rock and roll emerged as a defined musical style in America in the 1950s, though elements of rock and roll can be seen in rhythm and blues records as far back as the 1920s. ...


Rock and roll emerged as a defined musical style in America in the 1950s, though elements of rock and roll can be heard in rhythm and blues records as far back as the 1920s. Early rock and roll combined elements of blues, boogie woogie, jazz and rhythm and blues, and is also influenced by traditional Appalachian folk music, gospel and country and western. Going back even further, rock and roll can trace a foundational lineage to the old Five Points district of mid-19th century New York City, the scene of the first fusion of heavily rhythmic African shuffles and sand dances with melody driven European genres, particularly the Irish jig. The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... Events and trends Technology United States tests the first fusion bomb. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1870s 1880s 1890s 1900s 1910s - 1920s - 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s Years: 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 Referred to as the Roaring 20s. ... Blues is a vocal and instrumental musical form which evolved from African American spirituals, shouts, work songs and chants and has its earliest stylistic roots in West Africa. ... Boogie-woogie is a style of blues piano playing that became very popular in the 1940s and was extended from piano, to three pianos at once, guitar, big band, and country and western music. ... Jazz is a musical art form characterized by blue notes, syncopation, swing, call and response, polyrhythms, and improvisation. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... Appalachian folk music is a distinctive genre of folk music originating in the Appalachia region of the United States of America. ... Gospel music may refer either to the religious music that first came out of African-American churches in the 1930s or, more loosely, to both black gospel music and to the religious music composed and sung by white southern Christian artists. ... Country music, once known as country and western music, is a popular musical form developed in the southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, spirituals, and the blues. ... Five Points (or The Five Points) was a notorious slum centered on the intersection of Worth St. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... This article is about the folk dance jig, for other meanings, see Jig (disambiguation). ...


Rocking was a term first used by gospel singers in the American South to mean something akin to spiritual rapture. By the 1940s, however, the term was used as a double entendre, ostensibly referring to dancing, but with the hidden subtextual meaning of sex; an example of this is Roy Brown's "Good Rocking Tonight". This type of song was usually relegated to "race music" (the music industry code name for rhythm and blues) outlets and was rarely heard by mainstream white audiences. In 1951, Cleveland, Ohio disc jockey Alan Freed would begin playing this type of music for his white audience, and it is Freed who is credited with coining the phrase "rock and roll" to describe the rollicking R&B music that he brought to the airwaves. This article needs cleanup. ... Roy Brown born (1950) in San Juan, Puerto Rico, is a composer, singer and a fervent believer in the cause for the independence of Puerto Rico. ... African American music (also called black music, formerly known as race music) is an umbrella term given to a range of musical genres emerging from or influenced by the culture of African Americans, who have long constituted a large ethnic minority of the population of the United States. ... Global Metrics Human security Major Armed Conflicts: Total Deaths in Battle: 700,000 people Violent Deaths caused by Government (Other than War): Violent Deaths caused by other humans: Juvenile Violent Crime: Political security Nations Holding Multi-party Elections: Percentage Living under a Fully Democratic System of Governance: Free Countries: Percentage... City nickname: The Forest City Location in the state of Ohio Founded 1796 Incorporated 1836 County Cuyahoga County Mayor Jane Campbell ( Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 213. ... For other meanings of DJ, see DJ (disambiguation). ... This article is about Clevelands Moondog; the 1950s dj on WINS, New York. ...


There is much debate as to what should be considered the first rock and roll record. Candidates include the 1951 "Rocket 88" by Jackie Brenston & His Delta Cats, or later and more widely-known hits like Chuck Berry's "Maybellene" "Johnny B. Goode" or Bo Diddley's "Bo Diddley" or Bill Haley & His Comets' "Rock Around the Clock". Some historians go further back, pointing to musicians like Fats Domino, who were recording in the 40s in styles largely indistinguishable from rock and roll; these include Louis Jordan's "Is You Is or Is You Ain't My Baby?", Jack Guthrie's "The Oakie Bookie" (1947) and Benny Carter and Paul Vandervoort II's "Rock Me to Sleep" (1950). There are many candidates for the title of the first Rock and Roll record. ... Global Metrics Human security Major Armed Conflicts: Total Deaths in Battle: 700,000 people Violent Deaths caused by Government (Other than War): Violent Deaths caused by other humans: Juvenile Violent Crime: Political security Nations Holding Multi-party Elections: Percentage Living under a Fully Democratic System of Governance: Free Countries: Percentage... Rocket 88, a rhythm and blues song from 1951 claimed by Sun Records owner and pioneer rock and roll record producer Sam Phillips as the first rock and roll song. The record was credited to Jackie Brenston and his Delta Cats, but the band did not actually exist. ... Rocket 88, a rhythm and blues song from 1951 claimed by Sun Records owner and pioneer rock and roll record producer Sam Phillips as the first rock and roll song. The record was credited to Jackie Brenston and his Delta Cats, but the band did not actually exist. ... Chuck Berry Charles Edward Berry (born October 18, American guitarist, singer and composer. ... Chuck Berry Charles Edward Berry (born October 18, 1926), better known as Chuck Berry, is an American guitarist, singer and composer. ... Johnny B. Goode is a song written by Chuck Berry in 1955, and is considered one of the first rock and roll songs ever recorded. ... Bo Diddleys emphasis on rhythm largely influeced popular music, especially that of rock and roll in the 1960s. ... The original members of Bill Haley and His Comets, c. ... Rock Around the Clock is a pop song from 1953. ... Fats Domino, born Antoine Dominique (born February 26, 1928 in New Orleans, Louisiana), is a classic R&B singer. ... Louis Jordan (July 8, 1908 - February 4, 1975) was an African-American jazz and rhythm & blues musician, and one of the few such to sell well to mainstream audiences in the post swing music era. ... Jack Guthrie (13 November 1915–15 January 1948) was born Leon Jerry Guthrie in Olive, Oklahoma, USA. He was the cousin of Woody Guthrie and had a hit record in the country and western charts with a rewritten version of a Woody Guthrie song Oklahoma Hills (1945). ... 1947 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Bennett Lester Carter (August 8, 1907 – July 12, 2003) was an American jazz alto saxophonist, trumpeter, composer, arranger, and bandleader. ... Events January January 5 - US Senator Estes Kefauver introduces a resolution calling for examination of organized crime in the USA January 6 - The United Kingdom recognizes the Peoples Republic of China. ...


Early North American rock and roll (1953-1963)

Whatever the beginning, it is clear that rock appeared at a time when racial tensions in the United States were coming to the surface. African Americans were protesting segregation of schools and public facilities. The "separate but equal" doctrine was nominally overturned by the Supreme Court in 1954. It can hardly be a coincidence, then, that a musical form combining elements of white and black music should arise, and that this music should provoke strong reactions, of all types, in all Americans. Segregation means separation. ... Separate but equal was a policy enacted into law throughout the U.S. Southern states during the period of segregation, in which African Americans and Americans of European descent would receive the same services (schools, hospitals, water fountains, bathrooms, etc. ... 1954 was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...

Enlarge
The rock 'n' roll music of the 1950s would change popular music forever.

The phrase may possibly first be heard on Louis Jordan and His Tympany Five's version of Tamburitza Boogie recorded on August 18, 1950, in New York City. Celebrate the Century - 1950s - Rock n Roll Music This image is a postage stamp produced by the United States Postal Service after 1978. ... Celebrate the Century - 1950s - Rock n Roll Music This image is a postage stamp produced by the United States Postal Service after 1978. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events January January 5 - US Senator Estes Kefauver introduces a resolution calling for examination of organized crime in the USA January 6 - The United Kingdom recognizes the Peoples Republic of China. ...


On March 21, 1952 in Cleveland, Alan Freed (also known as Moondog) organized the first rock and roll concert, titled "The Moondog Coronation Ball". The audience and the performers were mixed in race and the evening ended after one song in a near-riot as thousands of fans tried to get into the sold-out venue. March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (81st in leap years). ... 1952 - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ...


By the end of the decade, rock had spread throughout the world. In Australia, for example, Johnny O'Keefe became perhaps the first modern rock star of the country, and began the field of Australian rock. Australian rock and rock musicians have produced a wide variety of music. ...


Rockabilly

Main article: Rockabilly Rockabilly is one of the component parts of rock and roll. ...


Two years later in 1954, Elvis Presley began recording with Sam Phillips, starting with the hit "That's All Right, Mama". Elvis played a rock and country & western fusion called rockabilly, which was characterized by hiccupping vocals, slapping base and a spastic guitar style. He became possibly the first celebrity musician and teen idol to perform in the genre. A teen idol is a famous person who generates attention from large numbers of teenagers, who follow their every move. ...


It was the following year's "Rock Around the Clock" by Bill Haley & His Comets that really set the rock boom in motion, though. The song was one of the biggest hits in history, and frenzied teens flocked to see Haley and the Comets perform it, even causing riots in some places; "Rock Around the Clock" was a breakthrough for both the group and for all of rock and roll music. If everything that came before laid the groundwork, "Clock" certainly set the mold for everything else that came after. With its combined rockabilly and R & B influences, "Clock" topped the U.S. charts for several weeks, and became wildly popular in places like Australia and Germany. The single, released by independent label Festival Records in Australia, was the biggest-selling recording in the country at the time. Rock Around the Clock is a pop song from 1953. ... The original members of Bill Haley and His Comets, c. ... In 1958, Herb Abramson leaves Atlantic Records. ...


Covers

Main article: Cover version In pop music a cover version is a new rendition of a previously recorded song. ...


Through the late 1940s and early 1950s, R&B music had been gaining a stronger beat and a wilder style, with artists such as Fats Domino and Johnny Otis speeding up the tempos and increasing the backbeat to great popularity on the juke-joint circuit. Despite the efforts of Freed and others, black music was still taboo on many white-owned radio outlets. However, savvy artists and producers quickly recognized the potential of rock and raced to cash in with white versions of this black music. Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s - 1940s - 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s Years: 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 Events and trends Technology First nuclear bomb First cruise missile, the V1 flying bomb and the first ballistic missile, the... Events and trends Technology United States tests the first fusion bomb. ... Fats Domino, born Antoine Dominique (born February 26, 1928 in New Orleans, Louisiana), is a classic R&B singer. ... Johnny Otis (born John Veliotes on December 28, 1921 in Vallejo, California) is an American blues and rhythm and blues vibraphonist, drummer, singer, bandleader, and impresario. ...


Covering was customary in the music industry at the time. One of the first successful rock and roll covers was Wynonie Harris's transformation of Roy Brown's "Good Rocking Tonight" from a jump blues to a showy rocker. The most notable trend, however, was white pop covers of black R&B numbers. Wynonie Mr. ... There have been a number of notable people named Roy Brown: Roy Brown, the Canadian pilot who is credited with shooting down the Red Baron Roy Brown, a Blues musician who was a pioneer of Rock and Roll Roy Brown, a famous clown most famous for his role as sidekick... The jump blues is a type of blues music, characterized by a jazzy, saxophone (or other horn instruments) sound, driving rhythms and shouted vocals. ...


Black performers saw their songs recorded by white performers, an important step in the dissemination of the music, but often at the cost of feeling and authenticity. Most famously, Pat Boone recorded sanitized versions of Little Richard songs, though Boone found "Long Tall Sally" so intense that he couldn't cover it. Later, as those songs became popular, the original artists' recordings received radio play as well. Little Richard once called Pat Boone from the audience and introduced him as "the man who made me a millionaire". Pat Boone (born June 1, 1934) is a singer whose smooth style made him one of the most popular performers of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Little Richard (born Richard Wayne Penniman, December 5, 1932 in Macon, Georgia) is a pioneer of rock and roll though he says (quoted in Hamm 1979, p. ...


The cover versions were not necessarily straightforward imitations. For example, Bill Haley's incompletely bowdlerized cover of "Shake, Rattle and Roll" transformed Big Joe Turner's humorous and racy tale of adult love into an energetic teen dance number, while Georgia Gibbs replaced Etta James's tough, sarcastic vocal in "Roll With Me, Henry" (covered as "Dance With Me, Henry") with a perkier vocal more appropriate for an audience unfamiliar with the song to which James's song was an answer, (Hank Ballard's "Work With Me, Annie"). Shake, Rattle and Roll is a prototypical blues-form rock and roll song written by Jesse Stone (under his working name Charles Calhoun). ... Big Joe Turner ( May 18, 1911 – November 24, 1985) was an American blues singer from Kansas City, Missouri. ... Georgia Gibbs (born Fredda Lipson Gibbons, later Fredda Gibson, her date of birth is alternately listed as 8/17/20 or 8/26/20 or 8/26/27) is an American popular singer. ... Etta James (born January 25, 1938) is an American R&B and gospel singer. ... This is an incomplete list. ... Hank Ballard (November 18, 1936 - March 2, 2003) was an American R&B singer and a member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. ...


Rock spreads and diversifies

Diversification of American rock

Main article: American rock 1950s Covers: Early 50s Through the late 1940s and early 1950s, rhythm and blues music had been gaining a stronger beat and a wilder style, with artists such as Fats Domino and Johnny Otis speeding up the tempos and increasing the backbeat to great popularity on the juke-joint circuit. ...


With the runaway popular success of rock, the style began to influence other genres. Vocalized R&B became doo wop, for example, while uptempo, secularized gospel music became soul, and audiences flocked to see Appalachian-style folk bands playing a rock-influenced pop version of their style. Young adults and teenagers across the country were playing in amateur rock bands, laying the roots for local scenes, garage rock and alternative rock. More immediately, places like Southern California produced their own varieties of rock, such as surf. Doo-wop is a style of vocal-based rhythm and blues music popular in the mid-1950s to the early 1960s in America. ... Gospel music may refer either to the religious music that first came out of African-American churches in the 1930s or, more loosely, to both black gospel music and to the religious music composed and sung by white southern Christian artists. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... Garage rock was a simple, raw form of rock and roll created by a number of American bands in the mid-1960s. ... The term alternative rock or alternative music1 was coined in the early 1980s to describe bands which didnt fit into the mainstream genres of the time. ... In the early 1960s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was surf rock. ...


Surf music

Main article: surf music In the early 1960s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was surf rock. ...


The rockabilly sound reached the West Coast and mutated into a wild, mostly instrumental sound called surf music. This style, exemplified by Dick Dale and The Surfaris, featured faster tempos, innovative percussion, and processed electric guitar sounds which would be highly influential upon future rock guitarists. Other West Coast bands, notably The Beach Boys and Jan and Dean, would capitalize on the surf craze, slowing the tempos back down and adding harmony vocals to create the "California Sound". In the early 1960s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was surf rock. ... Dick Dale (born Richard Monsour on May 4, 1937) was one of the pioneers in surf rock, one of the most influential musicians of the early 1960s. ... The Surfaris were a surf rock band formed in California in 1962, and are best known for two songs that hit the charts in the Los Angeles area, and nationally by May, 1963 : Surfer Joe (the A side), andWipe Out on the B side of a 45 RPM single. ... An electric guitar is a type of guitar with a solid or semi-solid body that utilizes electromagnetic pickup (music)s to convert the vibration of the steel-cored strings into electrical current. ... The Beach Boys 1976 album 15 big ones The Beach Boys are a pop music group formed in Hawthorne, California in 1961, whose popularity has lasted into the twenty-first century. ... Jan Berry (April 3, 1941, Los Angeles -- March 26, 2004) and Dean Torrence (born March 10, 1940, Los Angeles) were a rock and roll duo briefly popular in the early 1960s as part of the surf music craze inspired by The Beach Boys. ...


Australia

Main article: Australian rock Australian rock and rock musicians have produced a wide variety of music. ...


After Johnny O'Keefe's last major hit in 1961, Australian popular music was dominated by clean-cut family bands. Bubbling beneath the surface, however, was a group of pioneering bands like the surf band The Atlantics. 1961 (As MAD Magazine pointed out on its first cover for the year) was the first upside-down year - i. ... In the early 1960s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was surf rock. ... The Atlantics were an Australian surf rock band in the 1960s. ...


British rock

Main article: British rock Outside of its home in the United States, the UKs brand of rock is undoubtedly the most well-known and widespread. ...


American rock and roll had an impact across the globe, perhaps most intensely in the United Kingdom, where record collecting and trend-watching were in full bloom among the youth culture prior to the rock era, and where color barriers were less of an issue. Countless British youths listened to R&B and rock pioneers and began forming their own bands to play with an intensity and drive seldom found in white American acts. Britain quickly became a new center of rock and roll, leading to the British Invasion from 1964 to 1969. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... The British Invasion was an influx of rock and roll performers from the United Kingdom who became popular in the United States in 1964 ending the years immediately afterward. ... 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ...


In 1958 three British teenagers formed a rock and roll group, Cliff Richard and the Drifters (later renamed Cliff Richard and the Shadows). The group recorded a hit, "Move It", marking not only what is held to be the very first true British rock 'n' roll single, but also the beginning of a different sound — British rock. Richard and his band introduced many important changes, such as using a "lead guitarist" (virtuoso Hank Marvin) and an electric bass. Richard inspired many British teens to begin buying records and follow the music scene, thus laying the groundwork for Beatlemania. Sir Cliff Richard (born Harry Webb in Lucknow, India, on October 14, 1940) is the stage name of one of the UKs most popular singers. ... Outside of its home in the United States, the UKs brand of rock is undoubtedly the most well-known and widespread. ... Hank B. Marvin (born Brian Rankin, October 28, 1941, Newcastle upon Tyne, England) is the lead member of guitar group The Shadows. ... Fender Precision Bass Bass Guitar is a commonly spoken phrase used to refer to the electric bass and horizontal acoustic basses, a stringed instrument similar in design to the electric guitar, but larger in size, commonly fretted and sometimes fretless and with a lower range. ... ...


British invasion

Main article: British Invasion The British Invasion was an influx of rock and roll performers from the United Kingdom who became popular in the United States in 1964 ending the years immediately afterward. ...


By the early 1960s, bands from England were dominating the rock and roll scene world-wide. First re-recording standard American tunes, these bands then infused their original rock and roll compositions with an industrial-class sensibility. Foremost among these was The Beatles, who became the single most influential and popular act in the history of rock and roll. The Beatles brought together an appealing mix of image, songwriting, and personality and, after initial success in the UK, were launched a large-scale US tour to ecstatic reaction, a phenomenon quickly dubbed Beatlemania. Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s - 1960s - 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s Years: 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... ...


Although they were not the first British band to come to America, The Beatles spearheaded the Invasion, triumphing in the US on their first visit in 1964 (including historic appearances on the Ed Sullivan Show). In the wake of Beatlemania other British bands headed to the U.S., notably the Rolling Stones (who disdained the Beatles' clean-cut image and presented a darker, more aggressive image), and other acts like The Animals and The Yardbirds. Throughout the early and mid-60s Americans seemed to have an insatiable appetite for British rock. Other British bands, including The Who and The Kinks, had some success during this period but saved their peak of popularity for the second wave of British invasion in the late 1960s. 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Ed Sullivan Show was an American television variety show that ran from June 20, 1948, to June 6, 1971, and was hosted by Ed Sullivan. ... For other uses, see Rolling Stones (disambiguation) The Rolling Stones in 1964 The Rolling Stones are a British rock and roll band who rose to prominence during the mid-1960s. ... The Animals were a British rock and roll band of the 1960s, formed in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. ... The Yardbirds were an early British rock band, noted for spawning the careers of several of rock musics most famous guitarists, including Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Jimmy Page. ... The Who is a British rock band. ... The Kinks, a British Invasion pop/rock band, were formed in London in 1963 by Dave Davies and Peter Quaife. ...


1960s garage rock

Main article: Garage rock Garage rock was a simple, raw form of rock and roll created by a number of American bands in the mid-1960s. ...


The British Invasion spawned a wave of imitators in the U.S. and across the globe. Many of these bands were cruder than the bands they tried to emulate. Playing mainly to local audiences and recording cheaply, very few of these bands broke through to a higher level of success. This movement, later known as Garage Rock, gained a new audience when record labels started re-issuing compilations of the original singles; the best known of these is a series called Nuggets. Some of the better known band of this genre include The Sonics, ? & the Mysterians, and The Standells. Garage rock was a simple, raw form of rock and roll created by a number of American bands in the mid-1960s. ... Nuggets: Original Artyfacts From the First Psychedelic Era is a compilation album of garage rock from the mid- to late 1960s, assembled by Jac Holzman, founder of Elektra Records. ... This article is on the garage rock band The Sonics; see Seattle SuperSonics for the basketball team. ... The Standells were a 1960s rock and roll band from Los Angeles, California who, like the The Seeds, exemplified the garage rock style. ...


Bob Dylan and folk-rock (starting 1963)

Main articles: Bob Dylan, Folk-rock Portrait photograph of Bob Dylan taken by Daniel Kramer Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman May 24, 1941, Duluth, Minnesota, USA) is widely regarded as one of Americas greatest popular songwriters. ... Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ...


As the British Invasion led by The Beatles picked up steam, a homegrown American trend was making itself felt, led by Bob Dylan. By 1963 the 22 year old Dylan had assimilated a variety of regional American styles and was set to create a new genre, usually dubbed "folk-rock". From 1961 to mid-1963 Dylan had kept his distance from rock and roll even though his first adolescent musical forays owed more to early rockers like Buddy Holly and Little Richard than to any of the more obscure folk and blues artists he would later revere as paradigms (in particular, Woody Guthrie, Leadbelly and Robert Johnson). Dylan and others on the new folk circuit tended to view The Beatles as bubblegum (that is, tritely commercial), but admitted to a grudging respect for their melodic originality and energetic, danceable delivery. In 1963 Dylan's release of the album The Times They Are A-Changin was a watershed event, bringing "relevant" and highly poetic lyrics to the edge of rock and roll. The Beatles listened to this album incessantly and moved away from the exclusively romantic/interpersonal themes of their songs to date. In 1964 and 1965 Dylan threw off all pretense to roots purity and embraced the rock beat and electrified instruments, culminating in the release of the song "Like a Rolling Stone" which, at over six minutes playing time, changed the landscape of hit radio and ushered in a period of intense lyrical and structural experimentation on both sides of the Atlantic. Dylan would continue to surprise fans and critics with tour-de-force albums in many styles, but, from 1964 on, he has worked mostly within the rock and roll framework. His influence on all rock sub-genres is incalculable, probably equaled only by The Beatles'. Among Dylan's most important disciples was Neil Young, whose lyrical inventiveness, wedded to an often wailing electric guitar attack, would presage grunge. Portrait photograph of Bob Dylan taken by Daniel Kramer Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman May 24, 1941, Duluth, Minnesota, USA) is widely regarded as one of Americas greatest popular songwriters. ... Events January-February January 11 - The Whisky A Go-Go night club in Los Angeles, the first disco in the USA, is opened. ... 1961 (As MAD Magazine pointed out on its first cover for the year) was the first upside-down year - i. ... Charles Hardin Holley (September 7, 1936–February 3, 1959), better known as Buddy Holly, was an American singer, songwriter, and a pioneer of Rock and Roll. ... Little Richard (born Richard Wayne Penniman, December 5, 1932 in Macon, Georgia) is a pioneer of rock and roll though he says (quoted in Hamm 1979, p. ... Woodrow Wilson Guthrie (July 14, 1912 - October 3, 1967), known almost universally as Woody, was a folk singer and raconteur who wrote some of Americas best-loved songs. ... Leadbelly (January 29, 1885 - December 6, 1949) was an influential blues singer and guitarist. ... Robert Johnson Robert Leroy Johnson (May 8, 1911 – August 16, 1938) is probably the most famous Delta blues singer and guitarist in history. ... Bubblegum pop (bubblegum rock, bubblegum music) is a genre of popular music and rock and roll. ... Categories: Music stubs | Bob Dylan albums | 1964 albums ... 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1965 was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... Like a Rolling Stone is a song by Bob Dylan, from the album Highway 61 Revisited. ... Neil Young with guitar (from the 1991 Weld tour) Neil Young (born November 12, 1945) is a Canadian musician and filmmaker. ... Grunge music (sometimes also referred to as the Seattle Sound) is an independent-rooted music genre that became a commercially successful offshoot of hardcore punk, thrash metal, and alternative rock in the late 1980s and early 1990s. ...


Birth of a counterculture (1967-1974)

Main article: Counterculture In sociology, counterculture is a term used to describe a cultural group whose values and norms are at odds with those of the social mainstream. ...


As part of the societal ferment in North America and Europe, rock changed and diversified in a number of subtle and not-so-subtle ways.


As early as the mid-1960s, the image of rock and roll became less like previous musical forms. The Rolling Stones are credited with being the first band to dispense with band uniforms; band members simply wore whatever clothes they wished, and these clothes were often outlandish or controversial. Hair styles also became longer and less tamed. As trivial as these changes may sound today, this break from tradition was shocking to audiences used to clean-cut musical groups in matching suits. For other uses, see Rolling Stones (disambiguation) The Rolling Stones in 1964 The Rolling Stones are a British rock and roll band who rose to prominence during the mid-1960s. ...


But in 1967, one album forever changed the course of rock and roll. The Beatles' groundbreaking album, Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, was unlike any album or song that had come before, with a sound unlike anything The Beatles (or any other band or solo artist) had performed. After the climactic final chord of A Day In The Life, it was clear that rock and roll was about to move in different directions, such as the following: The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... Sgt. ... A Day in the Life is a song composed by John Lennon and Paul McCartney and recorded for the Beatles album Sgt. ...


Psychedelic rock

Main article: Psychedelic rock Psychedelic music draws its inspiration from the experience of mind-altering drugs such as cannabis, psilocybin, mescaline, ecstasy and especially LSD. Characteristic features of the style include modal melodies, lengthy instrumental solos, esoteric lyrics and trippy special effects such as reversed, distorted, delayed and/or phased sounds. ...


The music took on a greater social awareness; it was not just about dancing and smooching anymore, but took on themes of social justice. The counterculture that was emerging (partly as a reaction to the Vietnam War) adopted rock and roll as its defining feature, and the music began to be heavily influenced by the various drugs that the youth culture was experimenting with. In America, psychedelic rock influenced and was influenced by the drug scene and the larger psychedelic lifestyle. It featured long, often improvised jams and wild electronic sounds. Jimi Hendrix, Jefferson Airplane, Iron Butterfly, and the Grateful Dead were leading practitioners of psychedelia. A more esoteric form of British psychedelia and the Canterbury Sound is exemplified by the Soft Machine, who accompanied Hendrix on his first U.S. tour. Pink Floyd found their roots in British psychedelia, moving on to becoming more of a progressive rock, and arena rock band later in their careers. The Vietnam War was a war fought roughly from 1957 to 1975 after the North Vietnamese government secretly agreed to begin involvement in South Vietnam. ... Many drugs are provided in tablet form. ... Psychedelic music draws its inspiration from the experience of mind-altering drugs such as cannabis, psilocybin, mescaline, ecstasy and especially LSD. Characteristic features of the style include modal melodies, lengthy instrumental solos, esoteric lyrics and trippy special effects such as reversed, distorted, delayed and/or phased sounds. ... Jimi Hendrix James Marshall Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitarist, singer, songwriter and producer who is widely considered to be the most important electric guitarist in the history of popular music. ... Jefferson Airplane was an American rock band from San Francisco, a pioneer of the LSD-influenced psychedelic rock movement. ... Iron Butterfly was a U.S. hard rock and psychedelic band, mostly known for their sole hit In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida. Their heyday was the late 1960s, but the band has reincarnated several times with various members. ... Jerry Garcia later in life The Grateful Dead was an American rock band, which was formed in 1965 in San Francisco from the remnants of another band, Mother McCrees Uptown Jug Champions. ... The Canterbury Scene (or Canterbury Sound) is a term used to loosely describe the group of progressive rock musicians that were based around the town of Canterbury, Kent, England during the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... The book The Soft Machine is the title of a novel written by William S. Burroughs in 1961, which gave the name to the band described below. ... Ummagumma album cover Pink Floyd is a British progressive band famous for its songwriting, harmonic classical rock compositions, bombastic style and elaborate live shows. ...


The culmination of rock and roll as a socially-unifying force was seen in the rock festivals of the late '60s, the most famous of which was Woodstock which began as a three-day arts and music festival and turned into a "happening", as hundreds of thousands of youthful fans converged on the site. A rock festival, or rock fest, is a large-scale outdoor rock music concert, featuring multiple acts, often spread out over several days. ... The Woodstock Music and Art Festival was the most famous rock festival of its era. ...


Progressive rock

Main article: Progressive rock The progressive rock band Yes performing in 1977. ...


The music itself broadened past the guitar-bass-drum format; while some bands had used saxophones and keyboards before, now acts like The Beach Boys and The Beatles (and others following their lead) experimented with new instruments including wind sections, string sections, and full orchestration. Many bands moved well beyond three-minute tunes into new and diverse forms; increasingly sophisticated chord structures, previously limited to jazz and orchestrated pop music, were heard. The classical guitar typically has nylon strings. ... Fender Precision Bass Bass Guitar is a commonly spoken phrase used to refer to the electric bass and horizontal acoustic basses, a stringed instrument similar in design to the electric guitar, but larger in size, commonly fretted and sometimes fretless and with a lower range. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... The Beach Boys 1976 album 15 big ones The Beach Boys are a pop music group formed in Hawthorne, California in 1961, whose popularity has lasted into the twenty-first century. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ...


Dabbling heavily in classical, jazz, electronic, and experimental music resulted in what would be called progressive rock (or, in its German wing, krautrock). Progressive rock could be lush and beautiful or atonal and dissonant, highly complex or minimalistic, sometimes all within the same song. At times it was hardly recognizable as rock at all. Some notable practitioners include King Crimson, Genesis, Gentle Giant, The Nice, Yes, Gong, Emerson, Lake & Palmer, Magma, Can, and Faust. The progressive rock band Yes performing in 1977. ... Krautrock (most likely derived from the slang term Kraut for Germans) is often used as a term as though synonymous with German rock in general, although it may be more specifically applied to a group of early-1970s bands like Tangerine Dream and Faust, many of whom worked closely with... King Crimson is a musical group founded by guitarist Robert Fripp and drummer Michael Giles in 1968. ... Genesis is a progressive rock group that was formed in 1967 when founding members Peter Gabriel, Mike Rutherford, and Tony Banks were still students at Charterhouse School. ... Gentle Giant was a British progressive rock band with strong classical influences that emerged from Simon Dupree and the Big Sound in 1970 and existed continuously until 1980. ... The Nice are a progressive rock band from the 1960s, known for their unique blend of rock, jazz and classical music. ... Yes in concert in Indianapolis in 1977 (left to right, Steve Howe, Alan White, Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Rick Wakeman) The popular music group Yes is a progressive rock band that formed in London in 1968. ... Gong are a progressive rock band formed by Australian musician Daevid Allen. ... ELP can also stand for Extra Long Play, a format for the VCR tape. ... Magma is a French progressive rock band founded in 1969 by classically-trained drummer Christian Vander, who claimed as his inspiration a vision of humanitys spiritual and ecological future that profoundly disturbed him. ... Can was one of the major Krautrock bands, an avant-garde, improvisational anarchist community who have had a great influence on modern rock and electronic music. ... Faust is a German band composed of Uwe Nettelbeck, Hans Joachim Irmler, Zappi Diermaier, Arnulf Meifert, Jean Herve Peron, Gunther Wustoff and Rudolf Sosna. ...


German prog

Main article: Krautrock Krautrock (most likely derived from the slang term Kraut for Germans) is often used as a term as though synonymous with German rock in general, although it may be more specifically applied to a group of early-1970s bands like Tangerine Dream and Faust, many of whom worked closely with...


In the mid-1960s, American and British rock entered Germany, especially British progressive rock bands. At the time, the musical avant-garde in Germany were playing a kind of electronic classical music, and they adapted the then-revolutionary electronic instruments for a progressive-psychedelic rock sound. By the early 1970s, the scene, now known as krautrock, had begun to peak with the incorporation of jazz (Can) and Asian music (Popol Vuh). This sound, and later pioneers like Kraftwerk, were to prove enormously influential in the development of techno and other genres later in the century. Electronic music is a loose term for music created using electronic equipment. ... Classical music is music considered classical, as sophisticated and refined, in a regional tradition. ... Can was one of the major Krautrock bands, an avant-garde, improvisational anarchist community who have had a great influence on modern rock and electronic music. ... Kraftwerk (German for power plant) is a German avant-garde electro-pop group from Düsseldorf that contributed much to the development of, and interest in, electronic music. ... Techno is a form of electronic music that emerged in the mid-1980s and primarily refers to a particular style developed in and around Detroit and subsequently adopted by European producers. ...


Italian prog

In Italy progressive rock had a great success in the 1970s and some bands played prog at the same level of the more famous American groups and went in tour in the States. The Italian Republic or Italy (Italian: Repubblica Italiana or Italia) is a country in southern Europe. ... Events and trends Although in the United States and in many other Western societies the 1970s are often seen as a period of transition between the turbulent 1960s and the more conservative 1980s and 1990s, many of the trends that are associated widely with the Sixties, from the Sexual Revolution...


Some Italian progressive rock bands were Premiata Forneria Marconi, Banco del Mutuo Soccorso and Area International Popular Group.


Birth of heavy metal

Main article: Heavy metal music Heavy metal is a form of rock music characterized by aggressive, driving rhythms and highly amplified distorted guitars, generally with grandiose lyrics and virtuosic instrumentation. ...


A second wave of British bands and artists gained great popularity during this period dominant; these bands typically were more directly steeped in American blues music than their more pop-oriented predecessors but their performances took a highly amplified, often spectacular form. These were the bands that were led by the guitar; Cream and Led Zeppelin were early examples of this blues-rock form and were followed by heavier rock bands including Black Sabbath and Deep Purple. This style of rock would come to be known as heavy metal music. This article is about the 1960s rockband, Cream is also the name of a British nightclub. ... Led Zeppelin (clockwise from left: Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, John Bonham, John Paul Jones) Led Zeppelin was a British band noted for their innovative, influential approach to heavy blues-rock and as one of the most popular and influential bands of all time. ... Blues Rock or Blues-rock is a fusion genre of music which combines elements of the blues with rock and roll. ... From left to right, Bill Ward, Toni Iommi, Ozzy Osbourne, Geezer Butler This article is about the British heavy metal band. ... Deep Purple was the biggest hit written by pianist Peter De Rose (1900—1953), who broadcast, 1923 to 1939, with May Singhi as The Sweethearts of the Air on the NBC radio network. ... Heavy metal is a form of rock music characterized by aggressive, driving rhythms and highly amplified distorted guitars, generally with grandiose lyrics and virtuosic instrumentation. ...


Corporate movements out of the counterculture (the 1970s)

Arena rock

Main article: Arena rock Arena rock is a loosely defined style of rock music. ...


The Beatles and the Rolling Stones had set the table for massive live performances in stadiums and arenas. The growing popularity of metal and progressive rock led to more bands selling out large venues. The corporate world saw the chance for huge profits and began marketing a series of what came to be called arena rock bands. Bands whose roots were in other genres, like Queen, Pink Floyd and Genesis, paved the way by putting on extravagant live shows drawing a large number of fans. Following in this wake, Boston, Styx, Foreigner, Journey, and many other bands began playing similar music, often less progressive and metal-like. This movement became a precursor to the power pop of future decades, and set the mold for live performances by popular artists. Arena rock is a loosely defined style of rock music. ... Political A queen regnant is a female monarch. ... Ummagumma album cover Pink Floyd is a British progressive band famous for its songwriting, harmonic classical rock compositions, bombastic style and elaborate live shows. ... Genesis is a progressive rock group that was formed in 1967 when founding members Peter Gabriel, Mike Rutherford, and Tony Banks were still students at Charterhouse School. ... Boston is a best-selling rock band that achieved its most notable successes during the 1970s and 1980s. ... Styx was an American rock and roll band popular in the 1970s and early 1980s. ... A foreigner, or an alien, is a natural person who is not a citizen of the State in question. ... Journey is an American rock and roll band formed in 1973. ... Power pop is a long-standing musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop music. ...


Soft rock/Pop

Main article: Pop music Depending on context, pop music is either an abbreviation of popular music or, more recently, a term for a sub- genre of it. ...


Even rock music would get soft, or at least in between soft and hard. Out of the short-lived "bubble gum pop" era came such groups as The Partridge Family, The Cowsills, The Osmonds, and The Archies (the latter "group" actually being one person, Ron Dante, who would go on to help manage the career of Barry Manilow). Opening title card The Partridge Family was an American television sitcom about a widowed mother and her five children who traveled around in a very colorful bus to different venues to perform songs. ... The Cowsills was a band that was formed in 1965 by four brothers — Barry, Bill, Bob, and John Cowsill — in Newport, Rhode Island. ... The Osmonds are an American family pop group who achieved enormous worldwide success as teenybopper idols in the 1970s. ... The Archies are a group of adolescent fictional characters of the Archie universe, a garage band founded by Archie Andrews, Reggie Mantle, and Jughead Jones. ... Barry Manilow in 1975 Barry Manilow in 1987 Barry Manilow in 1990 Barry Manilow in 2004 doing a MJ imitation during Copacabana Barry Manilow (born Barry Alan Pincus in Brooklyn, New York on June 17, 1943) is an American singer and songwriter. ...


With the demise of The Beatles as a group, other bands and artists would take this emerging soft rock format and add a touch of orchestration to partially form some of the first "power ballads". Solo artists such as Manilow, Elton John, Billy Joel, Olivia Newton-John, and Eric Carmen, and groups such as Bread, The Carpenters, and England Dan & John Ford Coley would make popular the format we know today as Soft rock. Barry Manilow in 1975 Barry Manilow in 1987 Barry Manilow in 1990 Barry Manilow in 2004 doing a MJ imitation during Copacabana Barry Manilow (born Barry Alan Pincus in Brooklyn, New York on June 17, 1943) is an American singer and songwriter. ... Sir Elton Hercules John, KBE, born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on March 25, 1947, is one of the most successful British pop singers, composers and musicians. ... Billy Joel was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1999. ... Olivia Newton-John (born September 26, 1948) is a British-born Australian singer and actress. ... Eric Carmen is an American singer, songwriter, guitarist and keyboardist, born in Cleveland, Ohio. ... Bread was a 1970s rock and roll band from Los Angeles, California. ... Karen and Richard Carpenter This article is about a musical group. ...


Other well-known artists from the 1960s such as Neil Diamond and Barbra Streisand were continuing to chart. Essential Neil Diamond album cover Neil Diamond (born Neil Leslie Diamond on January 24, 1941) is a singer/songwriter who has had a number of hits in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, and who has maintained a very loyal following with popular live performances to this day. ... Barbra Streisand Barbra Streisand (born April 24, 1942) is an iconic American singer and film actress, producer, and director. ...


Classic rock emerging

Main article: Classic rock Genre Classic rock was originally conceived as a radio station broadcasting format and although loosely defined, it generally includes the music from rock bands formed between the early 1960s and late 1970s. ...


Meanwhile, groups such as Queen, Led Zeppelin, AC/DC, Aerosmith, REO Speedwagon, ZZ Top, Van Halen, and The Rolling Stones, as well as such solo artists as Peter Frampton and Paul McCartney, were being heard mainly on AM radio and sharing the charts with their soft rock counterparts. Political A queen regnant is a female monarch. ... Led Zeppelin (clockwise from left: Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, John Bonham, John Paul Jones) Led Zeppelin was a British band noted for their innovative, influential approach to heavy blues-rock and as one of the most popular and influential bands of all time. ... From left to right: Singer Brian Johnson, Rhythm Guitarist Malcolm Young, Bass Guitarist Cliff Williams, Lead Guitarist Angus Young, Drummer Phil Rudd. ... Arrowsmith is a 1925 book by Sinclair Lewis. ... REO Speedwagon is a rock band which grew in popularity in the Midwestern United States during the 1970s. ... ZZ Top is a rock band, most prominent in the 1970s and 1980s, from Houston, Texas. ... Van Halen is a United States hard rock band named after the guitarist Eddie Van Halen and his brother drummer Alex Van Halen. ... Peter Frampton (born April 22, 1950) is a British musician, best known today for his solo work in the mid-1970s as an arena rocker. He originally became famous, however, as a member of the Herd and became a teen idol in Britain. ... Paul McCartney, as photographed by Richard Avedon for the 1968 LP The Beatles (aka The White Album). Sir James Paul McCartney,KBE, MBE (born June 18, 1942), better known as Paul McCartney, is a British musician, composer and producer. ...


For example, Frampton's 1976 live album Frampton Comes Alive, rapidly becoming the best-selling live album of all time, had spawned a number of singles that hit the Top Ten charts, such as "Show Me The Way" and "Baby, I Love Your Way". Aerosmith's rock anthem "Walk This Way", among others, were becoming popular with junior high and high school students. It was an era where both soft and hard rock mixed together. Extremely popular recordings, such as Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven" and Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody," actually put the two together. Frampton Comes Alive! is a live album by Peter Frampton. ...


Disco, punk and New Wave (1976-1981)

Disco

Main article: Disco Discothèque redirects here. ...


While Funk music had been part of the rock and roll scene in the early 1970s, it would eventually give way to more accessible songs with a danceable beat. The Disco format was propelled by such groups as K.C. and the Sunshine Band, MFSB, The Three Degrees, The O'Jays, Barry White, Gloria Gaynor, Chic, and The Trammps. Suddenly, many popular hits featured the danceable disco beat, and discotheques -- previously a European phenomenenon -- began to open in the U.S., notably Studio 54 in New York, which became the model for dozens of disco clubs nationwide. Funk is a distinct style of music originated by African-Americans, e. ... KC and the Sunshine Band is an American musical group. ... MFSB (short for Mother, Father, Sister, Brother) were a loose conglomeration of studio musicians who provided backing tracks for dozens of seminal Philadelphia soul recordings in the 1970s, and later released successful songs and albums as a standalone recording act. ... The Three Degrees is a philly soul, disco, smooth soul and soul band formed in 1963 in Philadelphia, PA by Fayette Pickney, Shirley Porter, and Linda Turner. ... The OJays were a 1970s Philadelphia soul group, originally consisting of Walter Williams, Bill Isles, Bobby Massey, William Powell and Eddie Levert. ... Barry White Barry White (September 12, 1944 – July 4, 2003) was an American record producer and singer responsible for the creation of numerous hit soul and disco songs. ... Gloria Gaynor (real name Gloria Fowles, born September 7, 1949) is a U.S. singer best-known for the disco hit songs I Will Survive (1979) and Never Can Say Goodbye (1973). ... Chic is an American band that was formed in 1975/76 by guitarist Nile Rodgers and bassist Bernard Edwards. ... The Trammps, based in Philadelphia, were one of the first disco bands. ... Discothèque redirects here. ... Studio 54 was a legendary New York City disco located on West 54th St. ...


The group most associated with the Disco era was The Bee Gees, whose music for the 1977 Paramount film Saturday Night Fever marked the pinnacle of the era. Many mainstream rock acts, including the Rolling Stones, Rod Stewart, Queen and even the Grateful Dead, incorporated disco beats into their releases in attempts to keep up with the trend; many rock radio stations began to adopt all-disco formats. The Bee Gees were a British and Australian band, originally a pop singer-songwriter combination, reborn as funk and disco. ... See also: 1976 in film 1977 1978 in film 1970s in film years in film film Events In the Academy Awards, Peter Finch, Faye Dunaway and Beatrice Straight win Best Actor and Actress and Supporting Actress awards for Network. ... The Paramount Pictures logo used from 1988 to 1989. ... Saturday Night Fever is a 1977 movie starring John Travolta based around New York discotheques of the disco era period, the associated music and dancing, and the subculture surrounding such. ... For other uses, see Rolling Stones (disambiguation) The Rolling Stones in 1964 The Rolling Stones are a British rock and roll band who rose to prominence during the mid-1960s. ... Roderick David Stewart Roderick David Stewart (born January 10, 1945) is an English singer of Scottish descent. ... Political A queen regnant is a female monarch. ... Jerry Garcia later in life The Grateful Dead was an American rock band, which was formed in 1965 in San Francisco from the remnants of another band, Mother McCrees Uptown Jug Champions. ...


But by the end of the 1970s an anti-disco backlash occurred as, in the rush to capitalize on the popular format, the overall quality of disco music began to fall and as rock fans reacted to the perceived loss of traditional rock outlets in favor of disco. The anti-disco movement culminated in the disco demolition riot in Chicago during the summer of 1979. Disco Demolition Night occurred on July 12, 1979 at Comiskey Park during a doubleheader between the Chicago White Sox and Detroit Tigers. ... Chicago (officially named the City of Chicago) is the third largest city in the United States (after New York City and Los Angeles), with an official population of 2,896,016, as of the 2000 census. ...


While much of the cachet of disco as a genre had dissipated by the end of the '70s, danceable sounds persisted; disco, in its own way, would spin off Rap/Hip-Hop music as we know today, when The Sugarhill Gang took portions of Chic's hit "Good Times" and transformed them into "Rapper's Delight", generally considered to be the first popular rap single. Hip hop music is a style of popular music. ... The Sugarhill Gang is an American hip hop group, known mostly for one hit, Rappers Delight, the first hip hop single to become a Top 40 hit. ... Rappers Delight is a 1979 (see 1979 in music) single by American hip hop trio The Sugarhill Gang; it is widely acknowledged as the first hip hop hit single. ...


Punk Rock

Main article: Punk rock Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ...


Punk rock started off as a reaction to the lush, producer-driven sounds of disco, and against the perceived commercialism of progressive rock that had become arena rock. Early punk borrowed heavily from the garage band ethic: played by bands for which expert musicianship was not a requirement, punk was stripped-down, three-chord music that could be played easily. Many of these bands also intended to shock mainstream society, rejecting the "peace and love" image of the prior musical rebellion of the 1960s which had degenerated, punks thought, into mellow disco culture. Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... The progressive rock band Yes performing in 1977. ...


Punk rose to public awareness nearly simultaneously in Britain with the Sex Pistols and in America with The Ramones. Despite their short existence, the Sex Pistols were perhaps the quintessential British punk rock band. ... The Ramones were a hugely influential punk rock band formed in Forest Hills, Queens, New York in March 1974. ...


The Sex Pistols chose aggressive stage names (including "Johnny Rotten" and "Sid Vicious") and did their best to live up to them, deliberately rejecting anything that symbolized "hippies": long hair, soft music, loose clothing, and liberal politics, and displaying an anarchic, often confrontational, stage presence; well represented on their first two singles "Anarchy in the U.K." and "God Save the Queen". Despite an airplay ban on the BBC, the record rose to the top chart position in the UK. The Sex Pistols paved the way for The Clash, whose approach was less nihilistic but more overtly political and idealistic. A stage name, or a screen name for movie stars, is a pseudonym used by performers and actors. ... Anarchy in the U.K. (B-side I Wanna Be Me) was the first single by the punk band the Sex Pistols. ... God Save the Queen (B-side Did You No Wrong), released on May 27, 1977 was the second single by the punk band the Sex Pistols. ... ... The Clash was a British punk rock group that existed from 1976 to 1985. ...


The Ramones exemplified the American side of punk: equally aggressive but mostly apolitical, more alienated, and not above fun for its own sake. The Ramones reigned as the kings of the New York punk scene, which also included Richard Hell and Television, and centered around rough-and-tumble clubs, notably CBGB's. Punk was mostly an East-coast phenomenon in the US until the late 1970s when Los Angeles-based bands such as X and Black Flag broke through. State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Richard Hell (1949 - ) born Richard Myers, was the frontman for the early American punk band Richard Hell and the Voidoids. ... Television are an American rock and roll band of the 1970s. ... Griffith Observatory and the Downtown Los Angeles skyline. ... For the Australian band called X, see X (Australian band). ... Black Flag was a punk rock group formed in 1976 in southern California, largely as the brainchild of Greg Ginn, guitarist, primary songwriter and sole continuous member through multiple personnel changes. ...


New Wave

Main article: New Wave The New Wave is a movement in American, Australian and British popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, growing out of the New York City musical scene centred around the club CBGB. The term itself is a source of much confusion. ...


Punk rock attracted devotees from the art and collegiate world and soon bands sporting a more literate, arty approach, such as the Talking Heads and Devo began to infiltrate the punk scene; in some quarters the description New Wave began to be used to differentiate these less overtly punk bands. Talking Heads is also the name for a collection of monologues by Alan Bennett. ... Promotional photo distributed during Are We Not Men? era. ... The New Wave is a movement in American, Australian and British popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, growing out of the New York City musical scene centred around the club CBGB. The term itself is a source of much confusion. ...


If punk rock was a social and musical phenomenon, it garnered little in the way of record sales (small specialty labels such as Stiff Records had released much of the punk music to date) or American radio airplay, as the radio scene continued to be dominated by mainstream formats such as disco and album-oriented rock. Record executives, who had been mostly mystified by the punk movement, recognized the potential of the more accessible New Wave acts and began aggressively signing and marketing any band that could claim a remote connection to punk or New Wave. Many of these bands, such as The Cars and The Go-Go's were essentially pop bands dressed up in New Wave regalia; others, including The Police and The Pretenders managed to parlay the boost of the New Wave movement into long-lived and artistically lauded careers. The Stiff Records record label was created in 1976, at the height of the punk boom by Dave Robinson and Jake Riviera. ... Discothèque redirects here. ... AOR can refer to any of the following: AOR is an abbreviation of Album Oriented Rock. ... The Cars were an American New Wave band, one of the most popular to emerge out of the early punk scene in the late 1970s. ... The Go-Gos are an all-women band. ... The Police was a three-piece British pop band which was strongly influenced by reggae, and came to prominence in the wake of the punk rock phenomenon. ... The Pretenders are a New Wave and rock band, known best for innovative songwriting and charismatic performances by bandleader, guitarist, and vocalist Chrissie Hynde. ...


Punk and post-punk bands would continue to appear sporadically, but as a musical scene, punk had largely self-destructed and been subsumed into mainstream New Wave pop by the mid-1980s, but the influence of punk has been substantial. The grunge movement of the late 1980s owes much to punk, and many current mainstream bands claim punk rock as their stylistic heritage. Punk also bred other genres, including hardcore, industrial music, and goth. Post punk generally refers to the particularly fertile and creative period following the initial UK punk rock explosion, roughly spanning 1978-1982. ... Grunge music (sometimes also referred to as the Seattle Sound) is an independent-rooted music genre that became a commercially successful offshoot of hardcore punk, thrash metal, and alternative rock in the late 1980s and early 1990s. ... Hardcore punk (or hardcore) is an intensified version of punk rock usually characterized by short, loud, and often angry songs with exceptionally fast tempos and chord changes. ... Industrial music is a loose term for a number of different styles of electronic and experimental music. ... This article is about the contemporary goth subculture. ...


Rock diversifies in the 1980s

Main article: 1980s in music 1980 in music International trends Alternative rock and post punk artists like Joy Division (Closer), The Specials (More Specials) and U2 (Boy) achieve some popularity with influential releases; they are accompanied by popular punk and New Wave releases from Devo (Freedom of Choice), Talking Heads (Remain in Light), The Pretenders...


In the 1980s, popular rock diversified. The early part of the decade saw Eddie Van Halen achieve musical innovations in rock guitar, while vocalists David Lee Roth (of Van Halen) and Freddie Mercury (of Queen) raised the role of frontman to near performance art standards. Concurrently, pop-New Wave bands remained popular, while pop-punk performers, like Billy Idol and The Go-Go's, gained fame. American heartland rock gained a strong following, exemplified by Bruce Springsteen, Bob Seger, and others. Led by the American folk singer-songwriter Paul Simon and the British former prog rock star Peter Gabriel, rock and roll fused with a variety of folk music styles from around the world; this fusion came to be known as "world music", and included fusions like Aboriginal rock. Amidst this, Michael Jackson would reach the peak of his remarkable career with the album Thriller. Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 1960s and 1970s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... Edward Lodewijk Van Halen, generally known as Eddie Van Halen, (born January 26, 1955 in Nijmegen, Netherlands,) is a virtuoso guitarist, classically-trained pianist, and founding member of the hard rock band Van Halen. ... David Lee Roth, also known as Diamond Dave, (born October 10, 1954 in Bloomington, Indiana,) is a Jewish, American rock vocalist. ... Freddie Mercury Freddie Mercury (September 5, 1946 - November 24, 1991) was a singer and the lead vocalist of the British Rock band Queen. ... Pop punk is used for two separate subgenres of punk rock music: the kind typically found on Lookout! Records, which stray very little from the three-chord formula that The Ramones pioneered, as well as a newer subgenre of melodic, more emotional punk, which includes by bands like NOFX and... Billy Idol (born William Michael Albert Broad on November 30, 1955 in Middlesex, England) is a British-born hard rock musician. ... The Go-Gos are an all-women band. ... In the late 1970s and 1980s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was heartland rock. ... Bruce Springsteen on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine. ... Robert Clark Bob Seger (May 6, 1945-) was an important figure in American rock and roll and pop music in the 1970s and 1980s, and continues to be influential today. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... This article is about the musician; for other Paul Simons, see Paul Simon (disambiguation). ... The progressive rock band Yes performing in 1977. ... Peter Brian Gabriel, born February 13, 1950, in Cobham (Surrey), England, is an English musician. ... World music is a term that covers all music that is not part of mainstream popular music or classical music and has some kind of ethnic component. ... Aboriginal rock is a rather nebulous term for a style of music which mixes traditional rock music elements (guitar, drums, bass etc) with the instrumentation of the Australian Aborigines (Didjeridu, clap-sticks etc). ... Michael Jackson Michael Joseph Jackson (born August 29, 1958 in Gary, Indiana), is an American singer, songwriter, and record producer. ... Thriller (1982) is an album by pop star Michael Jackson, and produced by Quincy Jones. ...


Hard rock and hair metal

Main article: Hair metal (also see Hard rock and Heavy metal.) Hair metal is a type of heavy metal music that arose in the late 1970s, in the United States, and was a strong force in popular music throughout the 1980s and early-1990s. ... Hard rock is a form of rock and roll music that finds its closest roots in early 1960s garage rock. ... Heavy metal is a form of rock music characterized by aggressive, driving rhythms and highly amplified distorted guitars, generally with grandiose lyrics and virtuosic instrumentation. ...


Heavy metal languished in obscurity until the mid- or late 1970s. A few bands maintained large followings, like Queen, AC/DC, Led Zeppelin and Aerosmith, and there were occasional mainstream hits, like Blue Öyster Cult's "Don't Fear the Reaper". Music critics overwhelmingly hated the genre, and mainstream listeners generally avoided it because of its strangeness. Judas Priest are the prototype heavy metal band, with three of their albums (Sad Wings Of Destiny - 1976, Sin After Sin - 1977 and Stained Class - 1978) laying down the foundation for what heavy metall would eventually be. For many, Judas Priest is synonymous with Classic Metal. However this changed in 1978 with the release of the hard rock band Van Halen's eponymous debut, which ushered in an era of widely popular, high-energy rock and roll, based out of Los Angeles, California. Political A queen regnant is a female monarch. ... From left to right: Singer Brian Johnson, Rhythm Guitarist Malcolm Young, Bass Guitarist Cliff Williams, Lead Guitarist Angus Young, Drummer Phil Rudd. ... Led Zeppelin (clockwise from left: Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, John Bonham, John Paul Jones) Led Zeppelin was a British band noted for their innovative, influential approach to heavy blues-rock and as one of the most popular and influential bands of all time. ... Arrowsmith is a 1925 book by Sinclair Lewis. ... Blue Öyster Cult - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Judas Priest is a hugely influential heavy metal band formed in 1969 in Birmingham, England. ... Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ... Stained Class is the fourth album by Judas Priest. ... Events January January 1 - The Copyright Act of 1976 takes effect, making sweeping changes to United States copyright law. ... Hard rock is a form of rock and roll music that finds its closest roots in early 1960s garage rock. ... Van Halen is a United States hard rock band named after the guitarist Eddie Van Halen and his brother drummer Alex Van Halen. ... Van Halen is a United States hard rock band named after the guitarist Eddie Van Halen and his brother drummer Alex Van Halen. ... Griffith Observatory and the Downtown Los Angeles skyline. ...


While bands like Van Halen and Metallica innovated in the genre, and the New Wave of British Heavy Metal found fans, a group of musicians formulated what later became known as hair metal. Taking cues from Van Halen, but without their humor, Mötley Crüe, Bon Jovi, and Ratt are often regarded as the first hair metal bands to gain popularity. They became known for their debauched lifestyles, teased hair, feminized use of make-up, clothing (usually spandex,) and over-the-top posturing. Their songs were bombastic, aggressive, and often defiantly macho, with lyrics focused on sex, drinking, drugs, and the occult. After Def Leppard's wildly popular Pyromania, and Van Halen's seminal 1984, hair metal became ubiquitous. Many hair metal bands became one-hit wonders, or as David Lee Roth once said of them, "here today, gone later today," (for example, Winger and Slaughter.) Old logo as used in Master Of Puppets Metallica is an American heavy metal band active from the 1980s to the 2000s. ... The New Wave of British Heavy Metal (NWOBHM) emerged in the late 70s, in part a reaction to the contemporary decline of traditional heavy metal bands such as Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple and Black Sabbath, all three of which had been submerged by a mixture of personal problems, tiredness and... Hair metal is a type of heavy metal music that arose in the late 1970s, in the United States, and was a strong force in popular music throughout the 1980s and early-1990s. ... -1... Jon Bon Jovi Portrait by T.HO 2004 Bon Jovi is a rock band from New Jersey, USA that sold a total of 90 million albums in the 1980s and 1990s and played live concerts in major cities in Asia, Europe, Canada and South America, in addition to a large... Ratt was a 1980s Los Angeles metal band, originally formed in the 1970s as Mickey Ratt by vocalist Stephen Pearcy, guitarist Jake E. Lee, bassist Matt Thorr, guitarist Chris Hagar (no relation to Sammy Hagar) & drummer John Turner. ... Spandex or elastane is a synthetic fiber known for its exceptional elasticity (stretchability). ... Def Leppard. ... For the album by Def Leppard, see Pyromania (album) Pyromania is an obsession with fire and starting fires, in an intentional fashion, usually on multiple occasions. ... 1984 is the title of several albums: 1984, released by British keyboardist Rick Wakeman in 1981. ... In the music industry, a one-hit wonder is an artist who is generally known for only one hit single. ... This article is about a musical rock group. ... Slaughter may refer to: result of slaughtering, see slaughterhouse a music group Slaughter Jimmy Ray Slaughter awaiting execution in Oklahoma amidst brain fingerprinting controversy This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


By the middle of the 1980s, a formula developed in which a hair metal band had two hits -- one a soft ballad, and the other a hard-rocking anthem. The original line-up of Van Halen broke up in 1985, creating something of a quality vacuum in the genre; however, in 1987, Guns n' Roses released Appetite for Destruction, which became phenomenally successful. Until hair metal's demise in the early-1990s, Guns n' Roses were hard rock's standard-bearers, and influenced its sound by incorporating influences from punk rock, and thrash metal. 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The original lne-up of Guns N Roses. ... General release sleeve Appetite for Destruction was rock and roll band Guns n Roses breakthrough album. ... Events and trends Technology Explosive growth of the Internet; decrease in the cost of computers and other technology Reduction in size and cost of mobile phones leads to a massive surge in their popularity Year 2000 problem (commonly known as Y2K) Microsoft Windows operating system becomes virtually ubiquitous on IBM... Thrash metal is a subgenre of heavy metal music. ...


Birth of Chinese rock

Main article: Chinese rock Chinese rock (中国摇滚) is oftenly and inaccurately described as a style of music which combines Chinese musical instruments with techniques of Western-style rock and roll. ...


Beginning about 1986, the Northwest Wind (xibeifeng, 西北风) style of rock began to enter the burgeoning youth culture in China. The first Chinese rock song may be "I Have Nothing" by Cui Jian, now the widely-admired godfather of the Chinese rock scene. Spurred by pro-democracy activism, such as at Tianamen Square, and by governmental repression, rock flourished in the Chinese counterculture. Of especial popularity later in the decade were melancholy tunes called prison songs. By 1990, Chinese rock had begun to enter the mainstream, but almost immediately incorporated sounds and styles from the Cantopop style. Though alternative bands remained, Chinese rock became subverted, often by bands working in cohesion with the Chinese government and in favor of the status quo; many of rock's fans in China became disillusioned as a result, leading to a general decline in popularity later in the decade. 1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cui Jian standing in front of Tiananmen Square in 1990. ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cantopop is a colloquial abbreviation for Cantonese pop music, a form of popular music that is a subgenre of Cpop. ...


Alternative music and the indie movement

Main article: Alternative music The term alternative rock or alternative music1 was coined in the early 1980s to describe bands which didnt fit into the mainstream genres of the time. ...


The term alternative music (also often known as alternative rock) was coined in the early 1980s to describe bands which didn't fit into the mainstream genres of the time. Bands dubbed "alternative" could be most any style not typically heard on the radio, however, most alternative bands were unified by their collective debt to punk. Although these groups never generated spectacular album sales, they exerted a considerable influence on the generation of musicians who came of age in the 80s. Two of the most famous bands to arise from this genre were R.E.M. and the Red Hot Chilli Peppers. The term alternative rock or alternative music1 was coined in the early 1980s to describe bands which didnt fit into the mainstream genres of the time. ... Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 1960s and 1970s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... R.E.M. is a rock band formed in Athens, Georgia in 1980 by Michael Stipe (vocals), Bill Berry (drums), Peter Buck (guitar), and Mike Mills (bass). ... Red Hot Chili Peppers (from left): Flea, Chad Smith, John Frusciante and Anthony Kiedis Red Hot Chili Peppers are a Californian rock band who have combined aspects of funk and hip-hop with rock and roll, pioneering funk metal. ...


Grunge and the anti-corporate rock movement

Main article: Grunge music Grunge music (sometimes also referred to as the Seattle Sound) is an independent-rooted music genre that became a commercially successful offshoot of hardcore punk, thrash metal, and alternative rock in the late 1980s and early 1990s. ...


By the late 1980s rock radio was dominated by aging rock artists, slick commercial pop-rock, and hair metal; MTV had arrived and brought with it a perception that style was more important than substance. Any remaining traces of rock and roll rebelliousness or the punk ethic seemed to have been subsumed into corporate-sponsored and mass-marketed musical product. Disaffected by this trend, some young musicians began to reject the polished, glamor-oriented posturing of hair metal, and created crude, sometimes angry music. The American Pacific Northwest region, especially Seattle, became a hotbed of this style, dubbed grunge. The MTV logotype, often used in different, less stylized, forms. ... Darker red states are always part of the Pacific Northwest. ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ...


Early grunge bands, particularly Mudhoney and Soundgarden, took much of their sound from early heavy metal and much of their approach from punk, though they eschewed punk's ambitions towards political and social commentary to proceed in a more nihilistic direction. Grunge remained a mostly local phenomenon until the breakthrough of Nirvana in 1991 with their album Nevermind. A slightly more melodic, more completely produced variation on their predecessors, Nirvana was an instant sensation worldwide and made much of the competing music seem stale and dated by comparison, hair metal faded almost completely from the mainstream. Mudhoney is a grunge band, formed in Seattle in 1988. ... Soundgarden was a seminal Seattle rock band instrumental in creating the sound that came to be called grunge. ... This article is about the 1980s-1990s grunge band Nirvana. ... Nevermind is Nirvanas second album, released in September of 1991. ...


Nirvana whetted the public's appetite for more direct, less polished rock music, leading to the success of bands like Pearl Jam and Stone Temple Pilots. Pearl Jam took a somewhat more traditional rock approach than other grunge bands but shared their passion and rawness. Pearl Jam were a major commercial success from their debut but, beginning with their second album, refused to buy in to the corporate promotion and marketing mechanisms of MTV and Ticketmaster, with whom they famously engaged in legal skirmishes over ticket service fees. Pearl Jam was one of the most popular bands of the grunge music era in the early 1990s. ... Stone Temple Pilots (abbreviated STP) is a popular rock and roll band, formed in 1990, after Scott Weiland and Robert DeLeo met at a Black Flag concert in Long Beach, California, after discovering they were dating the same woman. ... The MTV logotype, often used in different, less stylized, forms. ... Ticketmaster is the worlds largest ticketing company. ...


While grunge itself can be seen as somewhat limited in range, its influence was felt across many geographic and musical boundaries; many artists who were similarly disaffected with commercial rock music suddenly found record companies and audiences willing to listen, and dozens of disparate acts positioned themselves as alternatives to mainstream music; thus alternative rock emerged from the underground. The term alternative rock or alternative music1 was coined in the early 1980s to describe bands which didnt fit into the mainstream genres of the time. ...


Britpop

Main article: Britpop Britpop is a British alternative rock movement from the middle 90s, characterised with the appearance of bands who borrowed many influences from 60s and 70s while creating big and catchy hooks, as well as the glamour of earlier pop stardom and the sense that they were creating the soundtrack to...


While America was full of grunge, post-grunge, and hip hop, Britain launched a 1960s revival in the mid-90s, often called Britpop, with bands like Oasis, Radiohead, Pulp and Blur. These bands drew on myriad styles from the 80s British rock underground, including twee pop, shoegazing and space rock and from the alternative rock. For a time, the Oasis-Blur rivalry was similar to the Beatles-Rolling Stones rivalry. While bands like Blur tended to follow on from the Small Faces and The Kinks, Oasis mixed the attitude of the Rolling Stones with the melody of the Beatles. Radiohead took inspiration from performers like Elvis Costello, Pink Floyd and R.E.M. with their progressive rock music, manifested in their most famous album, OK Computer. These bands became very successful, and for a time Oasis was given the title "the biggest band in the world" thanks to an album selling some 14 million copies worldwide but slowed down after band breakups, publicity disasters in the United States and slightly less popular support. On the other hand Radiohead threw themselves into electronic experimentation in their latest records and have stood the test of time in both the U.K and the U.S.A as a major act. Britpop is a British alternative rock movement from the middle 90s, characterised with the appearance of bands who borrowed many influences from 60s and 70s while creating big and catchy hooks, as well as the glamour of earlier pop stardom and the sense that they were creating the soundtrack to... Theres also a simpergroup called Oasis, consisting of Peter Skellern, Julian Lloyd Webber, Mary Hopkin, Bill Lovelady and Mitch Dalton. ... L to R: Ed OBrien, Jonny Greenwood, Thom Yorke, Phil Selway and Colin Greenwood Radiohead are a British alternative rock band from Oxford. ... The pop group Pulp were formed in Sheffield, England, in 1978 by then 15-year-old school-boy Jarvis Cocker (vocals, guitar). ... Cover of Blur: The Best Of - Clockwise from top left: Coxon, James, Rowntree, Albarn Blur is the name of a British rock band. ... Twee (or Twee pop) is a type of indie rock that is known for simple, sweet melodies and lyrics, often with jangling guitars. ... Shoegazing is a style of music that emerged in Britain in the late 1980s. ... For space rocks, see asteroid. ... Elvis Costello Declan Patrick Aloysius McManus (born August 25, 1954), better known by his stage name, Elvis Costello, is a popular British musician, singer, and songwriter of Irish descent. ... Ummagumma album cover Pink Floyd is a British progressive band famous for its songwriting, harmonic classical rock compositions, bombastic style and elaborate live shows. ... R.E.M. is a rock band formed in Athens, Georgia in 1980 by Michael Stipe (vocals), Bill Berry (drums), Peter Buck (guitar), and Mike Mills (bass). ... OK Computer is a rock album by the band Radiohead. ...


Indie rock

Main article: Indie rock Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ...


Alternative music and the rebellious, DIY ethic it espoused became the inspiration for grunge, the popularity of which, paradoxically, took alternative rock into the mainstream. By the mid-90s, the term "alternative music" had lost much of its original meaning as rock radio and record buyers embraced increasingly slick, commercialized, and highly marketed forms of the genre. At the end of the decade, hip hop music had pushed much of alternative rock out of the mainstream, and most of what was left played pop-punk and highly polished versions of a grunge/rock mishmash. The DIY punk ethic refers to the idea of doing it yourself, i. ... Hip hop music is a style of popular music. ... Pop punk is used for two separate subgenres of punk rock music: the kind typically found on Lookout! Records, which stray very little from the three-chord formula that The Ramones pioneered, as well as a newer subgenre of melodic, more emotional punk, which includes by bands like NOFX and...


Following the lead of Pearl Jam, many acts who, by choice or fate, remained outside the commercial mainstream, became part of the indie rock movement. Indie rock acts placed a premium on maintaining complete control of their music and careers, often releasing albums on their own independent record labels and relying on touring, word-of-mouth, and airplay on independent or college radio stations for promotion. Linked by an ethos more than a musical approach, the indie rock movement encompasses a wide range of styles, from hard-edged, grunge influenced bands like Superchunk to punk-folk singers such as Ani DiFranco. Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Superchunk is an indie rock band from Chapel Hill, North Carolina. ... Ani DiFranco (pronounced AHH-nee) (born September 23, 1970) is a progressive feminist singer, guitarist, and songwriter. ...


Currently, many countries have an extensive local Indie scene, flourishing with bands with much less popularity than commercial bands, just enough of it to survive inside the respective country, but virtually unknown outside them.


Alternative Rock and Current Trends (1995-present)

With the death of Kurt Cobain, rock and roll music searched for a new face, sound, and trend. A second wave of alternative rock bands began to become popular, with grunge declining in the mid-90s. The Foo Fighters, Green Day and Radiohead spearheaded rock radio. In 1995, a Canadian pop star Alanis Morissette arose, and released Jagged Little Pill, a major hit that featured blunt, personally-revealing lyrics. It succeeded in moving the introspection that had become so common in grunge to the mainstream. The success of Jagged Little Pill spawned a wave of popularity in the late 90s of confessional rock releases by female artists including Jewel, Tori Amos, Fiona Apple, and Liz Phair. Many of these artists drew on their own alternative rock heroes from the 1980s and early 90s, including the folksy Tracy Chapman and various Riot Grrl bands. The use of introspective lyrics bled into other styles of rock, including those dubbed alternative. Kurt Donald Cobain (February 20, 1967 - April 5, 1994) was the lead singer and guitarist of the grunge band Nirvana, which also included bassist Krist Novoselic and drummer Dave Grohl. ... This article is about the band. ... Green Day is an American punk rock band consisting of Billie Joe Armstrong, Mike Dirnt (born Michael Pritchard), and Tré Cool (born Frank Edwin Wright III). ... L to R: Ed OBrien, Jonny Greenwood, Thom Yorke, Phil Selway and Colin Greenwood Radiohead are a British alternative rock band from Oxford. ... Alanis Morissette Alanis Nadine Morissette (born June 1, 1974) is a successful Canadian- American singer-songwriter and occasional actress. ... Jagged Little Pill was Canadian singer/songwriter Alanis Morissettes third album, released on June 13, 1995 (see 1995 in music). ... Jewel on the cover of her 2003 album 0304 Jewel Kilcher (born May 23, 1974) is a singer-songwriter better known by her stage name, Jewel. ... Tori Amos Tori Amos (born Myra Ellen Amos on August 22, 1963) is an American singer, pianist and songwriter. ... Fiona Apple Fiona Apple (born Fiona Apple Maggart on September 13, 1977) is a New York City-born singer-songwriter. ... Liz Phair on the cover of her album whitechocolatespaceegg (1998) Liz Phair (born April 17, 1967) is an American singer and songwriter. ... Tracy Chapman on the cover of her title album Tracy Chapman (born March 30, 1964) is an American singer-songwriter, best known for a small number of enduring hits, such as Fast Car and Give Me One Reason. Cleveland-born Chapman began playing guitar as a child, and eventually began... Riot grrl (also frequently spelled riot grrrl) is a form of hardcore punk rock music, known for its militant feminist stance. ...


The late 1990s brought about a wave of mergers and consolidations among US media companies and radio stations such as the Clear Channel Communications conglomerate. This has resulted in a homogenization of music available and the creation of artificially-hyped acts. Bands like Blink 182 and Green Day defined pop punk at the end of the 90s. At this time, "nu-metal" began to take popular form, it contained a mix of grunge, metal, and hip-hop. Using downtuned 7 string guitars KoRn first created their heavy crushing riffs in 1994 with their first self-titled album. This then spawned a wave of "nu-Metal" bands such as Linkin Park, Slipknot, Static-X, Creed, Disturbed, and Limp Bizkit. Clear Channel Communications is a media company based in the United States of America. ... blink-182 performs for sailors, marines and their families in Bahrain blink-182 (formerly known as blink) is a Southern-Californian pop punk band that was formed in 1992 by Tom Delonge and Mark Hoppus. ... Green Day is an American punk rock band consisting of Billie Joe Armstrong, Mike Dirnt (born Michael Pritchard), and Tré Cool (born Frank Edwin Wright III). ... Nu metal (or aggro metal) is a subgenre of heavy metal music. ... Linkin Park is (left to right) Joe Hahn, Mike Shinoda, Phoenix Farrell, Chester Bennington, Brad Delson and Rob Bourdon Linkin Park is a six-piece California nu metal band in the vein of Korn and Limp Bizkit. ... Slipknot can refer to several things: Slip knot, a kind of knot. ... Static-X is an alternative metal/heavy metal/Industrial metal band. ... Creed was formed in 1995 as a heavy metal, rock, and alternative rock group. ... (Disturbed is angry, mentally ill, or simply interrupted. ... Limp Bizkit is an American nu metal band. ...


In the early 2000s the entire music industry was shaken by claims of massive theft of music rights using file-sharing tools such as Napster, resulting in lawsuits against private file-sharers by the recording industry group the RIAA. File sharing is the activity of making files available to other users for download over the Internet, but also over smaller networks. ... For Napster, Inc. ... The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) is a special interest group representing the U.S. recording industry, and the body responsible for certifying gold and platinum albums and singles in the USA. For more information about sales data see list of best selling albums and list of best selling...


After existing in the musical underground, garage rock finally saw a resurgence of popularity in the early 2000s, with bands like The White Stripes, The Strokes, Jet, The Vines, and The Hives all releasing successful singles and albums. This wave is often referred to as back-to-basics rock because of its raw sound. Currently popular rock trends include, "Emo", or Emotional music, which draws its style from softer punk and alternative rock styles from the 1980s. Many new emo bands have become well-known since 2001, including Jimmy Eat World, My Chemical Romance, Dashboard Confessional and Taking Back Sunday. Additionally, the retro trend has led to the revitalization of dance-rock. Bands like Franz Ferdinand, Muse, and The Killers mix post-punk sensibilities with electronic beats. 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The White Stripes are a minimalist rock and roll duo from Detroit, formed in 1997. ... The Strokes are an American rock and roll band who formed in New York City and gained fame for their live shows. ... Jet is a rock band from Melbourne, Australia whose debut album Get Born released in 2003 has so far sold a million copies throughout the world. ... The Vines The Vines are an Australian garage rock band that emerged along with a new breed of alternative rockers such as The Strokes, The Hives and The White Stripes in 2002 (see 2002 in music). ... The Hives are a punk band from Fagersta, Sweden that emerged in the US and United Kingdom in the early 2000s. ... See Emo (disambiguation) for other uses of the term Emo. ... See Emo (disambiguation) for other uses of the term Emo. ... Jimmy Eat World promotional photograph, c. ... My Chemical Romance is an emo/punk band from Newark, New Jersey, formed by frontman Gerard Way and ex-drummer Matt Pelissier in 2001. ... Dashboard Confessional is an American emo band led by singer-songwriter and guitarist Chris Carrabba from Boca Raton, Florida. ... Taking Back Sunday Taking Back Sunday are a Long Island emo band from Amityville, New York. ...


Meanwhile, "Top 40" Rock music today is dependent on either synthesizer orchestration or sampling, prominent in such pop rock artists like Pink, Gwen Stefani, Ashlee Simpson, Hilary Duff, Lindsey Lohan, Jessica Simpson, and Kelly Clarkson. Gwen Stefani Gwen Renée Stefani (born October 3, 1969) is an American singer and the frontwoman of the band No Doubt who launched a successful solo career in late 2004. ... Ashlee Simpson in her Shadow music video ( 2004) Ashlee Nicole Simpson (born October 3, 1984 in Dallas, Texas) is an American singer, actress and the younger sister of singer Jessica Simpson. ... Hilary Duff Hilary Ann Lisa Duff (born September 28, 1987) is an American actress and pop music singer. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Jessica Simpson on the cover of her album Sweet Kisses Jessica Ann Simpson (born July 10, 1980) is an American pop singer who rose to fame during the late 1990s. ... Kelly Clarkson Kelly Brianne Clarkson (born April 24, 1982) is an American singer who was the winner of the first season of American Idol and has since gone on to have a very successful recording career. ...


Rap/Hip-Hop music dominantes the U.S. charts pop charts, with artists like 50 cent, Snoop Dogg, Puff Daddy, Nelly, Eminem and Jay Z selling millions of records. R&B acts like Destiny's Child, Eve and Alicia Keyes are very popular on the pop charts. 50 Cent 50 Cent a. ... Snoop Dogg Calvin Cordozar Broadus (born October 20, 1971 in Long Beach, California) is a rap musician and actor. ... Sean John Combs (born November 4, 1969 aka P. Diddy, Puff Daddy, Sean Puffy Combs) is an American record producer and CEO and founder of Bad Boy Entertainment, one of the driving forces in hip hop in the mid to late 1990s. ... This article is about Nelly, the rapper. ... Eminem is the stage name of Marshall Bruce Mathers III (born October 17, 1972), one of todays most controversial and popular hip hop musicians. ... Jay-Z (aka the Jigga, HOV and Hova, born Shawn Carter on December 4, 1970 in Brooklyn, New York) is an African American rapper/hip hop artist and record label executive; one of the most popular and successful rappers of the late 1990s and early 2000s. ... Destinys Child featured on the cover of their latest album, Destiny Fulfilled. ... Alicia Keys Alicia Keys (born Alicia Augello-Cook on January 25, 1981 in Manhattan, New York City, USA) is a popular R&B vocalist and pianist. ...


Timeline of well-known rock bands and artists


Social impacts

Main article: Social impact of rock and roll Rock and rebellion From its beginnings, rock and roll has been associated with youth, rebellion, and anti-establishmentism. ...


The influence of rock and roll is far-reaching, and has had significant impact worldwide on fashion, film styles, and attitudes towards sex and sexuality and use of drugs and alcohol. This impact is broad enough that "rock and roll" may also be considered a life style in addition to a form of music.


Awards

In rock and roll, there are four major US music awards shows that take place annually to honor the artists and their music: the American Music Awards (held in November), the Billboard Music Awards (held in December), the Grammy Awards (held in February), and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony (held in March). The American Music Awards show is one of four annual major music awards shows (the others being the Billboard Music Awards, the Grammy Awards, and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony). ... The Billboard Music Awards, held annually in December, is one of four major US music awards shows presented each year (the others being the American Music Awards, the Grammys, and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony). ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony is held annually in March and sponsored by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. ...


Trivia

  • The first gramophone record released in Britain to feature the words Rock and Roll was "Bloodnock's Rock And Roll Call", a 1956 record from The Goon Show.
  • There have been many songs with the title "Rock and Roll" from The Treniers in the 1950s to Led Zeppelin and Gary Glitter in the 1970s.

1956 is a leap year starting on Sunday. ... The Goon Show was a hugely popular and extremely influential British radio comedy programme, which was originally produced and broadcast by the BBC from 1951 to 1960 on the BBC Home Service. ... The Treniers (Cliff and Claude Trenier) played a cross between swing and early rock n roll. ... Led Zeppelin (clockwise from left: Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, John Bonham, John Paul Jones) Led Zeppelin was a British band noted for their innovative, influential approach to heavy blues-rock and as one of the most popular and influential bands of all time. ... Gary Glitter (born May 8, 1944 in Banbury, Oxfordshire, UK) was a British rock and roll performer in the early 1970s, most notable for his hit song Rock and Roll, parts of which have become an almost ubiquitous anthem at many American professional sports events. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about:

  Results from FactBites:
 
YOJOE.COM | Rock N Roll (369 words)
Rock N Roll came with a dark gray helmet, a fl M-60 machine gun, and a fl bipod that snapped onto the end of the machine gun.
Rock N Roll's head and arms were re-used for Breaker and Clutch.
Rock N Roll's legs were shared with Breaker, Clutch, Grunt, Hawk, Shortfuze, Stalker, Steeler, and Zap (and in 1983 Tan Grunt and in 1984 Tan Clutch).
rock 'n' roll: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (3278 words)
Rock and roll (also known as rock 'n' roll), is a defined supergenre of music that originated in the United States in the 1950s, and quickly spread to the rest of the world.
Rock and roll emerged as a defined musical style in America in the late 1940s, when it was called RandB, and, with the present name, in the early 1950s, though elements of rock and roll can be heard in blues records as far back as the 1920s.
An early form of rock and roll, though not the earliest, was rockabilly, which combined elements of blues, boogie woogie, and jazz with influences from traditional Appalachian folk music, gospel, and country and western.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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