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Encyclopedia > RoboCop (film)
RoboCop

Film poster
Directed by Paul Verhoeven
Produced by Jon Davison
Written by Edward Neumeier
Michael Miner
Starring Peter Weller
Nancy Allen
Daniel O'Herlihy
Ronny Cox
Kurtwood Smith
Miguel Ferrer
Music by Basil Poledouris
Cinematography Sol Negrin
Jost Vacano
Editing by Frank J. Urioste
Distributed by Orion Pictures
Release date(s) July 17, 1987
Running time 102 min.
Country United States
Language English
Budget $13,000,000 (estimated)
Followed by RoboCop 2 (1990)
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

RoboCop is a 1987 science fiction action movie and satire of business-driven capitalism, directed by Paul Verhoeven. It spawned two sequels, several comic books, multiple video games, two animated series, dozens of action figures and two television series, all featuring a cyborg police officer. The film was produced by Orion Pictures. Image File history File linksMetadata RoboCop. ... This article is about the Dutch director; for the German director, actor, and writer see Paul Verhoeven (Germany). ... Jon Davison is a film producer. ... Edward Neumeier is a screenwriter best known for his work on the science fiction movies RoboCop (with Michael Miner) and Starship Troopers. ... Peter Weller (born June 24, 1947 in Stevens Point, Wisconsin) is an American film and stage actor and lecturer. ... Nancy Allen (born June 24, 1950 in New York City died October 12, 2006) was an American film actress. ... Dan OHerlihy (May 1, 1919–February 17, 2005) was an Irish film actor. ... Ronny Cox as Former Vice-President Robert Kinsey in Stargate SG-1 Daniel Ronald Cox (born Saturday, July 23, 1938 in Cloudcroft, New Mexico and grew up in Portales, New Mexico. ... ≤silly kittens behind an alley looking for scaps of food Kurtwood Larson Smith (born July 3, 1943) is an American television and film character actor. ... Miguel Ferrer (born February 7, 1955 in Santa Monica, California) is a Puerto Rican-American actor who is often cast in movies as a villain. ... Basil Poledouris (Greek: Βασίλης Πολεδούρης) (August 21, 1945 - November 8, 2006) was an American film composer. ... Jost Vacano (* March 15, 1940) is a German cinematographer and director of photography. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... hellotyle=float:right; |- | |- | |} July 17 is the 198th day (199th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 167 days remaining. ... // May 9 - Actor Tom Cruise marries actress Mimi Rogers. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory[1], the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... RoboCop 2 is a satirical science fiction film, released in 1990 and set in the near future in a dystopian metropolitan Detroit, Michigan. ... // Chris Rock and Adam Sandler join SNL February 4 - Actor Tom Cruise and actress Mimi Rogers divorce. ... // May 9 - Actor Tom Cruise marries actress Mimi Rogers. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... Capitalism generally refers to an economic system in which the means of production are mostly privately[1] owned and operated for profit, and in which distribution, production and pricing of goods and services are determined in a largely free market. ... This article is about the Dutch director; for the German director, actor, and writer see Paul Verhoeven (Germany). ... A sequel is a work of fiction in literature, film, and other creative works that is produced after a completed work, and is set in the same universe but at a later time. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... This article is about computer and video games. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... Zarbon action figure of from Dragon Ball Z made by Bandai An action figure is a posable plastic figurine of a character, often from a movie, video game, or television program. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Cyborgs are a prominent staple in the science fiction genre. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The film is set in a dystopian near future, in Detroit, Michigan. Violent crime is out of control, and the city is in financial ruin. The city contracts the megacorporation Omni Consumer Products (OCP) to fund and operate the police department, in effect privatizing it. OCP is not interested in rebuilding "Old Detroit" but with replacing it with a modern utopia called "Delta City". Before this large construction project can begin, OCP wishes to end crime in the city, and creates a superhuman law-enforcement agent known as RoboCop. A dystopia (from the Greek δυσ- and τόπος, alternatively, cacotopia[1], kakotopia or anti-utopia) is a fictional society that is the antithesis of utopia. ... Nickname: Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (Latin for, We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes) Location in Wayne County, Michigan Coordinates: Country United States State Michigan County Wayne County Government  - Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick Area  - City  143. ... A violent crime or crime of violence is a crime in which the offender uses or threatens violent force upon the victim. ... Bankruptcy is a legally declared inability or impairment of ability of an individual or organization to pay their creditors. ... Megacorp is a term popularized by William Gibson derived from the combination of the prefix mega- with an abbreviation of the word corporation. ... Omni Consumer Products (OCP) is the primary fictional corporation in the RoboCop series of movies, tv-shows, video-games, and comics. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Left panel (The Earthly Paradise, Garden of Eden), from Hieronymus Boschs The Garden of Earthly Delights. ...

Contents

Plot

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

Set in the near future, the film starts with the broadcast of a short television news program called “Media Break”. The report explains that social conditions are worsening in the city of Detroit. Drug abuse is growing rapidly, the number of impoverished and unemployed people increases daily, and violent crime has nearly overwhelmed the Detroit police force, which has recently been taken over by a large, multinational corporation and Megacorp, Omni Consumer Products (OCP). There are also rumblings of a potential strike by the police, who feel they are being mistreated by OCP. They are also angry about the brutal murders of several of their comrades, masterminded by a well-known crime boss, Clarence Boddicker. Drug abuse has a wide range of definitions related to taking a psychoactive drug or performance enhancing drug for a non-therapeutic or non-medical effect. ... An 1837 political cartoon about unemployment in the United States. ... A multinational corporation (MNC) is a corporation or enterprise that manages production establishments or delivers services in at least two countries. ... Megacorp is a term popularized by William Gibson derived from the combination of the prefix mega- with an abbreviation of the word corporation. ...


At a meeting of OCP executives, Dick Jones, Senior Vice President, introduces a new law enforcement droid, ED-209. During the demonstration, ED-209’s programming fails and it brutally kills junior executive Mr. Kinney. Seizing upon Jones’ failure, a young, opportunistic executive, Bob Morton, convinces the head of OCP that his own project, “RoboCop”, will be a more effective and less dangerous alternative. The “Old Man” gives Morton his blessing. Jones, naturally, is infuriated at Morton for going over his head. The first appearance of the ED-209 in the first RoboCop film The Enforcement Droid Series 209 (or ED-209) is a fictional law enforcement robot featured as one of the design and special effect highlights of the movie RoboCop (1987), and its two sequels. ...


Alex J. Murphy (Peter Weller), a dedicated cop and family man, begins his new assignment in the Metro West precinct, a particularly violent section of "Old Detroit." Murphy is partnered with Anne Lewis (Nancy Allen), a tough, experienced veteran officer. On their first assignment, they engage in a gun battle with Boddicker’s gang, who have just robbed a bank. Tracking them to an abandoned steel mill, Murphy and Lewis proceed inside without backup (which is 'unavailable'). While Lewis is temporarily incapacitated, Murphy is viciously and sadistically shot up by Boddicker and his gang, and later dies in an emergency room. Peter Weller (born June 24, 1947 in Stevens Point, Wisconsin) is an American film and stage actor and lecturer. ... Nancy Allen (born June 24, 1950 in New York City died October 12, 2006) was an American film actress. ...


Morton’s team goes ahead with its project of building a cyborg from Murphy’s corpse. Murphy, selected as a "prime candidate" for the project, is rebuilt as RoboCop. Programmed to follow a set of four Prime Directives (one of which is classified, even to RoboCop himself), RoboCop deals with criminals using extreme methods (his programming seems to disregard Miranda rights, though he does make use of them later in the film), often resulting in what would usually be considered police brutality. The project is a success with RoboCop spectacularly halting crime all over the city, and Morton is made a vice president of OCP. A cyborg is a cybernetic organism (i. ... The Miranda warning is a police warning that is given to criminal suspects in police custody in the United States before they are asked questions relating to the commission of crimes. ... David Kirkwood on the ground after being struck by police batons Police brutality is a term used to describe the excessive use of physical force, assault, verbal attacks, and threats by police officers and other law enforcement officers. ...


RoboCop begins to experience dreams that recall his previous life. Lewis suspects that RoboCop is Murphy, and she tells him his real name when they meet in a hallway. RoboCop shows no reaction, but later the cyborg happens to apprehend one of Boddicker’s gang, Emil, who also recognizes him. He accesses the main police computer and finds out that Alex Murphy was murdered and that Boddicker is the prime suspect. In the meantime, Morton is celebrating his promotion with two prostitutes when Boddicker appears. After chasing the girls out, Boddicker puts several rounds into Bob's legs, rendering him unable to walk, and he plays a recorded message from Dick Jones, who taunts Bob about going over the boss' head. Boddicker leaves a live grenade on the coffee table and exits the condo. The grenade goes off as Morton struggles toward it, killing him.

RoboCop, as portrayed by actor Peter Weller
RoboCop, as portrayed by actor Peter Weller

RoboCop tracks Boddicker to a cocaine factory. The factory workers open fire, but their firearms are useless against the armored cyborg. RoboCop reads Boddicker his Miranda rights while throwing him through several plate glass windows. He is about to kill him when the criminal reveals that he is working for Dick Jones and reminds RoboCop that he is a police officer, not a mindless killer. After some hesitation, RoboCop arrests him instead. Image File history File links RoboCop File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links RoboCop File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Peter Weller (born June 24, 1947 in Stevens Point, Wisconsin) is an American film and stage actor and lecturer. ...


RoboCop goes immediately to Dick Jones’ office at OCP headquarters with the intention of arresting him for "aiding and abetting a known felon." As he tries to arrest a surprisingly cooperative Jones, his system unexpectedly begins to shut down. Jones reveals that the previously classified "Directive Four" makes it impossible for RoboCop to arrest any senior executive of OCP, and any attempt to do so results in the disabling of RoboCop’s operating system. Jones also reveals that he had Morton murdered because of the success of the RoboCop project, and orders ED-209 to destroy RoboCop. A battle ensues and RoboCop manages to escape (mainly because of 209's inability to walk down stairs) though he takes heavy damage from ED-209's military grade weaponry. He is met in the parking garage by a large police unit, who open fire with armor-piercing bullets, attempting to destroy the cyborg. Lewis arrives and takes her old partner to an old factory (the same one where he was murdered). RoboCop removes his helmet and sees the face of Murphy. He asks about Murphy’s wife and son and Lewis informs him that they started a new life after his funeral.


Dick Jones frees Boddicker and provides him with weapons and a tracking device to find RoboCop and destroy him. Boddicker gathers his old gang and they track their quarry to the factory. RoboCop, aided by Lewis, kills them all. He travels to OCP headquarters to deal with Jones, destroys the ED-209 guarding the entrance, and interrupts a high-level meeting where Jones is promoting the use of ED-209 to replace the striking police force. Murphy reveals to the board that Jones had Morton murdered, playing a recording of Jones’ earlier confession. Jones grabs a gun, takes the Old Man hostage, demands a helicopter, and threatens to kill the Old Man if anyone tries to stop him. The Old Man fires Jones on the spot. Murphy, no longer having to abide by Directive Four, shoots Jones, causing him to fall out the window to his death. The Old Man comments, "Nice shooting, son. What's your name?" to which RoboCop, cracking a smile, replies, "Murphy."

Spoilers end here.

Robocop the character

The Prime Directives

Directive 4
Directive 4

RoboCop is programmed to follow four prime directives (the first three are comparable to Asimov's Laws of Robotics): Image File history File links RoboCop_-_Directive_4_DRM.png‎ Summary RoboCop attempts to arrest Omni Consumer Products (OCP) vice-president but cannot due to Directive 4. ... Image File history File links RoboCop_-_Directive_4_DRM.png‎ Summary RoboCop attempts to arrest Omni Consumer Products (OCP) vice-president but cannot due to Directive 4. ... Dr. Isaac Asimov (January 1, 1920 – April 6, 1992, IPA: , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов) was a Russian-born American author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful and exceptionally prolific writer best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...

  1. "Serve the public trust"
  2. "Protect the innocent"
  3. "Uphold the law"
  4. "Classified" (see below)

The fourth directive, which he was programmed to be unaware of unless it became relevant, rendered him physically incapable of placing any senior OCP employee under arrest ("Any attempt to arrest a senior OCP officer results in shutdown" - although it's not clear if this is the actual wording of the directive). In the first movie, it made him unable to act against corrupt Vice-President Richard "Dick" Jones until Jones was fired by the chairman of OCP. The Chicago Police Department arrests a man An arrest is the action of the police, or person acting under the law, to take a person into custody so that they may be forthcoming to answer for the commission of a crime. ...


In RoboCop 3, Directive Four is labelled as "Never oppose an OCP officer". Also noteworthy is that Directive 4 has been erased twice, in each of the sequels. RoboCop 2 sees the deletion of all of the directives. RoboCop 3 is a science fiction film, released in 1993, set in the near future in a dystopian metropolitan Detroit, Michigan. ... RoboCop 2 is a satirical science fiction film, released in 1990 and set in the near future in a dystopian metropolitan Detroit, Michigan. ...


Weapons

  • Auto-9: Ammo Type: 9mm; Magazine Size: 50 Rounds; Fire Rate: 600 Rounds/minute; In essence the weapon used is a modifed Beretta 93R. This is RoboCop's primary weapon. It is "holstered" in his right thigh.
  • Cobra assault cannon: The "Cobra gun" that is used in RoboCop 1 is based on the Barrett M82A1A Sniper rifle. The Cobra gun used in RoboCop 2 is different from the one in RoboCop 1. RoboCop 2 uses a Pauza P-50 rifle caliber .50 BMG. In RoboCop 1 the "Cobra gun" could fire explosive rounds equivalent to that of a missle launcher. In RoboCop 2 the weapon has a smaller build and fires explosive rounds whose explosion is several times smaller then the first version of the weapon.
  • Multi-weapon: This weapon of an unspecified name was created exclusively for RoboCop in Robocop 3 by replacing one of his "hands". The weapon contains a machine gun (presumably either 9mm, 7.62mm NATO or 5.56mm NATO), an anti-tank launcher, and a flame thrower.

Beretta Model 93R is a selective-fire machine pistol. ... It has been suggested that L82A1 be merged into this article or section. ... A . ... RoboCop 3 is a science fiction film, released in 1993, set in the near future in a dystopian metropolitan Detroit, Michigan. ... ball and hollowpoint 9mm Luger rounds are popular handgun ammunition. ... NATO 7. ... U.S. Military 5. ...

Visor

RoboCop's visor contains a 4x zoom scope for better aim as well as tracking. RoboCop also has different vision modes but the only one that has been used in the movies was thermal vision in RoboCop 1 and RoboCop 3. His visor also contains a grid which is crucial to RoboCop's targeting as well as bullet projectery, though apparently the targeting reticle of RoboCop is seemingly internal to him, as seen in the first movie (after the fight with the ED-209 his aim becomes slightly unhinged and requires Lewis to "aim for him" while he recalibrates his targeting). The visor also has a recorder which can detect voice fluctuations as well as play back recordings. Besides this the visor is made of several layers of titanium laminated with kevlar and a black strip of bulletproof anti-fog glass which protects the cranium apparatus and eyes. The visor also has an under cloth of kevlar which protects the neck and covers up any wires etc. Thermography can refer to a printing process and an imaging process. ... General Name, Symbol, Number titanium, Ti, 22 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 4, 4, d Appearance silvery metallic Standard atomic weight 47. ... Chemical structure of Kevlar. ...


Body Structure

RoboCop's body is titanium with steel backing and is also kevlar laminated. When shot at, the kevlar coating will slowly break off but will provide as much protection until that certain area of body armor has been shot off. Being made of titanium, RoboCop is incredibly resilient against both bombs and bullets, as well as getting hit by cars and any other injuries. As demonstrated in RoboCop 1 the body armor can sustain thousands of armor-piercing rounds before damage begins to appear on the armor itself.


RoboCop's arms, legs and other appendages contain tubes through which the blood for RoboCop's biological organs flows. In RoboCop 2 RoboCop's right arm contained a signal that alerted personnel to his health status. RoboCop's hands also contain motors strong enough to crush every bone in a human hand (at 400 foot pounds as mentioned in Robocop 1). His right hand also contains a data jack in the shape of a spike which is used to retrieve or display data. At the end of the first film, the jack is used as a stabbing weapon against the antagonist Clarence Boddicker.


Production details

Origins

RoboCop was written by Edward Neumeier and Michael Miner. Allegedly, while the two were attempting to pitch the screenplay around Hollywood, they accidentally got stuck at an airplane terminal with a high ranking movie executive for several hours. Here they were able to warm him up for the project and thus set into motion the chain of events which eventually became RoboCop the movie. Edward Neumeier is a screenwriter best known for his work on the science fiction movies RoboCop (with Michael Miner) and Starship Troopers. ...


RoboCop marked the first major Hollywood production for Dutch director Paul Verhoeven. Although he had been working in the Netherlands for over a decade and directed several films to great acclaim (e.g. Soldier of Orange), Verhoeven moved away in 1984 to seek broader opportunities in Hollywood. While RoboCop is often credited as his English language debut, he had in fact previously made Flesh & Blood (film) in 1985, starring Rutger Hauer and Jennifer Jason Leigh. It was for RoboCop however, that Verhoeven would rise to the international spotlight. This article is about the Dutch director; for the German director, actor, and writer see Paul Verhoeven (Germany). ... Soldaat van Oranje (Soldier of Orange) is a 1977 film by Paul Verhoeven, starring Rutger Hauer and Jeroen Krabbe. ... Flesh & Blood (1985) is a film directed by Paul Verhoeven. ... Rutger Oelsen Hauer (IPA: [rʏtxɛr ulsɛn hʌuɛr]) (born in Breukelen, January 23, 1944) is a Dutch film actor. ... Jennifer Jason Leigh (born February 5, 1962) is an American actress who has appeared in numerous films. ...


On the audio commentary Verhoeven recalls that, when he first glanced through the script, he threw it away in disgust. Afterwards, his wife picked the script from the bin and read it more thoroughly, convincing him that the plot had more substance than he originally assumed. Repo Man director Alex Cox was offered to direct before Verhoeven came aboard [1]. The four alien bodies. Repo Man is a 1984 cult film directed by Alex Cox, produced by Michael Nesmith, and starring Emilio Estevez and Harry Dean Stanton. ... Alexander Morton Cox (b. ...


The story satirizes Reagonomics and the consumerism of the eighties era, with OCP presented as a massive corporate hulk that controls citizens' lives on all levels of society. Almost no distinction is made between the conduct of top level executives and street criminals, as both are seen occupied with drugs, corrupting society and talking the same catch phrases while conducting their shady affairs ("good business is where you find it").[2] The term Reaganomics, a portmanteau of Reagan and economics, was used to describe, and decry, the economic policies of U.S. President Ronald Reagan during the 1980s. ... It has been suggested that affluenza and anti-consumerism be merged into this article or section. ...


The character of RoboCop itself was inspired by Judge Dredd[3] as well as the Marvel Comics superhero Iron Man (one of these comic books can be seen during the convenience store robbery). Iron Man was conceived by Stan Lee as the alter ego of Tony Stark, a Vietnam veteran, billionaire and industrialist working as a military contractor. During the original run of the comic, Iron Man was mostly occupied battling communism. In this light, RoboCop is seen as a subversive take on this classic Marvel character. Although both Neumeier and Verhoeven have declared themselves staunchly on the left as far politics are concerned, Neumeier recalls on the audio commentary to Starship Troopers that many of his leftist friends wrongly perceived RoboCop as a fascist movie. For the 1995 film, see Judge Dredd (film). ... Marvel Comics (Stan Lee is behind many of the superheros) is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... Iron Man (Anthony Edward Stark) is a fictional comic book character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Stan The Man Lee (born Stanley Martin Lieber on December 28, 1922[1] New York, New York) is an American writer, editor, Chairman Emeritus of Marvel Comics, and memoirist, who — with several artist co-creators, most notably Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko — introduced complex, naturalistic characters and a thoroughly shared... Vietnam veteran is a phrase used to describe someone who served in the armed forces of participating countries during the Vietnam War. ... Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production. ... Starship Troopers is a science fiction novel by Robert A. Heinlein, first published (in abridged form) as a serial in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction (October, November 1959, as Starship Soldier) and published hardcover in 1959. ...

"I'd buy that for a dollar"
"I'd buy that for a dollar"

In several articles and interviews previously published and also on the DVD commentary to the film, Paul Verhoeven revealed that, despite not being a Christian, he immediately saw parallels in the story of RoboCop with that of the crucifixion of Jesus Christ. In the commentary, Verhoeven goes on to defend the graphic death of Murphy as a necessity to make the resurrection as RoboCop gain dramatic weight, and the aversion of the audience to the villains greater. Four years earlier, Verhoeven had made the movie The Fourth Man, which relies heavily on Christian symbolism. Image File history File linksMetadata Buyfordollar. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Buyfordollar. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... In The Fourth Man (original Dutch title is De Vierde Man), an alcoholic novelist, Gerard Reve, leaves Amsterdam to deliver a lecture at the Vlissingen Literary Society where he becomes sexually involved with its attractive treasurer, Christine Halslag. ...


A running joke within RoboCop is the TV show It's Not My Problem, with its catchphrase "I'd buy that for a dollar!", starring the goofy character, Bixby Snyder (S.D. Nemeth), who was based on Benny Hill. However neither the name of the show nor the character are ever revealed in the movie. On the DVD commentary, Edward Neumeier comments that somehow they never got it into the dialog. According to the one version of the script, Snyder was set to appear in a fourth "media break" immediately following the death of Dick Jones in the OPC boardroom (where the film version ends). A news program was to show Snyder handcuffed by police and doing a Frog-march because of allegations of child molestation. Alfred Hawthorn Hill (21 January 1924 – 20 April 1992), better known as Pulle Hill, was a prolific English comic, actor and singer, best known for his television programme, The Benny Hill Show. ... Look up frog march in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sexual abuse is physical or psychological abuse that involves crimes in most countries. ...


Casting

Paul Verhoeven initially considered Rutger Hauer, who he had worked with on most of his films, as well as Michael Ironside, for the role of RoboCop. Allegedly Arnold Schwarzenegger was at one point in talks to do the film, but Verhoeven eventually dismissed all three on the basis that the bulky RoboCop costume would require a light-built actor to work with. Peter Weller was subsequently cast as Murphy/RoboCop and prepared for the role by studying bird movements in a padded baseball suit. Rutger Oelsen Hauer (IPA: [rʏtxɛr ulsɛn hʌuɛr]) (born in Breukelen, January 23, 1944) is a Dutch film actor. ... Michael Ironside screen shot Michael Ironside (born Fred Ironside February 12, 1950 in Toronto, Ontario) is a Canadian character actor. ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German pronunciation (IPA): ) (born on July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, actor and an American politician, currently serving as the 38th Governor of California. ...


In the commentary, Verhoeven explains his choice to cast Kurtwood Smith and Ronny Cox as the central villains. Ronny Cox was an actor who until then was primarily known for "nice-guy" roles such as fatherly figures, and similarily Kurtwood Smith was cast against type as a more intellectual type of gang leader. Verhoeven comments that the look of Clarence Boddicker with the glasses reminded him of Heinrich Himmler. ≤silly kittens behind an alley looking for scaps of food Kurtwood Larson Smith (born July 3, 1943) is an American television and film character actor. ... Ronny Cox as Former Vice-President Robert Kinsey in Stargate SG-1 Daniel Ronald Cox (born Saturday, July 23, 1938 in Cloudcroft, New Mexico and grew up in Portales, New Mexico. ...   (October 7, 1900 – May 23, 1945) was the commander of the German Schutzstaffel (SS) and one of the most powerful men in Nazi Germany. ...


The principal cast of RoboCop:

In addition, the secretary of OCP executive Dick Jones is played by Joan Pirkle, the real-life wife of Kurtwood Smith. Paul Verhoeven himself has a small cameo during the arrest of Leon in the nightclub scene. Peter Weller (born June 24, 1947 in Stevens Point, Wisconsin) is an American film and stage actor and lecturer. ... Nancy Allen (born June 24, 1950 in New York City died October 12, 2006) was an American film actress. ... Ronny Cox as Former Vice-President Robert Kinsey in Stargate SG-1 Daniel Ronald Cox (born Saturday, July 23, 1938 in Cloudcroft, New Mexico and grew up in Portales, New Mexico. ... ≤silly kittens behind an alley looking for scaps of food Kurtwood Larson Smith (born July 3, 1943) is an American television and film character actor. ... Miguel Ferrer (born February 7, 1955 in Santa Monica, California) is a Puerto Rican-American actor who is often cast in movies as a villain. ... Robert DoQui (born 1934 in Stillwater, Oklahoma, United States) is an African-American actor who has starred in film and on television. ... Felton Perry (born on September 11, 1939 in Chicago, Illinois, USA) is an African-American actor. ... Paul McCrane as Dr. Romano on ER. Paul David McCrane (born January 19, 1961) is an American movie, television and theatre actor. ... Jesse D. Goins is an African-American character actor who has starred in film and on television. ... Ray Wise as Vice President Hal Gardner on 24 Ray Wise (born 20 August 1947 in Akron, Ohio, USA) is an American actor, known for his roles in Twin Peaks (as Leland Palmer) and RoboCop (as Leon Nash). ...


Filming

Filming began during the summer of 1986 and lasted from August 6 until mid-October. Many of the urban settings of the movie were filmed in downtown Dallas, Texas due to the futuristic appearances of the buildings. The front of Dallas City Hall was used as the exterior for the fictional OCP Headquarters, combined with extensive matte painting to make the building appear taller. 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 6 is the 218th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (219th in leap years), with 147 days remaining. ... Nickname: Big D Location in the state of Texas Country United States State Texas Counties Dallas, Collin, Denton, Kaufman, and Rockwall Incorporated 2 February 1856  - Mayor Laura Miller Area    - City  385. ...


Although Peter Weller had prepared extensively for the role using a padded costume (supposedly, development of the actual RoboCop suit was three weeks behind schedule. By the time shooting was underway and the costume arrived on set, Weller discovered he was almost unable to move in it as he had anticipated, and required additional training to get accustomed. Weller later revealed to Roger Ebert that during filming, he was losing three pounds a day due to sweat loss while wearing the RoboCop suit in 100+ degree temperatures [4]. Peter's personal assistant, Todd Trotter, was responsible for keeping the actor cool in between takes with electric fans and, when available, large ducts connected to free-standing air conditioning units. The suit later had a fan built into it. Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize winning American film critic. ...

6000 SUX adversement.
6000 SUX adversement.

The Ford Taurus was used as the police interceptor in the movie due to its then-futuristic design. Additionally, the main competitor of the Ford Taurus at the time was the Pontiac 6000, which is parodied by its movie counterpart, the "6000 SUX". The 6000 SUX itself was based on a 1976 Oldsmobile Cutlass with extensive bodywork. Commercials advertise the SUX as "an American tradition" with a fuel efficiency of 8.2 miles per gallon. In early production, it was to be powered by jet turbines. The exhaust of the turbine is still visible above the rear license plate of Clarence Boddicker's SUX in chase scenes. The 6000 SUX was designed by Gene Winfield of Winfield Rod & Custom, while the Chiodo Brothers Productions fabricated and animated the dinosaur puppet in the 6000 SUX commercial[5]. Image File history File links 6000SUX.jpg‎ Screenshot of the adversment for the 6000 SUX. Fair use rationale: Screenshot is taken from a movie. ... Image File history File links 6000SUX.jpg‎ Screenshot of the adversment for the 6000 SUX. Fair use rationale: Screenshot is taken from a movie. ... The Ford Taurus is a mid-size, front wheel drive car manufactured by the Ford Motor Company in North America. ... The Pontiac 6000 was a conservatively styled mid-size car introduced by Pontiac in 1981 for the 1982 model year, slotting between the Bonneville and the Phoenix. ... The Oldsmobile Cutlass was an automobile made by the Oldsmobile division of General Motors. ... Miles per gallon (MPG, or mpg) is a measure of fuel efficiency - the number of miles the car can run on one gallon of fuel. ...


Soundtrack

The soundtrack score for the movie was composed by Basil Poledouris (1945 - 2006), who used both synthesized and orchestral music as a mirror to the man-versus-machine theme of the movie. The score alternates brass heavy material, including the memorable RoboCop theme and ED-209's theme, with more introverted pieces for strings, such as during RoboCop's home-coming scene. The soundtrack is available on CD and has been reissued and remastered several times in recent years. The theme song also made its way into the arcade and NES RoboCop video games. Basil Poledouris (Greek: Βασίλης Πολεδούρης) (August 21, 1945 - November 8, 2006) was an American film composer. ... Image of a trumpet. ... A string instrument (or stringed instrument) is a musical instrument that produces sound by means of vibrating strings. ...


In the Nightclub scene of the movie, the song "Show Me Your Spine" by P.T.P. was played. P.T.P was a short lived side project consisting of members of the band Ministry. However, this song was not available in any official form until it was eventually released in 2004 on an album called "Side Trax" by Ministry. The industrial band PTP was a short-lived side project of Ministrys Alain Jourgensen. ... Ministry is an American industrial metal band of the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s fronted by Al Jourgensen. ...


Reception

RoboCop opened in American theaters on July 17, 1987. The film was a commercial success and grossed over $8 million in its opening weekend and almost $54 million during its domestic run, making it the 16th most successful movie that year [6] [7]. hellotyle=float:right; |- | |- | |} July 17 is the 198th day (199th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 167 days remaining. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The movie was originally given an X rating by the MPAA in 1987. To satisfy the requirements of the ratings board, Verhoeven trimmed blood and gore from the most violent scenes in the movie, including the malfunctioning of ED-209, Murphy's execution (where his entire right arm is severed by a shotgun blast and a final overhead shot of Lewis sobbing over Murphy on the blood-soaked floor), and the final battle with Clarence Boddicker. It was re-evaluated and given an R rating. The original version was included on the Criterion Collection laserdisc and DVD of the film (both now out of print), as well as the 2005 trilogy box set version. All DVD versions, except the out of print Criterion, allow the option to view both the theatrical version and the director's cut. X-rated, X certificate, X classification or similar terms are labels for movies implying strong adult content, typically pornography or violence. ... The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), originally called the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors Association of America, is a non-profit trade association based in the United States which was formed to advance the interests of movie studios. ... The MPAA film rating system is a system used in the United States and territories and instituted by the Motion Picture Association of America to rate a movie based on its content. ...


Critical reaction to the movie was almost overwhelmingly positive, gaining 91% approval rate on Rotten Tomatoes.[8]. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Themes

RoboCop explores larger themes regarding the media and human nature in addition to being a big budget action film; the philosopher Steven Best wrote an essay on some of this content[9]. Image:Steven best. ...


In the Criterion Edition DVD commentary track, executive producer Jon Davison and writer Edward Neumeier both point to the decay of American industry from the 1970s through the early 1980s. The abandoned Rust Belt-style factories that RoboCop and Clarence Boddicker's gang use as hideouts demonstrate this theme. Massive unemployment is prevalent, being reported frequently on the news, as is poverty and the crime that results from economic hardship. The Criterion Collection is a privately held company which produces and releases authorative consumer versions of important classic and contemporary films on DVD. It was established in 1984 as a joint venture between Janus Films and the Voyager Company. ... Manufacturing Belt, highlighted in red The Rust Belt, a term coined from Manufacturing Belt, is an area in parts of the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States of America. ...


The concept of dehumanization is also represented in the title character. Murphy is killed in the line of duty and rebuilt as a cold, mechanized, and violent entity. Although he later seems to regain some of his humanity, his ruthlessness in dealing with criminals is quite outside the boundaries of reasonable use of force employed by the police. His methods are, however, amazingly effective against the criminal elements of the city, with the movie depicting crime decreasing dramatically where RoboCop is operating.


In contrast to the theme of dehumanization is the theme of regaining one's humanity. Although Murphy has become "RoboCop", during the last sequence of the movie we find that despite being a product of OCP, his basic core of individuality has not been lost. The president of OCP says, "Nice shooting son, what's your name?" Robocop declares, "Murphy." It is now clear that Robocop is no longer just a programmed and manufactured amalgam of flesh and robotics, but a human being.


Another theme is the sense of justice finally being brought to vicious and remorseless criminals. The criminals mercilessly execute Murphy as well as many other cops and innocent citizens and are involved in drug trafficking, murder, and prostitution. A key point is that lawyers, probably controlled by ruthless corporate executives, are able to release criminals within hours or days despite the severity and number of crimes they were charged with. This shows the inability of the judicial system to effectively contend with criminals, and the only way for the citizens of Detroit to be truly safe is when Murphy "deals" with them.


Sequels, Spin-offs, and Attractions

Due to the enduring popularity of the character, there have been a number of RoboCop spin-offs,sequels, and attractions. They are: A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... A sequel is a work of fiction in literature, film, and other creative works that is produced after a completed work, and is set in the same universe but at a later time. ...

  • Two feature film sequels, RoboCop 2 and RoboCop 3, were made. Both movies were based on a story by Frank Miller.
  • A series of licensed video games for various arcade and home console systems. See: RoboCop, RoboCop 2, RoboCop 3, Robocop versus The Terminator.
  • Two animated television series, RoboCop: The Animated Series in the 1980s, and RoboCop: Alpha Commando in the late-90s.
  • A live-action television series in 1994, RoboCop: The Series.
  • RoboCop: The Ride – SimEx-Iwerks (formerly Iwerks Entertainment) opened RoboCop: The Ride in the winter of 1995 around the world at its various Iwerks Motion Simulator Theaters, amusement parks, and casinos. The “Turbo Ride” as it was called was a "ride simulation" synchronizing hydraulically activated seats with the giant screen image, putting the audience right in the middle of the movie action (similar to Star Tours at Disneyland with a screen about three-quarters the size of an IMAX). The ride focused on you assisting Robocop riding a supped up police motorcycle on a mission to save the mayor of Detroit from the clutches of the vicious Cyberpunk ROM and his gang of villains. In the latter part of the ride the bike would then convert into hover mode and would fly through the the skyline of New Detroit using rockets that jettisoned from the back sides of the motorcycle. Though not as impressive or technical savvy as other Iwerks attractions at the time, due to the enduring popularity of the character the ride was very popular amongst children and teenagers and especially in foreign markets outside of North America. The ride was a mixture of motion picture film and computer animation which lasted approximately 4:00 minutes, the cost was $5.00 USD to ride at pay-per-ride theaters. The ride was removed from the Iwerks theaters in the North American market in 1998. (http://www.robocoparchive.com/info/ride.htm)
  • A four-part television mini-series, RoboCop: Prime Directives, in 2000.
  • Comic books published by Marvel, Dark Horse Comics and Avatar Press which, along with containing the further adventures of RoboCop, also included titles such as the speculative crossover RoboCop vs. The Terminator (which was also converted into a video game) and Frank Miller's RoboCop, a graphic novel limited series of Miller's rejected original script for RoboCop 2.
  • Remake of the original RoboCop - Sony Pictures (Screen Gems division) was working on a remake of RoboCop with Hollywood legend Michael DeLuca (New Line's former President of Production) in the winter of 2005. No details were revealed other than the unofficial (and confirmed) announcement. While dozens of remakes are seeing green, a source from Bloody-Disgusting.com informs that the RoboCop remake has been told to "freeze" as of November 2006. "The studio no longer has interest in the remake." The website also discovered that many individuals involved in the original film (including Jon Davison and Ed Neumeier) were talking to the studio about being involved in the remake, but as of now the entire project has been put on hold indefinitely.

RoboCop 2 is a satirical science fiction film, released in 1990 and set in the near future in a dystopian metropolitan Detroit, Michigan. ... RoboCop 3 is a science fiction film, released in 1993, set in the near future in a dystopian metropolitan Detroit, Michigan. ... Frank Miller (born January 27, 1957) is an American writer, artist and film director best known for his film noir-style comic book stories. ... This article is about computer and video games. ... A video arcade (known as an amusement arcade in the United Kingdom) is a place where people play arcade video games. ... Four different video game consoles from different generations. ... Robocop is a video game released in 1989 by Data East for the Nintendo Entertainment System. ... Robocop 2 is a 1990 video game published by Ocean. ... RoboCop 3 is a 1992 video game published by Ocean. ... RoboCop versus The Terminator is a video game released for a number of platforms and based on the RoboCop and Terminator franchises. ... Animation refers to the process in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... A miniseries, in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Marvel Comics (Stan Lee is behind many of the superheros) is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... Dark Horse Comics logo Dark Horse Comics is one of the largest independent American comic book publishers, behind dominant publishers Marvel Comics and DC Comics. ... The Avatar Press company logo. ... A fictional crossover occurs when two or more otherwise separated fictional characters, stories, settings, universes, or media meet and interact with each other. ... RoboCop vs. ... Frank Millers RoboCop (also known as Frank Miller--RoboCop) is comic book mini-series published by Avatar Press. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ...

References

  1. ^ Alex Cox Interview with The Onion
  2. ^ Essay: RoboCop, Now and Forever
  3. ^ Interview with Paul Verhoeven by Xi-Online
  4. ^ Roger Ebert reviews RoboCop 3
  5. ^ http://www.chiodobros.com/fxcredits.html#features
  6. ^ Box office receipts for RoboCop
  7. ^ USA Box Office rankings for 1987
  8. ^ General critical reaction from Rotten Tomatoes
  9. ^ Dr. Steven Best, PhD - Robocop: The Crisis of Subjectivity (1987)

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
RoboCop
RoboCop

Films: RoboCop | RoboCop 2 | RoboCop 3 Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... RoboCop 2 is a satirical science fiction film, released in 1990 and set in the near future in a dystopian metropolitan Detroit, Michigan. ... RoboCop 3 is a science fiction film, released in 1993, set in the near future in a dystopian metropolitan Detroit, Michigan. ...

TV: RoboCop: The Series | RoboCop: The Animated Series | RoboCop: Alpha Commando |
RoboCop: Prime Directives

Video Games: RoboCop | RoboCop 2 | RoboCop 3 | RoboCop versus The Terminator | RoboCop Robocop is a video game released in 1989 by Data East for the Nintendo Entertainment System. ... Robocop 2 is a 1990 video game published by Ocean. ... RoboCop 3 is a 1992 video game published by Ocean. ... RoboCop versus The Terminator is a video game released for a number of platforms and based on the RoboCop and Terminator franchises. ...

Comics: RoboCop versus The Terminator | Frank Miller's RoboCop For the video game, see Robocop versus The Terminator RoboCop versus The Terminator is a four-issue comic book crossover limited series written by Frank Miller that was published in 1992 by Dark Horse Comics. ... Frank Millers RoboCop (also known as Frank Miller--RoboCop) is comic book mini-series published by Avatar Press. ...

Characters: RoboCop | ED-209 | RoboCop 2 The first appearance of the ED-209 in the first RoboCop film The Enforcement Droid Series 209 (or ED-209) is a fictional law enforcement robot featured as one of the design and special effect highlights of the movie RoboCop (1987), and its two sequels. ... RoboCop 2 is a satirical science fiction film, released in 1990 and set in the near future in a dystopian metropolitan Detroit, Michigan. ...

Organizations: Omni Consumer Products Omni Consumer Products (OCP) is the primary fictional corporation in the RoboCop series of movies, tv-shows, video-games, and comics. ...


 
 

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