FACTOID # 5: Minnesota and Connecticut are both in the top 5 in saving money and total tax burden per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Robin Hood
Robin Hood memorial statue in Nottingham.
Robin Hood memorial statue in Nottingham.

Robin Hood is an archetypal figure in English folklore, whose story originates from medieval times but who remains significant in popular culture where he is painted as a man known for robbing the rich to give to the poor and fighting against injustice and tyranny. His band consists of "seven score" group of fellow outlawed yeomen – called his "Merry Men".[1] He has been the subject of numerous movies, television series, books, comics, and plays. Robin Hood was a famous English folk hero and outlaw. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x1536, 936 KB) the Robin Hood Memorial in Nottingham near the castle picture taken by me in 2001 I license it to GNU-FDL File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x1536, 936 KB) the Robin Hood Memorial in Nottingham near the castle picture taken by me in 2001 I license it to GNU-FDL File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Archetype (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... 20 (twenty) is the natural number following 19 and preceding 21. ... For other senses of this word, see outlaw (disambiguation). ... Yeoman is an antiquated term for farmers, tradesmen and other members of the early English middle class. ... The Merry Men are the group of outlaws who follow Robin Hood, according to English folklore. ...


In popular culture Robin Hood and his band's tales are usually associated with the area Sherwood Forest and Nottinghamshire, though most historians point towards him being a Yorkshireman.[2][3][4][5] Historically his birthplace is said to be Loxley in South Yorkshire,[6] while his grave is claimed to be at Kirklees Priory in West Yorkshire.[7] visitor centre Birch trees in the Sherwood Forest The legendary Major Oak Major Oak in December 2006 View of the Forest looking Northeast Sherwood Forest is a 4. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... Yorkshire is a historic county of northern England. ... See also: Stannington, Northumberland Stannington Ward—which includes the districts of Loxley, Stannington, and Worrall, and also the small villages of Dungworth, High Bradfield, and Low Bradfield—is one of the 28 electoral wards in City of Sheffield, England. ... South Yorkshire is a metropolitan and ceremonial county in the Yorkshire and the Humber Government Office Region of England, in the United Kingdom. ... Kirklees was a medieval village in the county of West Yorkshire, England, north of Mirfield, and close to the current site of the M62 motorway. ... Coat of Arms of South Yorkshire West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, that has a population of 2. ...


The first clear reference to "rhymes of Robin Hood" is from the 14th century poem Piers Plowman, but the earliest surviving copies of the narrative ballads which tell his story have been dated to the 15th century.[8] In these early accounts Robin Hood's class consciousness, his Marianism and associated special regard for women, his anti-clericalism and his particular animus towards the Sheriff of Nottingham are already clear. [9] This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... Page from a 14th century Psalter, showing drolleries on the right margin and a plowman at the bottom. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Blessed Virgin Mary A traditional Catholic picture displayed sometimes in homes. ...


In the oldest surviving accounts a particular reason for the outlaw's hostility to the sheriff is not given [10] but in later versions the sheriff is despotic and gravely abuses his position, appropriating land, levying excessive taxation, and persecuting the poor. In some tales the antagonist is Prince John, based on the historical John of England, who is seen as the unjust usurper of his pious brother Richard the Lionheart. In the oldest versions surviving, Robin Hood is a yeoman, but in some later versions he is described as a nobleman and Lord of the Manor of Loxley (or Locksley), usually designated Robin of Loxley, who was unjustly deprived of his lands.[11] This article is about the King of England. ... Piety is a desire and willingness to perform religious duties. ... Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England and ruler of the Angevin Empire from 6 July 1189 until his death. ... Yeoman is a word with several modern and historical meanings. ... The Lords and Barons prove their Nobility by hanging their Banners and exposing their Coats-of-arms at the Windows of the Lodge of the Heralds. ... The title of Lord of the Manor arose in the English medieval system of Manorialism following the Norman Conquest. ... See also: Stannington, Northumberland Stannington Ward—which includes the districts of Loxley, Stannington, and Worrall, and also the small villages of Dungworth, High Bradfield, and Low Bradfield—is one of the 28 electoral wards in City of Sheffield, England. ...


In other stories, he has served in the crusades, returning to England to find his lands pillaged by the dastardly sheriff. In some tales he is the champion of the people, fighting against corrupt officials and the oppressive order that protects them, while in others he is an arrogant and headstrong rebel, who delights in bloodshed, cruelly slaughtering and beheading his victims.[citation needed] The Third Crusade (1189–1192), also known as the Kings Crusade, was an attempt by European leaders to reconquer the Holy Land from Saladin. ...


Despite the fact that most historians and experts link Hood to real life places that still exist today, a subsection argue that his tales (although not the very earliest) have some similarities to other outlaws such as Hereward the Wake, Eustace the Monk, and Fulk FitzWarin[12] - the latter of whom was a Norman noble who was disinherited and became an outlaw and an enemy of John of England.[12] // Hereward the Wake, known in his own times as Hereward the Outlaw or Hereward the Exile, was an 11th century leader in England who led resistance to the Norman Conquest, and was consequently labelled an outlaw. ... Eustace the Monk (c. ... Fulk FitzWarin (also called Fulke or Fouke FitzWaryn or FitzWarren) was a medieval landed gentleman turned outlaw, from Whittington Castle in Shropshire. ... Norman conquests in red. ... For other senses of this word, see outlaw (disambiguation). ... This article is about the King of England. ...

Contents

Early references

The oldest references to Robin Hood are not historical records, or even ballads recounting his exploits, but hints and allusions found in various works. From 1228 onwards the names 'Robinhood', 'Robehod' or 'Hobbehod' occur in the rolls of several English Justices. The majority of these references date from the late 13th century. Between 1261 and 1300 there are at least eight references to 'Rabunhod' in various regions across England, from Berkshire in the south to York in the north.[13] (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Events July 25 - Constantinople re-captured by Nicaean forces under the command of Michael VIII Palaeologus, Byzantine Empire re-formed August 29 - Urban IV becomes Pope, the last man to do so without being a Cardinal first Bela IV of Hungary repels Tatar invasion Charles of Anjou given rule of... Events February 22 - Jubilee of Pope Boniface VIII. March 10 - Wardrobe accounts of King Edward I of Englanddo (aka Edward Longshanks) include a reference to a game called creag being played at the town of Newenden in Kent. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... York shown within England Coordinates: , Sovereign state Constituent country Region Yorkshire and the Humber Ceremonial county North Yorkshire Admin HQ York City Centre Founded 71 City Status 71 Government  - Type Unitary Authority, City  - Governing body City of York Council  - Leadership: Leader & Executive  - Executive: Liberal Democrat  - MPs: Hugh Bayley (L) John...


The term seems to be applied as a form of shorthand to any fugitive or outlaw. Even at this early stage, the name Robin Hood is used as that of an archetypal criminal. This usage continues throughout the medieval period. In a petition presented to Parliament in 1439, the name is again used to describe an itinerant felon. The petition cites one Piers Venables of Aston, Derbyshire, "who having no liflode, ne sufficeante of goodes, gadered and assembled unto him many misdoers, beynge of his clothynge, and, in manere of insurrection, wente into the wodes in that countrie, like as it hadde be Robyn Hude and his meyne."[14] The name was still used to describe sedition and treachery in 1605, when Guy Fawkes and his associates were branded "Robin Hoods" by Robert Cecil. For other senses of this word, see outlaw (disambiguation). ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... Events Battle of Grotnik, which ended the hussite movement in Poland Eric of Pomerania, King of Sweden, Denmark and Norway is declared deposed in Sweden. ... Look up itinerant in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A felony, in many common law legal systems, is the term for a very serious crime; misdemeanors are considered to be less serious. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... 1605 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Guido Fawkes (disambiguation). ... ] The Right Honourable Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury, KG, PC (1 June 1563–24 May 1612), son of William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley and half-brother of Thomas Cecil, 1st Earl of Exeter, statesman, spymaster and minister to Queen Elizabeth I and King James I. Lord Salisbury is the...


The first allusion to a literary tradition of Robin Hood tales occurs in William Langland's Piers Plowman (c.1362–c.1386) in which Sloth, the lazy priest, confesses: "I kan [know] not parfitly [perfectly] my Paternoster as the preest it singeth,/ But I kan rymes of Robyn Hood".[15] Langlands Dreamer: from an illuminated initial in a Piers Plowman manuscript held at Corpus Christi College, Oxford William Langland is the conjectured author of the 14th-century English dream-vision Piers Plowman. ... Page from a 14th century Psalter, showing drolleries on the right margin and a plowman at the bottom. ...


The first mention of a quasi-historical Robin Hood is given in Andrew of Wyntoun's Orygynale Chronicle, written about 1420. The following lines occur with little contextualisation under the year 1283: Andrew of Wyntoun (?1350-?1420), author of a long metrical history of Scotland, called the Orygynale Cronykil of Scotland, was a canon regular of St Andrews, and prior of St Serfs in Lochieven. ...

Lytil Jhon and Robyne Hude
Wayth-men ware commendyd gude
In Yngil-wode and Barnysdale
Thai oysyd all this tyme thare trawale.

The next notice is a statement in the Scotichronicon, composed by John Fordun between 1377 and 1384, and revised by Walter Bower in about 1440. Among Bower's many interpolations is a passage which directly refers to Robin. It is inserted after Fordun's account of the defeat of Simon de Montfort and the punishment of his adherents. Robin is represented as a fighter for de Montford's cause. [16]This was in fact true of the historical outlaw of Sherwood Forest Roger Godberd, whose points of similarity to the Robin Hood of the ballads have often been noted [17] [18] John Fordun (died 1384?), chronicler, was said to have been a chantry priest and Canon of Aberdeen. ... Walter Bower or Bowmaker (1385-1449), Scottish chronicler, was born about 1385 at Haddington, East Lothian. ... From the Chamber of the United States House of Representatives Simon V de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester (1208 – August 4, 1265) was the principal leader of the baronial opposition to King Henry III of England. ... visitor centre Birch trees in the Sherwood Forest The legendary Major Oak Major Oak in December 2006 View of the Forest looking Northeast Sherwood Forest is a 4. ...


Bower writes:

Then [c.1266] arose the famous murderer, Robert Hood, as well as Little John, together with their accomplices from among the disinherited, whom the foolish populace are so inordinately fond of celebrating both in tragedies and comedies, and about whom they are delighted to hear the jesters and minstrels sing above all other ballads.

Despite Bower's reference to Robin as a 'murderer', his account is followed by a brief tale in which Robin becomes a symbol of piety, gaining a decisive victory after hearing the Mass. For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ...


Another reference is provided by Thomas Gale, Dean of York (c.1635–1702),[19] but this comes nearly four hundred years after the events it describes: Thomas Gale (?1636-1702), English classical scholar and antiquarian, was born at Scruton, Yorkshire. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...

[Robin Hood's] death is stated by Ritson to have taken place on the 18th of November, 1247, about the eighty-seventh year of his age; but according to the following inscription found among the papers of the Dean of York…the death occurred a month later. In this inscription, which bears evidence of high antiquity, Robin Hood is described as Earl of Huntington — his claim to which title has been as hotly contested as any disputed peerage upon record.
Hear undernead dis laitl stean
Lais Robert Earl of Huntingun
Near arcir der as hie sa geud
An pipl kauld im Robin Heud
Sic utlaws as hi an is men
Vil England nivr si agen.
Obiit 24 Kal Dekembris 1247

This inscription also appears on a grave in the grounds of Kirklees Priory near Kirklees Hall (see below). Despite appearances, and the author's assurance of 'high antiquity', there is little reason to give the stone any credence. It certainly cannot date from the 13th century; notwithstanding the implausibility of a 13th century funeral monument being composed in English, the language of the inscription is highly suspect. Its orthography does not correspond to the written forms of Middle English at all: there are no inflected '—e's, the plural accusative pronoun 'hi' is used as a singular nominative, and the singular present indicative verb 'lais' is formed without the Middle English '—th' ending. Overall, the epitaph more closely resembles modern English written in a deliberately 'archaic' style. Furthermore, the reference to Huntingdon is anachronistic: the first recorded mention of the title in the context of Robin Hood occurs in the 1598 play The Downfall of Robert, Earl of Huntington by Anthony Munday. The monument can only be a 17th century forgery. is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Shams ad-Din disappears resulting in Jalal Uddin Rumi writing 30,000 verses of poetry about his disappearance. ... For people, see Earl (given name) and Earl (surname). ... See also Samuel Huntington See also Huntingtons disease Huntington is the name of a number of places: United Kingdom Huntington, East Lothian, Scotland Huntington, Cheshire, England Huntington, City of York, England Huntington, Herefordshire, England Huntington, Staffordshire, England United States of America Huntington in Sebastian County, Arkansas Huntington in Fairfield... Kirklees Hall is a 16th century Jacobean hall, close to the village of Clifton, West Yorkshire in Calderdale. ... Middle English is the name given by historical linguistics to the diverse forms of the English language spoken between the Norman invasion of 1066 and the mid-to-late 15th century, when the Chancery Standard, a form of London-based English, began to become widespread, a process aided by the... In linguistics and grammar, a pronoun is a pro-form that substitutes for a noun or noun phrase with or without a determiner, such as you and they in English. ... It has been suggested that Verbal agreement be merged into this article or section. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... An anachronism (from Greek ana, back, and chronos, time) is an artifact that belongs to another time, a person who seems to be displaced in time (i. ... Anthony Munday (or Monday) (1560?–August 10, 1633), was an English dramatist and miscellaneous writer. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ...


Therefore Robert is largely fictional by this time. The Gale note is inaccurate. The medieval texts do not refer to him directly, but mediate their allusions through a body of accounts and reports: for Langland Robin exists principally in "rimes", for Bower "comedies and tragedies", while for Wyntoun he is "commendyd gude". Even in a legal context, where one would expect to find verifiable references to Robert, he is primarily a symbol, a generalised outlaw-figure rather than an individual. Consequently, in the medieval period itself, Robin Hood already belongs more to literature than to history. In fact, in an anonymous carol of c.1450, he is treated in precisely this manner — as a joke, a figure that the audience will instantly recognise as imaginary: "He that made this songe full good,/ Came of the northe and the sothern blode,/ And somewhat kyne to Robert Hoad".[20]


Sources

"Robin shoots with Sir Guy" by Louis Rhead.
"Robin shoots with Sir Guy" by Louis Rhead.

On the other hand, even though clearly fictitious, the tales of Robin do not appear to have stemmed from mythology or folklore. While there are occasional efforts to trace the figure to fairies (such as Puck under the alias Robin Goodfellow) or other mythological origins, good evidence for this has not been found, and when Robin Hood has been connected to such folklore, it is a later development.[21] While Robin Hood and his men often show improbable skill in archery, swordplay, and disguise, they are no more exaggerated than those characters in other ballads, such as Kinmont Willie, which were based on historical events.[22] The origin of the legend is claimed by some to have stemmed from actual outlaws, or from tales of outlaws, such as Hereward the Wake, Eustace the Monk, and Fulk FitzWarin.[23] Image File history File links Robin_shoots_with_sir_Guy_by_Louis_Rhead_1912. ... Image File history File links Robin_shoots_with_sir_Guy_by_Louis_Rhead_1912. ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... It has been suggested that Puck (Shakespeare) be merged into this article or section. ... Robin Goodfellow in English folklore is a euphemistic personification of a half-tamed, troublesome elf or hob-goblin, a prankster who is the domesticated aspect of Puck. ... Kinmont Willie is a Child Ballad, a ballad from the English-Scottish border country. ... // Hereward the Wake, known in his own times as Hereward the Outlaw or Hereward the Exile, was an 11th century leader in England who led resistance to the Norman Conquest, and was consequently labelled an outlaw. ... Eustace the Monk (c. ... Fulk FitzWarin (also called Fulke or Fouke FitzWaryn or FitzWarren) was a medieval landed gentleman turned outlaw, from Whittington Castle in Shropshire. ...


There are many Robin Hood tales, The prince of thieves is one of his many, featuring both historical and fictitious outlaws. Hereward appears in a ballad much like Robin Hood and the Potter, and as the Hereward ballad is older, it appears to be the source. The ballad Adam Bell, Clym of the Cloughe and Wyllyam of Cloudeslee runs parallel to Robin Hood and the Monk, but it is not clear whether either one is the source for the other, or whether they merely show that such tales were told of outlaws.[24] Some early Robin Hood stories appear to be unique, such as the story where Robin gives a knight, generally called Richard at the Lee, money to pay off his mortgage to an abbot, but this may merely indicate that no parallels have survived.[25] Adam Bell was a legendary English outlaw. ... Richard at the Lee (also referred to as Rychard at the Lea and Sir Richard of Verysdale) was a major character in the early medieval ballads of Robin Hood, especially the lengthy ballad Sir Richard is said to have been a nobleman, the lord of Verysdale, and he gives Robin...


Ballads and tales

The earliest surviving Robin Hood text is "Robin Hood and the Monk".[26] This is preserved in Cambridge University manuscript Ff.5.48, which was written shortly after 1450.[27] It contains many of the elements still associated with the legend, from the Nottingham setting to the bitter enmity between Robin and the local sheriff. Robin Hood and the Monk is Child ballad 119, and among the oldest existing ballads of Robin Hood, existing in manuscript from about 1450 AD. It may have been originally recited rather than sung; it refers to itself as a talking in its last verse: Thus endys the talkyng of...


The first printed version is A Gest of Robyn Hode (c.1475), a collection of separate stories which attempts to unite the episodes into a single continuous narrative.[28] After this comes "Robin Hood and the Potter",[29] contained in a manuscript of c.1503. "The Potter" is markedly different in tone from "The Monk": whereas the earlier tale is 'a thriller'[30] the latter is more comic, its plot involving trickery and cunning rather than straightforward force. The difference between the two texts recalls Bower's claim that Robin-tales may be both 'comedies and tragedies'. Other early texts are dramatic pieces such as the fragmentary Robyn Hod and the Shryff off Notyngham[31] (c.1472). These are particularly noteworthy as they show Robin's integration into May Day rituals towards the end of the Middle Ages. A Gest of Robyn Hode is Child Ballad 117; it is also called A Lyttell Geste of Robyn Hode in one of the two oldest manuscripts of it. ... Robin Hood and the Potter is Child ballad 121, and among the oldest existing tales of Robin Hood. ... This article is about the holidays celebrated on May 1. ...

Douglas Fairbanks as Robin Hood; the sword with which he is depicted was common in the oldest ballads.
Douglas Fairbanks as Robin Hood; the sword with which he is depicted was common in the oldest ballads.

In many respects, the character of Robin in these first texts differs from his later incarnations. While in modern stories Robin Hood typically pursues justice, and the Merry Men are a proto-democracy, this sense of generosity and egalitarianism is absent from the medieval and Early Modern sources. Robin is often presented as vengeful and self-interested, meting out barbaric punishments to his own enemies, but rarely fighting on the behalf of others. Nothing is stated about 'giving to the poor', although Robin does make a large loan to an unfortunate knight.[32] Furthermore, even within his band, ideals of equality are generally not in evidence. In the early ballads Robin's men usually kneel before him in strict obedience: in A Gest of Robyn Hode the king even observes that "His men are more at his byddynge/Then my men be at myn". Their social status, as yeomen, is shown by their weapons; they use swords rather than quarterstaffs. The only character to use a quarterstaff in the early ballads is the potter, and Robin Hood does not take to a staff until the eighteenth century Robin Hood and Little John.[33] And rather than being deprived of his lands by the villainous Sheriff of Nottingham, when an origin story for Robin appears, he takes to 'the greenwood' after killing royal foresters for mocking him (see Robin Hood's Progress to Nottingham). Image File history File links Fairbanks_Robin_Hood_standing_by_wall_w_sword. ... Image File history File links Fairbanks_Robin_Hood_standing_by_wall_w_sword. ... Douglas Fairbanks (May 23, 1883 – December 12, 1939) was an American actor, screenwriter, director and producer, who became noted for his swashbuckling roles in silent movies such as The Mark of Zorro (1920), The Three Musketeers (1921), Robin Hood (1922), The Thief of Bagdad (1924) and The Black Pirate (1926). ... Egalitarianism (derived from the French word égal, meaning equal or level) is a political doctrine that holds that all people should be treated as equals from birth. ... For other uses, see Loan (disambiguation). ... Knights Dueling, by Eugène Delacroix For other uses, see Knight (disambiguation) or Knights (disambiguation). ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Quarterstaffs in use, from Old English Sports, Pastimes and Customs, published 1891 A quarterstaff is a medieval English variant of the staff weapon, consisting of a shaft of hardwood, sometimes with metal-reinforced tips. ... The Sheriff of Nottingham was historically the office responsible for enforcing law and order in Nottingham and bringing criminals to justice. ... |}Robin Hoods Progress to Nottingham is Child ballad 139, a Robin Hood ballad, and in fact an origin story. ...


While he is sometimes described as a figure of peasant revolt, the details of his legends do not match this. He is not a peasant but an archer, and his tales make no mention of the complaints of the peasants, such as oppressive taxes.[34] He appears not so much as a revolt against societal standards as an embodiment of them, being generous, pious, and courteous, opposed to stingy, worldly, and churlish foes. His tales glorified violence, but did so in a violent era.[35] While he fights with royal officials, his loyalty to the king himself is strong.[36]

"Little John and Robin Hood" by Frank Godwin.
"Little John and Robin Hood" by Frank Godwin.

Although the term "Merry Men" belongs to a later period, the ballads do name several of Robin's companions.[37] These include Will Scarlet (or Scathlock), Much the Miller's Son, and Little John — who was called "little" as a joke, as he was quite the opposite.[38] Even though the band is regularly described as being over a hundred men, usually only three or four are specified. Some appear only once or twice in a ballad: Will Stutly in Robin Hood Rescuing Will Stutly and Robin Hood and Little John; David of Doncaster in Robin Hood and the Golden Arrow; Gilbert with the White Hand in A Gest of Robyn Hode; and Arthur a Bland in Robin Hood and the Tanner.[39] Many later adapters developed these characters. Guy of Gisbourne also appeared in the legend at this point, as was another outlaw Richard the Divine who was hired by the sheriff to hunt Robin Hood, and who dies at Robin's hand.[40] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Frank Godwin (October 20,1889-August 5,1959) was an American illustrator and comic strip artist. ... Will Scarlet (also Scarlett, Scarlock, Scadlock, Scatheloke and Scathelocke) was a prominent member of Robin Hoods Merry Men. ... Much the Millers Son was, in the tales of Robin Hood, a young boy who befriended the merry men. ... Little John is a presumably fictional character in the legend of Robin Hood. ... Will Stutely or Will Stutly is in English folklore a prominent member of Robin Hoods Merry Men. ... Robin Hood Rescuing Will Stutly is Child ballad 141, about Robin Hood. ... David of Doncaster is, in English folklore, a member of Robin Hoods Merry Men. ... Robin Hood and the Golden Arrow is Child ballad 152. ... Gilbert Whitehand (also Gilbert with the White Hand ) is in English folklore a less prominent member of Robin Hoods merry men. ... A Gest of Robyn Hode is Child Ballad 117; it is also called A Lyttell Geste of Robyn Hode in one of the two oldest manuscripts of it. ... Arthur a Bland is, in English folklore, a member of Robin Hoods Merry Men, though his chief appearance is in the ballad in which he joins the band. ... Robin Hood and the Tanner is Child ballad 126. ... Sir Guy of Gisburne (also spelled Gisbourne, Gysborne or Gisborn) is a villain in the Robin Hood legends. ...


Printed versions of the Robin Hood ballads, generally based on the Gest, appear in the early 16th century, shortly after the introduction of printing in England. Later that century Robin is promoted to the level of nobleman: he is styled Earl of Huntington, Robert of Locksley, or Robert Fitz Ooth. In the early ballads, by contrast, he was a member of the yeoman classes, a common freeholder possessing a small landed estate. [41] For other uses, see Print. ... Aristocrat redirects here. ... Robert, Earl of Huntingdon or Robert Fitz Ooth - to give him his full name – Lived from 1160 to 1247. ... Yeoman is a word with several modern and historical meanings. ...


In the fifteenth century, Robin Hood became associated with May Day celebrations; people would dress as Robin or as other members of his band for the festivities. This was not practiced throughout England, but in regions where it was practiced, lasted until Elizabethean times, and during the reign of Henry VIII, was briefly popular at court.[42] This often put the figure in the role of a May King, presiding over games and processions, but plays were also performed with the characters in the roles.[43] These plays could be enacted at "church ales", a means by which churches raised funds.[44] A complaint of 1492, brought to the Star Chamber, accuses men of acting riotously by coming to a fair as Robin Hood and his men; the accused defended themselves on the grounds that the practice was a long-standing custom to raise money for churches, and they had not acted riotously but peaceably.[45] This article is about the holidays celebrated on May 1. ... The Star Chamber (Latin Camera stellata) was an English court of law at the royal Palace of Westminster that sat between 1487 and 1641, when the court itself was abolished. ...

Robin Hood and Maid Marian
Robin Hood and Maid Marian

It is from this association that Robin's romantic attachment to Maid Marian (or Marion) stems. The naming of Marian may have come from the French pastoral play of c. 1280, the Jeu de Robin et Marion, although this play is unrelated to the English legends.[46] Both Robin and Marian were certainly associated with May Day festivities in England (as was Friar Tuck), but these were originally two distinct types of performance — Alexander Barclay, writing in c.1500, refers to "some merry fytte of Maid Marian or else of Robin Hood" — but the characters were brought together.[47] Marian did not immediately gain the unquestioned role; in Robin Hood's Birth, Breeding, Valor and Marriage, his sweetheart is 'Clorinda the Queen of the Shepherdesses'.[48] Clorinda survives in some later stories as an alias of Marian.[49] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Robin Hood and Maid Marian (poster, ca. ... The Jeu de Robin et Marion is reputedly the earliest French secular play with music, and is the most famous work of Adam de la Halle. ... This article is about the holidays celebrated on May 1. ... The friar took Robin on his back Illustration by Louis Rhead to Bold Robin Hood and His Outlaw Band: Their Famous Exploits in Sherwood Forest Friar Tuck is a companion to Robin Hood in the legends about that character. ... Alexander Barclay (c. ... Robin Hoods Birth, Breeding, Valor and Marriage is Child ballad 149. ...


The first allusions to Robin Hood as stealing from the rich and giving to the poor appear in the 16th century. However, they still play a minor role in the legend; Robin still is prone to waylaying poor men, such as tinkers and beggars.[50] Robin Hood and the Tinker is Child Ballad 127. ... Robin Hood and the Beggar, II is Child ballad 134. ...


In the 16th century, Robin Hood is given a specific historical setting. Up until this point there was little interest in exactly when Robin's adventures took place. The original ballads refer at various points to 'King Edward', without stipulating whether this is Edward I, Edward II, or Edward III.[51] Hood may thus have been active at any point between 1272 and 1377. However, during the 16th century the stories become fixed to the 1190s, the period in which King Richard was absent from his throne, fighting in the crusades.[52] This date is first proposed by John Mair in his Historia Majoris Britanniæ (1521), and gains popular acceptance by the end of the century. Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver or the English Justinian because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and tried to do the same to Scotland. ... Edward II, (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327), of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until deposed in January, 1327. ... This article is about the King of England. ... Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England and ruler of the Angevin Empire from 6 July 1189 until his death. ... The Third Crusade (1189–1192), also known as the Kings Crusade, was an attempt by European leaders to reconquer the Holy Land from Saladin. ... John Mair, or John Major (1467-1550) was Scottish philosopher. ...


Giving Robin an aristocratic title and female love interest, and placing him in the historical context of the true king's absence, all represent moves to domesticate his legend and reconcile it to ruling powers. In this, his legend is similar to that of King Arthur, which morphed from a dangerous male-centered story to a more comfortable, chivalrous romance under the troubadours serving Eleanor of Aquitaine. From the 16th century on, the legend of Robin Hood is often used to promote the hereditary ruling class, romance, and religious piety. The "criminal" element is retained to provide dramatic colour, rather than as a real challenge to convention.[53] A title is a prefix or suffix added to a persons name to signify either veneration, an official position or a professional or academic qualification. ... For other uses, see King Arthur (disambiguation). ... Eleanor of Aquitaine (right) and John sans Terre Eleanor of Aquitaine (or Aliénor), Duchess of Aquitaine and Gascony and Countess of Poitou (1122[1]–April 1, 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Europe during the High Middle Ages. ... The term ruling class refers to the social class of a given society that decides upon and sets that societys political policy. ... This article primarily discusses philosophical ideologies in relation to the subject of romantic love. ... In spiritual terminology, piety is a virtue. ...


In 1601 the story appears in a rare historical play chronicling the late twelfth century: "The Downfall of Robert, Earl of Huntingdon, afterwards called Robin Hood of merrie Sherwoode; with his love to chaste Matilda, the Lord Fitz-Walter's daughter, afterwards his fair Maid Marian." [54] The seventeenth century introduced the minstrel Alan-a-Dale. He first appeared in a seventeenth century broadside ballad, and unlike many of the characters thus associated, managed to adhere to the legend.[55] This is also the era in which the character of Robin became fixed as stealing from the rich to give to the poor.[56] In the stories of Robin Hood, Alan-a-Dale (also spelled Alan-A-Dale, Allen-a-Dale, Allan-a-Dale and Allin-a-Dale) is a young minstrel who was a member of the Merry Men. ... A ballad is a story in song, usually a narrative song or poem. ...


In the eighteenth century, the stories become even more conservative, and develop a slightly more farcical vein. From this period there are a number of ballads in which Robin is severely "drubbed" by a succession of professionals, including a potter, a tanner, a tinker and a ranger.[57] In fact, the only character who does not get the better of Hood is the luckless Sheriff. Yet even in these ballads Robin is more than a mere simpleton: on the contrary, he often acts with great shrewdness. The tinker, setting out to capture Robin, only manages to fight with him after he has been cheated out of his money and the arrest warrant he is carrying. In Robin Hood's Golden Prize, Robin disguises himself as a friar and cheats two priests out of their cash. Even when Robin is defeated, he usually tricks his foe into letting him sound his horn, summoning the Merry Men to his aid. When his enemies do not fall for this ruse, he persuades them to drink with him instead. Look up farce in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Robin Hood and the Potter is Child ballad 121, and among the oldest existing tales of Robin Hood. ... Robin Hood and the Tanner is Child ballad 126. ... Robin Hood and the Tinker is Child Ballad 127. ... Robin Hood and the Ranger is Child ballad 131. ... An arrest warrant is a warrant issued by a public officer which authorizes the arrest and detention of an individual. ... Robin Hood’s Golden Prize is Child ballad 147. ... A friar is a member of a religious mendicant order of men. ... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ...


The continued popularity of the Robin Hood tales is attested by a number of literary references. In As You Like It, the exiled duke and his men "live like the old Robin Hood of England", while Ben Jonson produced the (incomplete) masque The Sad Shepheard, or a Tale of Robin Hood[58] as a satire on Puritanism. Somewhat later, the Romantic poet John Keats composed Robin Hood. To A Friend[59] and Alfred Lord Tennyson wrote a play The Foresters, or Robin Hood and Maid Marian,[60] which was presented with incidental music by Sir Arthur Sullivan in 1892. Later still, T. H. White featured Robin and his band in The Sword in the Stoneanachronistically, since the novel's chief theme is the childhood of King Arthur.[61] Walter Deverell,The Mock Marriage of Orlando and Rosalind, 1853 William Shakespeares As You Like It is a pastoral comedy written in 1599 or early 1600. ... For other persons of the same name, see Ben Johnson (disambiguation). ... The Puritans were members of a group of radical Protestants which developed in England after the Reformation. ... Romanticism largely began as a reaction against the prevailing Enlightenment ideals of the day. ... Keats redirects here. ... Lord Tennyson, Poet Laureate Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (August 6, 1809 - October 6, 1892) is generally regarded as one of the greatest English poets. ... Birch trees in Sherwood Forest The Foresters is a set of incidental music in nine movements composed in 1891 by Arthur Sullivan for a play written by Alfred Tennyson called The Foresters, or, Robin Hood and Maid Marian. ... Incidental music is music in a play, television program, radio program or some other form not primarily musical. ... Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan (May 13, 1842–November 22, 1900) was a British composer best known for his operatic collaborations with librettist William S. Gilbert. ... Terence Hanbury White (May 29, 1906 – January 17, 1964) was an English writer, born in Bombay (now Mumbai), India. ... Wikibooks [[wikibooks:|]] has more about this subject: The Sword in the Stone This article is about the novel. ... Look up Anachronism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see King Arthur (disambiguation). ...

The title page of Howard Pyle's 1883 novel, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood.
The title page of Howard Pyle's 1883 novel, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood.

The Victorian[62] era generated its own distinct versions of Robin Hood. The traditional tales were often adapted for children, most notably in Howard Pyle's Merry Adventures of Robin Hood. These versions firmly stamp Robin as a staunch philanthropist, a man who takes from the rich to give to the poor. Nevertheless, the adventures are still more local than national in scope: while Richard's participation in the Crusades is mentioned in passing, Robin takes no stand against Prince John, and plays no part in raising the ransom to free Richard. These developments are part of the 20th century Robin Hood myth. The idea of Robin Hood as a high-minded Saxon fighting Norman Lords also originates in the 19th century. The most notable contributions to this idea of Robin are Thierry's Histoire de la Conquête de l'Angleterre par les Normands (1825), and Sir Walter Scott's Ivanhoe (1819). In this last work in particular, the modern Robin Hood — "King of Outlaws and prince of good fellows!" as Richard the Lionheart calls him — makes his début.[63] Howard Pyle (March 5, 1853-November 9, 1911) was an American illustrator and writer, primarily of books for young audiences. ... Howard Pyle (March 5, 1853-November 9, 1911) was an American illustrator and writer, primarily of books for young audiences. ... Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England and ruler of the Angevin Empire from 6 July 1189 until his death. ... The Third Crusade (1189–1192), also known as the Kings Crusade, was an attempt by European leaders to reconquer the Holy Land from Saladin. ... This article is about the King of England. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Norman conquests in red. ... Jacques Nicolas Augustin Thierry (May 10, 1795 - May 22, 1856) was a French historian. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... For the first Premier of Saskatchewan see Thomas Walter Scott Sir Walter Scott (August 14, 1771 - September 21, 1832) was a prolific Scottish historical novelist and poet popular throughout Europe. ... For other uses, see Ivanhoe (disambiguation). ...


The 20th century has grafted still further details on to the original legends. The movie The Adventures of Robin Hood portrayed Robin as a hero on a national scale, leading the oppressed Saxons in revolt against their Norman overlords while Richard the Lion-Hearted fought in the Crusades; this movie established itself so definitively that many studios resorted to movies about his son (invented for that purpose) rather than compete with the image of this one.[64] The Adventures of Robin Hood is an American film released in 1938 and directed by Michael Curtiz and William Keighley. ...


Since the 1980s, it has become commonplace to include a Saracen among the Merry Men, a trend which began with the character Nasir in the Robin of Sherwood television series. Later versions of the story have followed suit: the 1991 movie Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves and 2006 BBC TV series Robin Hood each contain equivalents of Nasir, in the figures of Azeem and Djaq respectively.[64] Saracens was a term used in the Middle Ages for those who professed the religion of Islam. ... Nasir, full name Nasir Malik Kemal Inal Ibrahim Shams ad-Dualla Wattab ibn Mahmud, is a character played by Mark Ryan in the British 1980s adventure series Robin of Sherwood (1984-1986). ... Robin of Sherwood, retitled Robin Hood in the US, was an acclaimed 1980s British television series, based on the legend of Robin Hood. ... Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves was a 1991 film directed by Kevin Reynolds. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Robin Hood is a British television programme, produced by independent production company Tiger Aspect Productions for BBC One, with co-funding from the BBC America cable television channel in the United States. ... A main character, who is Saracen, in the 2006 BBC TV series Robin Hood portrayed by Anjali Jay. ...


The Robin Hood legend has thus been subject to numerous shifts and mutations throughout its history. Robin himself has evolved from a yeoman bandit to a national hero of epic proportions, who not only supports the poor by taking from the rich, but heroically defends the throne of England itself from unworthy and venal claimants. Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England and ruler of the Angevin Empire from 6 July 1189 until his death. ...


Connections to existing locations

In modern versions of the legend, Robin Hood is said to have taken up residence in the verdant Sherwood Forest in the county of Nottinghamshire. For this reason the people of present-day Nottinghamshire have a special affinity with Robin Hood, often claiming him as the symbol of their county. For example, major road signs entering the shire depict Robin Hood with his bow and arrow, welcoming people to 'Robin Hood County.' BBC Radio Nottingham also uses the phrase 'Robin Hood County' on its regular programmes. The Robin Hood Way runs through Nottinghamshire. Specific sites linked to Robin Hood include the Major Oak tree, claimed to have been used by him as a hideout.[65] Nottingham Forest F.C. are often thought to have their name derive from Sherwood Forest and the legend of Robin Hood, when in fact it comes from an area they played on called the Forest Recreation Ground. However, the Nottingham setting is a matter of some contention. While the Sheriff of Nottingham and the town itself appear in early ballads, and Sherwood is specifically mentioned in the early ballad Robin Hood and the Monk, many of the original ballads (even those with Nottingham references) locate Robin in Barnsdale (the area between Pontefract and Doncaster), some fifty miles north of Sherwood in the county of Yorkshire; furthermore, the ballads placed in this area are far more geographically specific and accurate.[66] This is reinforced for some by the similarity of Locksley to the area of Loxley in Sheffield, where in nearby Tideswell, which was the "Kings Larder" in the Royal Forest of the Peak, a record of Robert de Lockesly in court is found, perhaps in his retirement years in 1245. Although it cannot be proven that this is the man himself, it is believed he had a brother called Thomas, which gives credence to the following reference: ImageMetadata File history File links Robin_Hood_Major_Oak. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Robin_Hood_Major_Oak. ... The Major Oak The Major Oak is a huge Oak tree near the village of Edwinstowe in the heart of Sherwood Forest, England. ... visitor centre Birch trees in the Sherwood Forest The legendary Major Oak Major Oak in December 2006 View of the Forest looking Northeast Sherwood Forest is a 4. ... For other uses, see Legend (disambiguation). ... visitor centre Birch trees in the Sherwood Forest The legendary Major Oak Major Oak in December 2006 View of the Forest looking Northeast Sherwood Forest is a 4. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... A bow is a weapon that shoots arrows powered by the elasticity of the bow and/or the string. ... BBC Radio Nottingham is the BBC Local Radio service for the English county of Nottinghamshire. ... The Major Oak The Major Oak is a huge Oak tree near the village of Edwinstowe in the heart of Sherwood Forest, England. ... Nottingham Forest Football Club is an English professional football club based at The City Ground in Nottingham, England. ... Forest Recreation Ground The Forest Recreation Ground is a recreation ground in Nottingham, England, about a mile north of the city centre. ... Barnsdale, or Barnsdale Forest, is a relatively small area of Yorkshire, England which has a rich history and the region is steeped in folklore. ... Pontefract Castle in the early 17th Century Pontefract is a town in the county of West Yorkshire, England, near the A1 (or Great North Road), the M62 motorway, and Castleford. ... For other places with the same name, see Doncaster (disambiguation). ... Sherwood (or Sherwood Forest) is the place where the legendary Robin Hood is said to have lived. ... Yorkshire is a historic county of northern England. ... Stannington Ward—which includes the districts of Loxley, Stannington, and Worrall, and also the small villages of Dungworth, High Bradfield, and Low Bradfield—is one of the 28 electoral wards in City of Sheffield, England. ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... Tideswell is a village in the Derbyshire Peak District, England (location map). ... Retirement is the point where a person stops employment completely. ...

24) No. 389, f0- 78. Ascension Day, 29 H. III., Nic Meverill, with John Kantia, on the one part, and Henry de Leke. Henry released to Nicholas and John 5 m. rent, which he received from Nicolas and John and Robert de Lockesly for his life from the lands of Gellery, in consideration of receiving from each of them 2M (2 marks). only, the said Henry to live at table with one of them and to receive 2M. annually from the other. T., Sampson de Leke, Magister Peter Meverill, Roger de Lockesly, John de Leke, Robert fil Umfred, Rico de Newland, Richard Meverill. (25) No. 402, p. 80 b. Thomas de Lockesly bound himself that he would not sell his lands at Leke, which Nicolas Meveril had rendered to him, under a penalty of L40 (40 pounds).

A pound was 240 silver pence, and a mark was 160 silver pence (i.e., 13 shillings and fourpence).


In Barnsdale Forest there is at least one Robin Hood's Well (by the side of the Great North Road), one Little John's Well (near Hampole) and a Robin Hood's stream (in Highfields Wood at Woodlands). Barnsdale, or Barnsdale Forest, is a relatively small area of Yorkshire, England which has a rich history and the region is steeped in folklore. ... This Robin Hoods Well is at Skellow, by the old Great North Road, in what was known as Barnsdale or Barnsdale Forest See Robin Hood Robin Hoods Well, Skellow ... Sign at Junction 1 of the A1(M) at South Mimms in Hertfordshire The A1, at 409 miles (658 km) long, is the longest numbered British road. ... This Little Johns Well is situated near to the A638 at Hampole in what was known as Barnsdale Forest. ... Hampole is a small village and a civil parish in the metropolitan borough of Doncaster (part of South Yorkshire, England), on the border with West Yorkshire. ... Highfields is a former coal mining village, located south of the model village of Woodlands, in the English county of South Yorkshire. ... , Woodlands is a model village, 3 miles (5 km) north of Doncaster in South Yorkshire, and was built in the early years of the 20th century. ...


There is something of a modern movement amongst Yorkshire residents to reclaim the legend of Robin Hood, to the extent that South Yorkshire's new airport, on the site of the redeveloped RAF Finningley airbase near Doncaster, although ironically in the historic county of Nottinghamshire, has been given the name Robin Hood Airport Doncaster Sheffield. South Yorkshire is a metropolitan and ceremonial county in the Yorkshire and the Humber Government Office Region of England, in the United Kingdom. ... RAF Finningley was a Royal Air Force station near Doncaster, South Yorkshire, partly within the traditional county boundaries of Nottinghamshire and partly in the West Riding of Yorkshire, now wholly within the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster. ... For other places with the same name, see Doncaster (disambiguation). ... The historic counties of England are ancient subdivisions of England. ... Robin Hood Airport Doncaster Sheffield (IATA: DSA, ICAO: EGCN) is an international airport located at the former RAF Finningley airbase in Finningley, South Yorkshire, England. ...


There has long been a pub in the village of Hatfield Woodhouse, quite close to the airport, which is known as The Robin Hood and Little John. Centuries ago, a variant of 'as plain as the nose on your face' was 'Robin Hood in Barnesdale stood.' An amusingly named pub (the Old New Inn) at Bourton-on-the-Water, in the Cotswold Hills of South West England A pub in the Haymarket area of Edinburgh, Scotland A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada... The civil parish of Hatfield is an administrative area of the metropolitan borough of Doncaster (part of South Yorkshire, England). ...


There have been further claims made that he is from Swannington in Leicestershire. [1] Swannington is a former mining village in the English county of Leicestershire. ... Leicestershire ( IPA: (RP), IPA: (locally)), abbreviation Leics. ...

Robin Hood Tree aka Sycamore Gap, Hadrian's Wall, UK. This location was used in the 1991 movie Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves.
Robin Hood Tree aka Sycamore Gap, Hadrian's Wall, UK. This location was used in the 1991 movie Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves.

This debate is hardly surprising, given the considerable value that the Robin Hood legend has for local tourism. One of Nottinghamshire's biggest tourist attractions is the Major Oak, a tree that local folklore claims was the home of the legendary outlaw. The age of the tree disproves this myth as it would have been a sapling in the days of Robin Hood. [67] The Sheriff of Nottingham also had jurisdiction in Derbyshire that was known as the "Shire of the Deer", and this is where the Royal Forest of the Peak is found, which roughly corresponds to today's Peak District National Park. The Royal Forest included Bakewell, Tideswell, Castleton, Ladybower and the Derwent Valley near Loxley. The Sheriff of Nottingham possessed property near Loxley, including Hazlebadge Hall, Peveril Castle and Haddon Hall. Mercia, to which Nottingham belonged, came to within three miles of Sheffield City Centre. The supposed grave of Little John can be found in Hathersage, also in the Peak District. Image File history File links CRW_2684. ... Image File history File links CRW_2684. ... Hadrians Wall is a stone and turf fortification built by the Roman Empire across the width of modern-day England. ... Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves was a 1991 film directed by Kevin Reynolds. ... Tourist redirects here. ... The Major Oak The Major Oak is a huge Oak tree near the village of Edwinstowe in the heart of Sherwood Forest, England. ... The Peak District National Park is a national park in the north of England. ... Bakewell is a small market town in Derbyshire, England, deriving its name from Badecas Well. According to the UK 2001 census the civil parish of Bakewell had a population of 3,979. ... Tideswell is a village in the Derbyshire Peak District, England (location map). ... This article is about the English village. ... The Ladybower Reservoir is one of three reservoirs in the Upper Derwent Valley in Derbyshire, England. ... The Derwent is a river in the county of Derbyshire, England. ... Peveril Castle in Castleton, Derbyshire, England (SK149826) stands on a hill overlooking the village with an impressive view across the Hope Valley and Cave Dale. ... Haddon Hall, Bakewell, Derbyshire, England (2002) For other uses, see Haddon Hall (disambiguation). ... The Kingdom of Mercia at its greatest extent (7th to 9th centuries) is shown in green, with the original core area (6th century) given a darker tint. ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... Hathersage (from heathers edge) is a village in Derbyshire Peak District, in England. ...


Robin Hood himself is reputed to be buried in the grounds of Kirklees Priory between Brighouse and Mirfield in West Yorkshire. There is an elaborate grave there with the inscription referred to above. The story is that the Prioress was a relative of Robin's. Robin was ill and staying at the Priory where the Prioress was supposedly caring for him. However, she betrayed him, his health worsened, and he eventually died there. , Brighouse is the second largest town in the metropolitan district of Calderdale in the county of West Yorkshire, England. ... , Mirfield is a small town and civil parish within the Kirklees borough of West Yorkshire, England, near Dewsbury. ... Coat of Arms of South Yorkshire West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, that has a population of 2. ...


Before he died, he told Little John (or possibly another of his Merry Men) where to bury him. He shot an arrow from the Priory window, and where the arrow landed was to be the site of his grave. The actual grave is within sight of the ruins of the Priory, corresponding to the story. It is behind the Three Nuns pub in Mirfield, West Yorkshire. The nuns supposedly cared for him when he was ill. An amusingly named pub (the Old New Inn) at Bourton-on-the-Water, in the Cotswold Hills of South West England A pub in the Haymarket area of Edinburgh, Scotland A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada...


The grave can be visited on occasional organised walks, organised by Calderdale Council Tourist Information office. Calderdale is a metropolitan district in West Yorkshire, England. ...


Further indications of the legend's connection with West Yorkshire (and particularly Calderdale) are noted in the fact that there are pubs called the Robin Hood in both nearby Brighouse and at Cragg Vale; higher up in the Pennines beyond Halifax, where Robin Hood Rocks can also be found. Robin Hood Hill is near Outwood, West Yorkshire, not far from Lofthouse. There is a village in West Yorkshire called Robin Hood, on the A61 between Leeds and Wakefield and close to Rothwell and Lofthouse. With all these references to Robin Hood, it is not surprising that the people of both South Yorkshire and West Yorkshire lay some claim to Robin Hood, who, if he existed, could easily have roamed between Nottingham, Lincoln, Doncaster and right into West Yorkshire. In those days, Sherwood Forest and Barnsdale Forest were probably all one vast forest affording plenty of cover for a band of outlaws.[citation needed] Coat of Arms of South Yorkshire West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, that has a population of 2. ... , Brighouse is the second largest town in the metropolitan district of Calderdale in the county of West Yorkshire, England. ... , Cragg Vale is a village south of Mytholmroyd, in the borough of Calderdale, West Yorkshire. ... For other uses, see Halifax. ... Outwood is a district to the north of Wakefield, a city in West Yorkshire, United Kingdom. ... Lofthouse is a village in West Yorkshire, England between the cities of Wakefield and Leeds and is also in the Leeds Metropolitan District. ... Masouleh village, Gilan Province, Iran. ... Robin Hood is a village in West Yorkshire, England, within the Metropolitan Borough of Leeds, with Wakefield WF3 postcodes. ... The A61 is a major road in England, running from Alfreton in Derbyshire to Thirsk in North Yorkshire. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wakefield (disambiguation). ... , Rothwell is a town in the south east of the metropolitan borough of Leeds in West Yorkshire, situated between Oulton to the east, Belle Isle to the west, Woodlesford to the north east and Robin Hood to the south west. ... Lofthouse is a village in West Yorkshire, England between the cities of Wakefield and Leeds and is also in the Leeds Metropolitan District. ... South Yorkshire is a metropolitan and ceremonial county in the Yorkshire and the Humber Government Office Region of England, in the United Kingdom. ... Coat of Arms of South Yorkshire West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, that has a population of 2. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... Lincoln (pronounced //) is a cathedral city and county town of Lincolnshire, England. ... For other places with the same name, see Doncaster (disambiguation). ... Coat of Arms of South Yorkshire West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, that has a population of 2. ... visitor centre Birch trees in the Sherwood Forest The legendary Major Oak Major Oak in December 2006 View of the Forest looking Northeast Sherwood Forest is a 4. ... See Barnsdale ...


A British Army Territorial (reserves) battalion formed in Nottingham in 1859 was known as the The Robin Hood Battalion through various reorganisations until the "Robin Hood" name finally disappeared in 1992. With the 1881 Childers reforms that linked regular and reserve units into regimental families ,the Robin Hood Battalion became part of The Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). [2] The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The Territorial Army (TA) is the principal and Volunteer reserve force of the British Army, the land armed forces branch of the United Kingdom, and composed mostly of part-time soldiers paid at a similar rate, while engaged on military activities, as their Regular equivalents. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Robin Hood (T) Battalion was a unit of the British Territorial Army. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Childers Reforms were undertaken by Secretary of State for War Hugh Childers in 1881. ... Category: Possible copyright violations ...


A Neolithic causewayed enclosure on Salisbury Plain has acquired the name Robin Hood's Ball, although had Robin Hood existed it is doubtful that he would have travelled so far south. An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... Causewayed enclosures are a type of large prehistoric earthworks common to the early Neolithic Europe. ... This article is about the plateau in southern England; Salisbury Plain is also an area on South Georgia Island. ... Robin Hoods Ball is the name of a Neolithic causewayed enclosure near Amesbury in the English county of Wiltshire. ...


List of traditional ballads

Elizabethean song of Robin Hood.
Elizabethean song of Robin Hood.

Ballads are the oldest existing form of the Robin Hood legends, although none of them are recorded at the time of the first allusions to him, and many are much later. They evince many common features, often opening with praise of the greenwood and relying heavily on disguise as a plot device, but include a wide variation in tone and plot.[68] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A plot device is an element introduced into a story to solely to advance or resolve the plot of the story. ...

Some ballads, such as Erlinton, feature Robin Hood in some variants, where the folk hero appears to be added to a ballad pre-existing him and in which he does not fit very well.[69] He was added to one variant of Rose Red and the White Lily, apparently on no more connection than that one hero of the other variants is named "Brown Robin."[70] Francis James Child indeed retitled Child ballad 102; though it was titled The Birth of Robin Hood, its clear lack of connection with the Robin Hood cycle (and connection with other, unrelated ballads) led him to title it Willie and Earl Richard's Daughter in his collection.[71] A Gest of Robyn Hode is Child Ballad 117; it is also called A Lyttell Geste of Robyn Hode in one of the two oldest manuscripts of it. ... Robin Hood and the Monk is Child ballad 119, and among the oldest existing ballads of Robin Hood, existing in manuscript from about 1450 AD. It may have been originally recited rather than sung; it refers to itself as a talking in its last verse: Thus endys the talkyng of... Robin Hoods Death is Child ballad 120. ... Robin Hood and the Potter is Child ballad 121, and among the oldest existing tales of Robin Hood. ... Robin Hood and the pimp is Child ballad 122. ... Robin Hood and the Curtal Friar is Child ballad number 123, about Robin Hood. ... The Jolly Pinder of Wakefield is Child ballad 124, about Robin Hood. ... Robin Hood and the Tanner is Child ballad 126. ... Robin Hood and the Tinker is Child Ballad 127. ... Robin Hood Newly Revived is Child ballad 128, and an origin story for Will Scarlett Synopsis Spoiler warning: Robin Hood and Little John are hunting when they see a finely dressed stranger shoot a deer. ... The Bold Pedlar and Robin Hood is Child ballad 132, featuring Robin Hood. ... Robin Hood and the Prince of Aragon is Child ballad 129. ... Robin Hood and the Scotchman is Child ballad 130. ... Robin Hood and the Ranger is Child ballad 131. ... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ... |}Robin Hoods Progress to Nottingham is Child ballad 139, a Robin Hood ballad, and in fact an origin story. ... Robin Hood Rescuing Three Squires or Robin Hood and the Widows Three Sons is Child ballad 140, about Robin Hood. ... Robin Hood Rescuing Will Stutly is Child ballad 141, about Robin Hood. ... Robin Hood and the Bishop is Child ballad 143. ... Robin Hood and the Bishop of Hereford is Child ballad 144. ... Robin Hood and Queen Katherine is Child ballad 145. ... Robin Hoods Chase is Child ballad 146, and a sequel to Child ballad 145, Robin Hood and Queen Katherine. ... Robin Hood’s Golden Prize is Child ballad 147. ... The Noble Fisherman or Robin Hoods Preferment is Child ballad 148, a tale of Robin Hood. ... Robin Hoods Birth, Breeding, Valor and Marriage is Child ballad 149. ... The King’s Disguise, and Friendship with Robin Hood is Child ballad 151. ... Robin Hood and the Golden Arrow is Child ballad 152. ... Robin Hood and the Valiant Knight is Child ballad 153. ... A True Tale of Robin Hood is Child ballad 154, featuring Robin Hood and, indeed, presents a full account of his life, from before his becoming an outlaw, to his death. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Rose Red and the White Lily is Child ballad number 103. ... Francis James Child (February 1, 1825 - September 11, 1896), was an American scholar and educationist, and collector of what came to be known as the Child Ballads. ... The Child Ballads are a collection of 305 ballads from England and Scotland, and their American variants, collected by Francis James Child. ... Willie and Earl Richards Daughter is Child ballad 102. ...


Popular culture

Songs, plays, games, and later novels, musicals, films, and TV series have developed Robin Hood and company according to the needs of their times, and the myth has been subject to extensive ideological manipulation. Movie poster for the 1922 United Artists Robin Hood film, starring Douglas Fairbanks. ... For other uses, see Myth (disambiguation). ...


Robin Hood has become shorthand for a good-hearted bandit who steals from the rich to give to the poor. It is also a proverbial expression for somebody who takes other people's giveaways and gives them to people he or she knows who could use them. This can be called "Robin Hood giving." Many countries and situations boast their own Robin Hood characters; the Category:Robin Hood page tracks them.


The BBC has recently released the second series of Robin Hood starring Jonas Armstrong in the eponymous role. Three series (or seasons, as they are known elsewhere) have completed or are in production. For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Robin Hood is a British television programme, produced by independent production company Tiger Aspect Productions for BBC One, with co-funding from the BBC America cable television channel in the United States. ... Jonas Armstrong (born 1 January 1981) is an Irish actor, best known for his appearances on British television. ...

The University of Nottingham is a leading research and teaching university in the city of Nottingham, in the East Midlands of England. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... Nottingham Forest Football Club is an English football club, based at the City Ground, which is just outside the official boundary of Nottingham on the south side of the River Trent. ...

Bibliography

  • Barry, Edward (1832). Sur les vicissitudes et les transformations du cycle populaire de Robin Hood. Rignoux. 
  • Blamires, David (1998). Robin Hood: A Hero for All Times. J. Rylands Univ. Lib. of Manchester. ISBN 0-86373-136-8. 
  • Coghlan, Ronan (2003). The Robin Hood Companion. Xiphos Books. ISBN 0-9544936-0-5. 
  • Deitweiler, Laurie, Coleman, Diane (2004). Robin Hood Comprehension Guide. Veritas Pr Inc. ISBN 1-930710-77-1. 
  • Dixon-Kennedy, Mike (2006). The Robin Hood Handbook. Sutton Publishing. ISBN 0-7509-3977-X. 
  • Doel, Fran, Doel, Geoff (2000). Robin Hood: Outlaw and Greenwood Myth. Tempus Publishing Ltd. ISBN 0-7524-1479-8. 
  • Hahn, Thomas (2000). Robin Hood in Popular Culture: Violence, Transgression and Justice. D.S. Brewer. ISBN 0-85991-564-6. 
  • Harris, P. V. (1978). Truth About Robin Hood. Linney. ISBN 0-900525-16-9. 
  • Hilton, R.H., The Origins of Robin Hood, Past and Present, No. 14. (Nov., 1958), pp. 30-44. Available online at JSTOR.
  • Holt, J. C. (1982). Robin Hood. Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6. 
  • Knight, Stephen T. (1994). Robin Hood: A Complete Study of the English Outlaw. Blackwell Publishers. ISBN 0-631-19486-X. 
  • Knight, Stephen T. (2005). Robin Hood: A Mythic Biography. Four Courts Press. ISBN 1-85182-931-8. 
  • Phillips, Helen (2003). Robin Hood: Medieval and Post-medieval. Cornell University Press. ISBN 0-8014-3885-3. 
  • Pollard, A. J. (2004). Imagining Robin Hood: The Late Medieval Stories in Historical Context. Routledge, an imprint of Taylor & Francis Books Ltd. ISBN 0-415-22308-3. 
  • Potter, Lewis (1998). Playing Robin Hood: The Legend as Performance in Five Centuries. University of Delaware Press. ISBN 0-87413-663-6. 
  • Pringle, Patrick (1991). Stand and Deliver: Highway Men from Robin Hood to Dick Turpin. Dorset Press. ISBN 0-88029-698-4. 
  • Rutherford-Moore, Richard (1999). The Legend of Robin Hood. Capall Bann Publishing. ISBN 1-86163-069-7. 
  • Rutherford-Moore, Richard (2002). Robin Hood: On the Outlaw Trail. Capall Bann Publishing. ISBN 1-86163-177-4. 
  • Vahimagi, Tise (1994). British Television: An Illustrated Guide. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-818336-4. 
  • Wright, Thomas (1847). Songs and Carols, now first imprinted. Percy Society. 

JSTOR®, begun in 1995, is an online system for archiving academic journals. ...

Notes

  1. ^ "Merry-man" has referred to the follower of an outlaw since at least 1386. See Online Etymology Dictionary
  2. ^ "Robin Hood - Evidence for Yorkshire", Icons.org.uk, 24 October 2007. 
  3. ^ "Robin Hood - On the move?", BBC.co.uk, 24 October 2007. 
  4. ^ "Dead in West Yorkshire? Robin Hood", BBC.co.uk, 24 October 2007. 
  5. ^ "Robin Hood Was A Yorkshireman", Mike-Duffy.me.uk, 24 October 2007. 
  6. ^ "In the footsteps of Robin Hood", Channel4.com, 24 October 2007. 
  7. ^ "Robin Hood's Grave", Britannia.com, 24 October 2007. 
  8. ^ See separate articles Robin Hood and the Monk and A Gest of Robyn Hode
  9. ^ The Gest of Robin Hood stanzas 10-15, http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch117.htm , accessed 15 April 2008 ,
  10. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 9 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6.
  11. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 7 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6.
  12. ^ a b Curran, Bob. Walking with the Green Man: Father of the Forest, Spirit of Nature. New Page Books. ISBN 978-1564149312. 
  13. ^ Holt, 1982
  14. ^ Rot. Parl. v. 16.
  15. ^ V.396 in Schmidt's ed.
  16. ^ Dobson, R. B., and J. Taylor. Rymes of Robin Hood (London, 1976, p.5)
  17. ^ J. R. Maddicott, "Edward the First and the Lessons of Baronial Reform" in Coss and Loyd ed, Thirteenth century England:1 Proceedings of the Newcastle Upon Tyne Conference 1985, Boydell and Brewer, page 2
  18. ^ Maurice Hugh Keen The Outlaws of Medieval England, 1987, Routledge, page 196-7 ,
  19. ^ The Annotated Edition of the English Poets — Early ballads (London, 1856, p.70)
  20. ^ Wright, 1847: p.104
  21. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 55 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6
  22. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 57 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6
  23. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 62 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6
  24. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 73 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6
  25. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 74-5 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6
  26. ^ "Robin Hood and the Monk"
  27. ^ Introduction accompanying Knight and Ohlgren's 1997 ed.
  28. ^ Ohlgren, Thomas, Robin Hood: The Early Poems, 1465-1560, (Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2007), "From Script to Print: Robin Hood and the Early Printers", p 97-134
  29. ^ "Robin Hood and the Potter"
  30. ^ J.C. Holt, 1982
  31. ^ Robyn Hod and the Shryff off Notyngham
  32. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 11 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6.
  33. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 36 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6.
  34. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 37-8 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6.
  35. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 10 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6.
  36. ^ Allen W. Wright, "A Beginner's Guide to Robin Hood"
  37. ^ Jeffrey Richards, Swordsmen of the Screen: From Douglas Fairbanks to Michael York, p 190, Routledge & Kegan Paul, Lond, Henly and Boston, 1988
  38. ^ Allen W. Wright, "A Beginner's Guide to Robin Hood"
  39. ^ Allen W. Wright, "A Beginner's Guide to Robin Hood"
  40. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 30-1 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6.
  41. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 159 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6.
  42. ^ Ronald Hutton, The Stations of the Sun, p 270-1, ISBN 0-19-288045-4
  43. ^ Ronald Hutton, The Rise and Fall of Merry England: The Ritual Year 1400-1700 p 32, ISBN 0-10-285327-9
  44. ^ Ronald Hutton, The Rise and Fall of Merry England: The Ritual Year 1400-1700 p 31, ISBN 0-10-285327-9
  45. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 148-9 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6.
  46. ^ Ronald Hutton, The Stations of the Sun, p 270-1, ISBN 0-19-288045-4
  47. ^ Jeffrey Richards, Swordsmen of the Screen: From Douglas Fairbanks to Michael York, p 190, Routledge & Kegan Paul, Lond, Henly and Boston, 1988
  48. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 165 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6.
  49. ^ Allen W. Wright, "A Beginner's Guide to Robin Hood"
  50. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 184 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6.
  51. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 37 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6.
  52. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 170 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6.
  53. ^ The Times (London), July 11, 1999
  54. ^ Black letter, 1601 4to. See Richard Thomson: An Historical Essay on the Magna Charta, London, 1829, pages 505 - 507 for further details.
  55. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 165 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6
  56. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 184 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6.
  57. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 170 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6.
  58. ^ Johnson's "The Sad Shepherd"
  59. ^ Keat's "Robin Hood. To a friend"
  60. ^ Tennyson's "The Foresters"
  61. ^ W.R. Irwin, The Game of the Impossible, p 151, University of Illinois Press, Urbana Chicago London, 1976
  62. ^ Egan, Pierce the Younger (1846). Robin Hood and Little John or The Merry Men of Sherwood Forest. Pub. George Peirce. London.
  63. ^ Allen W. Wright, "Wolfshead through the Ages"
  64. ^ a b Allen W. Wright, "Wolfshead through the Ages"
  65. ^ Nottinghamshire County Council. Major Oak. Retrieved on 2007-11-21.
  66. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 83 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6
  67. ^ Nottinghamshire County Council. Major Oak. Retrieved on 2007-11-21.
  68. ^ Holt, J. C. Robin Hood p 34-5 (1982) Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-27541-6.
  69. ^ Francis James Child, The English and Scottish Popular Ballads, v 1, p 178, Dover Publications, New York 1965
  70. ^ Francis James Child, The English and Scottish Popular Ballads, v 2, p 416, Dover Publications, New York 1965
  71. ^ Francis James Child, The English and Scottish Popular Ballads, v 2, p 412, Dover Publications, New York 1965
  72. ^ "Robin Hood is scholarly subject". BBC. 10 October 2006.
  73. ^ "Sherwood Signs Off". Nottingham Forest 30 July 2007.

is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Robin Hood and the Monk is Child ballad 119, and among the oldest existing ballads of Robin Hood, existing in manuscript from about 1450 AD. It may have been originally recited rather than sung; it refers to itself as a talking in its last verse: Thus endys the talkyng of... A Gest of Robyn Hode is Child Ballad 117; it is also called A Lyttell Geste of Robyn Hode in one of the two oldest manuscripts of it. ... Illustration by Arthur Rackham of the ballad The Twa Corbies A ballad is a story, usually a narrative or poem, in a song. ... Thomas Wright (April 21, 1810 - December 23, 1877) was an English antiquarian and writer. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

See also

For other uses, see Vigilante (disambiguation). ... St Basils Cathedral Saint Basil or Vasily (known also as Vasily Blazhenny, Basil Fool for Christ or Basil the Blessed) is a Russian Orthodox saint born to serfs in 1469 in Yelokhov, near Moscow. ... Janosik, wood engraving by Władysław Skoczylas Juraj Jánošík (modern pronunciation: ), or Jur, Juro, Jurko Jánošík (1688-1713), Polish: Jerzy Janosik (modern pronunciation: ), Hungarian: Juraj Jánosik[1] was a famous Slovak outlaw, often described as the Slovak Robin Hood. ... The Folville Cross, said to mark the site of Sir Roger Belleres murder in 1326. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Hong Gil-dong is a fictitious character of an old Korean novel, The story of Hong Gil-dong (홍길동전), written in the Joseon Dynasty. ... Nezumi Kozō (鼠小僧) was the nickname of one Jirokichi (次郎吉 d. ... Rummu Jüri (Jüri Rummo; 2 August (21 July) 1856) is the archetypical Estonian folk hero, an outlaw who stole from the rich to give to the poor. ... Salvatore Giuliano (November 16, 1922 – July 5/6, 1950) was a Sicilian hero, killed by the alliance of politics and mafia, that governs Italy since its Unification. ... William de Wendenal was a Norman baron probably born during the mid-1100s, and was one of the highest officials left in charge of England when King Richard the Lionheart of England was away at the Kings Crusade to reclaim the Holy Land from the Saracens. ... Lampião Lampião (Oil Lamp in Portuguese) was the nickname of Captain Virgulino Ferreira da Silva, the most famous leader of a Cangaço band (marauders and outlaws who terrorized the Brazilian Northeast in the 1930s). ... Verysdale is a part of medieval England which is mentioned in the early ballads of Robin Hood (especially the ballad A Gest of Robyn Hode, in which a friendly knight, Richard at the Lee, befriends the gallant outlaw and later is revealed as the lord or Earl of Verysdale). ... A Tryst is a time and a place for a meeting, especially of lovers. ... Woodwoses support coats of arms in the side panels of a portrait by Albrecht Dürer, 1499 (Alte Pinakothek, Munich) Grand arms of Prussia, 1873 The Woodwose or hairy wildman of the woods was the Sasquatch figure of pre-Christian Gaul, in Anglo-Saxon a Woodwoses appear in the carved... visitor centre Birch trees in the Sherwood Forest The legendary Major Oak Major Oak in December 2006 View of the Forest looking Northeast Sherwood Forest is a 4. ... Robin Hood and Maid Marian (poster, ca. ... A folk hero is type of hero, real or mythological. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... old Radio 4 logo BBC Radio 4 is a UK domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ... In Our Time is a discussion programme hosted by Melvyn Bragg on BBC Radio 4 in the United Kingdom. ... Robin Hood and Maid Marian (poster, ca. ... Much the Millers Son was, in the tales of Robin Hood, a young boy who befriended the merry men. ... Little John is a presumably fictional character in the legend of Robin Hood. ... The friar took Robin on his back Illustration by Louis Rhead to Bold Robin Hood and His Outlaw Band: Their Famous Exploits in Sherwood Forest Friar Tuck is a companion to Robin Hood in the legends about that character. ... In the stories of Robin Hood, Alan-a-Dale (also spelled Alan-A-Dale, Allen-a-Dale, Allan-a-Dale and Allin-a-Dale) is a young minstrel who was a member of the Merry Men. ... Will Scarlet (also Scarlett, Scarlock, Scadlock, Scatheloke and Scathelocke) was a prominent member of Robin Hoods Merry Men. ... Will Stutely is in English folklore a prominent member of Robin Hoods Merry Men. ... Gilbert Whitehand (also Gilbert with the White Hand ) is in English folklore a less prominent member of Robin Hoods merry men. ... Arthur a Bland is, in English folklore, a member of Robin Hoods Merry Men, though his chief appearance is in the ballad in which he joins the band. ... David of Doncaster is, in English folklore, a member of Robin Hoods Merry Men. ... Saracens was a term used in the Middle Ages for those who professed the religion of Islam. ... The Sheriff of Nottingham was historically the office responsible for enforcing law and order in Nottingham and bringing criminals to justice. ... Sir Guy of Gisburne (also spelled Gisbourne, Gysborne or Gisborn) is a villain in the Robin Hood legends. ... The Bishop of Hereford is a character in the Robin Hood legend, known for his greed. ... Richard at the Lee (also referred to as Rychard at the Lea and Sir Richard of Verysdale) was a major character in the early medieval ballads of Robin Hood, especially the lengthy ballad Sir Richard is said to have been a nobleman, the lord of Verysdale, and he gives Robin... visitor centre Birch trees in the Sherwood Forest The legendary Major Oak Major Oak in December 2006 View of the Forest looking Northeast Sherwood Forest is a 4. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... See also: Stannington, Northumberland Stannington Ward—which includes the districts of Loxley, Stannington, and Worrall, and also the small villages of Dungworth, High Bradfield, and Low Bradfield—is one of the 28 electoral wards in City of Sheffield, England. ... Barnsdale, or Barnsdale Forest, is a relatively small area of Yorkshire, England which has a rich history and the region is steeped in folklore. ... Movie poster for the 1922 United Artists Robin Hood film, starring Douglas Fairbanks. ... Fairbanks as Robin Hood in the 1922 film version. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Robin Hood (112 words)
Share the spirit of the holidays by sending Robin Hood holiday cards.
Sirius Satellite Radio, WNBC News' Perri Peltz and Robin Hood have teamed together to bring you Robin Hood Stories.
Run the 2007 New York City Marathon for Robin Hood.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m