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Encyclopedia > Robert Zemeckis
Robert Zemeckis
Birth name Robert Lee Zemeckis
Born May 14, 1952 (1952-05-14) (age 55)
Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
Spouse(s) Mary Ellen Trainor (1980-2000)
Leslie Harter Zemeckis (2001-)

Robert Lee "Bob" Zemeckis (born May 14, 1952) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American movie director, producer and writer. Zemeckis first came to public attention in the 1980s as the director of the comedic time-travel Back to the Future films as well as the live-action/animated film Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988), though in the 1990s he diversified into more dramatic fare, including 1994's Forrest Gump,[1] for which he won an Academy Award for Best Director. May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Mary Ellen Trainor is a American film and television actress who is probably best remembered as either Dr. Stephanie Woods in the Lethal Weapon movies or as Harriet Walsh (the mother) in The Goonies. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... For the main character of the same name, see Forrest Gump (character) Forrest Gump is a 1994 drama film based on a 1986 novel by Winston Groom and the name of the title character of both. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Golden Globe Award for Best Director - Motion Picture has been awarded annually since 1944 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. ... For the main character of the same name, see Forrest Gump (character) Forrest Gump is a 1994 drama film based on a 1986 novel by Winston Groom and the name of the title character of both. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... The Back to the Future trilogy is a science fiction film trilogy written by Bob Gale and Robert Zemeckis, directed by Zemeckis and distributed by Universal Pictures. ... Who Framed Roger Rabbit is a 1988 film produced by Amblin Entertainment and The Walt Disney Company (released on its Touchstone Pictures banner), which blends traditional animation and live action. ... For the main character of the same name, see Forrest Gump (character) Forrest Gump is a 1994 drama film based on a 1986 novel by Winston Groom and the name of the title character of both. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ...


His films are characterized by an interest in state-of-the-art special effects, including the early use of match moving in Back to the Future Part II (1989) and the pioneering performance capture techniques seen in The Polar Express (2004). Though Zemeckis has often been pidgeonholed as a director only interested in effects,[2] his work has been defended by several critics, including David Thomson, who wrote that "No other contemporary director has used special effects to more dramatic and narrative purpose."[3] Special effects (abbreviated SPFX or SFX) are used in the film, television, and entertainment industry to create effects that cannot be achieved by normal means, such as depicting travel to other star systems. ... Match moving is a special effects technology related to motion capture. ... Back to the Future Part II is a 1989 film and the first sequel to the 1985 film Back to the Future. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Motion capture. ... The Polar Express is a 2004 feature film based on the childrens book of the same title by Chris Van Allsburg. ... David Thomson (born 1941 in London, UK) is a noted film critic in the United States and the author of the lauded New Biographical Dictionary of Film. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life

Zemeckis was born in Chicago, Illinois to a Lithuanian father and Yugoslavian mother and was raised in a working-class Catholic family. Zemeckis has said that "the truth was that in my family there was no art. I mean, there was no music, there were no books, there was no theater....The only thing I had that was inspirational, was television--and it actually was."[4] As a child, Zemeckis loved television and was fascinated by his parents' 8 mm film home movie camera. Starting off by filming family events like birthdays and holidays, Zemeckis gradually began producing narrative films with his friends that incorporated stop-motion work and other special effects. Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... This article is about the 8mm film format. ... A stop motion animation of a moving coin. ...


Along with enjoying movies, Zemeckis remained an avid TV watcher. "You hear so much about the problems with television," he said, "but I think that it saved my life."[4] Television gave Zemeckis his first glimpse of a world outside of his blue-collar upbringing;[4] specifically, he learned of the existence of film schools on an episode of The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. After seeing Bonnie and Clyde with his father and being heavily influenced by it,[2] Zemeckis decided that he wanted to go to film school. A film school is a generic term for any educational institution dedicated to teaching moviemaking, including, but not limited to, film production, theory, and writing for the screen. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bonnie and Clyde (1967) is a film about Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, bank robbers who roamed the central United States during the Great Depression. ...


His parents disapproved of the idea, Zemeckis later said, "But only in the sense that they were concerned....for my family and my friends and the world that I grew up in, this was the kind of dream that really was impossible. My parents would sit there and say, 'Don't you see where you come from? You can't be a movie director.' I guess maybe some of it I felt I had to do in spite of them, too."[4]


USC education and early films

Zemeckis applied only to University of Southern California's School of Cinematic Arts, and got into the Film School on the strength of an essay and a music video based on a Beatles song. Not having heard from the University itself, Zemeckis called and was told he had been rejected, because of his average grades. The director gave an "impassioned plea" to the official on the other line, promising to go to summer school and improve his studies, and eventually convinced the school to accept him.[4] Arriving at USC that Fall, Zemeckis encountered a program that was, in his words, made up of "a bunch of hippies [and] considered an embarrassment by the university."[4] The classes were difficult, with professors constantly stressing how hard the movie business was. Zemeckis remembered not being much fazed by this, citing the "healthy cynicism" that had been bred into him from his Chicago upbringing.[4] The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... The USC School of Cinematic Arts, formerly named the School of Cinema-Television (CNTV), is a film school within the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, California. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ...


While at USC, Zemeckis developed a close friendship with the writer Bob Gale, who was also a student there. Gale later recalled, "The graduate students at USC had this veneer of intellectualism....So Bob and I gravitated toward one another because we wanted to make Hollywood movies. We weren't interested in the French New Wave. We were interested in Clint Eastwood and James Bond and Walt Disney, because that's how we grew up."[5] Bob Gale (May 25, 1951, University City, Missouri), born Michael Robert Gale, is an Academy Award nominated American screenwriter who, amongst other things, co-wrote Back to the Future with writing partner Robert Zemeckis and also wrote the two sequels for the film. ... François Truffauts New Wave film Jules et Jim The New Wave (French: la Nouvelle Vague) was a blanket term coined by critics for a group of French filmmakers of the late 1950s and 1960s, influenced (in part) by Italian Neorealism. ... This article is about the actor/producer/director. ... “007” redirects here. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ...


As a result of winning a Student Academy Award at USC for his film, A Field of Honor, Zemeckis came to the attention of Steven Spielberg. Spielberg said, "He barged right past my secretary, and sat me down and showed me this student film....and I thought it was spectacular, with police cars and a riot, all dubbed to Elmer Bernstein's score for The Great Escape."[5] Spielberg became Zemeckis' mentor and executive produced his first two films, both of which Zemeckis co-wrote with Bob Gale. The Student Academy Awards are awards given by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to filmmakers at the undergraduate and graduate levels, primarily in the United States. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... Elmer Bernstein (pronounced Bern-steen[1]) (April 4, 1922 – August 18, 2004) was an Academy and two-time Golden Globe award winning American film score composer. ... The Great Escape, written by James Clavell, W.R. Burnett, and Walter Newman (uncredited), and directed by John Sturges is a popular 1963 World War II film, based on a true story about Allied prisoners of war with a record for escaping from German prisoner-of-war camps. ...


1978's I Wanna Hold Your Hand and 1980's Used Cars (starring Kurt Russell) were well-received critically, with Pauline Kael going into particular rhapsody over the latter film, but both were commercially inert. (I Wanna Hold Your Hand was the first of several Zemeckis films to incorporate historical figures and celebrities into his movies; in the film, he used archival footage and doubles to simulate the presence of The Beatles.) After the failure of his first two films, and the Spielberg-directed 1941 in 1979 (for which Zemeckis and Gale had written the screenplay), the pair gained a reputation for writing "scripts that everyone thought were great [but] somehow didn't translate into movies people wanted to see."[5] I Wanna Hold Your Hand is a comedy film directed and co-written by Robert Zemeckis. ... Used Cars is a 1980 comedy film. ... Kurt Vogel Russell (born March 17, 1951) is an American actor. ... Pauline Kael (June 19, 1919 – September 3, 2001) was an American film critic who wrote for The New Yorker magazine. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed. ...


Breakthrough films and Forrest Gump

As a result of his reputation within the industry, Zemeckis had trouble finding work in the early 1980s, though he and Gale kept busy. They wrote scripts for other directors, including Car Pool for Brian De Palma and Growing Up for Spielberg; neither ended up getting made. Another Zemeckis-Gale project, about a teenager who accidentally travels back in time to the 1950s, was turned down by every major studio.[6] The director was jobless until Michael Douglas hired him in 1984 to film Romancing the Stone. A romantic adventure starring Douglas and Kathleen Turner, Romancing was expected to flop (to the point that, after viewing a rough cut of the film, the producers of the then-in-the-works Cocoon fired Zemeckis as director),[6] but the film became a sleeper hit. While working on Romancing the Stone, Zemeckis met composer Alan Silvestri, who has scored all of his subsequent pictures. Brian De Palma (born Brian Russell DePalma on September 11, 1940 in Newark, New Jersey) is a controversial American film director, best known for directing the Al Pacino classic Scarface, and the Academy Award-winning The Untouchables. ... For other people bearing this name, see Michael Douglas (disambiguation) Michael Kirk Douglas (born September 25, 1944) is an American actor and producer, primarily in movies and television. ... Romancing the Stone is an American 1984 action-adventure film. ... Mary Kathleen Turner (born June 19, 1954) is an Academy Award nominated American actress. ... Cocoon is a 1985 science fiction film about a group of elderly humans who were rejuvenated by aliens. ... Romancing the Stone is an American 1984 action-adventure film. ... Alan Silvestri (b. ...


After Romancing, the director suddenly had the clout to direct his time-traveling screenplay, which was titled Back to the Future. Starring Michael J. Fox, the 1985 movie was wildly successful upon its release, and was followed by two sequels, released in 1989 and 1990. Before the Back to the Future sequels were released, Zemeckis directed another film, the madcap 1940s-set mystery Who Framed Roger Rabbit, which painstakingly combined traditional animation and live action; its $70 million budget made it one of the most expensive films made up to that point. The film was both a financial and critical success, and won four Academy Awards. In 1990, Zemeckis commented, when asked if he would want to make non-comedies, "I would like to be able to do everything. Just now, though, I’m too restless to do anything that’s not really zany."[6] This article is about the first film in the Back to the Future trilogy. ... For other persons named Michael Fox, see Michael Fox (disambiguation). ... Back to the Future Part II is a 1989 film and the first sequel to the 1985 film Back to the Future. ... Back to the Future Part III is a science fiction western comedy film starring Michael J. Fox and Christopher Lloyd that opened on May 25, 1990. ... Who Framed Roger Rabbit is a 1988 film produced by Amblin Entertainment and The Walt Disney Company (released on its Touchstone Pictures banner), which blends traditional animation and live action. ... Traditional animation, also referred to as classical animation, cel animation, or hand-drawn animation, is the oldest and historically the most popular form of animation. ... In film and video, live action refers to works that are acted out by flesh-and-blood actors, as opposed to animation. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ...


In 1992, Zemeckis directed the black comedy Death Becomes Her, starring Meryl Streep, Goldie Hawn, and Bruce Willis. He followed that with his first non-comedy, and his biggest commercial and critical success to date, 1994's Forrest Gump. Starring Tom Hanks in the title role, Forrest Gump tells the story of a mentally retarded man who unwittingly participates in some of the major events of the twentieth century, falling in love and interacting with several major historical figures in the process. The film grossed $677 million worldwide and became the top grossing U.S. film of 1994; it won six Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Hanks as Best Actor, and Zemeckis as Best Director. In 1997, Zemeckis directed Contact, a long-gestating project based on Carl Sagan's 1985 novel of the same name. The film centers around Eleanor Arroway, a scientist played by Jodie Foster, who believes she has made contact with extraterrestrial beings. Death Becomes Her is a 1992 black comedy fantasy film directed by Robert Zemeckis and starring Goldie Hawn, Meryl Streep and Bruce Willis. ... Mary Louise Streep, mostly known as Meryl Streep (born June 22, 1949) is an Academy Award-winning American actress who has worked in theatre, television, and film. ... Goldie Jeanne Hawn (born November 21, 1945) is an Academy Award-winning American actress, director and producer. ... Walter Bruce Willis (born March 19, 1955 in Idar-Oberstein, Germany) is an American actor and singer. ... For the main character of the same name, see Forrest Gump (character) Forrest Gump is a 1994 drama film based on a 1986 novel by Winston Groom and the name of the title character of both. ... Thomas Jeffrey Hanks (born July 9, 1956) is an American two-time Academy Award-winning film actor, Emmy-winning director, voice-over artist and movie producer. ... Mental retardation is a term for a pattern of persistently slow learning of basic motor and language skills (milestones) during childhood, and a significantly below-normal global intellectual capacity as an adult. ... // The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Academy Awards, awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which are voted on by others within the industry. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to directors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. ... Contact is a 1997 science fiction film adapted from the novel by Carl Sagan. ... Insert non-formatted text here Carl Edward Sagan (November 9, 1934 – December 20, 1996) was an American astronomer and astrobiologist and a highly successful popularizer of astronomy, astrophysics, and other natural sciences. ... Contact is a science fiction novel written by Carl Sagan and published in 1985. ... Alicia Christian Foster (born November 19, 1962), better known as Jodie Foster, is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress, director, and producer. ...


Work in the 2000s and interest in digital filmmaking

In 1999, Zemeckis donated $5 million towards the Robert Zemeckis Center for Digital Arts at USC, a 35,000 square-foot center that houses production stages, an immense 60-system digital editing lab, and a 50-seat screening room. When the Center opened in March 2001, Zemeckis spoke in a panel about the future of film, alongside friends Steven Spielberg and George Lucas. Of those (including Spielberg) who clung to celluloid and disparaged the idea of shooting digitally, Zemeckis said, "These guys are the same ones who have been saying that LPs sound better than CDs. You can argue that until you're blue in the face, but I don't know anyone who's still buying vinyl. Film, as we have traditionally thought of it, is going to be different. But the continuum is man's desire to tell stories around the campfire. The only thing that keeps changing is the campfire."[7] The Robert Zemeckis Center currently hosts many film school classes, much of the Interactive Media Division, and Trojan Vision, USC's student television station, which has been voted the number one college television station in the country. Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... An LP Long playing (LP), either 10 or 12-inch diameter, 33 rpm (actually 33. ... CD may stand for: Compact Disc Canadian Forces Decoration Cash Dispenser (at least used in Japan) CD LPMud Driver Centrum-Demokraterne (Centre Democrats of Denmark) Certificate of Deposit České Dráhy (Czech Railways) Chad (NATO country code) Chalmers Datorförening (computer club of the Chalmers University of Technology) a 1960s... The University of Southern Californias School of Cinema-Televisions Interactive Media Division first accepted students in 2002. ... Robert Zemeckis Center for Digital Arts Trojan Vision is a student television station operated by students at the University of Southern California through the Annenberg School for Communication . ...


In 1996, Zemeckis had begun developing a project titled The Castaway with Tom Hanks and writer William Broyles Jr., about a man who becomes stranded on a desert island and undergoes a profound physical and spiritual change.[8] While working on The Castaway, Zemeckis also became attached to a Hitchcockian thriller titled What Lies Beneath, the story of a married couple experiencing an extreme case of empty nest syndrome that was based on an idea by Steven Spielberg.[9] Because Hanks' character needed to undergo a dramatic weight loss over the course of The Castaway (which was eventually retitled Cast Away), Zemeckis decided that the only way to retain the same crew while Hanks lost the weight was to shoot What Lies Beneath in between. He shot the first part of Cast Away in early 1999, and shot What Lies Beneath in fall 1999, completing work on Cast Away in early 2000.[9] Zemeckis later quipped, when asked about shooting two films back-to-back, "I wouldn't recommend it to anyone."[8] What Lies Beneath, starring Harrison Ford and Michelle Pfeiffer, was released in July 2000 to mixed reviews, but did well at the box office, grossing over $155 million domestically. Cast Away was released in that December and grossed $233 million domestically; as Chuck Noland, Hanks received an Oscar nomination for Best Actor. William Broyles Jr. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... What Lies Beneath is a 2000 motion picture that tells the story of a housewife who finds her home is haunted. ... Empty nest syndrome is a general feeling of depression and loneliness that parents feel when one or more of their children leave home. ... For other uses, see Castaway (disambiguation). ... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... Michelle Marie Pfeiffer (born April 29, 1958) is a three-time Academy Award-nominated and internationally known American actress. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ...


In 2004, Zemeckis reteamed with Hanks and directed The Polar Express, based on the children's book of the same name by Chris Van Allsburg. The Polar Express utilized the computer animation technique known as performance capture, whereby the movements of the actors are captured digitally and used as the basis for the animated characters. As the first major film to use performance capture, The Polar Express caused The New York Times to write that, "Whatever critics and audiences make of this movie, from a technical perspective it could mark a turning point in the gradual transition from an analog to a digital cinema."[10] The Polar Express is a 2004 feature film based on the childrens book of the same title by Chris Van Allsburg. ... The Polar Express is a 1985 childrens book (ISBN 0-86264-143-8) written and illustrated by Chris Van Allsburg, a former professor at the Rhode Island School of Design. ... Chris Van Allsburg (born June 18, 1949 in Grand Rapids, Michigan) is an American author and illustrator of childrens books. ... Computer animation is the art of creating moving images via the use of computers. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Motion capture. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ...


In February 2007, Zemeckis and Walt Disney Studios chairman Dick Cook announced plans to set up a new performance capture film company devoted to CG-created, 3-D movies.[11] The company, ImageMovers Digital, will create films using the performance capture technology, with Zemeckis expected to direct a number of the projects. Disney will distribute and market the motion pictures worldwide. Alternate meanings: Disney (disambiguation) The Walt Disney Company (also known as Disney Enterprises, Inc. ... Dick Cook is the studio chief for the Walt Disney Company (officially, Chairman of the Walt Disney Studios). ... Originally called ImageMovers, is a studio run by Robert Zemeckis (Polar Express and Monster House) and Walt Disney Studios and it specializes in Performance Capture CGI. Its first movie is A Christmas Carol starring Jim Carrey. ...


Zemeckis used the performance capture technology again in his latest film, Beowulf, which retells the Anglo-Saxon epic poem of the same name and stars Ray Winstone, Angelina Jolie, and Anthony Hopkins. Hugo Award-winning science fiction writer Neil Gaiman, who co-wrote the adaptation with Roger Avary, described the film as a "cheerfully violent and strange take on the Beowulf legend."[12] The film will be released on November 16, 2007. In July 2007, Variety announced that Zemeckis had written a screen adaptation of Charles Dickens' 1843 story A Christmas Carol, with plans to use performance capture and release it under the aegis of ImageMovers Digital. Zemeckis wrote the screenplay with Jim Carrey in mind, and Carrey has agreed to play a multitude of roles in the film, including Ebenezer Scrooge as a young, middle-aged, and old man, and the three ghosts who haunt Scrooge.[13] The film is expected to begin shooting in early 2008.[14] Beowulf is a 2007 fantasy film directed by Robert Zemeckis. ... In mathematics, see epic morphism. ... This article is about the epic poem. ... Raymond Andrew Winstone (born February 19, 1957) is an Emmy Award winning English film and television actor. ... Angelina Jolie (born June 4, 1975) is an American film actress, a former fashion model and a Goodwill Ambassador for the UN Refugee Agency. ... For the composer, see Antony Hopkins. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Neil Richard Gaiman () (born November 10, 1960) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... Roger Avary, photographed for Score Magazine at the Hotel Costes K, Paris. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... “Dickens” redirects here. ... A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost Story of Christmas (commonly known as A Christmas Carol ) is what Charles Dickens described as his little Christmas Book and was first published on December 19, 1843 with illustrations by John Leech. ... James Eugene Carrey (born January 17, 1962) is a two-time Golden Globe Award-winning Canadian-American A-list film actor and comedian. ... Ebenezer Scrooge encounters Ignorance and Want in A Christmas Carol Ebenezer Scrooge is the main character in Charles Dickens 1843 novel, A Christmas Carol. ...


Personal life

Zemeckis has said that, for a long time, he sacrificed his personal life in favor of a career. "I won an Academy Award when I was 44 years old," he explained, "but I paid for it with my 20s. That decade of my life from film school till 30 was nothing but work, nothing but absolute, driving work. I had no money. I had no life."[4] In the early 1980s, Zemeckis married actress Mary Ellen Trainor, with whom he had a son, Alexander. He described the marriage as difficult to balance with filmmaking,[4] and his relationship with Trainor eventually ended in divorce. In 2001, he married actress Leslie Harter Zemeckis. Mary Ellen Trainor is a American film and television actress who is probably best remembered as either Dr. Stephanie Woods in the Lethal Weapon movies or as Harriet Walsh (the mother) in The Goonies. ...


Selected filmography

I Wanna Hold Your Hand is a comedy film directed and co-written by Robert Zemeckis. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed. ... Used Cars is a 1980 comedy film. ... Romancing the Stone is an American 1984 action-adventure film. ... This article is about the first film in the Back to the Future trilogy. ... Who Framed Roger Rabbit is a 1988 film produced by Amblin Entertainment and The Walt Disney Company (released on its Touchstone Pictures banner), which blends traditional animation and live action. ... Back to the Future Part II is a 1989 film and the first sequel to the 1985 film Back to the Future. ... Back to the Future Part III is a science fiction western comedy film starring Michael J. Fox and Christopher Lloyd that opened on May 25, 1990. ... Death Becomes Her is a 1992 black comedy fantasy film directed by Robert Zemeckis and starring Goldie Hawn, Meryl Streep and Bruce Willis. ... For the main character of the same name, see Forrest Gump (character) Forrest Gump is a 1994 drama film based on a 1986 novel by Winston Groom and the name of the title character of both. ... For the Matt Helm spy novel by Donald Hamilton, see The Frighteners (novel). ... Contact is a 1997 science fiction film adapted from the novel by Carl Sagan. ... What Lies Beneath is a 2000 motion picture that tells the story of a housewife who finds her home is haunted. ... For other uses, see Castaway (disambiguation). ... Matchstick Men is a 2003 film starring Nicolas Cage, Sam Rockwell and Alison Lohman. ... The Polar Express is a 2004 feature film based on the childrens book of the same title by Chris Van Allsburg. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed compared to the rest of the article. ... Beowulf is a 2007 fantasy film directed by Robert Zemeckis. ... A Christmas Carol is an upcoming film expected to be released in 2008. ... The Corrections is a film adaptation of the Jonathan Franzen novel of the same name. ...

References

  1. ^ Gleiberman, Owen. "Movie Review: Forrest Gump", Entertainment Weekly, 1994-07-15. Retrieved on 2007-01-26. 
  2. ^ a b Kehr, Dave. "FILM: 'Cast Away' Director Defies Categorizing" (fee required), The New York Times, 2000-12-17. Retrieved on 2007-01-21. 
  3. ^ Thomson, David. “Robert Zemeckis,” The New Biographical Dictionary of Film. 2002 ed. ISBN 0-3757-0940-1 p. 958-959.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i Robert Zemeckis Interview. Academy of Achievement: A Museum of Living History, 1996-06-29. Retrieved on 2007-01-22.
  5. ^ a b c Shone, Tom. Blockbuster: How Hollywood Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Summer. New York: Free Press, 2004. ISBN 0-7432-3568-1 p. 123-125.
  6. ^ a b c Horowitz, Mark. "Back with a Future," American Film, July/Aug. 1988. p. 32-35.
  7. ^ Hayes, Dade, and Dana Harris. "Helmers mull digital around state-of-art campfire," Variety, 2001-03-05.
  8. ^ a b Fall Movie Preview: December, Entertainment Weekly, 2000-08-18. Retrieved on 2007-09-11.
  9. ^ a b Petrikin, Chris. "Pairing for Zemeckis: Fox, DW near to sharing next two projects", Variety, 1998-10-14. Retrieved on 2007-09-11.
  10. ^ Kehr, Dave. "FILM: The Face That Launched A Thousand Chips" (fee required), The New York Times, 2004-10-24. Retrieved on 2007-01-21. 
  11. ^ Hollywood Reporter; Zemeckis, Disney in 3-D film partnership. Reuters/Hollywood Reporter, 2007-02-06. Retrieved on 2007-02-07.
  12. ^ Goldstein, Hilary. "Comic-Con 2006: Neil Gaiman's Future Movies", IGN, 2006-07-21. Retrieved on 2007-01-13. 
  13. ^ Fleming, Michael. "Jim Carrey set for 'Christmas Carol': Zemeckis directing Dickens adaptation", Variety, 2007-07-06. Retrieved on 2007-09-11.
  14. ^ Fleming, Michael. "Jim Carrey agrees with 'Yes Man'", Variety, 2007-07-24. Retrieved on 2007-09-11.

Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Robert Zemeckis at the Internet Movie Database
  • Robert Zemeckis at the Notable Names Database
  • 1994 Charlie Rose Show interview with Zemeckis about Forrest Gump and his career (video, 31 minutes)
  • 2004 Charlie Rose Show interview with Zemeckis and Tom Hanks about The Polar Express (video, 52 minutes)
Preceded by
Steven Spielberg
for Schindler's List
Academy Award for Best Director
1994
for Forrest Gump
Succeeded by
Mel Gibson
for Braveheart

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Robert Zemeckis Encyclopedia (0 words)
ROBERT ZEMECKIS was born and raised in the southside of Chicago, Illinois.
Zemeckis & Gale chose 1955 as their destination on the time line, a year which they are too young to really remember but which they look back at fondly.
Robert Zemeckis is married to actress Mary Ellen Trainor, and the couple, along with their son Alex, make their home in Santa Barbara, California.
Robert Zemeckis (294 words)
Robert Zemeckis was born and raised in Chicago, and began making 8mm films while he was in high school.
One of Zemeckis' biggest hits, Forrest Gump is often referred to as his masterpiece.
Zemeckis has also become a movie producer, mostly known for middle-budget low-imagination efforts like House on Haunted Hill, Thir13en Ghosts, and Halle Berry's bland thriller Gothika.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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