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Encyclopedia > Robert Y. Hayne

Robert Young Hayne (November 10, 1791September 24, 1839) was an American political leader. Born in St. Pauls Parish, Colleton District, South Carolina, he studied law in the office of Langdon Cheves in Charleston, South Carolina, and in November 1812 was admitted to the bar there, soon obtaining a large practice. For a short time during the War of 1812 against Great Britain, he was captain in the Third South Carolina Regiment. He was a member of the lower house of the South Carolina state legislature from 1814 to 1818, serving as Speaker of the House in the latter year; was attorney-general of the state from 1818 to 1822, and in 1823 was elected, as a Democrat, to the United States Senate. November 10 is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 51 days remaining. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... September 24 is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Langdon Cheves (pronounced chivis), (September 17, 1776–June 25, 1857), was an American politician and a president of the Second Bank of the United States. ... Nickname: The Palmetto City Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... Combatants United States Native Americans Great Britain, Canadian provincial forces First Nations Peoples Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn George Prevost Isaac Brock† Tecumseh† Strength •U.S. Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6 •Other vessels: 14 •Indigenous... The South Carolina General Assembly (also called the South Carolina Legislature) is the legislative branch of South Carolina and consists of the South Carolina House of Representatives and the South Carolina Senate. ... The term Speaker is usually the title given to the presiding officer of a countrys lower house of parliament or congress (ie: the House of Commons or House of Representatives). ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ...


Here he was conspicuous as an ardent free-trader and an uncompromising advocate of States Rights, opposed the protectionist tariff bills of 1824 and 1828, and consistently upheld the doctrine that slavery was a domestic institution and should be dealt with only by the individual states. In one of his speeches opposing the sending by the United States of representatives to the Panama Congress, he said, "The moment the federal government shall make the unhallowed attempt to interfere with the domestic concerns of the states, those states will consider themselves driven from the Union."


Although states' rights is often associated with the southern cause and slavery, Massachusetts Governor Caleb Strong defied President James Madison's request to call out the state militia to give assistance in prosecuting the War of 1812. After the war ended, southern men adapted the same policy, and applied it to the issue of slavery. A simmering resentment of the action taken by Governor Strong existed beneath the patina of happiness which is called the Era of Good Feeling. The resentment surfaced as early as 1819 when the slave trade was called piracy by the Congress of the United States. States rights refers to the idea that U.S. states possess certain rights and political powers in the politics of the United States and constitutional law. ... Caleb Strong (January 9, 1745 - November 7, 1819) was a U.S. political figure. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836), an American politician and fourth President of the United States of America (1809–1817), was one of the most influential Founders of the United States. ... Lexington Minuteman representing militia minuteman John Parker Militia is the activity of one or more citizens organized to provide defense or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ... Combatants United States Native Americans Great Britain, Canadian provincial forces First Nations Peoples Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn George Prevost Isaac Brock† Tecumseh† Strength •U.S. Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6 •Other vessels: 14 •Indigenous... The Era of Good Feelings is a phrase first used in the Boston Columbian Centinel newspaper on July 12, 1817 following the good-will visit to Boston of the new President James Monroe, is generally applied to describe the national mood of the United States from about 1815 to 1825. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Congress in Joint Session. ...


Webster-Hayne debate January 1830

In 1828, in response to the changing economic landscape in Massachusetts (there was a shift towards the manufacturing sector), Daniel Webster backed a high-tariff bill. This angered Southern leaders and brought Webster into dispute with South Carolina's Robert Young Hayne, producing one of the most famous debates in American history, the Webster-Hayne debate of January 19-27, 1830. Hayne argued that his state had the right to overturn this particular piece of legislation. Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 25, 1852) was a prominent American statesman during the nations antebellum, or Pre-Civil War, era. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35... Robert Young Hayne (November 10, 1791–September 24, 1839) was an American political leader. ... The Webster-Hayne debate was a famous debate in the U.S. between Senator Daniel Webster of Massachusetts and Senator Robert Y. Hayne of South Carolina that took place on January 19-27, 1830 regarding protectionist tariffs. ...


Hayne stressed the fact that New England was not a major participator during the War of 1812. Webster had been elected to Congress in 1812 by the party opposed to the war with England. He was re-elected in 1814, which was an indication that the people of the New England States opposed the war. The debate arose over the so-called Footes Resolution, introduced by Senator Samuel A. Foote (1780-1846) of Connecticut, calling for the restriction of the sale of public lands to those already in the market, but was concerned primarily with the relation to one another and the respective powers of the federal government and the individual states, Hayne contending that the constitution was essentially a compact between the states, and the national government and the states, and that any state might, at will, nullify any federal law which it considered to be in contravention of that compact. This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Combatants United States Native Americans Great Britain, Canadian provincial forces First Nations Peoples Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn George Prevost Isaac Brock† Tecumseh† Strength •U.S. Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6 •Other vessels: 14 •Indigenous... Samuel Augustus Foot (November 8, 1780 - September 15, 1846; his surname is also spelled Foote) was Governor of Connecticut as well as a United States Representative and Senator. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ...


The resentment that the southerners held towards the people of New England erupted on January 19, 1830, when Senator Hayne attacked the people of New England. Senator Daniel Webster responded on the next day. Senator Hayne spoke again on the 21st, 25th, and 27th. Senator Webster spoke again on the 26th and 27th. This was the famed "Second Reply to Hayne," one of the greatest speeches in American history. The final few paragraphs are still riveting to read. Webster concluded with his immortal cry, "Liberty and Union, Now and Forever, One and Inseparable!" As unfair as it might be to Hayne, he is remembered more for being the disputant with Webster, and on the receiving end of perhaps the greatest speech in the history of the Senate, than for anything else he did. January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 25, 1852) was a prominent American statesman during the nations antebellum, or Pre-Civil War, era. ...


However, the fact that the States of New England were lukewarm to the American cause during the war of 1812 could not be denied. By contrast, the State of South Carolina had fought fiercely against England. A cantankerous relationship continued to exist between the southerners and the people of New England until the time of secession from the Union and the outbreak of the Civil War. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


Hayne vigorously opposed the tariff of 1832, was a member of the South Carolina Nullification Convention of November 1832, and reported the ordinance of nullification passed by that body on the November 24. Resigning from the Senate, he was Governor of South Carolina from December 1832 to December 1834, and as such took a strong stand against President Andrew Jackson, though he was more conservative than many of the nullificationists in the state. He was intendant (mayor) of Charleston, S.C., from 1835 to 1837, and was president of the Louisville, Cincinnati & Charleston Railway from 1837 to 1839. November 24 is the 328th day (329th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... A list of South Carolina Governors. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... New France was governed by three rulers: the governor, the bishop and the intendant, all appointed by the King, and sent from France. ...


He died at Asheville, North Carolina. His nephew, Paul Hamilton Hayne (1830-1886), was a poet of some distinction, and in 1878 published a life of Senator Hayne. Asheville City Hall. ... Paul Hamilton Hayne (1830 - 1886) was an American poet. ...


Further reading

  • Sheidley, Harlow W. "The Webster-Hayne Debate: Recasting New England's Sectionalism" New England Quarterly 1994 67(1): 5-29. ISSN 0028-4866 Fulltext in Jstor
  • Theodore D. Jervey, Robert V. Hayne and his Times (New York, 1909).
  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

External links

Preceded by
William Smith
United States Senator (Class 2) from South Carolina
1823 – 1832
Served alongside: John Gaillard, William Harper, William Smith, Stephen Decatur Miller
Succeeded by
John C. Calhoun
Preceded by
James Hamilton, Jr.
Governor of South Carolina
1832 – 1834
Succeeded by
George McDuffie

 
 

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